Coxa Vara: Hip deformity in which the femoral neck leans forward resulting in a decrease in the angle between femoral neck and its shaft. It may be congenital often syndromic, acquired, or developmental.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalOsteochondrosis: Any of a group of bone disorders involving one or more ossification centers (EPIPHYSES). It is characterized by degeneration or NECROSIS followed by revascularization and reossification. Osteochondrosis often occurs in children causing varying degrees of discomfort or pain. There are many eponymic types for specific affected areas, such as tarsal navicular (Kohler disease) and tibial tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter disease).Coxa Valga: Hip deformity in which the angle between the femoral neck and its shaft is increased. It may be congenital, acquired, or developmental.Lower Extremity Deformities, Congenital: Congenital structural abnormalities of the LOWER EXTREMITY.Femoracetabular Impingement: A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Anatomy, Comparative: The comparative study of animal structure with regard to homologous organs or parts. (Stedman, 25th ed)EstersFemur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Fibrous Dysplasia, Monostotic: FIBROUS DYSPLASIA OF BONE involving only one bone.Vitamin A: Retinol and derivatives of retinol that play an essential role in metabolic functioning of the retina, the growth of and differentiation of epithelial tissue, the growth of bone, reproduction, and the immune response. Dietary vitamin A is derived from a variety of CAROTENOIDS found in plants. It is enriched in the liver, egg yolks, and the fat component of dairy products.Vitamin A Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN A in the diet, characterized by NIGHT BLINDNESS and other ocular manifestations such as dryness of the conjunctiva and later of the cornea (XEROPHTHALMIA). Vitamin A deficiency is a very common problem worldwide, particularly in developing countries as a consequence of famine or shortages of vitamin A-rich foods. In the United States it is found among the urban poor, the elderly, alcoholics, and patients with malabsorption. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1179)Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Joint DiseasesFemur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Palpation: Application of fingers with light pressure to the surface of the body to determine consistence of parts beneath in physical diagnosis; includes palpation for determining the outlines of organs.Leg Length Inequality: A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.Lordosis: The anterior concavity in the curvature of the lumbar and cervical spine as viewed from the side. The term usually refers to abnormally increased curvature (hollow back, saddle back, swayback). It does not include lordosis as normal mating posture in certain animals ( = POSTURE + SEX BEHAVIOR, ANIMAL).Gait: Manner or style of walking.Pericarditis: Inflammation of the PERICARDIUM from various origins, such as infection, neoplasm, autoimmune process, injuries, or drug-induced. Pericarditis usually leads to PERICARDIAL EFFUSION, or CONSTRICTIVE PERICARDITIS.Pericarditis, Constrictive: Inflammation of the PERICARDIUM that is characterized by the fibrous scarring and adhesion of both serous layers, the VISCERAL PERICARDIUM and the PARIETAL PERICARDIUM leading to the loss of pericardial cavity. The thickened pericardium severely restricts cardiac filling. Clinical signs include FATIGUE, muscle wasting, and WEIGHT LOSS.Lubricants: Compounds that provide LUBRICATION between surfaces in order to reduce FRICTION.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Pericarditis, Tuberculous: INFLAMMATION of the sac surrounding the heart (PERICARDIUM) due to MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS infection. Pericarditis can lead to swelling (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION), compression of the heart (CARDIAC TAMPONADE), and preventing normal beating of the heart.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Down Syndrome: A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)Metabolic Syndrome X: A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Osteochondrodysplasias: Abnormal development of cartilage and bone.Collagen Type X: A non-fibrillar collagen found primarily in terminally differentiated hypertrophic CHONDROCYTES. It is a homotrimer of three identical alpha1(X) subunits.Exostoses, Multiple Hereditary: Hereditary disorder transmitted by an autosomal dominant gene and characterized by multiple exostoses (multiple osteochondromas) near the ends of long bones. The genetic abnormality results in a defect in the osteoclastic activity at the metaphyseal ends of the bone during the remodeling process in childhood or early adolescence. The metaphyses develop benign, bony outgrowths often capped by cartilage. A small number undergo neoplastic transformation.Chondrodysplasia Punctata: A heterogeneous group of bone dysplasias, the common character of which is stippling of the epiphyses in infancy. The group includes a severe autosomal recessive form (CHONDRODYSPLASIA PUNCTATA, RHIZOMELIC), an autosomal dominant form (Conradi-Hunermann syndrome), and a milder X-linked form. Metabolic defects associated with impaired peroxisomes are present only in the rhizomelic form.Cystitis: Inflammation of the URINARY BLADDER, either from bacterial or non-bacterial causes. Cystitis is usually associated with painful urination (dysuria), increased frequency, urgency, and suprapubic pain.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Nasal Bone: Either one of the two small elongated rectangular bones that together form the bridge of the nose.Parietal Bone: One of a pair of irregularly shaped quadrilateral bones situated between the FRONTAL BONE and OCCIPITAL BONE, which together form the sides of the CRANIUM.Mandibular Condyle: The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.Cleft Palate: Congenital fissure of the soft and/or hard palate, due to faulty fusion.Jaw Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the jaw.Skeleton: The rigid framework of connected bones that gives form to the body, protects and supports its soft organs and tissues, and provides attachments for MUSCLES.Indian Ocean Islands: Numerous islands in the Indian Ocean situated east of Madagascar, north to the Arabian Sea and east to Sri Lanka. Included are COMOROS (republic), MADAGASCAR (republic), Maldives (republic), MAURITIUS (parliamentary democracy), Pemba (administered by Tanzania), REUNION (a department of France), and SEYCHELLES (republic).Genu Valgum: An inward slant of the thigh in which the knees are close together and the ankles far apart. Genu valgum can develop due to skeletal and joint dysplasias (e.g., OSTEOARTHRITIS; HURLER SYNDROME); and malnutrition (e.g., RICKETS; FLUORIDE POISONING).Arthrometry, Articular: Measurements of joint flexibility (RANGE OF MOTION, ARTICULAR), usually by employing an angle-measuring device (arthrometer). Arthrometry is used to measure ligamentous laxity and stability. It is often used to evaluate the outcome of ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT replacement surgery.

Cleidocranial dysplasia: a case report. (1/7)

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The Chitranjan Ranawat award: is neutral mechanical alignment normal for all patients? The concept of constitutional varus. (2/7)

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Operative treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head after proximal femur fractures in adolescents. (3/7)

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Comparison of neuromuscular and quadriceps strengthening exercise in the treatment of varus malaligned knees with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol. (4/7)

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Better outcomes in severe and morbid obese patients (BMI > 35 kg/m2) in primary Endo-Model rotating-hinge total knee arthroplasty. (5/7)

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Long-term stress distribution patterns of the ankle joint in varus knee alignment assessed by computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry. (6/7)

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Knee malalignment is associated with an increased risk for incident and enlarging bone marrow lesions in the more loaded compartments: the MOST study. (7/7)

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  • Osteoarthritic degeneration of the coxofemoraljoints, which is revealed by intense sclerotic changes seen onplain radiographs, may become an indication for hip replace-ment [myslide.es] […] epiphyseal involvement, rhizomelic shortening of the lower limbs with bowing of the femora and/or tibiae, coxa vara , genu varum and pear-shaped vertebrae in childhood. (symptoma.com)
  • AP view of lumbosacral spineshowing a severe ossification defect of the posterior pro-cesses.Scapuloiliac Dysostosis (Kosenow Syndrome) 497severe coxa vara and a mild bending [documents.tips] (including cauda equina syndrome). (symptoma.com)
  • Hofmeister F. Coxa Vara: a typical form of curvature of the femoral neck. (medscape.com)
  • [consultant360.com] SEDC, including both mild and severe coxa vara (SEDC-M and SEDC-S), is the most severe form of hypogenesis of the femoral head. (symptoma.com)
  • DiFazio RL, Kocher MS, Berven S, Kasser J. Coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest in patients who had neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. (medscape.com)
  • Herein, we describe a unique case of SEDC with mild coxa vara (SEDC-M) caused by double de novo COL2A1 mutations located on the same allele. (symptoma.com)
  • He suffered especially from deformed hip joints (due either to hip dysplasia or coxa vara , with secondary osteoarthritis). (diki.pl)
  • Vaoga review on the development of coxa vara by Currarino et al showed an association with spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, demonstrating that stimulated corner fractures were present in most instances. (spring-art.info)
  • More serious conditions leading to out-toeing can include slipped capital femoral epiphysis, coxa vara, and hip dysplasia (Lincoln, 2003). (posna.org)
  • Developmental disorders of the hip - developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCP), coxa vara including slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) - the knee, the ankle and foot, as well as rotational and angular deformities of the lower limb are discussed in detail. (worldcat.org)
  • The name comes from the main symptoms, including permanent bending of the fingers (camptodactyly), joint disease (arthropathy), and changes in the hip joint resulting in shortened legs and a possible limp (coxa vara). (malacards.org)
  • Other complications included avascular necrosis, coxa vara, coxa magna, growth arrest and flexion-adduction contractures. (scielo.org.za)
  • Coxa-I relatively long, sub-equal in length with postero-median and postero-lateral spurs spur, coxae II-IV each with obvious postero-lateral spur, with round tip, coxae II- IV each with postero-median spur. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A tabletop examination may reveal weak abductors, a prominent greater trochanter, decreased abduction due to a decreased articulotrochanteric distance, and coxa vara. (medscape.com)
  • We studied a family with SMCD: the mother, a 36-year-old woman with a height of 149 cm, had mild bilateral coxa vara . (symptoma.com)
  • [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The cardinal features of the phenotype are mild short stature, coxa vara and a waddling gait. (symptoma.com)
  • [jmedicalcasereports.biomedcentral.com] Mild hypoplasia of ossa ilea,marked coxa vara bilaterally, and hypoplastic femoralheads were apparent on X-ray examination. (symptoma.com)
  • Herein, we describe a unique case of SEDC with mild coxa vara (SEDC-M) caused by double de novo COL2A1 mutations located on the same allele. (symptoma.com)
  • [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The 2 types of the disease are the mild coxa vara form, with height maintained (as in our patient) and the severe coxa vara form, with clinical short stature. (symptoma.com)
  • [consultant360.com] SEDC, including both mild and severe coxa vara (SEDC-M and SEDC-S), is the most severe form of hypogenesis of the femoral head. (symptoma.com)
  • We report the first case of a five-year-old Colombian boy of mixed race ancestry (mestizo), with clinical features of microcephaly, prominent and narrow nose, arched palate, amelogenesis imperfecta, short stature, tall and narrow pelvis, disproportionate shortening of fore-arms and legs, and mild coxa vara. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • [genecards.org] The consequence of COL10A1 mutations is the bowing and the shortening of the long bones, coxa vara being usually observed. (symptoma.com)
  • Trigui M, Pannier S, Finidori G, Padovani JP, Glorion C. Coxa vara in chondrodysplasia: prognosis study of 35 hips in 19 children. (medscape.com)
  • Functional leg length discrepancy can occur when a child is born with a problem that alters alignment of the hips, such as coxa vara and developmental dislocation of the hip. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Osteoarthritic degeneration of the coxofemoraljoints, which is revealed by intense sclerotic changes seen onplain radiographs, may become an indication for hip replace-ment [myslide.es] […] epiphyseal involvement, rhizomelic shortening of the lower limbs with bowing of the femora and/or tibiae, coxa vara , genu varum and pear-shaped vertebrae in childhood. (symptoma.com)
  • this report confirm the characterization of this hip abnormality and presents a new possible cause of acquired coxa vara. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Coxa vara on the other hand is a direct match of above where the neck-shaft angle is increased(from nearly 135). (diki.pl)