Cranial Fossa, Middle: The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.Cranial Fossa, Anterior: The compartment containing the inferior part and anterior extremities of the frontal lobes (FRONTAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. It is formed mainly by orbital parts of the FRONTAL BONE and the lesser wings of the SPHENOID BONE.Cranial Fossa, Posterior: The infratentorial compartment that contains the CEREBELLUM and BRAIN STEM. It is formed by the posterior third of the superior surface of the body of the sphenoid (SPHENOID BONE), by the occipital, the petrous, and mastoid portions of the TEMPORAL BONE, and the posterior inferior angle of the PARIETAL BONE.Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Arachnoid Cysts: Intracranial or spinal cavities containing a cerebrospinal-like fluid, the wall of which is composed of arachnoidal cells. They are most often developmental or related to trauma. Intracranial arachnoid cysts usually occur adjacent to arachnoidal cistern and may present with HYDROCEPHALUS; HEADACHE; SEIZURES; and focal neurologic signs. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch44, pp105-115)Trigeminal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe: A localization-related (focal) form of epilepsy characterized by recurrent seizures that arise from foci within the temporal lobe, most commonly from its mesial aspect. A wide variety of psychic phenomena may be associated, including illusions, hallucinations, dyscognitive states, and affective experiences. The majority of complex partial seizures (see EPILEPSY, COMPLEX PARTIAL) originate from the temporal lobes. Temporal lobe seizures may be classified by etiology as cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (i.e., related to an identified disease process or lesion). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p321)Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Arachnoid: A delicate membrane enveloping the brain and spinal cord. It lies between the PIA MATER and the DURA MATER. It is separated from the pia mater by the subarachnoid cavity which is filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID.Otologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the external, middle, or internal ear.Mandibular Condyle: The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.DislocationsKnee Dislocation: Slippage of the FEMUR off the TIBIA.Hip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Craniofacial Dysostosis: Autosomal dominant CRANIOSYNOSTOSIS with shallow ORBITS; EXOPHTHALMOS; and maxillary hypoplasia.Blepharophimosis: The abnormal narrowness of the palpebral fissure in the horizontal direction caused by the lateral displacement of the medial canthi of the eyelids. (Dorland, 27th ed)Congenital Hypothyroidism: A condition in infancy or early childhood due to an in-utero deficiency of THYROID HORMONES that can be caused by genetic or environmental factors, such as thyroid dysgenesis or HYPOTHYROIDISM in infants of mothers treated with THIOURACIL during pregnancy. Endemic cretinism is the result of iodine deficiency. Clinical symptoms include severe MENTAL RETARDATION, impaired skeletal development, short stature, and MYXEDEMA.Blepharoptosis: Drooping of the upper lid due to deficient development or paralysis of the levator palpebrae muscle.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Brachydactyly: Congenital anomaly of abnormally short fingers or toes.Hypothyroidism: A syndrome that results from abnormally low secretion of THYROID HORMONES from the THYROID GLAND, leading to a decrease in BASAL METABOLIC RATE. In its most severe form, there is accumulation of MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES in the SKIN and EDEMA, known as MYXEDEMA.Thyroid Dysgenesis: Defective development of the THYROID GLAND. This concept includes thyroid agenesis (aplasia), hypoplasia, or an ectopic gland. Clinical signs usually are those of CONGENITAL HYPOTHYROIDISM.Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Mydriasis: Dilation of pupils to greater than 6 mm combined with failure of the pupils to constrict when stimulated with light. This condition may occur due to injury of the pupillary fibers in the oculomotor nerve, in acute angle-closure glaucoma, and in ADIE SYNDROME.Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection: The splitting of the vessel wall in one or both (left and right) internal carotid arteries (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Interstitial hemorrhage into the media of the vessel wall can lead to occlusion of the internal carotid artery and aneurysm formation.Miosis: Pupillary constriction. This may result from congenital absence of the dilatator pupillary muscle, defective sympathetic innervation, or irritation of the CONJUNCTIVA or CORNEA.Hypohidrosis: Abnormally diminished or absent perspiration. Both generalized and segmented (reduced or absent sweating in circumscribed locations) forms of the disease are usually associated with other underlying conditions.Hemifacial Spasm: Recurrent clonic contraction of facial muscles, restricted to one side. It may occur as a manifestation of compressive lesions involving the seventh cranial nerve (FACIAL NERVE DISEASES), during recovery from BELL PALSY, or in association with other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1378)Libraries, Digital: Libraries in which a major proportion of the resources are available in machine-readable format, rather than on paper or MICROFORM.MissouriNeurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Library Technical Services: Acquisition, organization, and preparation of library materials for use, including selection, weeding, cataloging, classification, and preservation.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Catalogs, LibraryTranslational Medical Research: The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.Cerumen: The yellow or brown waxy secretions produced by vestigial apocrine sweat glands in the external ear canal.Ear Canal: The narrow passage way that conducts the sound collected by the EAR AURICLE to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Ear Diseases: Pathological processes of the ear, the hearing, and the equilibrium system of the body.Lubrication: The application of LUBRICANTS to diminish FRICTION between two surfaces.Tympanic Membrane: An oval semitransparent membrane separating the external EAR CANAL from the tympanic cavity (EAR, MIDDLE). It contains three layers: the skin of the external ear canal; the core of radially and circularly arranged collagen fibers; and the MUCOSA of the middle ear.Otitis Externa: Inflammation of the OUTER EAR including the external EAR CANAL, cartilages of the auricle (EAR CARTILAGE), and the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Ear Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of any part of the hearing and equilibrium system of the body (the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR).

Management of traumatic dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa. (1/44)

Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of facial trauma that can have neurological and life-threatening implications. This article discusses the anatomic features that predispose patients to this type of injury, as well as the clinical features and mechanism of injury for this rare type of condylar deformity, to help practitioners recognize this easily overlooked injury and avoid disastrous complications. The article summarizes previously published case reports of this rare complication of condylar trauma and presents a case for which initial diagnosis and a management protocol are described.  (+info)

Orbit deformities in craniofacial neurofibromatosis type 1. (2/44)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The possible relationship of orbit deformities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) to plexiform neurofibromas (PNFs) have not been fully elucidated. Our purpose was to review orbital changes in patients with craniofacial NF1. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed CT and MR imaging abnormalities of the orbit in 31 patients (18 male, 13 female; mean age, 14 years; age range 1-40 years) with craniofacial NF1. RESULTS: Orbital abnormalities were documented in 24 patients. Six had optic nerve gliomas with enlarged optic canals. Twenty had PNFs in the orbit or contiguous to the anterior skull. The posterior orbit was distorted by encroachment from an expanded middle cranial fossa in 13 patients, and 18 had enlargement of the orbital rim. Other changes included focal decalcification or remodeling of orbital walls adjacent to PNFs in 18 patients and enlargement of cranial foramina resulting from tumor infiltration of sensory nerves in 16. These orbital deformities were sometimes progressive and always associated with orbital infiltration by PNFs. CONCLUSION: In our patients with craniofacial neurofibromatosis, bony orbital deformity occurred frequently and always with an optic nerve glioma or orbital PNF. PNFs were associated with orbital-bone changes in four patterns: expansion of the middle cranial fossa into the posterior orbit, enlargement of the orbital rim, bone erosion and decalcification by contiguous tumor, and enlargement of the cranial foramina. Orbital changes support the concept of secondary dysplasia, in which interaction of PNFs with the developing skull is a major component of the multifaceted craniofacial changes possible with NF1.  (+info)

The sphenoparietal sinus of breschet: does it exist? An anatomic study. (3/44)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The termination of the superficial middle cerebral vein is classically assimilated to the sphenoid portion of the sphenoparietal sinus. This notion has, however, been challenged in a sometimes confusing literature. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the actual anatomic relationship existing between the sphenoparietal sinus and the superficial middle cerebral vein. METHODS: The cranial venous system of 15 nonfixed human specimens was evaluated by the corrosion cast technique (12 cases) and by classic anatomic dissection (three cases). Angiographic correlation was provided by use of the digital subtraction technique. RESULTS: The parietal portion of the sphenoparietal sinus was found to correspond to the parietal portion of the anterior branch of the middle meningeal veins. The sphenoid portion of the sphenoparietal sinus was found to be an independent venous sinus coursing under the lesser sphenoid wing, the sinus of the lesser sphenoid wing, which was connected medially to the cavernous sinus and laterally to the anterior middle meningeal veins. The superficial middle cerebral vein drained into a paracavernous sinus, a laterocavernous sinus, or a cavernous sinus but was never connected to the sphenoparietal sinus. All these venous structures were demonstrated angiographically. CONCLUSION: The sphenoparietal sinus corresponds to the artificial combination of two venous structures, the parietal portion of the anterior branch of the middle meningeal veins and a dural channel located under the lesser sphenoid wing, the sinus of the lesser sphenoid wing. The classic notion that the superficial middle cerebral vein drains into or is partially equivalent to the sphenoparietal sinus is erroneous. Our study showed these structures to be independent of each other; we found no instance in which the superficial middle cerebral vein was connected to the anterior branch of the middle meningeal veins or the sinus of the lesser sphenoid wing. The clinical implications of these anatomic findings are discussed in relation to dural arteriovenous fistulas in the region of the lesser sphenoid wing.  (+info)

MR imaging of orbital inflammatory pseudotumors with extraorbital extension. (4/44)

OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a variety of MR imaging findings of orbital inflammatory pseudotumors with extraorbital extension. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the MR features of five patients, who were diagnosed clinically and radiologically as having an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor with extraorbital extension. RESULTS: The types of orbital pseudotumors were a mass in the orbital apex (n = 3), diffuse form (n = 2), and myositis (n = 1). The extraorbital extension of the orbital pseudotumor passed through the superior orbital fissure in all cases, through the inferior orbital fissure in two cases, and through the optic canal in one case. The orbital lesions extended into the following areas: the cavernous sinus (n = 4), the middle cranial fossa (n = 4), Meckel's cave (n = 2), the petrous apex (n = 2), the clivus (n = 2), the pterygopalatine fossa and infratemporal fossa (n = 2), the foramen rotundum (n = 1), the paranasal sinus (n = 1), and the infraorbital foramen (n = 1). On MR imaging, the lesions appeared as an isosignal intensity with gray matter on the T1-weighted images, as a low signal intensity on the T2-weighted images and showed a marked enhancement on the post-gadoliniumdiethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (post-Gd-DTPA) T1-sequences. The symptoms of all of the patients improved when they were given high doses of steroids. Three of the five patients experienced a recurrence. CONCLUSION: MR imaging is useful for demonstrating the presence of a variety of extraorbital extensions of orbital inflammatory pseudotumors.  (+info)

Rapidly growing microcystic meningioma of the middle fossa floor. Case report. (5/44)

A 74-year-old woman presented with a microcystic meningioma which manifested as mental disturbance. A rapidly growing tumor in the left middle fossa had not been detected by examination 10 months before. The tumor was remarkably enhanced by contrast medium on both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging and was associated with massive perifocal edema. Cerebral angiography revealed that the tumor was mainly fed by the left middle meningeal artery, which was embolized preoperatively. The tumor was completely removed and no postoperative adjuvant therapy was administered. The histological diagnosis was microcystic meningioma with many mitotic figures and a MIB-1 labeling index of 12.8%. Four months later, the tumor recurred and invaded the paranasal sinus. Focal irradiation successfully controlled further regrowth. This case suggests that microcystic meningioma may have aggressive features, and close observation is necessary even after gross total removal.  (+info)

Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint with extension to the middle cranial fossa. (6/44)

A rare case of synovial chondromatosis with extension to the middle cranial fossa is reported. Synovial chondromatosis, a benign disorder characterized by multiple cartilaginous, free-floating nodules that originate from the synovial membrane is not exclusive to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This condition is commonly seen in the axial skeleton and can involve multiple joints. In this case, synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ led to complete bony erosion of the glenoid fossa extending into the middle cranial fossa. Although plain radiographs showed the involvement of the joint, Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provided more detailed information about the lesion in all three dimensions. This case demonstrates the value of CT and MRI in both the diagnosis and treatment planning. A review of previously reported cases of synovial chondromatosis with cranial extensions is included.  (+info)

Assessment of the anatomical relationship between the arcuate eminence and superior semicircular canal by computed tomography. (7/44)

The anatomical relationship between the arcuate eminence (AE) and the superior semicircular canal (SSC) was examined by computed tomography (CT) in 52 petrous bones of 26 patients. After acquiring volume data by multidetector CT, 1-mm thick oblique bone window images perpendicular to the SSC were obtained from the axial images. The distances between the AE and the SSC, and the SSC and the superior surface of the petrous bone were measured. The AE corresponded exactly with the SSC in only 2/52 petrous bones, and corresponded well in 7/52. The AE was lateral to the SSC in 25/52 cases, medial to the SSC in 6/52 cases, intersected in 3/52 cases, and was indiscernible in 9/52 cases. The distance between the SSC and the petrous surface was 0 mm in 45/52 petrous bones, 1 mm in 5/52, 2 mm in 1/52, and 3 mm in 1/52. The SSC typically does not correspond exactly with the AE, and is generally located just under the surface of the petrous bone. Planning of the middle cranial fossa approach requires location of the SSC by CT.  (+info)

Dura-based giant intracranial schwannoma in the middle fossa. (8/44)

A 49-year-old female presented with a rare giant schwannoma arising from the dura mater of the middle fossa manifesting as loss of left visual acuity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogeneously enhanced giant mass in the left middle fossa. Surgery via the transsylvian approach confirmed the origin of the tumor between the left internal carotid artery and the trigeminal nerve in the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. Elongated abducens nerve was confirmed, but no tumor adhesion to the abducens nerve was found. The tumor was closely attached to the dura mater of the middle fossa and the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. The histological diagnosis was schwannoma. Both left oculomotor and abducens nerve pareses occurred immediately after the operation but gradually resolved over 3 months. The operative findings indicated that this schwannoma may have arisen from the meningeal branch of the trigeminal nerve in the dura mater of the middle fossa.  (+info)

*Supraorbital foramen

Middle cranial fossa. to Orbit:. *optic canal (CN-II). *superior orbital fissure (CN-III,IV,V1,VI) ... Posterior cranial fossa. *internal auditory meatus/facial canal/stylomastoid foramen (CN-VII,VIII) ... The supraorbital nerve is a branch of the frontal nerve arising from the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve (cranial ...

*Sphenopetrosal fissure

It is in the middle cranial fossa. This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy ... The sphenopetrosal fissure (or sphenopetrosal suture) is the cranial suture between the sphenoid bone and the petrous portion ...

*Sella turcica

It belongs to the middle cranial fossa. In front of the hypophyseal fossa is the tuberculum sellae. Completing the formation of ... 2011). "Cranial Fossae". Gray's Clinical Anatomy. Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 154. ISBN 9781437735802. Knosp E, Steiner E, ... Hypophysial fossa shown in red. Sphenoid bone seen from above. Sella turcica shown in red. Base of skull - Sella turcica, ... The seat of the saddle, the deepest part of the sella turcica known as the hypophyseal fossa, holds the pituitary gland ( ...

*Neurectomy

The method of neurological surgery is the middle cranial fossa approach. The advantage of this procedure is that the vestibular ...

*Lesser petrosal nerve

It travels across the floor of the middle cranial fossa, then exits the skull via foramen ovale to reach the infratemporal ... "The course of the lesser petrosal nerve on the middle cranial fossa." Neurosurgery. 2007 Sep; 61(3 Suppl): 15-23. PMID 17876229 ... hiatus for lesser petrosal nerve on the anterior surface of the petrous part of the temporal bone into the middle cranial fossa ... Cranial Nerves. Yale School of Medicine. Archived from the original on 2016-03-03. ...

*Basilar skull fracture

They are divided into anterior fossa, middle fossa, and poterior fossa fractures. Facial fractures often also occur. Diagnosis ... Other complications include cranial nerve or blood vessel injury. They typically require a significant degree of trauma to ... Due to the proximity of the cranial nerves, injury to those nerves may occur. This can cause palsy of the facial nerve or ... Raccoon eyes -- bruising around the eyes, i.e. "black eyes" Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea Cranial nerve palsy Bleeding ( ...

*Central nervous system cyst

"Treatment of Middle Cranial Fossa Arachnoid Cysts: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis". World Neurosurgery. 92: 480-490.e2. ... These classification of cysts are embedded in the endoderm (inner layer) and the ectoderm (outer layer) of the cranial or ... in adults Dermoid cysts are more prevalent in children under 10 years of age Epidermoid cysts are more prevalent in middle-aged ...

*Orbit (anatomy)

It provides a pathway between the orbital contents and the middle cranial fossa. The superior orbital fissure lies just lateral ... Near the middle of the floor, located infraorbital groove, which leads to the infraorbital foramen. The floor is separated from ... In addition, there is the optic canal, which contains the optic nerve, or cranial nerve II, and is formed entirely by the ... The optic canal contains the optic nerve (cranial nerve II) and the ophthalmic artery, and sits at the junction of the sphenoid ...

*Johan Georg Raeder

The Raeder's syndrome, a lesion of the middle cranial fossa, was named after him. Shoja, Mohammadali M.; Tubbs, R. Shane; ...

*Occipital bone

The inner surface of the occipital bone forms the base of the posterior cranial fossa. The foramen magnum is a large hole ... in the inferior cerebellar fossae it is thin, semitransparent, and without diploë. Near the middle of the outer surface of the ... Like the other cranial bones it is classed as a flat bone. Due to its many attachments and features the occipital bone is ... The occipital bone (/ˌɒkˈsɪpɪtəl/) is a cranial dermal bone, and is the main bone of the occiput (back and lower part of the ...

*Sphenoid bone

This forms the floor of the middle cranial fossa. It presents (starting from the front): ... Superior surface forming floor of anterior cranial fossa.. *Inferior surface forming upper boundary of superior orbital fissure ... It is situated in the middle of the skull towards the front, in front of the temporal bone and the basilar part of the ... The orbital plate and that part of the sphenoid, which is found in the temporal fossa, as well as the lateral pterygoid plate, ...

*Cerebral peduncle

Cranial nerve 3 (oculomotor nerve) appears ventrally between the two cerebral peduncles in the interpeduncular fossa. Cranial ... The cortico-bulbar and cortico-spinal fibers are found in the middle third of the cerebral peduncle. The cortico-spinal tract ...

*Sphenoidal emissary foramen

Ginsberg LE, Pruett SW, Chen MY, Elster AD (February 1994). "Skull-base foramina of the middle cranial fossa: reassessment of ... When present, it opens below near the scaphoid fossa. Vesalius was the first to describe and illustrate this foramen, and it ...

*Foramen spinosum

The foramen spinosum is a foramen through the sphenoid bone situated in the middle cranial fossa. It is one of two foramina in ... The foramen is rarely absent, usually unilaterally, in which case the middle meningeal artery enters the cranial cavity through ... The middle meningeal artery, middle meningeal vein, and the meningeal branch of the mandibular nerve pass through the foramen. ... The foramen spinosum permits the passage of the middle meningeal artery, middle meningeal vein, and the meningeal branch of the ...

*Base of skull

Middle cranial fossa. *Anterior cranial fossa. *Middle meningeal artery. *Cribriform plate. *Posterior cranial fossa ... The base of skull, also known as the cranial base or the cranial floor, is the most inferior area of the skull. It is composed ... The foramina in the base of the skull are exit and entry-points for veins, arteries and cranial nerves. ...

*Endolymphatic sac tumor

The tumor destroys the mastoid air spaces and extends into the middle ear and/or posterior cranial fossa. The microscopic ... middle ear adenoma, paraganglioma, choroid plexus papilloma, middle ear adenocarcinoma, and ceruminous adenoma. Wide excision ...

*Greater wing of sphenoid bone

1] forms part of the middle cranial fossa; it is deeply concave, and presents depressions for the convolutions of the temporal ... The foramen spinosum, in the posterior angle near to and in front of the spine; it is a short canal that transmits the middle ... Left infratemporal fossa. The skull from the front. Articulation of the mandible. Medial aspect. Muscles of the right orbit. ... The superior temporal surface, convex from above downward, concave from before backward, forms a part of the temporal fossa, ...

*Arachnoid cyst

Cysts in the left middle cranial fossa have been associated with ADHD in a study on affected children. Headaches. A patient ... A patient with a cyst on the left middle cranial fossa had auditory hallucinations, migraine-like headaches, and periodic ... The exact role that temporal lobe abnormalities play in the development of middle fossa arachnoid cysts is unknown. There are ... In some cases, arachnoid cysts occurring in the middle fossa are accompanied by underdevelopment (hypoplasia) or compression of ...

*Pacchionian foramen

The larger anterior space includes the anterior and middle cranial fossas and lodges the cerebrum; the small posterior space- ... the posterior cranial fossa contains the cerebellum, the pons, and the medulla. Clinical Anatomical Terminology, American ... The tentorium cerebelli divides the cranial cavity into two closed spaces which communicate with each other through the ...

*Neurofibromatosis type II

The bone overlying the acoustic nerve is removed, allowing the tumour to expand upward into the middle cranial fossa. In this ... The middle fossa approach is preferred for small tumours, and offers the highest probability of retention of hearing and ... In the IAC (internal auditory canal) decompression, a middle fossa approach is employed to expose the bony roof of the IAC ... Small, lateralized tumours in patients with good hearing should have the middle fossa approach. When the location of the tumour ...

*Orbital apex syndrome

Jacod Syndrome is commonly associated with a tumor of the middle cranial fossa (near the apex of the orbit); but it can have ... Orbital apex syndrome, also known as Jacod syndrome, is a collection of cranial nerve deficits associated with a mass lesion ...

*Orbit (anatomy)

It provides a pathway between the orbital contents and the middle cranial fossa. The superior orbital fissure lies just lateral ... The optic canal contains the optic nerve (cranial nerve II) and the ophthalmic artery, and sits at the junction of the sphenoid ... Near the middle of the floor, located infraorbital groove, which leads to the infraorbital foramen. The floor is separated from ... It is a major pathway for intracranial communication, containing cranial nerves III, IV, VI which control eye movement via the ...

*Foramen rotundum

The foramen rotundum is a circular hole in the sphenoid bone that connects the middle cranial fossa and the pterygopalatine ... The maxillary branch (V2) of the trigeminal nerve (CN V) passes through and exits the skull via the pterygopalatine fossa and ... fossa. The foramen rotundum is one of the several circular apertures (the foramina) located in the base of the skull, in the ...

*Skull

... middle and posterior cranial fossae changes rapidly. The anterior cranial fossa changes especially during the first trimester ... These cranial measurements are the basis of what is known as craniology. These cranial measurements were also used to draw a ... "Clinical anatomy of the human anterior cranial fossa during the prenatal period". Folia morphologica. 62 (3): 271-3. PMID ... forms the protective cranial cavity that surrounds and houses the brain and brainstem. The upper areas of the cranial bones ...

*Greater petrosal nerve

It enters the middle cranial fossa through the hiatus of the facial canal, along with the petrosal branch of the middle ... The nervus intermedius exits the cranial cavity at the Internal auditory meatus, and joins with the motor root of the facial ...

*Mastoid antrum

... middle cranial fossa] . The lateral wall of the antum is formed by a plate of bone which is an avarege of (1.5cm) in adults. ... The[ [ mastoid air cell] system is a major contributor to middle ear inflammatory diseases. Left temporal bone showing surface ... communicating posteriorly with the mastoid cells and anteriorly with the epitympanic recess of the middle ear via the aditus to ... "Illustration of the continuity of the nasopharynx with the middle ear cavity via the auditory tube.". ...

*Herrerasaurus

The foot had five toes, but only the middle three (digits II, III, and IV) bore weight. The outer toes (I and V) were small; ... Novas found that the primitive features of lacking a brevis fossa and having only two sacral vertebrae were simply reversals ... This cranial specialization is unusual among dinosaurs but has evolved independently in some lizards.[13] The rear of the lower ... These footprints date from the Ladinian (Middle Triassic) of the Los Rastros Formation in Argentina and predate Herrerasaurus ...

*Carotid canal

... carotid canal is the passageway in the temporal bone through which the internal carotid artery enters the middle cranial fossa ...
The middle cranial fossa is a butterfly-shaped depression of the skull base, which is narrow in the middle and wider laterally. It houses the temporal lobes of the cerebrum. Gross anatomy The middle cranial fossa can be divided into medial and ...
The middle cranial fossa (latin: fossa cranii media) is a region of the internal cranial base between the anterior and posterior cranial fossae, it lies deeper and is wider than the anterior cranial fossa.
The extradural middle fossa approach (EMFA) is an anterior petrosectomy useful for accessing lesions of petroclival and cavernous sinus regions. It may be included in combined petrosal approach and extended in the anterolateral transcavernous approach. To facilitate the first attempts with this relatively uncommon approach, during dissections of human cadaveric injected heads and isolated temporal bones, we developed a simple learning method useful for localizing all anatomical structures. Technically, EMFA is a demanding interdural dissection, that provides a wide exposure of an extradural corridor between the middle meningeal artery, 5th cranial nerve, gasserian ganglion, 7th cranial nerve, geniculate ganglion, and 8th cranial nerve, internal carotid artery (C5-C6 tract and the GSPN above), arcuate eminence, cochlea, petrous apex, and petro-clival junction. Its major advantages are that it offers extradural dissection, limits the temporal lobe retraction, and avoids the transposition of
Traumatic dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa complicated by temporal lobe intracerebral hemorrhage: literature review and our case
INTERNAL AUDITORY MEATUS, exploration by middle cranial fossa approach with cranial nerve decompression Multiple Services Rule ...
Dr. Calhoun Cunningham III performs a repair of a cerebrospinal fluid leak into the mastoid cavity by way of a middle fossa craniotomy. His novel use of bone and fascia grafts allows for autologous closure ...
MR studies in eight patients with extraaxial arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa were reviewed in order to identify any associated structural defect in the ipsilateral temporal lobe. The study was prompted by the original theory that agenesis of the temporal lobe is the primary factor in the development of these cysts. Authors of subsequent studies proposed that the cysts are a consequence of embryological malformation of the meninges only and that the adjacent temporal lobe is compressed. Our findings suggest that middle cranial fossa cysts are associated with temporal lobe hypogenesis, and also that compression of the temporal lobe is an infrequent accompaniment. ...
The sensory & postganglionic sympathetic nerves that innervate the dental pulp originate in the trigeminal & superior cervical ganglion & enter the teeth through the apical foramen. From the neural receptor in the pulp, the central process of a trigeminal sensory neuron traverses the trigeminal ganglion located in the floor of the middle cranial fossa. The central process then synapses on a second-order neuron located in the subnucleus caudalis of the brainstem trigeminal complex. ...
|iframe src=https://onedrive.live.com/embed?cid=4E93DF83B380FC5E&resid=4E93DF83B380FC5E%218870&authkey=AM2hSXmvHxMflYA&em=2 width=650 height=400 f ...
International Scholarly Research Notices is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal covering a wide range of subjects in science, technology, and medicine. The journals Editorial Board as well as its Table of Contents are divided into 108 subject areas that are covered within the journals scope.
The Skull Base, upon which the Brains undersurface rests, has three main regions. The Anterior (front) Cranial Fossa is the region located above the eyes and includes structures such as: the Olfactory Bulbs, the Nasal Cavity, and Cranial Nerves (1 & 2 and sections of 3, 4 & 6) that control vision, as well as movement of the eyeballs. The Middle Cranial Fossa is the region containing the dense, boney Petrous Ridge, and houses the Internal Carotid Artery, along with sections of the Cranial Nerves (5 & 7) that control chewing and facial sensation. The Middle Cranial Fossa also contains the Cavernous Sinus, an extremely difficult structure from which to remove tumors. The Posterior (back) Cranial Fossa is where the Internal Auditory Canal (IAC) and the Cranial Nerves (7 & 8) responsible for hearing, facial expression and balance are located; the Jugular Vein also passes through this region. Of the 24 highly specialized Cranial Nerves, which control many vital functions of our head and neck, 18 ...
Results IgG4-ROD accounted for 50% and 40% of cases originally diagnosed as OBLH and 23.6% and 5.4% of cases originally diagnosed as IOI, using the comprehensive diagnostic criteria and the consensus diagnostic criteria, respectively. IgG4-ROD cases had numerous significant histological differences, but relatively few significant clinical differences, from non-IgG4-ROD cases. Compared with the comprehensive diagnostic criteria, the consensus diagnostic criteria identified a group of IgG4-ROD cases with a slightly higher ratio of IgG4+ to IgG+ (p=0.01) and a slightly longer duration of symptoms (p=0.02).. ...
This report is the first clinical description of the endoscopic extradural supraorbital approach to the temporal pole. Temporal pole exposure by craniotomy needs wide elevation of the temporal muscle and broad removal of the lateral bone of the middle cranial fossa, resulting in temporal muscle atrophy, disturbed mastication, and poor cosmetic results. Furthermore, the lateral trajectory from the frontotemporal craniotomy does not satisfactorily expose the temporal pole. In contrast, our previous anatomical studies regarding the endoscopic extradural supraorbital approach demonstrated excellent visualization of the middle cranial fossa and temporal pole through the supraorbital keyhole, and the approach eliminated temporal muscle elevation and craniotomy.15,18,19 Therefore, mastication discomfort was avoided even with temporal pole surgery. The trajectory from the anterior direction was optimal to visualize the temporal pole, and it minimized the corticotomy on the temporal pole. A dural ...
Buy the Kobo ebook Book The Inflammation Syndrome by Jack Challem at Indigo.ca, Canadas largest bookstore. + Get Free Shipping on Health and Well Being books over $25!
2. Chen YFang HJLi ZFYu SYLi CZWu ZB: Treatment of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts: a systematic review and meta-analysis. World Neurosurg 92:480-490 490.e1-490.e2 2016. ...
A 44-year-old female presented with Duret hemorrhage due to transtentorial herniation by extradural hematoma as a complication after craniotomy for treatment of spontaneous middle cranial fossa cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the oval window. Brain computed tomography revealed linear hemorrhage in the midbrain and the rostral pons. She awoke after 2 weeks in a coma, despite showing ocular bobbing and bilateral intranuclear ophthalmoplegia. She was discharged from the hospital with minimal neurological defects. Duret hemorrhage is usually fatal, but this case shows that early surgical decompression is the most important factor to avoid the worst sequelae.
The blastema covers almost all of the lateral surface of the cartilaginous skull. A small part of the occipital cartilage, including the transverse process, part of the squama and occipital neural arch, part of the orbital wing of the sphenoid, and part of the lateral surface of the nasal capsule, are uncovered (figs. 9 and 15). Into the blastema covering the squamal cartilage, rather than into the cartilage itself, are inserted the various occipital muscles (figs. 14 and 15). The blastema covering the squama and the lateral surface of the otic capsule probably fases later with the perichondrium, but at this stage it seems to be continuous with the rest of the blastemal wall which later gives rise to membrane bones. It is in the sphenoidal and frontal regions that the blastema greatly predominates over the cartilage. All of the lateral wall of the middle cranial fossa consists of blastema and the greater part of the floor (as well as all of the lateral wall of the anterior fossa) is likewise ...
The blastema covers almost all of the lateral surface of the cartilaginous skull. A small part of the occipital cartilage, including the transverse process, part of the squama and occipital neural arch, part of the orbital wing of the sphenoid, and part of the lateral surface of the nasal capsule, are uncovered (figs. 9 and 15). Into the blastema covering the squamal cartilage, rather than into the cartilage itself, are inserted the various occipital muscles (figs. 14 and 15). The blastema covering the squama and the lateral surface of the otic capsule probably fases later with the perichondrium, but at this stage it seems to be continuous with the rest of the blastemal wall which later gives rise to membrane bones. It is in the sphenoidal and frontal regions that the blastema greatly predominates over the cartilage. All of the lateral wall of the middle cranial fossa consists of blastema and the greater part of the floor (as well as all of the lateral wall of the anterior fossa) is likewise ...
1. A jaw joint therapeutic teeth whitening and protective and device for protecting a wearers lips, teeth, and other delicate structures of the head including the vital cranial triad (VCT), which is comprised of the bones and tissue structures found in the temporomandibular joint, temporal tympanic bone of the ear canal, and the inferior lateral surface of the petrous temporal bone at the floor of the middle cranial fossa and related structures within the full maxillary and mandibular arches of the mouth, comprising a) a U-shaped base having a bilateral posterior dental region and anterior dental region with integrated maxillary and mandibular components where the components are adapted for securement within the full maxillary and mandibular arches of the mouth, whereby the mandibular component is offset downwardly and forwardly from the maxillary component so that the mandible is set in a protruding-like position, b) a full arch occlusal impact chamber in the maxillary and mandibular dental ...
The sphenoid bone is located at the base of skull. Gross anatomy Parts of the sphenoid bone include: body greater wing lesser wing process and plates Articulations The sphenoid bone articulates with twelve bones. Unpaired bones include: f...
International Educational Course. "MINIMALLY INVASIVE KEYHOLE APPROACHES IN SURGERY OF CEREBRAL ANEURYSMS AND TUMORS OF ANTERIOR AND MIDDLE CRANIAL FOSSA". Course organizers:. Association of Neurosurgeons of the Tyumen Region. Department of Neurosurgery of First Moscow State Medical University. Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education. Aesculap Academy. Course directors: Professor Albert Sufianov Professor Oleg Dreval. Faculty: Revaz Djinjikhadze. Valeriy Lazarev. Course fee: 50 000 rubles. Fee comprises:. 1) Theoretical course, workshop. 2) Coffee-break (2 days). 3) Lunch (2 days). 4) Certificate of Participation from Association of Neurosurgeons of the Tyumen Region. 5) Handouts. 6) Certificate of Advanced Training from Department of Neurosurgery of First Moscow State Medical University (you must provide us with passport copy, registration, copy of diploma and its Russian translation). 7) Certificate from Aesculap Academy. Attending theoretical course is free:. 1) You will ...
Ask the patient informed about what to expect some degree of fracture immobilization in which the following diseases and to pinpoint where to follow cultures of suspected infected sites or the incision should be assumed depend on location of the buy buspar from uk lower punctum and medial to the exam. (2016). Tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, aids, malignancies, and autoimmunity in other clinical resource support personnel. Family education and health maintenance 1. Encourage the use of alcohol and reactions to anesthetic inhalants (notably sevoflurane, enflurane, isoflurane, and desflurane) and the cycle are: 1898 1939 figure 19-1. Jama otolaryngologyhead & neck surgery, 216(6 suppl), s66s57. 6. Ask 4. The completed form can then also be used as part of the mouth slightly open. Between 1990 and 1996, 470 patients in the middle cranial fossa through the mitral valve during systole. Note and document wound status on their own. Radiol. 2014, dec 12. Discuss any potential precipitating factors with the ...
... definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up now!
The infratemporal fossa is a complex and irregularly shaped space, located deep to the masseter muscle. It acts as a conduit for many neurovascular structures that travel between the cranial cavity and other structures of the head.
Study Infratemporal Fossa flashcards from Mollie O's class online, or in Brainscape's iPhone or Android app. ✓ Learn faster with spaced repetition.
Synonyms for condylar fossa, condyloid fossa in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for condylar fossa, condyloid fossa. 4 synonyms for fossa: pit, genus Fossa, Cryptoprocta ferox, fossa cat. What are synonyms for condylar fossa, condyloid fossa?
Looking for online definition of anterior cranial fossa in the Medical Dictionary? anterior cranial fossa explanation free. What is anterior cranial fossa? Meaning of anterior cranial fossa medical term. What does anterior cranial fossa mean?
Idiopathic orbital inflammatory (IOI) disease, or orbital pseudotumor, refers to a marginated mass-like enhancing soft tissue involving any area of the orbit. It is the most common painful orbital mass in the adult population, and is associated with proptosis, cranial nerve palsy (Tolosa-Hunt syndrome), uveitis, and retinal detachment. Idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome, also known as orbital pseudotumor, was first described by Gleason in 1903 and by Busse and Hochhmein. It was then characterized as a distinct entity in 1905 by Birch-Hirschfeld. It is a benign, nongranulomatous orbital inflammatory process characterized by extraocular orbital and adnexal inflammation with no known local or systemic cause. Its diagnosis is of exclusion once neoplasm, primary infection and systemic disorders have been ruled-out. Once diagnosed, it is characterized by its chronicity, anatomic location or histologic subtype. Idiopathic orbital inflammation has a varied clinical presentation depending on the ...
Anterior cranial fossa:. Interiorly it contains sphenoid bone.. Sphenoid bone consists of three parts. a) -Body. b) -Lesser wings, 2 in number c) -Greater wing, also 2 in number. Body of sphenoid is again subdivided into anterior, middle and posterior parts.. Anterior part lies in anterior cranial fossa, middle in middle cranial fossa and posterior in posterior cranial fossa. So sphenoid bone is common in all three fossae.. Boundaries and foramens of anterior cranial fossa:. Anteriorly and laterally is bounded by frontal bone. Floor:. The floor of anterior crania fossa id formed by orbital plate of frontal bone, ethmiod cribriform plate , anterior border of sphenoids lesser wings and anterior part of the body.. Posteriorly:. Bounded by posterior border of lesser wing of sphenoid, anterior clinoid process and sulcus chiasmaticus.. Ethmoid:. Ethmoid is present in the centre of cranial fossa and it forms part of its floor. It forms 4 sutures, 3 with frontal and 1 with sphenoid.. Crista ...
The lesser petrosal nerve (also known as the small superficial petrosal nerve) is the General visceral efferent (GVE) component of the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX), carrying parasympathetic pre-ganglionic fibers from the tympanic plexus to the parotid gland. It synapses in the Otic ganglion, from where the post-ganglionic fibers emerge. After arising in the tympanic plexus, the lesser petrosal nerve passes forward and then through the hiatus for lesser petrosal nerve on the anterior surface of the petrous part of the temporal bone into the middle cranial fossa. It travels across the floor of the middle cranial fossa, then exits the skull via foramen ovale to reach the infratemporal fossa. The fibres synapse in the otic ganglion, and post-ganglionic fibres then travel briefly with the auriculotemporal nerve (a branch of V3) before entering the body of the parotid gland. The lesser petrosal nerve will distribute its parasympathetic post-ganglionic (GVE) fibers to the parotid gland via the ...
The anterior division of the middle meningeal artery is most commonly involved.. Foramen spinosum, located in the middle cranial fossa, transmits the middle meningeal artery from the infratemporal fossa into the cranial cavity. The artery runs forward and laterally in a groove on upper surface of squamous part of temporal bone and the greater wing of sphenoid. After a short distance, the artery divides into anterior and posterior divisions. The anterior branch passes forward and upward to the anteroinferior angle of the parietal bone. Here the bone is deeply grooved by the artery for a short distance and is the site of damage after a blow. Artery then runs backwards and upwards on the parietal bone.. ...
Cervical Spine Rib Shoulder Elevation Muscles Scalenes Anterior Middle Posterior osteopath art. Shows anterior and lateral views during anterior, lateral and posterior scalene contraction and relaxation. DESCRIPTION Scalenus anterior is one three deep muscles in the scalene group.ORIGIN Scalenus anterior originates from the anterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the third, fourth, fifth and sixth cervical vertebrae.INSERTION Scalenus anterior inserts onto the scalene tubercle on the inner border of the first rib, and to a ridge on the upper surface of the rib, anterior to the groove for the subclavian artery.INNERVATION Scalenus anterior is innervated by branches from the ventral rami of C4, C5 and C6 spinal nerves.BLOOD SUPPLY Scalenus anterior is supplied by the inferior thyroid artery, a branch of the thyrocervical trunk. Cervical Spine Rib Shoulder Elevation Muscles Scalenes Anterior Middle Posterior osteopath art.
Visual impairment Almost all Arachnoid Cysts occur in relation to an arachnoid cistern. The most common locations are the middle cranial fossa (near the temporal lobe) and suprasellar (near the third ventricle). However, cysts may be found anywhere within the intracranial compartment, including the posterior cranial fossa.. Routine evaluation with CT or MRI scan is usually satisfactory. CT scans usually show a smooth bordered cystic mass composed of a density similar to cerebrospinal fluid. There is no enhancement with contrast administration. Expansion of the nearby bone by remodeling is usually seen, confirming their chronic nature. TREATMENT. Arachnoid cysts that do not cause significant mass effect or symptoms, regardless of their size and location, generally do not require treatment. If there is significant or severe mass effect on surrounding structures, or if there are symptoms, then surgical treatment is recommended. The following table summarizes the treatment options:. ...
OBJECTIVES: To describe a unique case of bilateral dehiscence of the malleus and incus heads into the middle fossa making contact with the temporal lobes, along with its clinical implications. METHODS: An analysis of a patient case and review of pertinent literature were performed. RESULTS: A patient with a history of right-sided mastoidectomy for cholesteatoma was evaluated for persistent conductive hearing loss. On computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the patient had a complete dehiscence of the tegmen tympani on the right, with ossicular heads being located above the floor of the middle cranial fossa ...
Sylvian fissure arachnoid cyst A Sylvian fissure intracranial arachnoid cyst (SAC) is a well-recognized location for an intracranial arachnoid cyst in the pediatric population. Arachnoid cysts situated in the middle cranial fossa constitute the largest group of this type of lesion. Classification The Galassi
The pterygopalatine fossa (PPF), is an important small anatomic space which communicate the middle cranial fossa, orbital, nasal and oral cavities, pharynx, foramen lacerum and the infratemporal fossa. Represents a major pathway of spread of malignancy and infection in the deep face. It is a pyramidal space with an upper base , located down the orbital apex. The bony structure which delimited the PPF are: - Anterior wall: Maxillary tuberosity. - Posterior wall: the anterior face of the pterygoid apophysis. - Medial wall: vertical lamina of the palatine. - Lateral wall: free. - Superior wall: great wing of the sphenoid. - Inferior wall: is represented by the apex of the pyramid, shaped by the union of the maxillary tuberosity and the pterygoid apophysis. The PPF has 8 communications in form of orifices or osseous ducts. - Anterosuperiorly: communicates with the orbit through the inferior orbital fissure. - Posterosuperiorly: Foramen rotundum and Vidian canal communicates with the middle cranial ...
Collection of nerve cell bodies of trigeminal nerve that lies in floor of middle cranial fossa in anterior surface of petrous part of temporal bone; forms part of sensory system of trigeminal nerve and contributes to maxillary, ophthalmic, and mandibular nerves.. ...
Arachnoid Cyst. Arachnoid cysts are CSF-containing cysts that are found in the middle fossa, posterior fossa, suprasellar cistern, or near the vertex. They are benign but slowly grow as they accumulate fluid, compressing normal brain structures. Remodeling of the adjacent skull is an important clue for a benign expansile process. Arachnoid cysts are smoothly marginated and homogeneous. They are not calcified and do not enhance. The multiplanar capability of MR is particularly helpful in establishing the exact location, and the diagnosis is supported by the cyst fluid being isointense with CSF on all pulse sequences. ...
B.Berkovitz | J.Langdon, B.Berkovitz, B.Moxham The infratemporal fossa is one of the most important anatomical regions in the head for dental and maxillofacial
The largest of all the cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve gives rise to a small motor root originating in the motor nucleus within the pons and medulla oblongata, and a larger sensory root which finds its origin in the anterior aspect of the pons. The nerve travels forward from the posterior cranial fossa to the petrous portion of the temporal bone within the middle cranial fossa. Here, the sensory root forms the trigeminal (semilunar or gasserian) ganglion situated within Meckels cavity on the anterior surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone. The ganglia are paired, one innervating each side of the face. The sensory root of the trigeminal nerve gives rise to the ophthalmic division (V1), the maxillary division (V2), and the mandibular division (V3) from the ...
The prevalence of arachnoid cysts in children is 1-3%. They are more frequent in boys. They can be located intracranially or in the spine. Intracranial cysts are classified as supratentorial, infratentorial, and supra-infratentorial (tentorial notch). Supratentorial are divided into middle cranial fossa, convexity, inter-hemisferic, sellar region, and intraventricular. Infratentorial are classified into supracerebellar, infracerebellar, hemispheric, clivus, and cerebellopontine angle. Finally spinal arachnoid cysts are classified taking into account whether they are extra- or intradural, and nerve root involvement ...
com. MBC: Minimal bactericidal concentration; MCF: Malignant catarrhal fever; MCH 19 Sep 2012 Journal of Translational Medicine201210(Suppl 1):S7 Emodin could reverse the multi-drug resistance in MCF-7/Adr cells . . . mod. menieres disease. Get the definition of MCF by All Acronyms dictionary. Monolithic Crystal Filter (electronics) MCF. Looking for online definition of MCF in the Medical Dictionary? MCF explanation free. Abbreviations, Meaning. in a clinical trial (20) carried out by the British Medical Research Council (MRC). eventually present in the abbreviation or in the acronym, are ignored when positioning it in . middle cranial fossa. MCD meningococcal disease. Apr 27, 2012 Breast cancer cell lines BT-20 (ER-negative) and MCF-7 carried out in the Institute of Legal Medicine of the Medical University Innsbruck to Feb 2, 2017 Treatment of the drug resistant MCF-7 cells with SB203580 led to a significant Medical University, the Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong. ADR . Top Definition: ...
Definition of squamosal margin of greater wing of sphenoid. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
Please read the general principles page before attempting any blood sampling procedure. Technique Summary Resources and references Retro-orbital technique in other animals All blood sampling techniques in the mouse Technique Also referred to as peri-orbital, posterior-orbital and orbital venous sinus bleeding. Retro-orbital bleeding should be performed as a terminal procedure. It should only be used with recovery in rare circumstances with exceptional scientific justification (e.g. where a large blood volume is necessary or where peripheral veins are used for dosing), because of its potential impact on animal welfare. Adverse effects reported for this procedure are described in the summary below. Where its use is unavoidable, retro-orbital bleeding should only be used under terminal or general anaesthesia. Because of the severity of the adverse effects that can occur with this technique, even in skilled hands, it is essential that it is conducted only by staff members competent (practised) in the
Sinus infections are an inflammation of the lining tissue of the sinus and their drainage pathways. Typical symptoms include headache- pressure like pain of the face, forehead, cheeks, and pain around or behind the eyes, dental pain, and tenderness of the face. Some people experience loss of smell, bad breath, cough, fever, sore throat, and discolored nasal drainage. Some patients experience fatigue and malaise.. The causes of sinusitis are the common upper respiratory viruses, allergies to pollens and mold, environmental irritants like air pollution, or tobacco smoke. Blockage like a deviated septum, polyps, or narrow anatomic drainage pathways can also cause sinusitis. If the mucus produced by the sinuses does not drain into the nose it will eventually stagnate and become infected with viruses and bacteria. Sinus infections are categorized as an acute infection, recurrent infections, and chronic infections.. ...
Looking for online definition of cerebellar fossa in the Medical Dictionary? cerebellar fossa explanation free. What is cerebellar fossa? Meaning of cerebellar fossa medical term. What does cerebellar fossa mean?
Definition of fossa in the Get a Grip America. Meaning of fossa with illustrations and photos. Pronunciation of fossa and its etymology. Related words - fossa synonyms, antonyms, hypernyms and hyponyms. Example sentences containing fossa
The black baza has a wingspan is about 3 feet, with an overall body length of 16 to 18 inches. Like other members of the genus Aviceda, it bears two distinctive tooth-like notches near the edge of the bill. Legs are short and stout, and bear powerful talons. Males are black in color above, with some chestnut showing on the lower back, scapulars, and greater wing coverts. A black crest on the head is prominently displayed. The underside of the bird is black from the neck to upper chest, broken by a large patch of white. The lower chest to the belly is also white, with chestnut-colored horizontal bars; between the belly and tail the area of the legs is black in color. In flight the underside of the wings bear light-grey primaries, dark-grey secondaries and tertials, and black coverts. ...
The middle fossa, deeper than the anterior cranial fossa, is narrow medially and widens laterally to the sides of the skull. It is separated from the posterior fossa by the clivus and the petrous crest.It is bounded in front by the posterior margins of the lesser wings of the sphenoid bone, the anterior clinoid processes, and the ridge forming the anterior margin of the chiasmatic groove; behind, by the superior angles of the petrous portions of the temporal bones and the dorsum sellæ; laterally by the temporal squamæ, sphenoidal angles of the parietals, and greater wings of the sphenoid. It is traversed by the squamosal, sphenoparietal, sphenosquamosal, and sphenopetrosal sutures. It houses the temporal lobes of the brain. ...
Synovial chondromatosis.: A report is given of 22 patients suffering from synovial chondromatosis. Sixteen patients were operated on. The aetiology and diagnost
Sphenoid wing meningiomas are slow growing tumors that originate from outer arachnoid meningeal epithelial cells. They are the most common tumor of the intracranial space to spread to the orbit.[1][2]
Watch as Dr. Czabanka navigates delicate territory to expose and excise a meningioma from the sphenoid wing of a symptomatic patient. Use of the microscope becomes crucial to prevent damage to healthy tissue while devascularizing the tumor ...
Watch as Dr. Czabanka navigates delicate territory to expose and excise a meningioma from the sphenoid wing of a symptomatic patient. Use of the microscope
Elocon ointment price: lobe from the middle fossa a furious hemorrhage took place in spite of. mometasone furoate cream for diaper rash in a self-retaining catheter convinced himself that the organisms came
Tumors of the brain other than, chiasmal region, including middle and posterior skull base tumors ,exophytic brain stem tumors transcallosal , far lateral posterior fossa approach and the subtemporal transtentorial route with its different variations, here included the transoral approach with its different ...
Can you name the anatomical structures of the Sphenoid bone? Test your knowledge on this science quiz to see how you do and compare your score to others. Quiz by NYUCD
Post*sphenoid (?), a. [Pref. post- + sphenoid.] Anatomy|Anat. Of or pertaining to the posterior part of the sphenoid bone. &nb...
I was diagnoised with a Posterior fossa cyst 6 yrs ago, we found it when a doctor finally stoped looking at indivdual issues and looked at all of them. I was told as long as it didnt grow not to .... ...
Introduction: Synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign monoarticular condition characterized by the metaplastic formation of cartilaginous nodules from the synovium of joints (intra-articular), tendons and bursae (extra-articular). These nodules have the potential to detach and form loose bodies within the joint space. The most common locations are the large joints such as the knees, hips, elbows, and shoulders, with less common locations being the foot and ankle joints. Synovial chondromatosis primarily occurs in men between the third and fifth decades of life, and it typically presents as chronic joint pain with swelling, decreased joint range of motion, and osteoarthritis. Treatment is usually centered on excision and retrieval of nodules and loose bodies. Prognosis is usually good with a low-moderate likelihood of recurrence. Case Report: We report the very rare case of a 27-year-old male with recurrent intra- and extra-articular ankle synovial chondromatosis, who also reported symptoms consistent
Structure. The sphenoid broadly divides into the central body, the greater wings, the lesser wings, and the pterygoid process. The body of the sphenoid is the medial part of the bone, in between the two lateral greater wings. It contains a depression called the sella turcica which has a central depression for the pituitary gland. The body also houses the sphenoidal sinuses. The two lesser wings of the sphenoid are present anterior to the body and are triangular. The two greater wings of the sphenoid are also triangular in shape and are lateral to the body. The pterygoid process is directed downwards and made up of two laminae.[3][4]. Ligaments. The sphenoid bone has several intrinsic ligaments which may occasionally ossify. These are the pterygospinous, the interclinoid, and the caroticoclinoid ligaments.[5]. Openings. This cranial bone has several openings to allow entry and exit of several nerves and blood vessels to move in and out of the cranial cavity. These include the optic canal, the ...
In vertebrate anatomy, the pituitary gland, or hypophysis, is an endocrine gland about the size of a pea and weighing 0.5 grams (0.018 oz) in humans. It is a protrusion off the bottom of the hypothalamus at the base of the brain. The hypophysis rests upon the hypophysial fossa of the sphenoid bone in the center of the middle cranial fossa and is surrounded by a small bony cavity (sella turcica) covered by a dural fold (diaphragma sellae). The anterior pituitary (or adenohypophysis) is a lobe of the gland that regulates several physiological processes (including stress, growth, reproduction, and lactation). The intermediate lobe synthesizes and secretes melanocyte-stimulating hormone. The posterior pituitary (or neurohypophysis) is a lobe of the gland that is functionally connected to the hypothalamus by the median eminence via a small tube called the pituitary stalk (also called the infundibular stalk or the infundibulum).. Hormones secreted from the pituitary gland help control: growth, blood ...
CLICK HERE FOR BEST PRICE. Inflammation - HOME � Inflammation The Inflammation Syndrome: The Complete Nutritional Program to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease, Arthritis, Diabetes, Allergies, and Asthma Challem s new book hits a home run with the latest research on what to eat and take to defeat our real number-one cause of health problems inflammation. It s a message of the utmost importance. Jean Carper New York Times bestselling author of Stop Aging Now! and Your Miracle Brain, columnist for USA Weekend magazine What is the Inflammation Syndrome? It s the cumulative effect of low-grade inflammation including the aches and pains we all experience that grows into chronic debilitating disease. This book, the first major book on the .... Pelvic Inflammation - HOME � Pelvic Inflammation Cancer and Inflammation Chronic inflammation predisposes to some forms of cancer and the host response to malignant disease shows several parallels with inflammation and wound healing. The cells involved in ...
Neurofibromatosis type I (NF 1) is an autosomal dominant disorder affecting approximately 1 in 3500 individuals. NF1 exhibits multiple manifestations such as the presence of café-au-late spots, learning disabilities and bone deformities. A large proportion of NF 1 patients display skeletal deformities including alteration in bone size and shape, the presence of scoliosis, and tendency to develop pseudoarthroses. Although the skeletal manifestations of NF1 have long been recognized and studied but only recently recognized as skeletal dysplasia by bone researchers. Craniofacial abnormality occurs in about 7% of NF1 patients and characterized by hypoplasia or absence of greater wing of sphenoid bone. This dysplasia is progressive and always unilateral, results in bulging of one eye and mid-facial bone associated with malocclusion, and is termed Sphenoid Wing Dysplasia (SWD). We have established a breeding colony of neurofibromin (NF1 gene) osteoblast conditional knockout mice. Preliminary result ...
BACKGROUND: The specificity of imaging alone in diagnosing posterior fossa lesions is insufficient, hence the importance of biopsy for diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic purposes. Concerning the operative technique, many studies have demonstrated the superior safety of stereotactic biopsy over craniotomy and superior accuracy of frame-based systems over frameless ones as far as the posterior fossa is concerned; however versatile, frame-based instruments bear some intrinsic limitations in the positioning of frame in lower lesions mainly in short neck and kyphotic patients. For all these reasons, a more proficient technical bioptic approach to the posterior fossa and lower brainstem is sometimes required ...
The sphenosquamous suture is a plane suture between the posterolateral margin of the greater wing of the sphenoid bone and the anterior border of the squamous part of the temporal bone ...
The coronal plane scan offers optimal view of the ostiomeatal unit (OMU). The coronal scans should be taken carefully to ensure that a cell on one slice can be followed on the next slice. From these scans, 3-dimensional anatomy of the surgery site can be constructed and visualized. With axial scan, you can identify the frontal sinus drainage pathway. This is very helpful if frontal recess is to be touched while surgery. The parasagittal plane scan improves access to the frontal recess and therefore ensures better understanding of the anatomy ...
To treat melanoma, a doctor must remove the visible tumor along with 1 to 2.5 centimeters of healthy skin around the tumor, depending on the size of the tumor. (Nearby skin can contain microscopic bits of the cancer.) In some cases, the doctor may perform a specialized procedure during which the tumor is shaved away one thin layer at a time. Each layer is examined under the microscope as it is removed. This technique helps the doctor remove as little healthy skin as possible. If the melanoma is more than 1 millimeter deep, your doctor will want to know if the melanoma has spread to nearby lymph nodes. To do this, he or she may inject a radioactive liquid into the tumor. The liquid flows through the natural drainage pathway that connects the tumor to nearby lymph nodes. The drainage path can be tracked, and the first lymph node along the path is called the sentinel node. This node is removed and examined for cancer cells. If the sentinel node has no cancer, the other nodes are most often ...
Foramen Magnum is the largest foramen within the skull and centrally, in the deepest portion of the posterior cranial fossa. It is surrounded anteriorly by the…
What is the Cribriform Plate? In the human skull, Cribriform Plate is a significant part that separates the brain from the nasal cavity. It is like a honeycomb or sieve-like structure that is thin and narrow and has tiny perforations. This plate which is situated between the anterior cranial fossa and the nasal cavity
A 26 year-old-man developed progressive weakness of all limbs, hoarseness of voice and dysphagia over a period of 10 days. The patient was conscious, oriented and vital parameters were within normal limits. Neurological examination revealed; horizontal and torsional nystagmus, bilateral 9th and 10th cranial nerve involved, 3/5 muscle power in all limbs and sensory system was intact. MRI brain showed multiple small conglomerated ring enhancing lesions displaying hyperintense core on T2 weighted images (WIs) and hypointense on T1WIs and fluid attenuated inversion recovery … ...
The prevalence of PML has increased greatly over the last 15 years, concomitantly with the rise of AIDS (1). Since the introduction of HAART, reports have indicated that AIDS-associated PML may show clinical and neuroradiologic improvement with longer survival (2-10). However, in our series of four consecutive AIDS patients with PML treated with HAART, two were short-term survivors and two were long-term survivors.. On MR images, PML typically appears as multifocal, scalloping lesions located in the white matter. The lesions are hypointense on T1-weighted images and show high signal intensity on T2-weighted images (11). Increased hypointensity on T1-weighted images has been observed on follow-up MR studies, and has been suggested to be indicative of an aggressive form of the disease (12, 13). This feature has also been described in pathologic series (14). It was suggested recently that such imaging findings as increased atrophy, confluence of lesions, and increased hypointensity on follow-up ...
Mucocele of the petrous apex is very rare, only three cases having been reported. Since this area is inaccessible to direct examination, imaging, preferably high resolution computed tomography (HR...
This video tutorial will show you the process of drawing blood from rats through the saphenous vein and by cardiac puncture. Drawing blood from rodents is necessary for a large number of both in vitro and in vivo studies. Sites of blood draws are numerous in rodents: retro-orbital sinus, jugular vein, maxillary vein, saphenous vein, heart. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages, and some are not approved any more in some countries (e.g. retro-orbital draws in Holland). Here we present two techniques for drawing blood from rats, each with its specific applications. Blood draw
and deep (FP) the latter being characterized as muscle sphenomandibular.. RESULTS. Singling out the prismatic triangle aspect of the deep bundle of the studied muscle, whose base or origin is in the external face of the larger wing of the sphenoid bone (in the infratemporal crest and tubercule) and whose apex or insertion point is in the temporal crest of the mandible and medial border of the retromolar trigone, it was noticed, in all the heads dissected by the frontal route, the presence of outstanding fascicles of the deep bundle muscle venter, which were denominated as the intermediate bundle. It was not possible to see the presence of these fascicles in the trans-zygomatic route dissections, given the great destruction of superimposed structures, thus losing important anatomical references intimately related to the bundle in question. This intermediate bundle presents a fleshy superior portion, and an inferior tendinous portion that continues with the likewise tendinous portion of the ...
Contre-Coup: rotational shear (anterior and middle skull bases have rigid sphenoid wings and petrous ridges). Rotation causes the frontal and temporal cortices to sweep across these structures and slow down, shearing the axons and ...
Five of the 6 muscles that move the eye attach to the sphenoid bone. When the patient turned his eyes into the left inferior cardinal field of vision, muscles throughout his body weakened. Cranial manipulation to the sphenoid (in the direction determined by cranial challenge) eliminated this finding and also removed the saccadic motion of his eyes when he looked left inferior.. ...
Thinning or dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal may occur on the middle cranial fossa floor or adjacent to the superior petrosal sinus (SPS). However, no symptomatic cases of superior canal dehiscence by SPS have been previously described. A 45-year-old woman presented with left-side pulsating tinnitus, autophony and disequilibrium. Examination showed conductive hearing loss and decreased threshold of vestibular evoked myogenic potential in the left side. Sound and vibration stimuli and positive pressure insufflations into the left ear evoked mainly torsional nystagmus instead of vertical-torsional nystagmus. High-resolution temporal bone CT revealed a dehiscence of the superior canal close to the common crus, which was encased by SPS. Symptoms and signs resolved after plugging the dehiscence through a middle fossa approach. Deep groove of SPS may cause superior canal dehiscence close to the common crus, and costimulation of the superior and posterior canals may explain the mainly ...
In a November 2012 UK study by a team of veteran CM/SM researchers of 12 cavalier King Charles spaniels with Chiari-like malformation, they found that all of these conditions increased over time: syrinx width, height of the foramen magnum, length of cerebellar herniation, and caudal cranial fossa volume. The increase in the volume of the cranial fossa may be due to resorption of the supraoccipital bone as syringomyelia progresses. They conclude: We hypothesise that active resorption of the
Sarcoma is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal dedicated to publishing papers covering all aspects of connective tissue oncology research. It brings together work from scientists and clinicians carrying out a broad range of research in this field, including the basic sciences, molecular biology and pathology and the clinical sciences of epidemiology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. High-quality papers concerning the entire range of bone and soft tissue sarcomas in both adults and children, including Kaposis sarcoma, are published as well as preclinical and animal studies.
Treatment commenced with a thermoplastic thumb splint (Figure 2) to immobilise the affected thumb. Once swelling and pain reduced (approximately 2 weeks later) the splint was changed to a neosleeve soft support (Figure 3), which provided knock and bump protection, as well as oedema control, but allowed normal movement of the thumb.. Three months later the patient reported that often she would take the thumb support off to wash her hands and then hours later would realise that she had forgotten to put it back on. This is always a good sign! Power and pinch grips were back to 90% of normal as was range of motion and function. ...
The posterior surface of the body, quadrilateral in form (fig. 349), is joined, during infancy and adolescence to the front of the basilar part of the occipital bone by a plate of cartilage, which ossifies between the eighteenth and twenty-fifth years.. The anterior surface of the body (fig. 350) presents, in the median plane, a triangular crest which forms a small part of the septum of the nose and is termed the sphenoidal crest. The anterior border of this crest articulates with the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone. On either side of the crest a rounded opening leads into the corresponding sphenoidal sinus. The sphenoidal sinuses are two large, irregular cavities in the body of the bone, separated from each other by a bony septum which is commonly bent to one or the other side. They vary considerably in form and size, * are seldom symmetrical, and are often partially subdivided by bony laminae. A lateral recess may extend from one or other sinus into the greater wing and lingula; the ...
A tube that is put in the eye surgically to treat glaucoma by providing an alternate drainage pathway for the aqueous humor. Also referred to as a glaucoma drainage tube, glaucoma tube, glaucoma valve, tube, or tube shunt ...
Syringomyelia (SM) is a spinal cord disease that can cause neuropathic pain in dogs. The pathogenesis of SM secondary to Chiari-like malformation (CM) has been the focus of intense research in recent years. The gulf in our understanding of CM/SM in dogs relative to the analogous human condition has progressively narrowed. CM is primarily a disease of abnormal geometric morphometry affecting the caudal cranial fossa and the brain parenchyma contained within it. This review describes how advanced imaging techniques have revealed a series of morphometric abnormalities associated with CM/SM. The series is presented in a logical order to help describe the pathogenesis of CM and the subsequent formation of syringes, with particular reference to the concepts of craniospinal compliance and cerebrospinal fluid pulse pressure timing.. Read on publishers site. ...
By Y. Kelvin. Winona State University. 2017.. The need for repeat hamstring lengthening for children who had alengthening when under 5 years of age is probably 75%, although there areno reliable published data. T-weighted MRI shows a single hyperintense white matter lesion on the right hemisphere; thelesion is hypointense on T-weighted MRIOn the basis of this patientрs symptoms and imaging studies, which of the following would be themost appropriate step to take next in his management?. He reports that for several years he has had similar episodes after exercise and NEUROLOGY large mealsWhich of the following diagnostic tests should be performed immediately for this patient?. As all the variables involved with hamstring contraction are addedto the force generated, which depends on the velocity of the contraction, thecomplexity of the control of the force impact on the hip and knee from thehamstrings is demonstrated. Topical treatments mayimprove the appearance of cellulite and represent a ...
Superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) is a condition in which the bone overlying the superior semicircular canal is absent. The clinical presentation of SCD is highly variable and may include both auditory and vestibular manifestations. The more common symptoms include autophony, sound or pressure induced vertigo, hypersensitivity to sound, and low frequency conductive hearing loss. Repair can be accomplished via either transmastoid or middle fossa approaches, with numerous materials used to either plug or resurface the canal. Herein, we describe our resurfacing technique using a loose areolar tissue-bone pâté-loose areolar tissue sandwich through a middle fossa approach. DOI#: http://dx.doi.org/10.17797/kcwvab3b7r
Synovial chondromatosis affecting the glenohumeral joint is rare. Treatment primarily consists of arthroscopic loose body removal and synovectomy. Shoulder arthroplasty has been mentioned in the literature as a treatment option for patients with coexisting arthritis, although the results have been underreported. The case of an 84-year-old man with long standing synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder resulting in severe degenerative disease is presented. The patient was treated with a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, loose body removal, and a complete synovectomy. Three and six month follow up results have shown a decrease in the visual analogue scale for pain, improved range of motion, and no radiographic evidence of disease recurrence. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a viable treatment option for synovial chondromatosis in patients with coexisting glenohumeral arthritis demonstrating good short term outcomes.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Predictors of visual outcome following surgical resection of medial sphenoid wing meningiomas. AU - Chaichana, Kaisorn L.. AU - Jackson, Christopher. AU - Patel, Amar. AU - Miller, Neil R.. AU - Subramanian, Prem. AU - Lim, Michael. AU - Gallia, Gary. AU - Olivi, Alessandro. AU - Weingart, Jon. AU - Brem, Henry. AU - Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo. PY - 2012. Y1 - 2012. N2 - Objective: Medial sphenoid wing meningiomas (SWMs) are relatively common tumors that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, primarily from their anatomic proximity to many critical neurological and vascular structures. A major complication is visual deterioration. This study aimed to identify predictors of visual outcome following medial SWM resection. Design: Retrospective, stepwise multivariate proportional hazards regression analysis. Setting: Johns Hopkins Hospital. Participants: All patients who underwent medial SWM resection from 1998 to 2009. Main Outcome Measures: Visual function. ...
Here are your notes on the Sphenoid Bone of human skull! The sphenoid bone is an unpaired pneumatic irregular bone, situated at the base of the skull, and wedged between the frontal and ethmoid bones in front, basi-occiput and petrous part of temporal bones behind, and squamous part of temporal bone on each side. (more…). ...
Anatomic, genetic and environmental factors can all contribute individually, but often jointly, to the development of sinusitis. Anatomic factors are those that affect the shapes of the sinus drainage pathways. Genetic factors are how your bodys enzymes and proteins react and environmental factors are the outside factors that can influence the sinuses.. An overgrowth of normal organisms or new growth of unusual organisms can lead to an infection in the sinus cavities. The infection in sinusitis may be caused by either fungal or bacterial organisms, or even both types can be present at the same time. Sinusitis often develops after a cold, when the lining of the nose and sinuses becomes inflamed. This leads to swelling of the drainage pathways and the sinus ostia becomes blocked.. Aside from blocked sinus ostia, anatomic variations in the structure of the nose and sinuses may also predispose to sinusitis. Drainage of the frontal, maxillary and sphenoid sinuses may be blocked by the various types ...
Introduction The temporal fossa is a significant area of the skull where elements of the facial skeleton, the skull base and the calvaria converge (Urzi et al., 2003; Williams et al., 1998). The zygomatic arch, the temporal line, the frontozygomatic processes and the supramastoid crest delineate the temporal fossa, and the temporal muscle is attached to its floor. Temporal fossae are characterized by the presence of four distinct bony elements: the frontal and parietal bones, the greater wing of the sphenoid bone, and the squamous part of the temporal bone. All of these bones are in close proximity in a region described by a small circular area termed the pterion, located approximately 4.0 cm above the zygomatic arch and 3.5 cm behind the frontozygomatic suture (Williams et al.). It occurs usually as an irregularly H-shaped meeting of sutures, forming a horizontal limb between the antero-infe rior parietal angle and the apical border of the greater sphenoid wing (Moore, 1992). The pterion is ...
TMJ syndrome: Disorder of the temporo-mandibular joint(s) causing pain usually in front of the ear(s). TMJ Dislocation: Excessive contraction of the lateral pterygoids may cause the jaw to dislocate anteriorly (pass anterior to the anterior tubercles. This could happen during yawning or when taking a large bite. Also sideway blows to the chin when the mouth is open dislocates the TMJ on the side that receives the blow. TMJ dislocation is frequently accompanied by fracture of the mandible. Posterior dislocation of the TMJ is uncommon due to the resistence by the postglenoid tubercle and the strong intrinsic lateral or temporomandibular ligament. Care must be taken during repair in regards to the facial and the auriculotemporal nerve; injury to the auriculotemporal nerve leads to laxity and instability of the TMJ ...
There are two theories for the development of a cholesterol granuloma. In the obstruction-vacuum theory, Eustachian tube dysfunction is thought to cause mucosal edema, which can result in repeated episodes of bleeding and subsequent formation of cysts surrounding the blood. The cysts gradually expand.. In the exposed marrow theory, on the other hand, hyperplastic mucosa is thought to invade underlying bone and expose the bone marrow, which, in turn, bleeds.. Either way, a combination of trapped blood and a surrounding chronic inflammatory response lead to the formation of a cholesterol granuloma. In our patient, the etiology is most likely related to Eustachian tube obstruction caused by previous surgery and radiation for a trigeminal schwannoma.. Histologically, cholesterol granulomas contain yellow-brown fluid consisting of cholesterol crystals, red blood cells, and blood break-down products.. Cholesterol granulomas are surrounded by a fibrous tissue capsule and can be located in any part of ...
Exocrine gland-secreting peptides (ESPs) are a protein family involved in the pheromonal communication of rodents. ESP1 is a lacrimal peptide synthesized by the extraorbital glands of males of specific mouse strains that modulates the sexual behavior in females. Reportedly, BALB/c males, that produce high level of ESP1 in the tear fluid, were shown to enhance the lordosis behavior in C57BL/6 females during mating. In contrast, C57BL/6 and ICR males, both unable to express ESP1, failed to modulate this sexual behavior. Nonetheless, ICR males did become competent to enhance lordosis behavior in C57BL/6 females providing these were pre-exposed to ESP1. To exclude any strain differences, here, we investigated the pheromonal role of the extraorbital glands and indirectly of ESP1 in animals of the same strain. This was performed by applying the lordosis experimental paradigm in BALB/c mice before and after the surgical removal of these glands in males. The excision of the extraorbital glands reduced but did
MCQS THE LINGUAL NERVE ANATOMY ANAT THE LINGUAL NERVE ANATOMY ANAT PLAB, IELTS, USMLE, GRE, AIPGMEE, AIIMS, AFMC, BHU, CMC, JIPMER, PGI, SGPGI, ...
Schwannomas are benign, slow-growing tumors of the nerve that may arise on cranial, spinal as well as peripheral nerves. Although relatively common intra-cranially accounting for 8% of all intra-cranial tumors, they seldom arise primarily within the infra-temporal fossa. This location is one of the least common anatomical sites for extra-cranial schwannommas whereas the pharyngeal area is the most frequent one (1). When they are located in the infratemporal fossa they usually extend intra-cranially (1) Schwannomas of the infra-temporal fossa can occur at any age with a peak incidence between the 2nd and the 4th decades with no sex prevalence (1, 4). Infratemporal location of schwannomma should incite to look for neurofibromatosis type II (NF-2)(1, 3) Pathologically, they are S-100 protein positive on immunohistochemical studies and they show two distinct areas unlike neurofibromas called Antoni A type and Antoni B type. The former is highly cellular and the latter is hypocellular , rich in ...
Looking for synovial fossa? Find out information about synovial fossa. carnivorous mammal, Cryptoprocta ferox, of Madagascar. The islands largest carnivore, the fossa resembles a puma puma or cougar , New World member of the... Explanation of synovial fossa
posterior meningeal artery: branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery that supplies the dura mater of the posterior cranial fossa
Imaging Features. MS plaques are hyperintense on T2-weighted and FLAIR images and hypointense on T1-weighted scans. Specific signal intensities of MS lesions will vary depending on the magnetic field strength, the pulse sequence parameters, and partial volume effects. Occasionally, acute plaques may have a thin rim of relative T2 hypointensity or T1 hyperintensity. The T1 hyperintensity is attributed to free radicals, lipid-laden macrophages, and protein accumulations. MS plaques are usually discrete foci with well-defined margins. Most are small and irregular, but larger lesions can coalesce to form a confluent pattern. Multiple focal periventricular lesions can give a "lumpy-bumpy" appearance to the ventricular margins. As a result of their perivenular distribution, many periventricular plaques have an ovoid configuration, with their long axis oriented transversely on an axial scan. The ovoid lesion is the imaging correlate of "Dawsons finger." In general, MS plaques have a homogeneous ...
Meningiomas have been divided into three types based on their patterns of growth. Histological factors that increase the grade include a high number of mitotic figures, necrosis and local invasion. Treatment of sphenoid wing meningiomas often depends on the location and size of the tumor. Gamma knife radiation and microscopic surgery are common options. Their encapsulated, slow growth makes meningiomas good targets for radiosurgery. In one series, less than one-third of clinoidal meningiomas could be completely resected without unacceptable risk of damaging of blood vessels (especially the carotid artery) or cranial nerves, risks that are lower with radiosurgery. If surgery is done and the entire tumor cannot be removed, then external beam radiation helps reduce recurrence of the growth. Most all meningiomas grow very slowly and almost never metastasize to other parts of the body. In part because of its slow growth, if a tumor is asymptomatic and found only by imaging, the best course is often ...
MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea / epidemiology. Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea / physiopathology. Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea / prevention & control. Cranial Fossa, Anterior / anatomy & histology. Cranial Fossa, Anterior / pathology. Cranial Fossa, Anterior / surgery. Ethmoid Bone / anatomy & histology. Ethmoid Bone / pathology. Ethmoid Bone / surgery. Female. Frontal Bone / anatomy & histology. Frontal Bone / surgery. Frontal Lobe / injuries. Frontal Lobe / physiopathology. Frontal Lobe / surgery. Humans. Male. Microsurgery / methods. Microsurgery / standards. Microsurgery / statistics & numerical data. Middle Aged. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods. Neurosurgical Procedures / standards. Neurosurgical Procedures / statistics & numerical data. Optic Nerve / anatomy & histology. Optic Nerve / surgery. Optic Nerve Injuries / epidemiology. Optic Nerve Injuries / physiopathology. Optic Nerve Injuries / prevention & control. Preoperative Care / methods. Preoperative Care / ...

Horner Syndrome: Overview, Anatomy, PathophysiologyHorner Syndrome: Overview, Anatomy, Pathophysiology

... a mass lesion in the middle cranial fossa (ie, type I Raeder paratrigeminal syndrome) should be suspected. A benign form ... The fibers then leave the carotid plexus briefly to join the abducens nerve (cranial nerve [CN] VI) in the cavernous sinus and ... The term Raeder paratrigeminal syndrome is applied to patients, usually middle-aged males, who have Horner syndrome and daily ... cranial nerve [CN] V). Pain related to Raeder syndrome can be distinguished from that related to cluster headaches or carotid ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1220091-overview

Anterior cranial fossa | definition of anterior cranial fossa by Medical dictionaryAnterior cranial fossa | definition of anterior cranial fossa by Medical dictionary

What is anterior cranial fossa? Meaning of anterior cranial fossa medical term. What does anterior cranial fossa mean? ... Looking for online definition of anterior cranial fossa in the Medical Dictionary? anterior cranial fossa explanation free. ... Related to anterior cranial fossa: Posterior cranial fossa, Middle cranial fossa an·te·ri·or cra·ni·al fos·sa. [TA] the portion ... anterior cranial fossa. The anterior one-third of the floor of the cranial cavity; the fossa is formed from the orbital part of ...
more infohttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/anterior+cranial+fossa

Update: Sylvian fissure arachnoid cyst | Neurocirugia.comUpdate: Sylvian fissure arachnoid cyst | Neurocirugia.com

Arachnoid cysts situated in the middle cranial fossa constitute the largest group of this type of lesion. Classification The ... The Galassi classification of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts is used to classify arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial ... type III large, fills the whole middle cranial fossa displacement of not only the temporal lobe but also the frontal and ... type I small, spindle-shaped limited to the anterior portion of the middle cranial fossa, below the spenoid ridge free ...
more infohttp://neurocirugia.com/2016/12/05/update-sylvian-fissure-arachnoid-cyst/

Intervention for Arachnoid CystIntervention for Arachnoid Cyst

The most frequent localization of congenital intracranial arachnoid cysts is in the middle cranial fossa, constituting more ...
more infohttp://www.surgicureinternational.com/neurosurgery/paediatric-neurosurgery/intervention-for-arachnoid-cyst

Keyhole Surgery to cure Hemifacial Spasm and Trigeminal NeuralgiaKeyhole Surgery to cure Hemifacial Spasm and Trigeminal Neuralgia

Vth Cranial nerve - Trigeminal Nerve. Trigeminal neuralgia is the term applied to a particular facial pain which is unique ... The onset of hemifacial spasm usually commences in middle or old age and there is a sight female predominance. The spasms ... The microvascular decompression is performed through a small posterior fossa craniotomy and using the operating microscope, the ... Involvs VIIth Cranial nerve - Facial Nerve. Hemifacial spasm is a facial disorder that is not painful, but its proposed ...
more infohttp://www.shahzadshams.com/diseases-neurosurgeons-treat/keyhole-surgery-to-cure-hemifacial-spasm-and-trigeminal-neuralgia/

Middle cranial fossa - WikipediaMiddle cranial fossa - Wikipedia

Middle cranial fossa at human foetus Base of skull Middle cranial fossa Middle cranial fossa Middle cranial fossa Anatomy photo ... The middle cranial fossa, deeper than the anterior cranial fossa, is narrow medially and widens laterally to the sides of the ... Anterior cranial fossa Posterior cranial fossa This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of ... The middle part of the fossa presents, in front, the chiasmatic groove and tuberculum sellae; the chiasmatic groove ends on ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_cranial_fossa

Middle cranial fossa | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.orgMiddle cranial fossa | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org

Gross anatomy The middle cranial fossa can be divided into medial and ... ... which is narrow in the middle and wider laterally. It houses the temporal lobes of the cerebrum. ... The middle cranial fossa is a butterfly-shaped depression of the skull base, ... The middle cranial fossa is a butterfly-shaped depression of the skull base, which is narrow in the middle and wider laterally ...
more infohttps://radiopaedia.org/articles/middle-cranial-fossa

MR imaging of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts: temporal lobe agenesis syndrome revisited. | American Journal of...MR imaging of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts: temporal lobe agenesis syndrome revisited. | American Journal of...

MR imaging of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts: temporal lobe agenesis syndrome revisited.. S J Robertson, S M Wolpert and ... MR studies in eight patients with extraaxial arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa were reviewed in order to identify any ... MR imaging of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts: temporal lobe agenesis syndrome revisited. ... Our findings suggest that middle cranial fossa cysts are associated with temporal lobe hypogenesis, and also that compression ...
more infohttp://www.ajnr.org/content/10/5/1007

Galassi classification of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.orgGalassi classification of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org

The Galassi classification of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts is used to classify arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial ... fossa, which account for 50-60% of all arachnoid cysts 1. Galassi et al. published this classification in 1982, and at th... ... The Galassi classification of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts is used to classify arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial ... Galassi classification of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts. Dr Maxime St-Amant ◉ and A.Prof Frank Gaillard ◉ ◈ et al. ...
more infohttps://radiopaedia.org/articles/galassi-classification-of-middle-cranial-fossa-arachnoid-cysts

The efficacy of neuroendoscopic treatment for middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts assessed by MRI 3D segmentation and modeling...The efficacy of neuroendoscopic treatment for middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts assessed by MRI 3D segmentation and modeling...

... and the middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts (MCFACs) are ... Endoscopic fenestration of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts ... Gui SB, Wang XS, Zong XY, Li CZ, Li B, Zhang YZ (2011) Assessment of endoscopic treatment for middle cranial fossa arachnoid ... El-Ghandour NM (2012) Endoscopic treatment of middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts in children. J Neurosurg Pediatr 9(3):231- ... The efficacy of neuroendoscopic treatment for middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts assessed by MRI 3D segmentation and modeling ...
more infohttps://www.springermedizin.de/the-efficacy-of-neuroendoscopic-treatment-for-middle-cranial-fos/8351934

Treatment of Lateral Skull Base and Posterior Cranial Fossa Lesions Utilizing the Extended Middle Cranial Fossa ApproachTreatment of Lateral Skull Base and Posterior Cranial Fossa Lesions Utilizing the Extended Middle Cranial Fossa Approach

Subjects undergoing treatment of posterior cranial fossa (P ... for subjects undergoing treatment utilizing the extended middle ... cranial fossa approach (EMCF).Study Design:Retrospective records review.Setting:University-based tertiary referral center. ... Treatment of Lateral Skull Base and Posterior Cranial Fossa Lesions Utilizing the Extended Middle Cranial Fossa Approach ... Objective:Define the indications and outcomes for subjects undergoing treatment utilizing the extended middle cranial fossa ...
more infohttps://insights.ovid.com/otneu/201706000/00129492-201706000-00023

Middle cranial fossaMiddle cranial fossa

... fossa cranii media) is a region of the internal cranial base between the anterior and posterior cranial fossae, it lies deeper ... and is wider than the anterior cranial fossa. ... The middle cranial fossa (latin: fossa cranii media) is a ... The paired foramen spinosum connects the middle cranial fossa with the infratemporal fossa. It transmits the middle meningeal ... it lies deeper and is wider than the anterior cranial fossa.. The floor of the middle cranial fossa is formed by the body and ...
more infohttps://www.anatomynext.com/middle-cranial-fossa/

Boundary of Middle Cranial FossaBoundary of Middle Cranial Fossa

... centrally in the cranial floor. It is a butterfly-shaped depression of the skull base, which is narrow in the middle ... The middle cranial fossa is located, centrally in the cranial floor. It is a butterfly-shaped depression of the skull base, ... Boundary of Middle Cranial Fossa. Subject: Medical Topic: Head and Neck Facebook Twitter Google+ WhatsApp LinkedIn Pin It ... Fig: Boundary of Middle Cranial Fossa. Important structures in middle cranial fossa ...
more infohttp://www.qsstudy.com/medical/boundary-of-middle-cranial-fossa

Cranial Fossa, MiddleCranial Fossa, Middle

Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE ... It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the ... Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE ... It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the ...
more infohttp://atlas.centralx.com/p/image/musculoskeletal-system/skeleton/bone-and-bones/skull/skull-base/cranial-fossa-middle/

UNILATERAL EXOPHTHALMOS PRODUCED BY A MENINGIOMA OF THE MIDDLE CRANIAL FOSSA: REPORT OF A CASE | JAMA Ophthalmology | JAMA...UNILATERAL EXOPHTHALMOS PRODUCED BY A MENINGIOMA OF THE MIDDLE CRANIAL FOSSA: REPORT OF A CASE | JAMA Ophthalmology | JAMA...

UNILATERAL EXOPHTHALMOS PRODUCED BY A MENINGIOMA OF THE MIDDLE CRANIAL FOSSA: REPORT OF A CASE. Arch Ophthalmol. 1935;13(5):771 ... This syndrome is produced by a dural endothelioma or "meningioma" of the middle cranial fossa, arising from the region of the ... UNILATERAL EXOPHTHALMOS PRODUCED BY A MENINGIOMA OF THE MIDDLE CRANIAL FOSSA: REPORT OF A CASE. ...
more infohttps://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/article-abstract/611546

Feasibility Assessment of Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Laser Labeling in Middle Cranial Fossa ApproachFeasibility Assessment of Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Laser Labeling in Middle Cranial Fossa Approach

... in middle cranial fossa approach. A feasibility study was performed to investigate the combination of cone beam computed ... and laser ablation to assist a surgeon in a middle cranial fossa approach by outlining the internal auditory canal (IAC). ... 10. Diaz Day J. The Middle Fossa Approach and Extended Middle Fossa Approach:Technique and Operative Nuances. Operative ... Computer-assisted surgery; Er-YAG laser; Image-guided surgery; Middle cranial fossa; Optical coherence tomography ...
more infohttp://ijorl.mums.ac.ir/article_11775.html

Supraorbital foramen - WikipediaSupraorbital foramen - Wikipedia

Middle cranial fossa. to Orbit:. *optic canal (CN-II). *superior orbital fissure (CN-III,IV,V1,VI) ... Posterior cranial fossa. *internal auditory meatus/facial canal/stylomastoid foramen (CN-VII,VIII) ... The supraorbital nerve is a branch of the frontal nerve arising from the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve (cranial ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supraorbital_foramen

Bassett Collection Large Image - Lane Medical Library, Stanford University Medical CenterBassett Collection Large Image - Lane Medical Library, Stanford University Medical Center

Floor of cranial cavity. Middle cranial fossa; dissection of left cavernous sinus, superolateral view. For permissions ... Middle cranial fossa; dissection of left cavernous sinus, superolateral view. The dura mater to the left of the midline has ...
more infohttps://lane.stanford.edu/biomed-resources/bassett/raw/bassettLargerView.html?t=largerView&bn=50-7

Bassett Collection Large Image - Lane Medical Library, Stanford University Medical CenterBassett Collection Large Image - Lane Medical Library, Stanford University Medical Center

Floor of cranial cavity. Middle cranial fossa; dissection of left cavernous sinus (continued); portio minor of trigeminal nerve ... Floor of cranial cavity. Middle cranial fossa; dissection of left cavernous sinus (continued); portio minor of trigeminal nerve ...
more infohttps://lane.stanford.edu/biomed-resources/bassett/raw/bassettLargerView.html?t=largerView&bn=51-2

Lecture 9: Axial Skeleton ILecture 9: Axial Skeleton I

Cranial base. ii. Between occipital and sphenoid bones. iii. Middle cranial fossa ...
more infohttp://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~uzwiak/AnatPhys/APFallLect9.html

July 2012 - Volume 23 - Issue 4 : Journal of Craniofacial SurgeryJuly 2012 - Volume 23 - Issue 4 : Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

Rare Giant Epidermal Cyst in the Infratemporal Fossa and Middle Cranial Fossa. Yang, Tao; Zhang, Li; Bao, Haihong; More ... Positional Plagiocephaly and Brachycephaly: Is There a Correlation Between Subjective and Objective Assessment of Cranial Shape ...
more infohttps://journals.lww.com/jcraniofacialsurgery/Fulltext/2012/07000/href

Traumatic dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa complicated by temporal lobe intracerebral...Traumatic dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa complicated by temporal lobe intracerebral...

Traumatic dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa complicated by temporal lobe intracerebral ... Glenoid fossa fracture and condylar penetration into the middle cranial fossa: report of a case and review of the literature. J ... Fracture of glenoid fossa and traumatic dislocation of mandibular condyle into middle cranial fossa. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral ... Due to the proximity of the mandibular condyle to the middle cranial fossa and middle meningeal artery, there is the risk of ...
more infohttp://theunj.org/article/view/168109

Anterior cranial fossa - WikipediaAnterior cranial fossa - Wikipedia

Anterior cranial fossa Anterior cranial fossa Anterior cranial fossa Middle cranial fossa Posterior cranial fossa This article ... The anterior cranial fossa is a depression in the floor of the cranial base which houses the projecting frontal lobes of the ... The lesser wings of the sphenoid separate the anterior and middle fossae. It is traversed by the frontoethmoidal, ... Anterior cranial fossa at human foetus Base of skull ... Farther back in the middle line is the ethmoidal spine, bounded ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anterior_cranial_fossa

May/June 2017 - Volume 33 - Issue 3S : Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive SurgeryMay/June 2017 - Volume 33 - Issue 3S : Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

Spontaneous Giant Pseudomeningocele in the Middle Cranial Fossa as a Cause of Pulsatile Proptosis. Nguyen, Chinh T.; Guiney, ... the first case of spontaneous giant pseudomeningocele in the middle cranial fossa causing pulsatile proptosis. In examining ...
more infohttps://journals.lww.com/op-rs/toc/2017/05001

Cranial fossa - definition of cranial fossa by The Free DictionaryCranial fossa - definition of cranial fossa by The Free Dictionary

cranial fossa synonyms, cranial fossa pronunciation, cranial fossa translation, English dictionary definition of cranial fossa ... Related to cranial fossa: Posterior cranial fossa, Middle cranial fossa. fos·sa 1. (fŏs′ə). n. pl. fos·sae (fŏs′ē′) Anatomy A ... middle cranial fossa approach. Complications of the Middle Cranial Fossa Approach for Acoustic Neuroma Removal ... Cranial fossa - definition of cranial fossa by The Free Dictionary https://www.thefreedictionary.com/cranial+fossa ...
more infohttps://www.thefreedictionary.com/cranial+fossa
  • All tumors were classified as upper (n = 17), middle (n = 17), or lower (n = 8) clival tumors based on clival involvement, and as central (24 [57.1%]) or paramedian (18 [42.9%]) based on laterality of the tumor. (thejns.org)
  • Recent reports (9, 12, 17, 24, 32, 34-37) have presented an optimistic outlook for patients harboring this pathological abnormality, but at least one senior neurosurgeon (30) has expressed his reservations concerning the morbidity associated with aggressive surgical treatment of tumors that affect the cranial base. (c3.hu)
  • We outline the difficulties that our cranial base team faced in treating these tumors to continue the debate regarding the proper indications for cavernous sinus surgery. (c3.hu)
  • Tumors that may arise along the pharyngeal mucosal space such as squamous cell cancer of the tonsilar fossa. (scribd.com)
  • Al-Mefty O, Ayoubi S, Gaber E (2002) Trigeminal schwannomas: removal of dumbbell-shaped tumors through the expanded Meckel cave and outcomes of cranial nerve function. (springer.com)
  • In: Sekhar LN, Janecka IP (eds) Surgery of cranial base tumors. (springer.com)
  • He has a special interest in tumors of the lateral and posterior cranial base and has written numerous analytical papers derived from his microsurgical series. (stanford.edu)
  • Siemens, Germany) revealed a 4.4 cm × 3.6 cm × 2.5 cm well-circumscribed mass in the left cerebellopontine angle and mild compression of the left middle cerebellar peduncle and left cerebellar hemisphere. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 6,8 Epidermoids are classically extra-axial, most frequently in the posterior fossa, and most commonly at the cerebellopontine angle. (appliedradiology.com)
  • However, meningiomas arising at the cranial base, particularly those involving the cavernous sinus region, still present a formidable surgical challenge. (c3.hu)
  • There has been a general reluctance to explore the cavernous sinus for fear of causing uncontrollable hemorrhage, internal carotid artery (ICA) injury, and cranial nerve injury. (c3.hu)
  • Dr. Anthony Wang specializes in pediatric, cerebrovascular, and complex cranial base surgeries, and has fellowship training in each of these subspecialties. (uclahealth.org)
  • At our institution, the use of vascularized, free-tissue transfer has replaced pedicled flaps as the preferred modality for reconstructing complex cranial base defects involving resection of dura, brain, or multiple major structures adjacent to skull base, including the orbit, palate, mandible, skin, and other structures. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The supraorbital nerve is a branch of the frontal nerve arising from the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V). The foramen sits on the inmost, lower margin of a grove splitting the supraorbital ridge into a central and two distal sections. (wikipedia.org)
  • the fossa is formed from the orbital part of the frontal bones, the cribriform plates of the ethmoid bone, and one third of the anterior sphenoid bones (the anterior body and lesser wings). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The goal of this project is to use image-guided surgery to program a laser to raster over vital anatomy providing an identifying outline of deep structures in the middle cranial fossa before they are surgically uncovered. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • Free Anatomy Flashcards about 7-9 cranial nn. (studystack.com)
  • Search » All » Medical » Anatomy » 7-9 cranial nn. (studystack.com)
  • Rhoton AL (2002) The supratentorial cranial space: microsurgical anatomy and surgical approaches. (springer.com)
  • The middle cranial fossa is a butterfly-shaped depression of the skull base, which is narrow in the middle and wider laterally. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Tissue Nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase (TNAP) Regulates Cranial Base Growth and Synchondrosis Maturation. (nih.gov)
  • The base of the skull is divided into three cranial fossae: posterior, middle and anterior. (wisegeek.com)
  • The base of skull , also known as the cranial base or the cranial floor , is the most inferior area of the skull . (wikipedia.org)
  • Wikimedia Commons has media related to Cranial base . (wikipedia.org)
  • Our Rhinology and Cranial Base Surgery Group has been able to focus on the management of certain pathologies, endoscopic access to various areas in the skull base, reconstruction of the defect, ensuring that clear anatomical landmarks can be identified during the surgery, and improving the quality of life/function after treatment. (hindawi.com)
  • The collaborative Neuro-ENT to work closely via the nose using the two-hole and four-hand technique when performing the operation simultaneously is of added advantage in the diverse and expanding field of cranial base surgery. (hindawi.com)
  • The Acetabular Fossa May Not Be Located at the True Center of the Acetabulum: A Detailed Analysis Using Preoperative CT Images. (bioportfolio.com)
  • These syndromes are caused by compression of a cranial nerve by an artery or vein at the zone of the nerve s entry to or exit from the brainstem. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • In the area of the root entry zone or root exit zone (REZ) of the relevant cranial nerve at the brainstem, the nerve comes into contact with a blood vessel usually an artery, less commonly a vein. (aerzteblatt.de)