A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that is widely distributed in TICKS and various mammals throughout the world. Infection with this genus is particularly prevalent in CATTLE; SHEEP; and GOATS.
A species of gram-negative bacteria that grows preferentially in the vacuoles of the host cell. It is the etiological agent of Q FEVER.
An acute infectious disease caused by COXIELLA BURNETII. It is characterized by a sudden onset of FEVER; HEADACHE; malaise; and weakness. In humans, it is commonly contracted by inhalation of infected dusts derived from infected domestic animals (ANIMALS, DOMESTIC).
Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.
Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
Serologic tests based on inactivation of complement by the antigen-antibody complex (stage 1). Binding of free complement can be visualized by addition of a second antigen-antibody system such as red cells and appropriate red cell antibody (hemolysin) requiring complement for its completion (stage 2). Failure of the red cells to lyse indicates that a specific antigen-antibody reaction has taken place in stage 1. If red cells lyse, free complement is present indicating no antigen-antibody reaction occurred in stage 1.
Inflammation of the ENDOCARDIUM caused by BACTERIA that entered the bloodstream. The strains of bacteria vary with predisposing factors, such as CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS; HEART VALVE DISEASES; HEART VALVE PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION; or intravenous drug use.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria often surrounded by a protein microcapsular layer and slime layer. The natural cycle of its organisms generally involves a vertebrate and an invertebrate host. Species of the genus are the etiological agents of human diseases, such as typhus.
The etiologic agent of murine typhus (see TYPHUS, ENDEMIC FLEA-BORNE).
Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.
Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is the etiologic agent of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER. Its cells are slightly smaller and more uniform in size than those of RICKETTSIA PROWAZEKII.
A method that is used to detect DNA-protein interactions. Proteins are separated by electrophoresis and blotted onto a nitrocellulose membrane similar to Western blotting (BLOTTING, WESTERN) but the proteins are identified when they bind labeled DNA PROBES (as with Southern blotting (BLOTTING, SOUTHERN)) instead of antibodies.
EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.
Any spaces or cavities within a cell. They may function in digestion, storage, secretion, or excretion.
A written agreement for the transfer of patients and their medical records from one health care institution to another.
Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports basic and applied research to better understand, treat, and ultimately prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases. It was established in 1948.
Disposal, processing, controlling, recycling, and reusing the solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes of plants, animals, humans, and other organisms. It includes control within a closed ecological system to maintain a habitable environment.
Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.
The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.
The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.
Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports basic biomedical research that is not targeted to specific diseases and funds studies on genes, proteins, and cells, as well as on fundamental processes like communication within and between cells and metabolism. It was established in 1962.

Survival of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in acidified vacuoles of murine macrophages. (1/167)

Despite the antimicrobial mechanisms of vertebrate phagocytes, mycobacteria can survive within the phagosomes of these cells. These organisms use various strategies to evade destruction, including inhibition of acidification of the phagosome and inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion. In contrast to mycobacteria, Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, inhabits a spacious acidified intracellular vacuole which is prone to fusion with other vacuoles of the host cell, including phagosomes containing mycobacteria. The Coxiella-infected cell thus provides a unique model for investigating the survival of mycobacteria in an acidified phagosome-like compartment. In the present study, murine bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected with either Mycobacterium avium or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then coinfected with C. burnetii. We observed that the majority of phagocytosed mycobacteria colocalized to the C. burnetii-containing vacuole, which maintained its acidic properties. In coinfected macrophages, the growth of M. avium was not impaired following fusion with the acidified vacuole. In contrast, the growth rate of M. tuberculosis was reduced in acidified vacuoles. These results suggest that although both species of mycobacteria inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion, they may be differentially susceptible to the toxic effects of the acidic environment in the mature phagolysosome.  (+info)

Infectivity, transmission and 16S rRNA sequencing of a rickettsia, Coxiella cheraxi sp. nov., from the freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. (2/167)

A rickettsia-like organism isolated from infected, farm-reared Cherax quadricarinatus was cultured in the yolk sac of developing chicken eggs, but could not be cultured in 3 continuous cell lines, bluegill fry (BF-2), fathead minnow (FHM), and Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9). The organism was confirmed by fulfilling Koch's postulates as the aetiological agent of mortalities amongst C. quadricarinatus. When C. quadricarinatus was inoculated with the organism, mortality was 100% at 28 degrees C and 80% at an ambient temperature of 24 degrees C. Horizontal transmission with food and via the waterborne route was demonstrated, but mortalities were lower at 30 and 10% respectively over a 4 wk period. The 16S rRNA sequence of 1325 base pairs of the Gram-negative, obligate intracellular organism was 95.6% homologous to Coxiella burnetii. Of 18 species compared to this rickettsia, the next most closely related bacterium was Legionella pneumophila at 86.7%. The suggested classification of this organism is Order Rickettsiales, family Rickettsiaceae, tribe Rickettsieae, within the genus Coxiella. We suggest it should be named Coxiella cheraxi sp. nov.  (+info)

Detection of long-term cellular immunity to Coxiella burneti as assayed by lymphocyte transformation. (3/167)

Delayed hypersensitivity to the antigens of Coxiella burneti, Nine Mile strain, was demonstrated in human subjects with various past histories of exposure to the organism by using lymphocyte transformation assays. Individuals with histories indicating exposure to C. burneti up to 8 years before the study demonstrated marked lymphocyte transformation in vitro to whole-cell antigens consisting of formalin-killed C. burneti phase I and phase II. These individuals also demonstrated a marked lymphocyte response to the trichloracetic acid-soluable phase I antigen. One individual who acquired Q fever during the study and one individual who received an experimental Q fever vaccine 4 years earlier were also evaluated by the lymphocyte transformation assay. It was also found that phase I trichloroacetic acid-soluble material was capable of acting as an antigen in the assay, whereas the phase II trichloroacetic acid-soluble material did not contain any antigenic material capable of causing lymphocyte transformation. The complete phase I trichloroacetic acid-soluble antigen, which was found to consist of protein and carbohydrate, was chemically fractionated into monospecific fractions. The fraction treated to eliminate carbohydrate was the only fraction found to elicit an in vitro response.  (+info)

Changes in buoyant density relationships of two cell types of Coxiella burneti phase I. (4/167)

Coxiella burneti phase I, purified from a formalin-inactivated yolk-sac vaccine, was separated into two bands of morphologically distinct cell types when subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation. Recycling of the less dense, rod-shaped cells in unbuffered sucrose gradients (pH 5.5 to 6.0) resulted in the formation of bands having the location and appearance of the original two bands. Recycling of the denser band of larger ovoid-shaped cells yielded a single band, suggesting that the larger cell type arose from the smaller cell. In contrast to vaccine-derived rickettsiae, live, cell culture-propagated phase I organisms formed a single band in unbuffered sucrose gradients, at the same density as the upper band of the vaccine preparation. Centrifugation of cell culture-derived rickettsiae for 26 to 48 h in sucrose gradients of pH 5.5 resulted in the formation of a second band, at the same density as the lower band of the vaccine preparation. This did not occur in gradients of pH 7.0. Treatment of cell culture-propagated rickettsiae with formalin or germicidal ultraviolet radiation induced a total shift of the less dense cell population to a zone of higher density when centrifuged isopycnically in CsC1 gradients. This density change did not occur in sucrose gradients, suggesting a difference in the effect of these treatments on the permeability of the cell membrane to sucrose and CsC1.  (+info)

Glomerulonephritis associated with Coxiella burnetii endocarditis. (5/167)

A patient with endocarditis associated with chronic Coxiella burnetii infection is described in whom glomerulonephritis developed with granular deposits containing immunoglobulins and complement in the glomeruli. The serum was notable for the variety of circulating antibodies detected, which included antibodies directed against native DNA.  (+info)

Studies on the physiology of Rickettsiae. IV. Folic acids of Coxiella burnetii. (6/167)

Mattheis, Martha S. (University of Kansas, Lawrence), M. Silverman, and D. Paretsky. Studies on the physiology of rickettsiae. IV. Folic acids of Coxiella burnetii. J. Bacteriol. 85:37-41. 1963.-Yolk, yolk sac, and embryo tissues of uninfected eggs, and those infected with Coxiella burnetii, were analyzed for folic acid derivatives by employing diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose column chromatography. Infected tissues contained quantitatively less folate, but the elution profiles of both infected and uninfected tissues were identical. Purified C. burnetii contained some types of folate apparently unique to these rickettsiae, and not found in infected tissue. The major folate fraction of C. burnetii was partially characterized by (i) elution position from DEAE columns; (ii) treatment with conjugase; (iii) growth response by Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus faecalis R, and Pediococcus cerevisiae; and (iv) response to oxidation, reduction, and formylation.  (+info)

CONVERSION OF THE PHASE I ANTIGEN OF COXIELLA BURNETII TO HAPTEN BY PHENOL TREATMENT. (7/167)

Anacker, R. L. (Rocky Mountain Laboratory, Hamilton, Mont.), W. T. Haskins, D. B. Lackman, E. Ribi, and E. G. Pickens. Conversion of the phase I antigen of Coxiella burnetii to hapten by phenol treatment. J. Bacteriol. 85:1165-1170. 1963.-Trichloroacetic acid extracts of Coxiella burnetii are converted to hapten by treatment with phenol. Such extracts react, like the original trichloroacetic acid extract, at high dilution in the complement-fixation test and produce zones of precipitate with specific antibody in gel diffusion tests; but, unlike the parent extract, injection of the phenol-treated extract neither induces resistance to challenge in guinea pigs nor antibody formation in guinea pigs, rabbits, or mice. This loss of antigenicity is correlated with removal of protein from the original product.  (+info)

STUDIES ON THE PHYSIOLOGY OF RICKETTSIAE. V. METABOLISM OF CARBAMYL PHOSPHATE BY COXIELLA BURNETII. (8/167)

Mallavia, L. (University of Kansas, Lawrence) and D. Paretsky. Studies on the physiology of rickettsiae. V. Metabolism of carbamyl phosphate by Coxiella burnetii. J. Bacteriol. 86:232-238. 1963.-Preparations of disrupted Coxiella burnetii catalyze synthesis of citrulline from ornithine and carbamyl phosphate at an optimal pH of 7.0 to 7.5. Rickettsial synthesis of the pyrimidine precursor, ureidosuccinate, is demonstrated and confirmed by isolating C(14)-labeled ureidosuccinate from reaction mixtures of carbamyl phosphate and labeled aspartate. The data suggest a further rickettsial synthesis of orotate and imply rickettsial competence for host-independent pyrimidine synthesis.  (+info)

The disease is primarily transmitted through inhalation of infected particles, such as dust or aerosols, which contain the bacterium. People working in close contact with animals, such as veterinarians and farmers, are at higher risk of contracting Q fever.

Symptoms of Q fever typically develop within 2-3 weeks after exposure and may include fever, headache, fatigue, muscle pain, and respiratory symptoms such as cough and shortness of breath. In severe cases, the infection can spread to the heart, liver, and other organs, leading to life-threatening complications.

Diagnosis of Q fever is based on a combination of clinical findings, laboratory tests, and epidemiological investigations. Laboratory confirmation of the disease requires the isolation of Coxiella burnetii from blood or other bodily fluids.

Treatment of Q fever typically involves antibiotics, which can effectively cure the infection if administered early. However, treatment is not always necessary for mild cases, and some people may recover without any treatment.

Prevention of Q fever primarily involves avoiding exposure to infected animals or their tissues, as well as practicing good hygiene practices such as wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) when handling animals or their tissues. Vaccination is also available for high-risk groups, such as veterinarians and farmers.

Overall, Q fever is an important zoonotic disease that can cause significant illness in humans and a range of animal species. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are critical to preventing complications and ensuring effective management of the disease.

1. Caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE): A viral disease that affects the joints and central nervous system of goats.
2. Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA): A bacterial infection that causes abscesses in the lymph nodes and other organs.
3. Contagious ecthyma (Orf): A viral disease that causes skin lesions and scarring.
4. Goat pox: A viral disease that causes fever, weakness, and skin lesions.
5. Pneumonia: A bacterial or viral infection of the lungs that can be caused by a variety of pathogens.
6. Scabies: A parasitic infestation that causes skin irritation and hair loss.
7. Tetanus: A neurological disorder caused by a bacterial toxin that affects muscle contractions.
8. Toxoplasmosis: A parasitic infection that can cause fever, anemia, and other symptoms in goats.
9. Urinary tract infections (UTIs): Bacterial infections of the urinary system that can affect both male and female goats.
10. Vitamin deficiencies: Deficiencies in vitamins such as vitamin A, D, or E can cause a range of health problems in goats, including skin conditions, poor appetite, and weakness.

Goat diseases can be diagnosed through physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies. Treatment depends on the specific disease and may involve antibiotics, antiviral medications, or supportive care such as fluid therapy and nutritional supplements. Prevention is key in managing goat diseases, and this includes maintaining good hygiene, providing clean water and a balanced diet, and vaccinating goats against common diseases.

Sheep diseases can be caused by a variety of factors, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and environmental factors. Here are some common sheep diseases and their meanings:

1. Scrapie: A fatal neurological disorder that affects sheep and goats, caused by a prion.
2. Ovine Progressive Pneumonia (OPP): A contagious respiratory disease caused by Mycobacterium ovipneumoniae.
3. Maedi-Visna: A slow-progressing pneumonia caused by a retrovirus, which can lead to OPP.
4. Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD): A highly contagious viral disease that affects cloven-hoofed animals, including sheep and goats.
5. Bloat: A condition caused by gas accumulation in the rumen, which can lead to abdominal pain and death if not treated promptly.
6. Pneumonia: An inflammation of the lungs, often caused by bacteria or viruses.
7. Cryptosporidiosis: A diarrheal disease caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, which can be fatal in young lambs.
8. Babesiosis: A blood parasitic disease caused by Babesia oviparasites, which can lead to anemia and death if left untreated.
9. Fascioliasis: A liver fluke infection that can cause anemia, jaundice, and liver damage.
10. Anthrax: A serious bacterial disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, which can be fatal if left untreated.

Sheep diseases can have a significant impact on the health and productivity of flocks, as well as the economy of sheep farming. It is important for sheep farmers to be aware of these diseases and take appropriate measures to prevent and control them.

Causes and risk factors:

The most common cause of bacterial endocarditis is a bacterial infection that enters the bloodstream and travels to the heart. This can occur through various means, such as:

* Injecting drugs or engaging in other risky behaviors that allow bacteria to enter the body
* Having a weakened immune system due to illness or medication
* Having a previous history of endocarditis or other heart conditions
* Being over the age of 60, as older adults are at higher risk for developing endocarditis

Symptoms:

The symptoms of bacterial endocarditis can vary depending on the severity of the infection and the location of the infected area. Some common symptoms include:

* Fever
* Chills
* Joint pain or swelling
* Fatigue
* Shortness of breath
* Heart murmurs or abnormal heart sounds

Diagnosis:

Bacterial endocarditis is diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and diagnostic tests such as:

* Blood cultures to identify the presence of bacteria in the bloodstream
* Echocardiogram to visualize the heart and detect any abnormalities
* Chest X-ray to look for signs of infection or inflammation in the lungs or heart
* Electrocardiogram (ECG) to measure the electrical activity of the heart

Treatment:

The treatment of bacterial endocarditis typically involves a combination of antibiotics and surgery. Antibiotics are used to kill the bacteria and reduce inflammation, while surgery may be necessary to repair or replace damaged heart tissue. In some cases, the infected heart tissue may need to be removed.

Prevention:

Preventing bacterial endocarditis involves good oral hygiene, regular dental check-ups, and avoiding certain high-risk activities such as unprotected sex or sharing of needles. People with existing heart conditions should also take antibiotics before dental or medical procedures to reduce the risk of infection.

Prognosis:

The prognosis for bacterial endocarditis is generally good if treatment is prompt and effective. However, delays in diagnosis and treatment can lead to serious complications such as heart failure, stroke, or death. Patients with pre-existing heart conditions are at higher risk for complications.

Incidence:

Bacterial endocarditis is a relatively rare condition, affecting approximately 2-5 cases per million people per year in the United States. However, people with certain risk factors such as heart conditions or prosthetic heart valves are at higher risk for developing the infection.

Complications:

Bacterial endocarditis can lead to a number of complications, including:

* Heart failure
* Stroke or brain abscess
* Kidney damage or failure
* Pregnancy complications
* Nerve damage or peripheral neuropathy
* Skin or soft tissue infections
* Bone or joint infections
* Septicemia (blood poisoning)

Prevention:

Preventive measures for bacterial endocarditis include:

* Good oral hygiene and regular dental check-ups to reduce the risk of dental infections
* Avoiding high-risk activities such as unprotected sex or sharing of needles
* Antibiotics before dental or medical procedures for patients with existing heart conditions
* Proper sterilization and disinfection of medical equipment
* Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis (prevention) in high-risk patients.

Emerging Trends:

Newly emerging trends in the management of bacterial endocarditis include:

* The use of novel antibiotics and combination therapy to improve treatment outcomes
* The development of new diagnostic tests to help identify the cause of infection more quickly and accurately
* The increased use of preventive measures such as antibiotic prophylaxis in high-risk patients.

Future Directions:

Future directions for research on bacterial endocarditis may include:

* Investigating the use of novel diagnostic techniques, such as genomics and proteomics, to improve the accuracy of diagnosis
* Developing new antibiotics and combination therapies to improve treatment outcomes
* Exploring alternative preventive measures such as probiotics and immunotherapy.

In conclusion, bacterial endocarditis is a serious infection that can have severe consequences if left untreated. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial to improving patient outcomes. Preventive measures such as good oral hygiene and antibiotic prophylaxis can help reduce the risk of developing this condition. Ongoing research is focused on improving diagnostic techniques, developing new treatments, and exploring alternative preventive measures.

Definition:

Veterinary abortion refers to the intentional termination of a pregnancy in an animal, typically a farm or domesticated animal such as a dog, cat, horse, cow, or pig. The procedure is performed by a veterinarian and is usually done for reasons such as unwanted breeding, disease or genetic disorders in the fetus, or to prevent overpopulation of certain species.

Types of Veterinary Abortion:

1. Spontaneous Abortion (Miscarriage): This occurs naturally when the pregnancy is terminated by natural causes such as infection or trauma.
2. Induced Abortion: This is performed by a veterinarian using various methods such as injection of drugs or surgical procedures to terminate the pregnancy.

Methods of Veterinary Abortion:

1. Drug-induced abortion: This method involves administering medication to the animal to cause uterine contractions and expulsion of the fetus.
2. Surgical abortion: This method involves surgical intervention to remove the fetus from the uterus, usually through a small incision in the abdomen.
3. Non-surgical abortion: This method uses a device to remove the fetus from the uterus without making an incision.

Complications and Risks of Veterinary Abortion:

1. Infection: As with any surgical procedure, there is a risk of infection.
2. Hemorrhage: Excessive bleeding can occur during or after the procedure.
3. Uterine rupture: In rare cases, the uterus may rupture during the procedure.
4. Incomplete abortion: In some cases, not all of the fetus may be removed, leading to complications later on.
5. Scarring: Scars may form in the uterus or abdomen after the procedure, which can lead to reproductive problems in the future.

Prevention of Unwanted Pregnancies in Animals:

1. Spaying/neutering: This is the most effective way to prevent unwanted pregnancies in animals.
2. Breeding management: Proper breeding management, including selecting healthy and fertile breeding animals, can help reduce the risk of unwanted pregnancies.
3. Use of contraceptives: Hormonal contraceptives, such as injection or implants, can be used in some species to prevent pregnancy.
4. Behavioral management: In some cases, behavioral management techniques, such as separation or rehoming of animals, may be necessary to prevent unwanted breeding.

Ethical Considerations of Veterinary Abortion:

1. Animal welfare: The procedure should only be performed when necessary and with the intention of improving the animal's welfare.
2. Owner consent: Owners must provide informed consent before the procedure can be performed.
3. Veterinarian expertise: The procedure should only be performed by a licensed veterinarian with experience in the procedure.
4. Alternative options: All alternative options, such as spaying/neutering or rehoming, should be considered before performing an abortion.

Conclusion:

Veterinary abortion is a complex issue that requires careful consideration of ethical and practical factors. While it may be necessary in some cases to prevent the suffering of unwanted litters, it is important to approach the procedure with caution and respect for animal welfare. Owners must provide informed consent, and the procedure should only be performed by a licensed veterinarian with experience in the procedure. Alternative options, such as spaying/neutering or rehoming, should also be considered before performing an abortion. Ultimately, the decision to perform a veterinary abortion should be made with the intention of improving the animal's welfare and quality of life.

Zoonoses (zoonosis) refers to infectious diseases that can be transmitted between animals and humans. These diseases are caused by a variety of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi, and can be spread through contact with infected animals or contaminated animal products.

Examples of Zoonoses

Some common examples of zoonoses include:

1. Rabies: a viral infection that can be transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected animal, typically dogs, bats, or raccoons.
2. Lyme disease: a bacterial infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, which is spread to humans through the bite of an infected blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis).
3. Toxoplasmosis: a parasitic infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii, which can be transmitted to humans through contact with contaminated cat feces or undercooked meat.
4. Leptospirosis: a bacterial infection caused by Leptospira interrogans, which is spread to humans through contact with contaminated water or soil.
5. Avian influenza (bird flu): a viral infection that can be transmitted to humans through contact with infected birds or contaminated surfaces.

Transmission of Zoonoses

Zoonoses can be transmitted to humans in a variety of ways, including:

1. Direct contact with infected animals or contaminated animal products.
2. Contact with contaminated soil, water, or other environmental sources.
3. Through vectors such as ticks, mosquitoes, and fleas.
4. By consuming contaminated food or water.
5. Through close contact with an infected person or animal.

Prevention of Zoonoses

Preventing the transmission of zoonoses requires a combination of personal protective measures, good hygiene practices, and careful handling of animals and animal products. Some strategies for preventing zoonoses include:

1. Washing hands frequently, especially after contact with animals or their waste.
2. Avoiding direct contact with wild animals and avoiding touching or feeding stray animals.
3. Cooking meat and eggs thoroughly to kill harmful bacteria.
4. Keeping pets up to date on vaccinations and preventative care.
5. Avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked meat, particularly poultry and pork.
6. Using insect repellents and wearing protective clothing when outdoors in areas where vectors are prevalent.
7. Implementing proper sanitation and hygiene practices in animal housing and husbandry.
8. Implementing strict biosecurity measures on farms and in animal facilities to prevent the spread of disease.
9. Providing education and training to individuals working with animals or in areas where zoonoses are prevalent.
10. Monitoring for and reporting cases of zoonotic disease to help track and control outbreaks.

Conclusion

Zoonoses are diseases that can be transmitted between animals and humans, posing a significant risk to human health and animal welfare. Understanding the causes, transmission, and prevention of zoonoses is essential for protecting both humans and animals from these diseases. By implementing appropriate measures such as avoiding contact with wild animals, cooking meat thoroughly, keeping pets up to date on vaccinations, and implementing proper sanitation and biosecurity practices, we can reduce the risk of zoonotic disease transmission and protect public health and animal welfare.

... is a taxonomic homonym: Coxiella (bacterium), genus of bacteria in the family Coxiellaceae Coxiella burnetii, the ... causative agent of Q fever Coxiella (gastropod), genus of snails from saline lakes in the family Pomatiopsidae This ...
... is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, and is the causative agent of Q fever. The genus Coxiella is ... Coxiella was difficult to study because it could not be reproduced outside a host. However, in 2009, scientists reported a ... Coxiella burnetii small RNAs (CbSRs 1, 11, 12, and 14) are encoded within intergenic region (IGR). CbSRs 2, 3, 4 and 9 are ... Sankaran N (2000). "Coxiella burnetii". Microbes and people : an A-Z of microorganisms in our lives. Phoenix, Arizona: The Oryx ...
Coxiella-like endosymbionts are often misidentified as Coxiella burnetii; however, Coxiella-like endosymbionts lack virulence ... Parte, A.C. "Coxiella". LPSN. Coxiella at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Duron, Olivier; ... Coxiella refers to a genus of Gram-negative bacteria in the family Coxiellaceae. It is named after Herald Rea Cox (1907-1986), ... Coxiella burnetii is the best known member of this genus. It is an intracellular parasite and it survives within the ...
Species within the genus Coxiella include: subgenus CoxiellaCoxiella badgerensis (Johnston, 1879) - subrecent Coxiella ... 1954 Coxiella minima MacPherson, 1954 Coxiella molesta Iredale, 1943 Coxiella pyrrhostoma (Cox, 1868) Coxiella striata (Reeve, ... Coxiella snails are iteroparous. When the saline lake dries out, adults of Coxiella are able to survive. Bouchet, Philippe; ... 1842) Coxiella striatula (Menke, 1843) - type species subgenus Coxielladda Iredale & Whitley, 1938 Coxiella gilesi (Angas, 1877 ...
They either reproduce inside of the phagolysosome (e.g. Coxiella spp.) or escape into the cytoplasm before the phagosome fuses ... "Biochemical stratagem for obligate parasitism of eukaryotic cells by Coxiella burnetii". Proceedings of the National Academy of ...
Coxiella burnetii, Bartonella spp., Borrelia burgdorferi, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Eastern equine encephalitis ...
Coxiella burnetii Causes Q fever. Francisella tularensis Causes tularemia. Legionella pneumophila Causes a severe form of ...
Coxiella burneti (causes Q fever); Epstein-Barr virus (causes infectious mononucleosis and Epstein-Barr virus-associated ...
Exposure to birds is associated with Chlamydia psittaci; farm animals with Coxiella burnetti; aspiration of stomach contents ...
Coxiella burnetii is also a coccobacillus. Bacteria from the genus Brucella are medically important coccobacilli that cause ...
Coxiella burnetti is also a coccobacillus. Spiral bacteria are another major bacterial cell morphology. Spiral bacteria can be ...
Coxiella sp.) Pastoral settlement began on the eastern side of Lake Galilee in 1877, when Charles Bowly acquired the Oakley run ...
Rickettsiales (Rickettsia, Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, Coxiella) Mycoplasma spp. Levinson, Warren (2018). Review of medical ...
It is a potential vector for Coxiella burnetii. "Species Details : Amblyomma gervaisi Lucas, 1847". Catalogue of Life. ...
Coxiella burnetii is a species in this order. Another is Rickettsiella melolonthae. "List of genera included in families - ...
Coxiella burnetii (Agent OU), causative agent of Q fever; and Bacillus globigii (Agent BG). During Project SHAD, Bacillus ...
Legionella has a correlation with another genus called Coxiella. Both cause lung infection that can eventually lead to ... "Specificity of Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii vacuoles and versatility of Legionella pneumophila revealed by ...
"An antigenic comparison of strains of Coxiella burnetii" (1971) "Immunologic evidence of human fetal infection with Coxiella ... Fiset, Paul (April 1957). "Phase Variation of Rickettsia (Coxiella) Burneti: Study of the Antibody Response in Guinea Pigs and ... In addition to writing extensively about his research into Coxiella burnetii, Fiset also researched typhus and Rocky Mountain ... Among his other published writings are: "Phase variation of Rickettsia (Coxiella) burneti: Study of the antibody response in ...
Also, H. leporispalustris transmits Coxiella burnetii and Francisella tularensis. Strains of Anaplasma bovis have also been ...
21: Rickettsia, Orientia, Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, Coxiella and Bartonella". Microbiology and Immunology On-line. University of ...
Coxiella burnetii - named for Cox and Burnet - is no longer regarded as closely related to the Rickettsiae, but as similar to ... Rijks JM, Roest HI, van Tulden PW, Kik MJ, IJzer J, Gröne A (December 2011). "Coxiella burnetii infection in roe deer during Q ... Q fever or query fever is a disease caused by infection with Coxiella burnetii, a bacterium that affects humans and other ... Quotations related to Q fever at Wikiquote Q fever at the CDC Coxiella burnetii genomes and related information at PATRIC, a ...
However, in 2009 scientists reported a technique allowing the Q-fever pathogen Coxiella burnetii to grow in an axenic culture ... Rickettsia Coxiella Certain species of Mycobacterium such as Mycobacterium leprae Certain protozoa, including: Apicomplexans ( ... "Host cell-free growth of the Q fever bacterium Coxiella burnetii". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. 106 (11 ...
Wachter, R. F.; Briggs, G. P.; Pedersen, C. E. (November 1975). "Precipitation of phase I antigen of Coxiella burnetii by ...
Terrestrial taxa occur only on the Japanese Archipelago located in East Asia (Blanfordia). Tomichia and Coxiella include ... Williams, W. D.; Mellor, M. W. (1991). "Ecology of Coxiella (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Prosobranchia), a snail endemic to ... 1861 Coxiella E. A. Smith, 1894 Floridiscrobs Pilsbry and McGinty, 1949 Fukuia Abbott & Hunter, 1949 Hemibia Heude, 1890 ( ...
Wachter, R. F.; Briggs, G. P.; Pedersen, C. E. (1975). "Precipitation of phase I antigen of Coxiella burnetii by sodium sulfite ...
2003). "Complete genome sequence of the Q-fever pathogen Coxiella burnetii". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100 (9): 5455-60. ...
Occurrence of Coxiella burnetii in the Placenta of Naturally Infected Sheep". Public Health Reports. 66 (45): 1473-1477. doi: ...
Duron O (September 2015). "The IS1111 insertion sequence used for detection of Coxiella burnetii is widespread in Coxiella-like ... Since Coxiella and Francisella endosymbionts are closely related to pathogens, there is a substantial risk of misidentification ... Although Coxiella and Francisella endosymbionts are distantly related bacteria, they have converged towards an analogous B ... December 2017). "A Coxiella mutualist symbiont is essential to the development of Rhipicephalus microplus". Scientific Reports ...
2009). "Host cell-free growth of the Q fever bacterium Coxiella burnetii". PNAS. 106 (11): 4430-4434. Bibcode:2009PNAS.. ... Coxiella burnetii. Asepsis Gnotobiotic animal Germ-free animal Sterilization (microbiology) Thain, M.; Hickman, M. (1994). ...
Complete inactivation of Coxiella burnetii (which was thought at the time to cause Q fever by oral ingestion of infected milk) ... Enright, J.B.; Sadler, W.W.; Thomas, R.C. (1957). "Thermal inactivation of Coxiella burnetii and its relation to pasteurization ... Cerf, O.; Condron, R. (2006). "Coxiella burnetii and milk pasteurization: an early application of the precautionary principle ... of Hygienic Practice for Milk notes that milk pasteurization is designed to achieve at least a 5 log10 reduction of Coxiella ...
Coxiella sp. SE467 - Coxiella sp. MO-1 - Coxiella sp. MO-5 - Coxiella cheraxi - Coxiella sp. 64 - Coxiella sp. 64e1 - Coxiella ... 64e2 - Coxiella sp. 64e3 - Coxiella sp. 64e4 - Name[edit]. Coxiella C.B. Philip et al. 1948, gen. nov. Type species: C. ... Genus: Coxiella Species: Coxiella burnetii - Haemaphysalis longicornis symbiont A - Ornithodoros moubata symbiont A - Coxiella ... Haemaphysalis longicornis symbiont 47 - Haemaphysalis longicornis symbiont 66 - Coxiella symbiont of Carios capensis - Coxiella ...
Coxiella burnetii is a strict intracellular bacterium with potential as a bioterrorism agent. To characterize different ... Coxiella burnetii genotyping Olga Glazunova 1 , Véronique Roux, Olga Freylikman, Zuzana Sekeyova, Ghislain Fournous, Judith ... Coxiella burnetii genotyping Olga Glazunova et al. Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Aug. ... Molecular typing of Coxiella burnetii (Q fever). Massung RF, Cutler SJ, Frangoulidis D. Massung RF, et al. Adv Exp Med Biol. ...
Coxiella-like endosymbiont of Argas persicus. Taxonomy ID: 2071649 (for references in articles please use NCBI:txid2071649). ...
COXIELLA BURNETII (UNII: GRY5SDU86N) (COXIELLA BURNETII - UNII:GRY5SDU86N) COXIELLA BURNETII. 30 [hp_C] in 1 mL. ... Anthracinum 30C, Arsenicum Album 30C, Botulinum 30C, Calcarea Hypophosphorosa 30C, Coxiella Burnetii 30C, Dysentery Bacillus ... Label: BIOLOGICAL COMPLEX III- anthracinum, arsenicum album, botulinum, calcarea hypophosphorosa, coxiella burnetii, dysentery ... BIOLOGICAL COMPLEX III- anthracinum, arsenicum album, botulinum, calcarea hypophosphorosa, coxiella burnetii, dysentery ...
Seroepidemiology of Rickettsia typhi, Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, and Coxiella burnetti Infection in Pregnant Women from ... Seroepidemiology of Rickettsia typhi, Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, and Coxiella burnetti Infection in Pregnant Women from ...
Antibodies Bacteria Coxiella Burnetii Denmark Fetus Infant Infertility Miscarriage Mother Pregnancy Q Fever Seropositivity ... A high risk for obstetric complications has been reported among women infected with Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q ... 2014). Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Coxiella burnetii Antibodies in Pregnant Women, Denmark. 20(6). Nielsen, Stine Yde et al ... "Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Coxiella burnetii Antibodies in Pregnant Women, Denmark" 20, no. 6 (2014). Nielsen, Stine Yde et ...
Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, and is the causative agent of Q fever. ... Coxiella burnetii. Catalogue no: Path-C.burnetii. Catalogue no: Path-C.burnetii-standard. ...
Biomemes Coxiella Burnetii RT-PCR Test detects the DNA of Coxiella Burnetii and already contains lyophilized master mix, ... Biomemes Coxiella Burnetii RT-PCR Go-Strips® Test is intended for the qualitative detection of Coxiella Burnetii DNA and ... Coxiella Burnetii. N/A. N/A. Go-Strips™ are pre-aliquoted, lyophilized strips optimized for outstanding performance in the ... Coxiella Burnetii 3-Well Go-Strips™. Each well of each strip contains a 20µL lyophilized triplex reaction with master mix, ...
Coxiella burnetii) case definitions; uniform criteria used to define a disease for public health surveillance. ...
We are investigating Coxiella burnetii, a bacterium that causes a severe flu-like illness called Q fever. Moreover, we are ... In addition to providing needed information on pathogen biology, our research goals are aimed at development of new Coxiella ... investigating the extent and relevance of Coxiella strain diversity and developing genetic methods to dissect the virulence of ... is Chief of the Coxiella Pathogenesis Section at NIAID. ... growth of Coxiella. Rescue of Coxiella from an obligate ...
Coxiella-Burnetii_Rickettsia. Coxiella burnetii and Rickettsia are two types of bacteria that can cause severe illness in ... Coxiella burnetii can cause a disease known as Q fever, which can cause flu-like symptoms and in severe cases can be fatal. ...
Coxiella burnetii Limite: Animais Idioma: Inglês Revista: J Microbiol Methods Ano de publicação: 2023 Tipo de documento: Artigo ... Coxiella burnetii Limite: Animais Idioma: Inglês Revista: J Microbiol Methods Ano de publicação: 2023 Tipo de documento: Artigo ... Coxiella burnetii; Febre Q; Animais; Chlorocebus aethiops; Febre Q/microbiologia; Lipopolissacarídeos; Fatores de Virulência; ... Coxiella burnetii is the bacterial causative agent of the zoonosis Q fever. This bacterium undergoes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) ...
Coxiella Burnetii (Q Fever) Antibodies - Serum (Surplus) (SSQFEV_C). Data File: SSQFEV_C.xpt. First Published: February 2008. ... Q fever is a zoonotic disease with acute and chronic stages caused by the rickettsia-like organism Coxiella burnetii. The ...
What is this Coxiella pathogen?. Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects animals and humans causing the Q ... coxiellaendocarditisPCRpneumoniaQ fever Post navigation. Pseudomonas putida - a helper of plants and scientists and a cleaner ... The Coxiella burnetii (Figure 1) is characterized as highly virulent and can be transmitted by aerosols. Due to this, U.S. ... The Coxiellas life cycle contains 2 forms of development - large-cell (LCV) or the active replicating form found during the ...
Molecular Detection of Candidatus Coxiella mudorwiae from Haemaphysalis concinna in China. Citation. Shi et al. [posted content ...
Coxiella burnetii (Q fever). In: Mandell GL, Douglas RG Jr, Bennett JE, eds. Principles and practice of infectious diseases. ... Immunoglobulin responses to Coxiella burnetii (Q fever): single-serum diagnosis of acute infection, using an immunofluorescence ... 20 or greater Coxiella burnetii-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) titer using an indirect immunofluorescence test on a single ...
Massive dispersal of coxiella burnetii among cattle across the United States. Microbial genomics. 2016 Aug 1;2(8). doi: 10.1099 ... Massive dispersal of coxiella burnetii among cattle across the United States. In: Microbial genomics. 2016 ; Vol. 2, No. 8. ... Massive dispersal of coxiella burnetii among cattle across the United States. Sonora Olivas, Heidie Hornstra, Rachael A. ... Massive dispersal of coxiella burnetii among cattle across the United States. / Olivas, Sonora; Hornstra, Heidie; Priestley, ...
Coxiella burnetti-associated thoracic endovascular stent graft infection. Nicholas S. Clarke, Scott I Reznik, Michael E Jessen ... Coxiella burnetti-associated thoracic endovascular stent graft infection. / Clarke, Nicholas S.; Reznik, Scott I; Jessen, ... Clarke NS, Reznik SI, Jessen ME, Murthy R. Coxiella burnetti-associated thoracic endovascular stent graft infection. Journal of ... Clarke, N. S., Reznik, S. I., Jessen, M. E., & Murthy, R. (Accepted/In press). Coxiella burnetti-associated thoracic ...
Coxiella burnetii:C burnetii is the causative agent of Q fever. It is spread from animals to humans; person-to-person ...
The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii (C burnetii) is a blood test that checks for infection due to bacteria called ... The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii (C burnetii) is a blood test that checks for infection due to bacteria called ... Hartzell JD, Marrie TJ, Raoult D. Coxiella burnetii (Q fever). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and ... Q fever - complement fixation test; Coxiella burnetii - complement fixation test; C burnetii - complement fixation test ...
Q fever (Coxiella burnetii). *Ricin toxin from Ricinus communis (castor beans)plus icon *Facts About Ricin ...
coxiella (which causes Q fever),. *chlamydia (which causes psittacosis/ovine chlamydiosis) and ...
Knobel DL, Maina AN, Cutler SJ, Ogola E, Feikin DR, Junghae M, Coxiella burnetii in humans, domestic ruminants, and ticks in ... Epidemiology of Coxiella burnetii infection in Africa: a OneHealth systematic review. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2014;8:e2787 . DOI ... To screen convalescent-phase serum samples, we used a Coxiella burnetii ImmunoDot assay (GenBio, San Diego, CA, USA) according ... Of patients assessed, 8.9%, 22.4%, 1.1%, and 3.6% had enhanced seroreactivity to Coxiella burnetii, spotted fever group ...
Three other CSIs suggest that members of the genera Coxiella and Rickettsiella shared a common ancestor exclusive of other ... Twenty four, 7 and 6 CSIs are uniquely shared by members of the genera Legionella, Coxiella and Aquicella, respectively, ... A robust phylogenetic framework for members of the order Legionellales and its main genera (Legionella, Aquicella, Coxiella and ... Coxiella, Legionella and Rickettsiella formed distinct clades confirming their monophyly. In these studies, Diplorickettsia ...
Coxiella burnetti. Trench Fever. Rochalimaea quintana. Trench Fever. Rochalimaea vinsonii. H I Influenza. Haemophilus ...
Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, an obligate gram-negative intracellular bacterium. Most commonly reported in ... Laboratory maintenance of Coxiella burnetii. Curr Protoc Microbiol. 2009 Nov. Chapter 6:Unit 6C.1. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... Coxiella burnetii: host and bacterial responses to infection. Vaccine. 2007 Oct 16. 25(42):7288-95. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma linked to Coxiella burnetii. Blood. 2016 Jan 7. 127 (1):113-21. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. [Full Text]. ...
  • Coxiella burnetii and Rickettsia are two types of bacteria that can cause severe illness in humans. (epibiodev.blog)
  • Coxiella burnetii can cause a disease known as Q fever, which can cause flu-like symptoms and in severe cases can be fatal. (epibiodev.blog)
  • Q fever is a zoonotic disease with acute and chronic stages caused by the rickettsia-like organism Coxiella burnetii. (cdc.gov)
  • Subsequent blood tests indicated that the hepatitis was caused by Coxiella burnetii , the organism which causes Q fever. (cdc.gov)
  • To date, a total of 191 clinical cases of acute Q fever (Figure 1) have been serologically confirmed at the VCL by a fourfold or greater rise in Q fever complement fixation phase II antibody titer or by a 1:20 or greater Coxiella burnetii-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) titer using an indirect immunofluorescence test on a single serum specimen. (cdc.gov)
  • Q-fever is an underreported disease caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii, which is highly infectious and has the ability to disperse great distances. (nau.edu)
  • Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium. (bvsalud.org)
  • To screen convalescent-phase serum samples, we used a Coxiella burnetii ImmunoDot assay (GenBio, San Diego, CA, USA) according to the manufacturer's instructions. (cdc.gov)
  • So tell me David, what is Coxiella burnetii ? (cdc.gov)
  • Dr. David Swerdlow] Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterium that causes Q fever. (cdc.gov)
  • Infection with Coxiella burnetii can be asymptomatic, acute, or chronic. (cdc.gov)
  • Coxiella burnetii is a category B bioterrorism agent because it is highly infectious, rather resistant to heat and drying, and can become airborne and inhaled by humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Dr. David Swerdlow] If there were an intentional spread of Coxiella burnetii , we didn't know who should be given preventative treatment, called post-exposure prophylaxis or PEP, to prevent illness. (cdc.gov)
  • Pregnant women are also at high risk following exposure to Coxiella burnetii . (cdc.gov)
  • It is crucial to know who should be treated and how, following an intentional release with possible BT agents, including Coxiella burnetii . (cdc.gov)
  • The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii ( C burnetii ) is a blood test that checks for infection due to bacteria called C burnetii , which causes Q fever . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hartzell JD, Marrie TJ, Raoult D. Coxiella burnetii (Q fever). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Q fever is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii . (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Sheep are a major reservoir for Coxiella burnetii. (cdc.gov)
  • Q fever is a disease caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii, which can be transmitted to humans from animals such as sheep, goats, and cattle. (cdc.gov)
  • Coxiella burnetii study was to describe the clinical, microt and Brucella spp. (who.int)
  • Detection of antibodies to Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, by complement fixation. (tamu.edu)
  • Phylogenetic inference of Coxiella burnetii by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. (cdc.gov)
  • Coxiella bacteria may also be present in raw milk from infected animals. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Three other CSIs suggest that members of the genera Coxiella and Rickettsiella shared a common ancestor exclusive of other Legionellales. (mcmaster.ca)
  • Twenty four, 7 and 6 CSIs are uniquely shared by members of the genera Legionella, Coxiella and Aquicella, respectively, identifying these groups in molecular terms. (mcmaster.ca)
  • In addition, overexpression of the active GTPase -defective mutant (GFP-Rab1b Q67L) affected the development of the Coxiella -replicative compartment inhibiting bacterial growth . (bvsalud.org)
  • Coxiella - Taxon details on National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). (wikimedia.org)
  • In this report , we present evidence that the Coxiella -replicative vacuoles (CRVs) also interact with the secretory pathway . (bvsalud.org)
  • Le present travail a consiste en l'etude sur systeme HLA de classe II dans la population congolaise. (bvsalud.org)
  • Because PV biogenesis, host cell maintenance, and generation of developmental forms adapted to intracellular replication and extracellular resistance are central to Coxiella pathogenesis, we are conducting studies to better understand the molecular and cellular biology of these processes. (nih.gov)
  • Rescue of Coxiella from an obligate intracellular lifestyle has enabled our development of complete set of genetic tools are now allowing fulfillment of molecular Koch's postulates for suspected Coxiella virulence genes. (nih.gov)
  • Coxiella -like bacteria have been associated with infection cal signs (fever, skin eschar, local lymph node enlargement) in birds ( 4 , 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • To explore pathogenicity to humans, we used and if a removed tick was positive for Coxiella -like bacte- molecular techniques targeting Coxiella- like bacteria to ria according to qPCR but no skin biopsy was sampled or retrospectively analyze skin biopsy samples and ticks col- when serologic results were positive. (cdc.gov)
  • Ticks were identified by matrix-assisted la- for the Coxiella -like bacteria associated with R. sanguin- ser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrom- eus , R. turanicus , and H. pusillus ticks to be Candidatus C. etry (Bruker Daltonics, Billerica, USA) ( 6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • On the basis of the aligned rrs (55%) Dermacentor marginatus , 7 (35%) R. sanguineus , gene sequences of Coxiella -like bacteria, we developed 1 (5%) R. bursa , and 1 (5%) Ixodes ricinus ticks. (cdc.gov)
  • Coxiella- a specific qPCR to detect the DNA of all Coxiella spe- like bacteria were found significantly less commonly in I. cies and degenerated primers aimed to amplify a 659-bps ricinus ticks (p = 0.002, relative risk = 0.5). (cdc.gov)
  • Moreover, we are investigating the extent and relevance of Coxiella strain diversity and developing genetic methods to dissect the virulence of this refractory pathogen. (nih.gov)
  • Our comparative genomics studies revealed genetic heterogeneity among Coxiella strains and predicted strain-specific virulence factors. (nih.gov)
  • Functional characterization of these effector proteins and their cellular targets will provide important insight into Coxiella virulence mechanisms. (nih.gov)
  • 11. Unrecognized pre-transplant disseminated Coxiella burnetti infection diagnosed in a post-transplant heart-kidney recipient. (nih.gov)
  • Vero cells infected with genetically transformed Coxiella expressing mCherry red fluorescent protein. (nih.gov)
  • In addition to providing needed information on pathogen biology, our research goals are aimed at development of new Coxiella countermeasures, such as rationally designed subunit vaccines and tools for molecular epidemiology. (nih.gov)
  • Coxiella is also a recognized category B biothreat with potential for illegitimate use. (nih.gov)
  • Using contemporary cell biology techniques, we are characterizing the Coxiella PV to define both bacterial and host factors that mediate its formation. (nih.gov)
  • Moreover, metabolic pathway reconstructions based on genome data helped us develop a medium that supports robust host cell-free (axenic) growth of Coxiella . (nih.gov)
  • Our results indicate that modulation of host cell functions by Coxiella proteins is required for PV formation and pathogen growth. (nih.gov)