Supreme Court Decisions: Decisions made by the United States Supreme Court.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Judicial Role: The kind of action or activity proper to the judiciary, particularly its responsibility for decision making.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Criminal Law: A branch of law that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging and trial of suspected persons, and fixes the penalties and modes of treatment applicable to convicted offenders.Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Crime: A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.Child Custody: The formally authorized guardianship or care of a CHILD.Child Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of children; frequently through a legal process.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Mandatory Programs: Programs in which participation is required.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Insanity Defense: A legal concept that an accused is not criminally responsible if, at the time of committing the act, the person was laboring under such a defect of reason from disease of the mind as not to know the nature and quality of the act done or if the act was known, to not have known that what was done was wrong. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed)Forensic Psychiatry: Psychiatry in its legal aspects. This includes criminology, penology, commitment of mentally ill, the psychiatrist's role in compensation cases, the problems of releasing information to the court, and of expert testimony.Forensic Medicine: The application of medical knowledge to questions of law.Juvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Transfer Agreement: A written agreement for the transfer of patients and their medical records from one health care institution to another.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Posthumous Conception: Conception after the death of the male or female biological parent through techniques such as the use of gametes that have been stored during his or her lifetime or that were collected immediately after his or her death.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Prussia: Former state in north central Germany. Formally abolished March 1, 1947. Kingdom established 1701.Forensic Sciences: Disciplines that apply sciences to law. Forensic sciences include a wide range of disciplines, such as FORENSIC TOXICOLOGY; FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY; FORENSIC MEDICINE; FORENSIC DENTISTRY; and others.Right to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Tennis: A game played by two or four players with rackets and an elastic ball on a level court divided by a low net.Criminals: Persons who have committed a crime or have been convicted of a crime.Social Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.United StatesPersons: Persons as individuals (e.g., ABORTION APPLICANTS) or as members of a group (e.g., HISPANIC AMERICANS). It is not used for members of the various professions (e.g., PHYSICIANS) or occupations (e.g., LIBRARIANS) for which OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS is available.Contracts: Agreements between two or more parties, especially those that are written and enforceable by law (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). It is sometimes used to characterize the nature of the professional-patient relationship.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.PrisonersRacquet Sports: Games in which players use a racquet to hit a ball or similar type object.Legislation, Drug: Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.Insurance, Liability: Insurance against loss resulting from liability for injury or damage to the persons or property of others.Police: Agents of the law charged with the responsibility of maintaining and enforcing law and order among the citizenry.Employee Retirement Income Security Act: A 1974 Federal act which preempts states' rights with regard to workers' pension benefits and employee benefits. It does not affect the benefits and rights of employees whose employer is self-insured. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Dangerous Behavior: Actions which have a high risk of being harmful or injurious to oneself or others.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Human Rights Abuses: Deliberate maltreatment of groups of humans beings including violations of generally-accepted fundamental rights as stated by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Charities: Social welfare organizations with programs designed to assist individuals in need.Courtship: Activities designed to attract the attention or favors of another.Criminal Psychology: The branch of psychology which investigates the psychology of crime with particular reference to the personality factors of the criminal.Surrogate Mothers: Women who allow themselves to be impregnated with the understanding that the offspring are to be given over to the parents who have commissioned the surrogate.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration: An office in the Department of Labor responsible for developing and establishing occupational safety and health standards.Famous PersonsInformed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Defensive Medicine: The alterations of modes of medical practice, induced by the threat of liability, for the principal purposes of forestalling lawsuits by patients as well as providing good legal defense in the event that such lawsuits are instituted.Prisons: Penal institutions, or places of confinement for war prisoners.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Legislation, Hospital: Laws and regulations concerning hospitals, which are proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)United States Federal Trade Commission: An independent administrative agency concerned with maintaining competitive free enterprise by prohibiting unfair methods of competition and unfair deceptive acts or practices.Jehovah's Witnesses: Members of a religious denomination founded in the United States during the late 19th century in which active evangelism is practiced, the imminent approach of the millennium is preached, and war and organized government authority in matters of conscience are strongly opposed (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). Jehovah's Witnesses generally refuse blood transfusions and other blood-based treatments based on religious belief.Capital Punishment: The use of the death penalty for certain crimes.Health Facility Merger: The combining of administrative and organizational resources of two or more health care facilities.Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Abortion, Legal: Termination of pregnancy under conditions allowed under local laws. (POPLINE Thesaurus, 1991)Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Employee Discipline: Regulations or conditions imposed on employees by management in order to correct or prevent behaviors which are counterproductive to the organization.Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Living Wills: Written, witnessed declarations in which persons request that if they become disabled beyond reasonable expectation of recovery, they be allowed to die rather than be kept alive by extraordinary means. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Treatment Refusal: Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Intellectual Property: Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)Firearms: Small-arms weapons, including handguns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, etc.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Insurance Carriers: Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.Drug and Narcotic Control: Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Automobile Driving: The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.Consumer Product SafetyRate Setting and Review: A method of examining and setting levels of payments.Antitrust Laws: Those federal and state laws, and their enforcement, that protect trade and commerce from unlawful restraints and monopolies or unfair business practices.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Epilepsy, Post-Traumatic: Recurrent seizures causally related to CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Seizure onset may be immediate but is typically delayed for several days after the injury and may not occur for up to two years. The majority of seizures have a focal onset that correlates clinically with the site of brain injury. Cerebral cortex injuries caused by a penetrating foreign object (CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, PENETRATING) are more likely than closed head injuries (HEAD INJURIES, CLOSED) to be associated with epilepsy. Concussive convulsions are nonepileptic phenomena that occur immediately after head injury and are characterized by tonic and clonic movements. (From Rev Neurol 1998 Feb;26(150):256-261; Sports Med 1998 Feb;25(2):131-6)Ethics: The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Therapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Forensic Genetics: The application of genetic analyses and MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES to legal matters and crime analysis.Legislation, Veterinary: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Punishment: The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Rape: Unlawful sexual intercourse without consent of the victim.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Substance Abuse Detection: Detection of drugs that have been abused, overused, or misused, including legal and illegal drugs. Urine screening is the usual method of detection.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Opiate Substitution Treatment: Medical treatment for opioid dependence using a substitute opiate such as METHADONE or BUPRENORPHINE.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Drug Users: People who take drugs for a non-therapeutic or non-medical effect. The drugs may be legal or illegal, but their use often results in adverse medical, legal, or social consequences for the users.Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Great BritainHistory, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.MichiganGovernment: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.ArizonaCrime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Psychiatric Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the organization and administration of psychiatric services.Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.CaliforniaMental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Child Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Propensity Score: Conditional probability of exposure to a treatment given observed covariates.Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry): The co-existence of a substance abuse disorder with a psychiatric disorder. The diagnostic principle is based on the fact that it has been found often that chemically dependent patients also have psychiatric problems of various degrees of severity.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Methadone: A synthetic opioid that is used as the hydrochloride. It is an opioid analgesic that is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. It has actions and uses similar to those of MORPHINE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1082-3)Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.New YorkProfessional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Case Management: A traditional term for all the activities which a physician or other health care professional normally performs to insure the coordination of the medical services required by a patient. It also, when used in connection with managed care, covers all the activities of evaluating the patient, planning treatment, referral, and follow-up so that care is continuous and comprehensive and payment for the care is obtained. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Opioid-Related Disorders: Disorders related or resulting from abuse or mis-use of opioids.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)LondonAlcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.
court". CBC News. 2007-09-19. Retrieved 2007-09-20. Campbell, Murray (2007-11-14). "Ontario crafts new adoption bill to uphold ... COAR (Coalition for Open Adoption Records) obtained amicus curiae status to put forward their side in this court case, ... Significant sections of it were quashed just two days later in a ruling by Judge Edward Belobaba of the Ontario Superior Court ...
It combined the whole of the former Court and Dock wards with parts of the Clifton, Shankill, Smithfield and Woodvale wards. It ... Court; Crumlin; New Lodge; North Howard; and Shankill. The DEA formed part of the Belfast North and Belfast West constituencies ... was abolished for the 1985 local government elections, when it was split between the new Oldpark and Court DEAs. The by- ...
His siblings included Harrie B. Chase, who served on the Vermont Supreme Court and the United States Court of Appeals for the ... Court", p. 2. Amherst College Bulletin, p. 141. "Miss Dexter is Bride of Paul Addison Chase", p. 2. "Death Notice, Paul Addison ... Chase had not informed the governor or the chief justice of his location or the reasons for his absence, and the court's ... He was succeeded on the court by James Stuart Holden. In 1953, Chase received the honorary degree of master of arts from ...
Judicial data can be given to: Court officials for use in court proceedings, staff members at the office of Public Prosecuter, ... The application will then be heard in court. The Act states that it is a criminal offence to employ a registered person into an ... The location of sex offenders in Ireland is provided by a certificate issued by the court, stating that the convicted person is ... The criminal record system for citizens of Bulgaria are kept in the Criminal Records Office located at every Regional Court in ...
Court)." MacBain, A. An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language (1896), p. 42: "bodach, an old man, a carle, Ir. bodach ...
Supreme Court rules in favor of Patent/(Copyright) exhaustion in the Lexmark case. "The Supreme Court determined that when a ... "US court to rule on ReDigi". court. Retrieved 18 March 2013. http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/appeals-court-grapples- ... 2017 US SUPREME COURT decision in the Lexmark case bodes well for ReDigi and Consumers. While ReDigi has created a way for ... However, here, the Court cannot of its own accord condone the wholesale application of the first sale defense to the digital ...
She argued that the Supreme Court's order in Herbert v. Kitchen, 134 S.Ct. 893 (2014), is precedent for a stay, that she is ... 1:13-CV-1861" (PDF). Court. U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania. Retrieved June 18, 2014. Dalton, J. ... She wanted the court to stay its decision in Whitewood v. Wolf and to allow her appeal it. Judge Jones denied the motion on ... Supreme Court rules also require it probable that four Justices grant certiorari on any question presented in order for a stay ...
He was a judge on the Vermont Superior Court from 1949 to 1956, and then succeeded Paul A. Chase as an associate justice of the ... Court". Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT. Morning Press Bureau. August 4, 1956. p. 2 - via Newspapers.com. (Subscription ... He served as an associate justice and chief justice of the Vermont Supreme Court and later on the federal United States ... On November 11, 1971, Holden was nominated by President Richard Nixon to a seat on the United States District Court for the ...
Open Court. - On the Frege-Husserl-Cantor triangle. Kenny, Anthony, 1995. Frege - An introduction to the founder of modern ... by Erich H. Reck and Steve Awodey, Open Court Publishing, 2004, pp. 18-26. The journal Beiträge zur Philosophie des Deutschen ...
Supreme Court; Gerhard Casper (1975). Landmark briefs and arguments of the Supreme Court of the United States: Constitutional ...
"Court Circular". The Times (36641). London. 18 December 1901. p. 6. "University intelligence". The Times (36776). London. 24 ...
"Court Circular". www.royal.uk. 8 July 2015. The Duke of Edinburgh, Honorary Member, the Institution of Engineering Designers, ...
"Court and Social: Appointments". The Times. 11 March 1987. "Court Circular". The Times. 12 December 1990. "Birthdays today". ...
"Court Circular". The Times (36767). London. 14 May 1902. p. 12. Photograph of Mahon The Relief of Mafeking by Filson Young at ...
"Cedar Court". British Listed Buildings. . Wood, Ron (November 2008). Ronnie: The Autobiography (Paper ed.). New York: St. ... and Cedar Court on Coombe Hill Road, built on its present site in 1911-12 incorporating timbers from a late medieval timber- ... Coombe Court, Coombe End, Ballard Coombe and Fairview. For further information on education in Coombe, Kingston upon Thames see ... Three Tudor-era structures built as a system for supplying water to Hampton Court Palace from springs in Coombe: Coombe Conduit ...
"Court Circular". The Times (36784). London. 3 June 1902. p. 9. The Royal Navy June 1906 Channel Fleet Extracts from Late 19th ...
"Declaration of Geoff Tate in Support of Motion for Preliminary Injunction" (PDF). Court declaration. 2012-06-09. Archived from ... Exhibit E.) "Geoff Tate Wins Court Ruling to Continue Using Queensrÿche Name". Loudwire. 2012-10-20. Retrieved 2012-11-29. " ...
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1-2. "Court circular". The Times (36652). London. 31 December 1901. p. 4. "No. 27374". The London Gazette (Supplement). 9 ...
Chris Court. "Rowers Launch Atlantic Record Bid". scotsman.com. Retrieved 2006-06-08. "Vivaldi Atlantic 4 Break Canada-Europe ...
"Court Circular". The Times (36844). London. 12 August 1902. p. 8. "No. 27467". The London Gazette. 22 August 1902. p. 5461. " ...
"Court Circular". Court and Social. The Times (50631). London. 11 December 1946. col B, p. 7. ...
"Five Guys Named Moe at Court Theatre". Court Theatre. Retrieved 2017-06-30. Greene, Morgan. "Court completes casting for 'Five ... From September 7 to October 8, 2017, Court Theatre in Chicago's Hyde Park neighborhood mounted a production featuring James ...
Rowland then proceeded to take the eight directors to court, to permanently prevent them from being able to vote on his removal ... "Court Circular". The Independent. 21 July 1992. Retrieved 9 July 2015. Bibliography Smallpeice, Sir Basil (1981). Of Comets and ... Rowland, aware of the possibility, had obtained an interlocutory injunction from the High Court of Justice preventing the board ...
Basketball court. Football and cricket ground. Separate cafeterias for boys and girls. Transport service for day scholars and ... Due to this illegal fee hike, in january 2018, one of the students emailed the fee challan to Supreme Court and PMDC. The ...
Indonesian Constitutional Court Declines to Ban Sex Outside Marriage. The ruling was a blow to religious conservatives who have ... The case now before a Moscow civil court, heard in a small courtroom, is being closely watched by religious and human rights ... The atmosphere at the hearing today in a grimy court building in a neighborhood north of the Kremlin -- where one of two ... Cherevatov, now 31 and a rigorous follower of the religious community that is now before a Moscow court, accused of inciting ...
Supreme Court Decision on "Straw Purchases" Does Not Make Gift Purchases of Firearms Illegal. On June 16, the U.S. Supreme ... In this case (Abramski v. United States), the Court ruled in effect that the Virginia man, a former police officer purchasing ... Meanwhile, it is our understanding that the Supreme Court ruling does not make it illegal for a consumer to purchase firearms ... NSSF has asked the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to provide clarification on the Supreme Courts decision ...
The Health Care Case: The Supreme Courts Decision and its Implications - A new book on last years controversial Supreme Court ... The Health Care Case: The Supreme Courts Decision and its Implications - Now Available for Pre-ordering. By Ilya Somin on May ... My own contribution to the volume addresses the Courts analysis of the Necessary and Proper Clause, and explains why the ... Why the Court should uphold Congresss power in the Jerusalem Passport case ...
The best Connecticut free Bridgeport CT website about divorce, family law, child support, alimony, child custody and visitation ...
Today at the Court - Sunday, Mar 24, 2019. *The Supreme Court Building is closed on weekends and federal holidays. The building ... followed by the swearing in of new members to the Bar of the Supreme Court. Unless otherwise noted, the Court generally hears ... The Court is closed on federal holidays. For questions on how the holiday impacts case filings, contact the Clerks Office. ... The Court convenes for a session in the Courtroom at 10 a.m. The session may begin with the announcement of opinions - ...
Learn about the CT scan and what to expect during one. ... Doctors use CT scans (or CAT scans) to look for broken bones, ... Cardiac CT Scan (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) * Chest CT Scan (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Also in ... CT angiography - arms and legs (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * CT angiography - chest (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ... What Are the Radiation Risks from CT? (Food and Drug Administration) * Whole-Body CT Screening--Should I or Shouldnt I Get One ...
Court International Court of Arbitration Administrative court Constitutional court Court of Faculties Court of record Court- ... martial Courts of England and Wales Ecclesiastical court Equity court Family court High Court of Justiciary Revolutionary ... Notable court shows include: Judge Judy Paternity Court The Peoples Court Judge Mathis Judge Alex Judge Joe Brown Eye for an ... The verb "to court", meaning to win favor, derives from the same source since people traveled to the sovereigns court to win ...
Belvedere Court is a residential block of fifty six flats in Lyttelton Road, East Finchley, North London, England. It was ... The plans were withdrawn following a ruling by the High Court and the freehold eventually secured by the residents. The law was ... Belvedere Court received its Grade II listing in 1999. Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1387706)". ... As a child, the television personality, Jerry Springer lived at Belvedere Court with his family. In the 1990s, the then ...
... American Tragedy borrows a title from Dreiser, but Norman Mailers take on O.J.s trial owes more to Barnum -- ... Whereas on Court TV the camera couldnt help itself, panning in twitchy reflex to the stone-cold defendant. Instead of ...
... this station is walking distance to the Arlington County administration buildings and court complex. ...
There are many chemists involved in court work, including forensic scientists, public analysts and toxicologists. Few, though, ... Chemistry in Court 6 December 2018 19:00-21:00, Belfast, United Kingdom ...
With cries of cronyism greeting the nomination of Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court, the White House is appealing to history- ... But nine years later Harry S. Truman was given hell-accused of rank favoritism-when he nominated to the high court his attorney ... Whereas Supreme Court justices once ran for president (as Charles Evans Hughes did in 1916) or freely dispensed partisan ... With cries of cronyism greeting the nomination of Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court, the White House is appealing to history- ...
a b c d History of the Supreme Court of India *^ "Constitution of Supreme Court of India". Supreme Court of India.. Missing or ... The 1950 Rules were replaced by the Supreme Court Rules, 1966.[48] In 2014, supreme court notified the Supreme Court Rules, ... Supreme Court of India 15 April 2014). Text *^ "India court recognises transgender people as third gender". BBC News. 15 April ... Supreme Court of India Chief Justice of India. Judges of the supreme court. High courts in India Chief justices of high courts ...
... which includes the Full Court of the Family Court.[13] From the Full Court, the only avenue of appeal is to the High Court of ... "Family Court of Australia. Retrieved 6 December 2017.. *^ "Judges of the Family Court". Family Court of Australia. Retrieved 6 ... The Family Court of Australia is a superior Australian federal court of record which deals with family law matters, such as ... When the Family Court was established, an attempt was made to make the court less formal and more family friendly, with a ...
The court uses the IBM® Watson® Care Manager solution to synthesize information in real time from families, probation officers ... Ohio Court of Common Pleas. In addition to two judges and nine magistrates, the court employs bailiffs, court reporters, ... Helping juvenile treatment court improve efficiency and outcomes with an IBM Watson Health solution. The court uses the IBM® ... Explains Capizzi: "A very large part of my court focuses on children who are in my court by no fault of their own. They have ...
... but a higher court blocked the order pending further consideration. ... Court Blocks McVeigh Videotaping. PITTSBURGH - A federal judge has ordered that Timothy McVeighs execution be videotaped, but ... But the ruling, which is under seal, was stayed by 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Joseph Weis Jr. until a panel of ... a higher court blocked the order Friday pending further consideration.. U.S. District Judge Maurice B. Cohill on Thursday ...
One of the worlds most criminally corrupt corporations will finally get its day in court. And it wont be pretty. OCA, along ... One of the worlds most criminally corrupt corporations will finally get its day in court. And it wont be pretty. ...
A prominent Belarusian opposition figure was sentenced to five years in prison yesterday after being convicted by a Minsk court ... The U.S. Embassy did not report the computers stolen, and a U.S. State Department statement presented to the court said the ... His lawyer, Vera Stremkovskaya, said they would appeal the case to the Minsk regional court.. Marynichs case raised concerns ... Marynich being led into court 31 December 2004 -- A prominent Belarusian opposition figure was sentenced to five years in ...
The Delaware Court of Chancery has refused to expedite an appeal because it could delay the court-ordered sale of a profitable ... The Delaware Supreme Court on Tuesday reversed a Delaware Court of Chancery ruling that payday lender DFC Global Corp. was sold ... Chancery Court Chancellor Andre G. Bouchard on Tuesday recommended that Delawares high court adopt a new rule to protect the ... For the first time since the U.S. Supreme Courts landmark ruling in TC Heartland, the chief judge of Delawares district court ...
... and other court decisions from The National Law Journal. ... demands for juries are required to be in writing a trial court ... when the litigant was unable to file her written demand due to a courthouse computer malfunction the District of Columbia Court ... COURT DECISIONS. Although demands for juries are required to be in writing, a trial court erred in denying a tenant a jury ... The court ruled for the landlords from the bench. Reversing, the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, the districts highest ...
Have you recently had a language dispute that you would like this column to resolve? Write to Word Court in care of The ...
... is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for up to 23 older people or people living with dementia. ...
Your organisation may have to display a number of posters. For example, if you have been rated at a number of premises and also at provider level, you will need to display posters at each premises, as well as a provider poster.. Check the other CQC webpages for your organisation (such as for any other premises you have) to find all the posters you need to display.. Youll find more information about displaying posters in our detailed guidance.. ...
A version of this archives appears in print on August 27, 1917, on Page B13 of the New York edition with the headline: COURT ...
President Obama nominated federal judge Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court yesterday, putting her in line to become the ... But sidestepping a court battle could be deflating to the partys base and hurt efforts to rally conservatives going forward. ... Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said of his GOP colleagues and conservative activists who are leading the court fight. I think ... We must remember that a Supreme Court justice sits for a lifetime appointment, and the Senate hearing is the only opportunity ...
  • Even though the Pennsylvania man who ultimately bought the gun was not legally prohibited from owning a firearm and passed a background check, the Court, in a 5-4 decision, said the transfer violated federal "straw purchase" law. (nssf.org)
  • The case now before a Moscow civil court, heard in a small courtroom, is being closely watched by religious and human rights groups as the first significant attempt to use the law to restrict worship. (nytimes.com)
  • On June 16, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a case involving a Virginia man who could legally purchase a firearm and did so for an uncle from Pennsylvania. (nssf.org)
  • In this case ( Abramski v. United States ), the Court ruled in effect that the Virginia man, a former police officer purchasing the firearm at a discounted price, was acting as agent for the true buyer-his uncle. (nssf.org)
  • Meanwhile, it is our understanding that the Supreme Court ruling does not make it illegal for a consumer to purchase firearms as gifts. (nssf.org)
  • Ch. Oct. 4, 2017), Vice Chancellor Laster held that a receiver's determination is subject to de novo review and the court has discretion to go beyond the record presented to the receiver by conducting an evidentiary hearing. (law.com)
  • A bus passes the U.S. Supreme Court on January 31, 2017 in Washington, DC. (cnn.com)
  • After a trial in 2017, the district Court then invalidated two districts of Plan C235 holding that one was enacted with discriminatory intent and the other contained was an impermissible racial gerrymander. (cnn.com)
  • Adjustment in the undernoted cases commenced on Wednesday 17 May 2017 and in the absence of any court order to the contrary the records therein will, without further publication in the rolls, close on Wednesday 12 July 2017 . (scotcourts.gov.uk)
  • TRENTON, N.J. (AP) - The Supreme Court of New Jersey ruled a defendant must turn over the passcodes for his two phones in response to a search warrant, opening the way for law enforcement to compel other defendants in the state to do the same. (ap.org)
  • The Connecticut Supreme Court on Friday reinstated the 2002 murder conviction of Kennedy cousin Michael Skakel in the 1975 death of teen Martha Moxley. (usatoday.com)
  • In early 2002, a lower Kyrgyz court had sentenced Otabek Ahadov to death and another three Uyughur exiles to lengthy prison terms in what rights groups say was a politically motivated case. (rferl.org)
  • Marynich's case raised concerns from the United States and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, which sent representatives to watch court proceedings. (rferl.org)
  • The rulings could have a significant precedential impact on some 5,000 families who opted to bring their cases in the Omnibus Autism Proceedings (OAP) hoping that the vaccine court would officially hold that the MMR vaccine or thimerosal had caused autism in their children. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In each of these cases, the plaintiffs' attorneys made the same tactical decision made by Bailey Bank's lawyer, electing to opt out of the highly charged Omnibus Autism Proceedings and argue their autism cases in the regular vaccine court. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The court however said its order should not be seen as approval of Kanojia's social media posts and that legal proceedings against him would continue according to law. (yahoo.com)
  • For now, the detainee cases will go back to the U.S. Court of Appeals, which under the Detainee Treatment Act is designated as the only court designated to review detainee proceedings. (npr.org)
  • The main task of the Procurator General of the Supreme Court is to provide the members of the Supreme Court with independent advice - known as an 'advisory opinion' - on how to rule in the cassation proceedings before them. (rechtspraak.nl)
  • Research over the decades shows that more sexual abuse cases are coming to light and children are increasingly being admitted as witnesses in court proceedings, but there are no national statistics on how many. (go.com)
  • In one study published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 1993 , New York child witness expert Stephen J. Ceci estimated that as many as 100,000 children end up participating in family court or criminal justice proceedings in the State of New York alone. (go.com)
  • Germany's Constitutional Court in Karlsruhe today has curbed Germany's wide-reaching data collection law even further, by stating that the data can only be collected and saved in case of real danger to citizens. (theregister.co.uk)
  • March saw the German Constitutional Court in Karlsruhe issue an injunction against the law, saying it needed further review. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Uganda's Constitutional Court has annulled tough anti-gay legislation signed into law in February. (bbc.co.uk)
  • However the legislation that was passed in parliament was "null and void", the presiding judge at the Constitutional Court said, as not enough lawmakers had been present to vote on the bill. (bbc.co.uk)
  • The retrogressive anti-homosexuality act of Uganda has been struck down by the constitutional court - it's now dead as a door nail," the AFP news agency quotes prominent journalist Andrew Mwenda, one of the petitioners, as saying. (bbc.co.uk)
  • The Constitutional Court was effectively saying it's up to the SCA to rule on the matter at this stage. (bloomberg.com)
  • US had urged Turkey to rescind ban on social media website after Turkey's Constitutional Court ruled it violated freedom of expression. (jpost.com)
  • Turkey's telecoms authority lifted a two-week-old ban on Twitter on Thursday after the constitutional court ruled the block breached freedom of expression, an official in Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan's office said. (jpost.com)
  • Its core function is to determine cases with the most complex law, facts and parties, to cover specialised areas in family law, and to provide national coverage as the national appellate court for family law matters. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was the first appellate court to reach that conclusion, despite a handful of lower-court decisions freeing the government from that requirement. (wired.com)
  • The Obama administration urged the appellate court to reconsider its position, an offer the court declined Wednesday without commenting on the merits. (wired.com)
  • Judge Anthony Capizzi has served the Montgomery County Juvenile Court for more than 13 years. (ibm.com)
  • Fortunately for the youth who attend Capizzi's juvenile treatment court, the judge also serves on several national organizations and industry groups. (ibm.com)
  • For now, the new dashboard is limited to Capizzi's juvenile treatment court, but the judge hopes to expand the program soon. (ibm.com)
  • A Delaware Court of Chancery judge on Friday dealt a major blow to Energy Transfer Equity's bid to recover a breakup fee from a failed merger with The Williams Cos. (law.com)
  • In introducing Sotomayor at the White House yesterday morning, Obama hailed the 54-year-old appeals court judge as an accomplished and 'inspiring' individual with a compelling life story. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Lawyers have been watching the case closely since New Jersey Superior Court Judge Carol Higbee certified the class action using what Thorpe called 'a very liberal standard. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The day the murderers of my daughter are hanged, we will feel we have got justice," the victim's mother said after the Delhi High Court confirmed the sentence of hanging handed down by a trial judge last September. (voanews.com)
  • To be eligible for selection, a candidate must be either a provincial superior court judge, or a barrister or advocate who has belonged to a provincial or territorial bar for at least 10 years. (encyclopedia.com)
  • There is no suggestion that in doing so WPL had access to the source code of the SAS Components or that WPL have copied any of the text of the source code of the SAS Components or that WPL have copied any of the structural design of the source code of the SAS Components," the presiding High Court judge wrote in his ruling . (theregister.co.uk)
  • When the defendant failed to show up in court, the judge issued a default judgment, turning over umbro.com to the company and awarding it $25,000 in attorney's fees. (internetnews.com)
  • Led by Judge Brett Kavanaugh, the court vacated the rule and ordered the EPA to develop a new one, leaving in its place a Bush-era regulation. (latimes.com)
  • As an advisory court, it hears matters which may specifically be referred to it under the constitution by President of India . (wikipedia.org)
  • They decide to accept which court ruling or which court judgment to obey. (voanews.com)
  • Given how important the Report is to the care and protection proceeding, the court investigator needs to have the ability to develop investigative information and write a report that displays excellent communications skills, solid analytical ability, and the aptitude to exercise sound independent judgment. (mass.gov)
  • La Cour suprême du Canada a été instituée en 1875 par une loi du Parlement du Canada et est régie par la Loi sur la Cour suprême, S.R.C. 1985, chapitre S-26. (encyclopedia.com)
  • More significantly, an explosive investigation by CBS News has found that since 1988, the vaccine court has awarded money judgments, often in the millions of dollars, to thirteen hundred and twenty two families whose children suffered brain damage from vaccines. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Johnny Depp arrived at Britain's High Court on Tuesday to attend a hearing of his claim against The Sun's publisher, News Group Newspapers over a story alleging he was abusive to his ex-wife Amber Heard. (usatoday.com)
  • Oh hearing the news Doherty immediatly left the court complex by car. (nme.com)
  • Hamud said a court order bars him from discussing the case, but said he'd been retained by the students' families. (nypost.com)
  • Brennan also challenges, inter alia , the district court s order that he be held jointly and severally liable for the entire amount of disgorgement ordered by the court. (columbia.edu)
  • Any court in the state of Arizona can review a petition and issue a Protective Order. (phoenix.gov)
  • You will need to contact a specific court for information on their Protective Order process. (phoenix.gov)
  • An Order of Protection ( A.R.S. 13-3602 ) is a court order to seek protection from a person you live with, now or in the past, or is an immediate family member. (phoenix.gov)
  • An Injunction Against Harassment ( A.R.S. 12-1809 ) is a court order to seek protection from a person other than someone you live with, a person with whom you have no relationship, or a current or former non-family member. (phoenix.gov)
  • Holding: When a juror makes a clear statement indicating that he or she relied on racial stereotypes or animus to convict a criminal defendant, the Sixth Amendment requires that the no-impeachment rule give way in order to permit the trial court to consider the evidence of the juror's statement and any resulting denial of the jury trial guarantee. (scotusblog.com)
  • The teenage triplets who terrorised shopkeepers in Kent walked free from court after magistrates gave them a two-year supervision order. (bbc.co.uk)
  • He was freed in March 2014 when the Shizuoka District Court ordered a fresh trial on concerns that investigators could have planted evidence in order to clear up a crime that had shocked the country. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • India's top court canceled all of the 122 mobile telecom-service licenses it allotted after January 2008 after allegations that officials rigged the allocation of the spectrum licenses. (wsj.com)
  • BERLIN (Reuters) - A German court ruled on Thursday that people have the right to claim compensation from service providers if their Internet access is disrupted, because the Internet is an "essential" part of life. (reuters.com)
  • PHOENIX (Reuters) - Arizona's highest court on Wednesday lifted the hold it placed on the execution of a man condemned for the 1984 rape and murder of a 13-year-old girl, clearing the way for him to be put to death. (reuters.com)
  • The ban has been lifted' the official from Erdogan's office told Reuters by telephone minutes after TIB removed court orders blocking the site from its webpage. (jpost.com)
  • One of the world's most criminally corrupt corporations will finally get its day in court. (organicconsumers.org)
  • A Japanese court has overturned a lower court ruling that freed a man described as the world's longest-serving death row inmate, raising the prospect that the 82-year-old could eventually be imprisoned again. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • Reversing, the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, the district's highest court, noted that tenants had a right to a jury trial in actions for possession by landlords. (law.com)
  • Sen. Jeff Sessions (Ala.), the ranking Republican on the Judiciary Committee, did not comment on Sotomayor's qualifications for the nation's highest court yesterday but indicated that he was not inclined to rush the confirmation process. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Connecticut's highest court has reinstated the murder conviction of Kennedy cousin Michael Skakel. (usatoday.com)
  • The highest court in Massachusetts threw out a gun conviction against a Boston man in a ruling that says black men who flee police may be reacting to racial profiling rather than trying to hide criminal activity. (cnn.com)
  • ALBANY - A Garden City lawyer whose brother embezzled millions of dollars of clients' funds is guilty of professional misconduct for lack of oversight, New York 's highest court ruled Tuesday. (newsday.com)
  • A court is a tribunal, often as a government institution, with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes between parties and carry out the administration of justice in civil, criminal, and administrative matters in accordance with the rule of law. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only three years later, when he tried to elevate the justice to chief, did the mostly conservative critics of the Warren Court and its liberal jurisprudence seize on Fortas' continuing contacts with the president as a reason to filibuster his nomination , which they did successfully. (slate.com)
  • The building is shaped to symbolize scales of justice with its centre-beam being the Central Wing of the building comprising the chief justice's court, the largest of the courtrooms, with two court halls on either side. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dominic Grieve, the shadow justice secretary, said: "It is interesting to note that the concerns we have about the operation of the European court are shared by one of the most senior members of the judiciary. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • THE HAGUE Netherlands (AP) - Mali's justice minister on Wednesday asked prosecutors at the International Criminal Court to open an investigation into 'grave and massive' crimes committed in the African nation that was plunged into turmoil by a coup this year. (lexisnexis.com)
  • Should Barrett replace late liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, her vote will cement a 6-3 conservative majority on the high court. (pbs.org)
  • A senior court advisor has issued an opinion to the European Court of Justice that software functions cannot be copyrighted. (theregister.co.uk)
  • This page covers the International Court of Justice (ICJ), the UN system's highest judicial body. (globalpolicy.org)
  • The International Court of Justice ruled that both Thailand and Cambodia must withdraw troops from the disputed Preah Vihear temple area. (globalpolicy.org)
  • In 2004, the International Court of Justice (ICOJ) found that Garcia and fifty other inmates had not been offered consular assistance at the time of their arrest and ruled that the US violated the Vienna Convention of Treaties. (globalpolicy.org)
  • The International Court of Justice ruled in 2004 that the barrier was illegal under international law. (globalpolicy.org)
  • The move is a rejection of a lower court ruling that Skakel's trial lawyer did not adequately represent him. (usatoday.com)
  • He was granted a new trial after the court ruled Skakel's lawyer at the time failed to argue that his brother could have been responsible for the death and also failed to present a key alibi witness. (usatoday.com)
  • U.S. companies shouldn't be able to get patents on abstract ideas when they combine those ideas with a computer process, a lawyer argued in an appeals court Friday. (pcworld.com)
  • If you are planning to go to court without a lawyer, please visit our Self-Service Legal Center website , which includes forms with detailed instructions. (in.gov)
  • Medina's lawyer, Brian Berger, was unavailable for comment because he was in court today, but a spokesman at his law office said Medina has denied the allegations of abuse. (go.com)
  • The court said, "Even though the computers were 'down,' everyone was aware that the tenants were demanding a trial by jury. (law.com)
  • After about five days of deliberations, the Los Angeles County Superior Court jury ruled against 64-year-old Frederic Reller, who had claimed he was unaware of the risks of smoking. (marketwatch.com)
  • The court investigator holds a position of public trust and confidence and, as such, court investigators shall conduct themselves in a professional manner and refrain from any conduct which may result in a breach of such trust and confidence. (mass.gov)
  • Juries are less common in court systems outside the Anglo-American common law tradition. (wikipedia.org)
  • A trial court asked the tenants what arguments they made in the answer, and they said their defense was illegal retaliation over complaints they had made about the property. (law.com)
  • Prosecutor Robin Baker, who also handled the millennium bombing trial of Mokhtar Haouari, declined to comment outside court. (nypost.com)
  • The following facts were found by the district court to have been established at trial and are not challenged by defendants. (columbia.edu)
  • While the advocates won a trial court ruling in 2010, an appeals court found that isolated genes could indeed be patented , the Wall Street Journal reported. (businessinsider.com)
  • Joining me now from the US District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania to talk about the first week of the trial is Chris Mooney. (npr.org)
  • The Tokyo High Court on Monday reversed the ruling dating from 2014 that granted Iwao Hakamada a fresh trial and saw him released from prison. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • The grandfather of a 6-year-old girl who was allegedly sexually assaulted by a 67-year-old man has argued she will be further traumatized by testifying at a trial this week in Berrien County Court in Michigan and his concerns have been echoed by those involved in the trial. (go.com)
  • Lawyers for Texas criticized the lower court opinion arguing that the maps should stand, particularly since they were adopted with the guidance of the district court. (cnn.com)
  • By statute, the court investigator is required to "investigate the conditions affecting the child 1 and to make a [R]eport under oath to the court. (mass.gov)
  • All the attorneys for the plaintiffs have to do is make the court apply that precedent to intelligent design, and so they're trying to draw a strong connection between intelligent design and creationism, and it helps them that they have presented evidence suggesting that the Dover board, before it started talking about intelligent design, was talking about creationism. (npr.org)
  • The Inspector General went to court in October of that year to enforce the subpoena after Armstrong's attorneys said he planned to ignore it. (cnbc.com)