Rotavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with ROTAVIRUS.Rotavirus: A genus of REOVIRIDAE, causing acute gastroenteritis in BIRDS and MAMMALS, including humans. Transmission is horizontal and by environmental contamination. Seven species (Rotaviruses A thru G) are recognized.Rotavirus Infections: Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Intussusception: A form of intestinal obstruction caused by the PROLAPSE of a part of the intestine into the adjoining intestinal lumen. There are four types: colic, involving segments of the LARGE INTESTINE; enteric, involving only the SMALL INTESTINE; ileocecal, in which the ILEOCECAL VALVE prolapses into the CECUM, drawing the ILEUM along with it; and ileocolic, in which the ileum prolapses through the ileocecal valve into the COLON.Vaccines, Attenuated: Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Viral Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Vaccines, Inactivated: Vaccines in which the infectious microbial nucleic acid components have been destroyed by chemical or physical treatment (e.g., formalin, beta-propiolactone, gamma radiation) without affecting the antigenicity or immunogenicity of the viral coat or bacterial outer membrane proteins.Diarrhea, Infantile: DIARRHEA occurring in infants from newborn to 24-months old.Vaccines, Combined: Two or more vaccines in a single dosage form.Immunization Schedule: Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.Reassortant Viruses: Viruses containing two or more pieces of nucleic acid (segmented genome) from different parents. Such viruses are produced in cells coinfected with different strains of a given virus.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Capsid Proteins: Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.Vaccines, Synthetic: Small synthetic peptides that mimic surface antigens of pathogens and are immunogenic, or vaccines manufactured with the aid of recombinant DNA techniques. The latter vaccines may also be whole viruses whose nucleic acids have been modified.Vaccines, DNA: Recombinant DNA vectors encoding antigens administered for the prevention or treatment of disease. The host cells take up the DNA, express the antigen, and present it to the immune system in a manner similar to that which would occur during natural infection. This induces humoral and cellular immune responses against the encoded antigens. The vector is called naked DNA because there is no need for complex formulations or delivery agents; the plasmid is injected in saline or other buffers.Safety-Based Drug Withdrawals: Removal of a drug from the market due to the identification of an intrinsic property of the drug that results in a serious risk to public health.Bacterial Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed bacteria administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious bacterial disease.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.NicaraguaInfant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.AIDS Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing inactivated HIV or some of its component antigens and designed to prevent or treat AIDS. Some vaccines containing antigens are recombinantly produced.Antigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.Vaccine Potency: The relationship between an elicited ADAPTIVE IMMUNE RESPONSE and the dose of the vaccine administered.Latin America: The geographic area of Latin America in general and when the specific country or countries are not indicated. It usually includes Central America, South America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean.Vaccines, Conjugate: Semisynthetic vaccines consisting of polysaccharide antigens from microorganisms attached to protein carrier molecules. The carrier protein is recognized by macrophages and T-cells thus enhancing immunity. Conjugate vaccines induce antibody formation in people not responsive to polysaccharide alone, induce higher levels of antibody, and show a booster response on repeated injection.Vaccines, Subunit: Vaccines consisting of one or more antigens that stimulate a strong immune response. They are purified from microorganisms or produced by recombinant DNA techniques, or they can be chemically synthesized peptides.Immunoglobulin A: Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Product Surveillance, Postmarketing: Surveillance of drugs, devices, appliances, etc., for efficacy or adverse effects, after they have been released for general sale.Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine: A vaccine consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and whole-cell PERTUSSIS VACCINE. The vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral: A live vaccine containing attenuated poliovirus, types I, II, and III, grown in monkey kidney cell tissue culture, used for routine immunization of children against polio. This vaccine induces long-lasting intestinal and humoral immunity. Killed vaccine induces only humoral immunity. Oral poliovirus vaccine should not be administered to immunocompromised individuals or their household contacts. (Dorland, 28th ed)Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Virus Shedding: The expelling of virus particles from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract. Virus shedding is an important means of vertical transmission (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).Malaria Vaccines: Vaccines made from antigens arising from any of the four strains of Plasmodium which cause malaria in humans, or from P. berghei which causes malaria in rodents.Vaccines, Live, Unattenuated: Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms without their virulence altered. Examples include smallpox (vaccinia) and adenovirus vaccines.Papillomavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS. Human vaccines are intended to reduce the incidence of UTERINE CERVICAL NEOPLASMS, so they are sometimes considered a type of CANCER VACCINES. They are often composed of CAPSID PROTEINS, especially L1 protein, from various types of ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Neutralization Tests: The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).Immunization, Secondary: Any immunization following a primary immunization and involving exposure to the same or a closely related antigen.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Germ-Free Life: Animals not contaminated by or associated with any foreign organisms.UzbekistanMeningococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS.United StatesMexicoIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Measles Vaccine: A live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had measles or been immunized with live measles vaccine and have no serum antibodies against measles. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Immunization: Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).Hepatitis B Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing inactivated hepatitis B or some of its component antigens and designed to prevent hepatitis B. Some vaccines may be recombinantly produced.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Pertussis Vaccine: A suspension of killed Bordetella pertussis organisms, used for immunization against pertussis (WHOOPING COUGH). It is generally used in a mixture with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (DTP). There is an acellular pertussis vaccine prepared from the purified antigenic components of Bordetella pertussis, which causes fewer adverse reactions than whole-cell vaccine and, like the whole-cell vaccine, is generally used in a mixture with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. (From Dorland, 28th ed)EuropeCost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.IndiaPoliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated: A suspension of formalin-inactivated poliovirus grown in monkey kidney cell tissue culture and used to prevent POLIOMYELITIS.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Haemophilus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing antigenic polysaccharides from Haemophilus influenzae and designed to prevent infection. The vaccine can contain the polysaccharides alone or more frequently polysaccharides conjugated to carrier molecules. It is also seen as a combined vaccine with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine.BCG Vaccine: An active immunizing agent and a viable avirulent attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, var. bovis, which confers immunity to mycobacterial infections. It is used also in immunotherapy of neoplasms due to its stimulation of antibodies and non-specific immunity.PhiladelphiaRabies Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent and treat RABIES. The inactivated virus vaccine is used for preexposure immunization to persons at high risk of exposure, and in conjunction with rabies immunoglobulin, for postexposure prophylaxis.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems: Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Cholera Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with VIBRIO CHOLERAE. The original cholera vaccine consisted of killed bacteria, but other kinds of vaccines now exist.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Malawi: A republic in southern Africa east of ZAMBIA and MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Lilongwe. It was formerly called Nyasaland.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Toxins, Biological: Specific, characterizable, poisonous chemicals, often PROTEINS, with specific biological properties, including immunogenicity, produced by microbes, higher plants (PLANTS, TOXIC), or ANIMALS.Typhoid-Paratyphoid Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent TYPHOID FEVER and/or PARATYPHOID FEVER which are caused by various species of SALMONELLA. Attenuated, subunit, and inactivated forms of the vaccines exist.Capsid: The outer protein protective shell of a virus, which protects the viral nucleic acid.Poliomyelitis: An acute infectious disease of humans, particularly children, caused by any of three serotypes of human poliovirus (POLIOVIRUS). Usually the infection is limited to the gastrointestinal tract and nasopharynx, and is often asymptomatic. The central nervous system, primarily the spinal cord, may be affected, leading to rapidly progressive paralysis, coarse FASCICULATION and hyporeflexia. Motor neurons are primarily affected. Encephalitis may also occur. The virus replicates in the nervous system, and may cause significant neuronal loss, most notably in the spinal cord. A rare related condition, nonpoliovirus poliomyelitis, may result from infections with nonpoliovirus enteroviruses. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp764-5)Smallpox Vaccine: A live VACCINIA VIRUS vaccine of calf lymph or chick embryo origin, used for immunization against smallpox. It is now recommended only for laboratory workers exposed to smallpox virus. Certain countries continue to vaccinate those in the military service. Complications that result from smallpox vaccination include vaccinia, secondary bacterial infections, and encephalomyelitis. (Dorland, 28th ed)Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Tuberculosis Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent or treat TUBERCULOSIS.Placebos: Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.Chickenpox Vaccine: A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Adjuvants, Immunologic: Substances that augment, stimulate, activate, potentiate, or modulate the immune response at either the cellular or humoral level. The classical agents (Freund's adjuvant, BCG, Corynebacterium parvum, et al.) contain bacterial antigens. Some are endogenous (e.g., histamine, interferon, transfer factor, tuftsin, interleukin-1). Their mode of action is either non-specific, resulting in increased immune responsiveness to a wide variety of antigens, or antigen-specific, i.e., affecting a restricted type of immune response to a narrow group of antigens. The therapeutic efficacy of many biological response modifiers is related to their antigen-specific immunoadjuvanticity.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Mumps Vaccine: Vaccines used to prevent infection by MUMPS VIRUS. Best known is the live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had mumps or been immunized with live mumps vaccine. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine.Hepatitis A Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with hepatitis A virus (HEPATOVIRUS).Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.BrazilMeasles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine: A combined vaccine used to prevent MEASLES; MUMPS; and RUBELLA.Viral Nonstructural Proteins: Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.Drug Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a drug container or wrapper. It includes contents, indications, effects, dosages, routes, methods, frequency and duration of administration, warnings, hazards, contraindications, side effects, precautions, and other relevant information.Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic: A specific immune response elicited by a specific dose of an immunologically active substance or cell in an organism, tissue, or cell.Streptococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTIONS.Mice, Inbred BALB CDengue Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with DENGUE VIRUS. These include live-attenuated, subunit, DNA, and inactivated vaccines.Anthrax Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent ANTHRAX.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Vaccines, Virosome: Vaccines using VIROSOMES as the antigen delivery system that stimulates the desired immune response.
PATH also conducts research to show the impact of rotavirus vaccines and help countries choose whether to adopt the vaccines ... In 2006, PATH helped Nicaragua become the first developing country to introduce rotavirus vaccines within months of their ... PATH supports the introduction of vaccines against rotavirus in developing countries to protect young children from severe ... Former PATH researcher John Wecker noted that rotavirus infections dropped in areas that began to use the vaccine after the WHO ...
"Performance of rotavirus vaccines in developed and developing countries". Human Vaccines. 6 (7): 532-542. doi:10.4161/hv.6.7. ... Two commercial rotavirus vaccines exist and several more are in development.[44] In Africa and Asia these vaccines reduced ... "Summary of effectiveness and impact of rotavirus vaccination with the oral pentavalent rotavirus vaccine: a systematic review ... "Reduction in rotavirus after vaccine introduction-United States, 2000-2009". Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 58 (41): ...
Elyas, Haffiya; Zuleikha Abdel Raziq (19 June 2011). "First Dose of Rotavirus Vaccine to a Sudanese Child". Sudan Vision. ... "GAVI Alliance". Developing Countries Unit. Archived from the original on 2013-04-10. ...
"Cost-effectiveness of introducing a rotavirus vaccine in developing countries: the case of Mexico". BMC Infect. Dis. 8: 103. ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) "Rotavirus Vaccine Access and Delivery - PATH" (PDF). Rotavirusvaccine.org. 2011 ... 68 low-income countries tracked by the WHO- and UNICEF-led collaboration Countdown to 2015 are estimated to hold for 97% of ... In low-income countries, the number of individuals with diabetes is expected to increase from 84 million to 228 million by 2030 ...
... of diarrheal disease deaths in the children of developing countries, use of a Rotavirus vaccine in trials in 1985 yielded a ... A rotavirus vaccine decrease the rates of diarrhea in a population. New vaccines against rotavirus, Shigella, Enterotoxigenic ... "Economic costs of rotavirus gastroenteritis and cost-effectiveness of vaccination in developing countries". The Journal of ... Oral cholera vaccines in mass immunization campaigns (PDF). WHO. 2010. pp. 6-8. ISBN 978 92 4 150043 2. Archived (PDF) from the ...
"Estimated impact and cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Senegal: A country-led analysis". Vaccine. 33: A119-25. doi ... HPV vaccine coverage increased well, and pneumococcal vaccine and meningococcal C vaccines faced positive public reception. ... "The French National Debate on Vaccine Safety". The Vaccine Reaction. National Vaccine Information Center. Missing or empty ,url ... Vaccines and Immunisation 2003. Based on the Third World Congress on Vaccines and Immunisation. 21 (7-8): 596-600. doi:10.1016/ ...
Rotavirus vaccines are licensed in more than 100 countries, but only 17 countries have introduced routine rotavirus vaccination ... The incidence and severity of rotavirus infections has declined significantly in countries that have added rotavirus vaccine to ... Additional rotavirus vaccines are under development. The World Health Organization(WHO) recommends that rotavirus vaccine be ... Two rotavirus vaccines against Rotavirus A infection are safe and effective in children: Rotarix by GlaxoSmithKline and RotaTeq ...
Current projects include the development of low cost, thermostable vaccines for the prevention of cholera, rotavirus, and ... In 191 of 193 countries, the original Merck company, the Merck Group of Darmstadt, owns the rights to the "Merck" name. In the ... "www.accessdata.fda.gov" (PDF). "Mumps - History of Vaccines". "Rubella - History of Vaccines". "1971-MMR Combination Vaccine ... Medically important vaccines developed at Merck include the first mumps vaccine, the first rubella vaccine, and the first ...
Rotaviruses cause diarrhoea and vomiting in young children and are a leading cause of death in the developing countries. Three ... Bishop was awarded the Florey Medal in 2013 for her discovery of rotavirus and subsequent work helping to develop a vaccine. ... ABC News Online (28 Oct 2013) "Professor Ruth Bishop awarded Florey Medal for work on rotavirus vaccine." [2]. ... The name "rotavirus" was later suggested by the Irishman, Thomas Henry Flewett, because of the round, wheel-like shape of virus ...
The mission includes five new vaccines, inactivated polio vaccine, adult Japanese Encephalitis vaccine, Rotavirus vaccine, PCV ... The 201 districts selected have nearly 50% of all unvaccinated children in the country. The mission follow planning and ... "New Vaccine that would be used in Indradhanush Program". "Shri J P Nadda launches Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV) under ... Injectable Polio Vaccine Bivalent and Rotavirus. In 2017, pneumonia was added to the Mission by incorporating Pneumococcal ...
... of AVI is to accelerate access to life-saving pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines for children in the world's poorest countries ... President Meets Pneumococcal Vaccine Sponsors New Funding Strategy Will Bring Pneumococcal Vaccine To Developing Countries ... He is also a Steering Committee Member of the Decade of Vaccines Collaboration, and the Co-Chair of the Decade of Vaccines ... He is currently the Director of Vaccine Delivery at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, USA. In the past he was the ...
"Hilleman Labs rotavirus and cholera vaccines enter phase I/II clinical trial". livemint.com. Retrieved 30 September 2016. " ... conducts various vaccine research and science programs to develop cost-effective vaccines especially for developing countries. ... This will determine the feasibility of applying latest delivery technologies to an existing oral rotavirus vaccine to make it ... Hilleman Laboratories has recently announced a significant advancement in improving access to the life-saving rotavirus vaccine ...
Measles vaccine coverage and reported measles cases in Eastern Mediterranean countries. As coverage increased, the number of ... Nakagomi, O; Iturriza-Gomara, M; Nakagomi, T; Cunliffe, N. A. (2013). "Incorporation of a rotavirus vaccine into the national ... Vaccines are usually imperfect however, so the effectiveness, E, of a vaccine must be accounted for: V. c. =. 1. −. 1. R. 0. E ... "Oxford Vaccine Group, University of Oxford. Retrieved 12 December 2017.. *^ a b c d e f Somerville, M.; Kumaran, K.; Anderson, ...
In 2009, the country achieved the lowest infant mortality rate in its history, ranking third in Latin America, behind only ... The basic vaccination scheme for the entire population was extended, through the incorporation of four new vaccines for ... children: chickenpox, pneumococcus, pertussis, and rotavirus. In April 2010, Law 8809 was passed, creating the National ... avoid its spread to the rest of the country's low areas. At the end of the administration in 2010, Costa Rica reported its ...
... from many countries and his team of research scientists contributed to the development of a vaccine against rotavirus ... Following the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine, worldwide the incidence of deaths of children caused by rotavirus has ... Clinical efficacy of the RIT 4237 live attenuated bovine rotavirus vaccine in infants vaccinated before a rotavirus epidemic" J ... As more countries use the vaccine, the incidence is decreasing. British Library P. S. Sharma, The Indian Forester, Vol 50, p. ...
The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, the rotavirus vaccine and the Hepatitis A vaccine are yet to be introduced to the National ... The vaccines were provided free of charge to university and government hospitals all around the country. In 2014, the Egyptian ... Vaccine. 33 Suppl 1: A182-191. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.12.044. ISSN 1873-2518. PMID 25919159. Philips Egypt (2014-10-17), ... Southern Vaccine Advocacy Challenge (2011-2012), Grand Challenges Canada: A grant that was given to 5 non-profits around the ...
... rotavirus vaccine (RVV) ,Measles-Rubella vaccine (MR). Four new vaccines have been introduced into the country's Universal ... an adult vaccine against Japanese Encephalitis and Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine. Vaccines against rotavirus, rubella and ... Vaccines have been a contentious issue in public health circles, with some doctors urging caution in the choice of vaccines ... With these new vaccines, India's UIP will now provide free vaccines against 13 life threatening diseases, to 27 million ...
... rotavirus, Argentina Hemorrhagic Fever, human papillomavirus (HPV) and influenzae vaccine viruses. Measles control has been an ... Halsey has worked internationally in many developing countries including Haiti, Peru, Guatemala, Kenya, Thiopia and Pakistan. A ... He has conducted or participated in epidemiological studies of vaccine-preventable diseases and phase I, II, and III vaccine ... Halsey has published more than 200 scientific articles in peer reviewed journals regarding vaccines and vaccine safety and ...
One of the most important findings was that a new measles vaccine used in low-income countries was associated with a two-fold ... Infectious diseases, e.g. measles, diarrhoea, rotavirus, respiratory infections, malaria, HIV, HTLV, and Tuberculosis. ... Admissions to the country's sole pediatric ward in the capital are recorded. The Bandim Health Project is member of the INDEPTH ... This discovery led to the withdrawal of the vaccine. Had it not been withdrawn, it could have cost at least ½ million ...
She has also worked on rotavirus disease, conducting a large phase III trial of rotavirus vaccine among American Indian ... Hib/SP GDP established far more reliable estimates of the burden of disease of both S.pneumoniae and H.influenzae on a country ... Katherine L. O'Brien is a recognized international expert in the areas of pneumococcal epidemiology, pneumococcal vaccine ... This research is critical to understanding pneumococcal vaccine needs and potential efficacy in different regions. The ...
Characterization of HIV strains present in different countries to guide vaccine development. Strengthening vaccine-trial action ... Gene sequence of some rotavirus proteins. Consistent with his advisory role at international agencies involved in HIV-vaccine ... "A brief history of the global effort to develop a preventive HIV vaccine". Vaccine. 31 (35): 3502-18. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine. ... "AIDS Vaccine 2011". www.vaccineenterprise.org. Retrieved Jan 14, 2016. "GAIA World AIDS Day Event - Hope is a Vaccine Award". ...
... vaccines are licensed in over 100 countries, and more than 80 countries have introduced routine rotavirus vaccination ... To make rotavirus vaccines available, accessible, and affordable in all countries-particularly low- and middle-income countries ... The incidence and severity of rotavirus infections has declined significantly in countries that have added rotavirus vaccine to ... In Nicaragua, which in 2006 became the first developing country to introduce a rotavirus vaccine, severe rotavirus infections ...
"Performance of rotavirus vaccines in developed and developing countries". Human Vaccines. 6 (7): 532-542. PMID 20622508. ... "Summary of effectiveness and impact of rotavirus vaccination with the oral pentavalent rotavirus vaccine: a systematic review ... "Reduction in rotavirus after vaccine introduction-United States, 2000-2009". MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 58 (41): 1146-9. ... "Rotavirus vaccines: an update" (PDF). Weekly epidemiological record. 51-52 (84): 533-540. Hinango noong 10 May 2012.. Unknown ...
Rotavirus vaccines are licensed in more than 100 countries, and more than 80 countries have introduced routine rotavirus ... The vaccine contains a G1P[8] human rotavirus strain.[23] Lanzhou lamb[edit]. Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine was licensed for ... Rotavirus vaccine is a vaccine used to protect against rotavirus infections, which are the leading cause of severe diarrhea ... 2014). "Bovine rotavirus pentavalent vaccine development in India". Vaccine. 32 (11): A124-A128. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.03. ...
Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine Program, Respiratory Pathogen Vaccine Program, Rotavirus Diarrhea Vaccine Program, and DPRK ... and introduces vaccines to developing countries in order to lessen the disease burden and to improve the access of vaccines for ... IVI has developed 3 new or improved vaccines: reformulated oral cholera vaccine, typhoid Vi polysaccharide vaccine, and typhoid ... IVI is involved in all areas of the vaccine spectrum - from new vaccine design in the laboratory to vaccine development and ...
Clayton, E (2012). Adverse Effects of Vaccines: Evidence and Causality. Institute of Medicine. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-309-21435-3. . ... Although sensitivity levels vary by country, the most common food allergies are allergies to milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, ... Food allergens prioritized in labeling laws by country Food US Canada UK Australia ... In response to the risk that certain foods pose to those with food allergies, some countries have responded by instituting ...
Forty-one countries worldwide include rotavirus vaccine in their NIPs, but "only two countries in Asia - Philippines and ... "Most countries in Asia have yet to make the rotavirus vaccine part of their national immunization program (NIP), despite a ... Most Asian Countries Fail To Include Rotavirus Vaccine In National Immunization Programs Citing Cost As Barrier. Sep 10, 2012 ... An email to IRIN from WHOs Manila office stated, "Price continues to be an important barrier to introducing rotavirus vaccine ...
2017)‎. Progress with the implementation of rotavirus surveillance and vaccines in countries of the WHO African Region, 2007- ... Progress with the implementation of rotavirus surveillance and vaccines in countries of the WHO African Region, 2007-2016 - ... Safety of rotavirus vaccines : postmarketing surveillance in the WHO Region of the Americas : Context = Innocuité des vaccins ... Sentinel surveillance of invasive bacterial vaccine-preventable diseases and rotavirus gastroenteritis  World Health ...
... has made rotavirus vaccine introduction in developing countries a high priority. The WHOs Guidelines for Vaccine Introduction ... Vaccines to prevent rotavirus or minimize its severity are now becoming available, and have already been introduced into the ... middle-income countries to determine if and to what degree rotavirus is perceived to be a problem and the priority of a vaccine ... In the poorest countries, advocacy and communication efforts to raise awareness about rotavirus sufficient for prioritization ...
Rotavirus vaccines are licensed in more than 100 countries, and more than 80 countries have introduced routine rotavirus ... The vaccine contains a G1P[8] human rotavirus strain.[23] Lanzhou lamb[edit]. Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine was licensed for ... Rotavirus vaccine is a vaccine used to protect against rotavirus infections, which are the leading cause of severe diarrhea ... 2014). "Bovine rotavirus pentavalent vaccine development in India". Vaccine. 32 (11): A124-A128. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.03. ...
... in the World Health Organization African Region have made significant progress in the introduction of rotavirus vaccines. ... in the World Health Organization African Region have made significant progress in the introduction of rotavirus vaccines. ... following rotavirus vaccine introduction. These results support introduction of rotavirus vaccine in the remaining countries in ... rotavirus vaccine.. * Calculated only for countries with data on rotavirus vaccine preintroduction and postintroduction. ...
Rotavirus vaccines have already been available in high-income countries since 2006. In 2009 WHO recommended that rotavirus ... The rotavirus vaccine was introduced in the routine infant immunization program in Kenya in July 2014. In 2015 CDC and the ... Vaccines are more effective against some strains of rotavirus than others, which is why the real-world data from the ... Rotavirus vaccine has been well-received in Kenya. Parents and local leaders have enthusiastically supported including it in ...
Read more about Bolivias Bet on Rotavirus Vaccines Pays Off. Rotavirus Vaccines Work Well in Developing Countries. Submitted ... Read more about Rotavirus Vaccines Work Well in Developing Countries. How purchasing power can help prevent child deaths: ... Bolivias Bet on Rotavirus Vaccines Pays Off. Submitted by Sabin on Fri, 2013-06-21 16:13. ... Two vaccines were recently introduced to the market, but their introduction in countries lags, as does awareness of the true ...
Because rotavirus vaccines have proven effective in developed countries but had not been tested in developing countries, we ... Because rotavirus vaccines have proven effective in developed countries but had not been tested in developing countries, we ... Because rotavirus vaccines have proven effective in developed countries but had not been tested in developing countries, we ... Because rotavirus vaccines have proven effective in developed countries but had not been tested in developing countries, we ...
Nearly a quarter of deaths from rotavirus gastroenteritis occur in India, a country with a high degree of rotavirus strain ... Since 2004, two new oral rotavirus vaccines have been introduced: a human-bovine reassortant pentavalent rotavirus vaccine and ... Efficacy of human rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus gastroenteritis during the first 2 years of life in European infants: ... Rotavirus disease in Uzbekistan: cost-effectiveness of a new vaccine. Vaccine2007;25:373-80. ...
33 African countries have rotavirus in their national vaccine schedule, many having received support from Gavi, the Vaccine ... Several large countries here plan to introduce rotavirus vaccines in the next few years. These include Nigeria and the ... 2. African countries were early adopters and have been at the vanguard African countries have been the vanguard of rotavirus ... Once prequalified, UNICEF can supply these new vaccines in Gavi-eligible countries. Expanding choices between vaccine products ...
The vaccine, which will be available for free in health facilities throughout the country, is the 11th vaccine to be added into ... Rotavirus vaccine is safe and can be administered simultaneously with other routine infant vaccines. It is given orally and ... the water we drink and the medicines and vaccines that treat and protect us. The Organization aims to provide every child, ... The Government of Uganda has launched today a new rotavirus vaccine to protect under five-year-old children from diarrhea. ...
Heterogeneity of Rotavirus Vaccine Efficacy Among Infants in Developing Countries. Gruber, Joann F.; Hille, Darcy A.; Liu, G. ... Effectiveness of 2 Rotavirus Vaccines Against Rotavirus Disease in Taiwanese Infants. Chang, Wan-Chi; Yen, Catherine; Wu, Fang- ... Rotavirus Vaccine: Current Use and Future Considerations. Bruijning-Verhagen, Patricia; Groome, Michelle ... Intussusception-related Hospitalizations Among Infants Before and After Private Market Licensure of Rotavirus Vaccines in ...
... of complete and partial vaccination with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) in the prevention of rotavirus acute ... Nlm Unique ID: 0376422 Medline TA: Pediatrics Country: - Other Details: Languages: ENG Pagination: - Citation Subset: - ... of complete and partial vaccination with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) in the prevention of rotavirus acute ... The VE of RV5 for 1, 2, and 3 doses against all rotavirus genotypes with the use of rotavirus-negative AGE controls was 74% (95 ...
Theres a rotavirus vaccine available in some countries.. Parasite. *Giardiasis. Giardia is a parasite that spreads easily ... Rotavirus. According to the Mayo Clinic, rotavirus is the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis in children worldwide. ...
Immunization programs have reduced the disease burden in many countries.... ... Background Human group A rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. ... Impact of rotavirus vaccines in Sub-Saharan African countries. Vaccine. 2018;36(47):7119-23.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Efficacy of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants in developing countries in sub- ...
... helping to prevent hundreds of thousands of deaths annually from rotavirus diarrhea in children living in developing countries. ... An effective oral rotavirus vaccine-created by NIAID scientists in the mid- to late 1980s and developed further through a ... Approximately 1,600 rotavirus-related deaths each day occur predominantly in the developing countries, notes Albert Z. Kapikian ... Later, he and his colleagues in NIAID developed the rotavirus vaccine that was tested in the United States and abroad in ...
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundations "Impatient Optimists": 5 Reasons the Global Gap in Rotavirus Vaccine Access is Shrinking. ... African countries were early adopters and have been at the vanguard … 3. Manufacturing developments are expanding choice, ... discusses the progress in achieving greater rotavirus vaccine coverage, highlighting five reasons for the improvement: "1. ... Blog Post Highlights Improvements In Global Rotavirus Vaccination Coverage. Jan 11, 2018 ...
Serotype G12 was identified in 30 (5%) of 546 rotavirus-positive fecal specimens. The G12 strain possessed multiple ... To assess diversity of rotavirus strains in Lilongwe, Malawi, we conducted a cross-sectional study of children with acute ... Introduction of rotavirus vaccines in developing countries: remaining challenges. Ann Trop Paediatr. 2007;27:157-67. DOIPubMed ... Glass RI, Parashar UD, Bresee JS, Turcios R, Fischer TK, Widdowson MA, Rotavirus vaccines: current prospects and future ...
... and middle-income countries (LMICs), using rotavirus vaccination as a case study. Specific equity-related indicators for ... Economic evaluations of rotavirus vaccine in LMICs identified via a systematic review of the literature were assessed to ... This study illustrates how equity considerations are currently being incorporated within CEA of rotavirus vaccination and ... a systematic review of rotavirus vaccine in low- and middle-income countries ...
... there is less rotavirus disease and an alternative vaccine is available. Other countries may decide to continue vaccinating ... Glaxo SmithKline Rotavirus vaccines Rotarix. GlaxoSmithKline Schemes with GAVI to Offer Rotavirus Vaccine at Reduced Costs to ... Rotavirus Vaccines Safe Despite Pig Virus. * Vaccinated Sibling Transmits Rotavirus to Unvaccinated Brother, Gets Rotavirus ... This also applies to many other types of donations to developing countries.. The vaccine donations illustrate in fact the ...
Paul Offits RotaTeq vaccine from Merck. AP medical news reported an apparently benign pig virus as the contaminant. ... The FDA has recomended the temporary suspension of GlaxoSmithKlines rotavirus vaccine called Rotarix, which is a direct ... Wasnt a great deal of the contributions to Mercks rotavirus vaccine for developing countries? Hmmm....Somebodys getting ... Vaccines and Absence of Evidence of Safety FDA Suspends Use of GlaxoSmithKline Rotavirus Vaccine Tainted with Pig Virus The FDA ...
Fortunately, since 2005, vaccination rates have been recovering in that country. No link between the MMR vaccine and autism has ... Vanderbilt receives $20 million to develop new vaccines for rotavirus, RSV and more.. By Paul Govern. January 2011 ... Vanderbilt and Vaccines. Vanderbilt has earned a spot in the recent history of vaccine achievements with its contributions. ... We need to arm them with the facts about vaccine. We need to tell them what reactions can be seen with vaccines and how we ...
Rotavirus Vaccines Work Well in Developing Countries. Submitted by Sabin on Fri, 2013-06-21 16:07. ... Bolivias Bet on Rotavirus Vaccines Pays Off. Submitted by Sabin on Fri, 2013-06-21 16:13. ... Ciro de Quadros recently wrote an opinion piece for AllAfrica.com about a new study showing that rotavirus vaccines will have a ... The Sabin Vaccine Institute has been a leader in global health and vaccine advocacy community for many years. ...
"Performance of rotavirus vaccines in developed and developing countries". Human Vaccines. 6 (7): 532-542. doi:10.4161/hv.6.7. ... Two commercial rotavirus vaccines exist and several more are in development.[44] In Africa and Asia these vaccines reduced ... "Summary of effectiveness and impact of rotavirus vaccination with the oral pentavalent rotavirus vaccine: a systematic review ... "Reduction in rotavirus after vaccine introduction-United States, 2000-2009". Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 58 (41): ...
  • Two or three doses more than a month apart should be given, depending on the vaccine administered. (wikipedia.org)
  • The VE of RV5 for 1, 2, and 3 doses against all rotavirus genotypes with the use of rotavirus-negative AGE controls was 74% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37%-90%), 88% (95% CI: 66%-96%), and 87% (95% CI: 71%-94%), respectively, and with the use of ARI controls was 73% (95% CI: 43%-88%), 88% (95% CI: 68%-95%), and 85% (95% CI: 72%-91%), respectively. (biomedsearch.com)
  • More than 1 million doses were administered before the vaccine was withdrawn from the market in 1999 because of a link with an intestinal blockage known as intussusception. (news-medical.net)
  • Whenever OPV is used, a minimum 2-week interval should be observed between HRV vaccine and OPV doses. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • ROTAVAC® has been supplied to low income countries at $ 1.0 / dose, with the feasibility for further ~30% price reductions, based on the procurement of around 100 million doses for these countries" Dr. Krishna Ella added . (dbtindia.nic.in)
  • Between January 2011 and November 2013, over 270,000 vaccine doses were distributed in Lusaka province. (scirp.org)
  • Although the agency subsequently withdrew its approval for one of the problematic rotavirus vaccines, it was not until after an estimated 500,000 children received at least one million doses . (infowars.com)
  • The projects set out the key steps, timelines, players and budgets needed to deliver a specific number of doses of vaccine by a specific date. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • This randomized, controlled trial in 162 healthy babies and toddlers measured the safety and adverse effects during three injections of increasing doses of the new parenteral subunit vaccine, called P2-VP8-P. (umn.edu)
  • For the study, 2,000 babies from Vietnam and Bangladesh aged one to three months were chosen to either receive 3 oral doses of the vaccine or placebo. (growingyourbaby.com)
  • The Geneva-based Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization has reached an agreement with vaccine makers Pfizer and Glaxo to provide 60 million doses a year of the pneumococcal vaccines at a reduced cost to developing nations. (growingyourbaby.com)
  • In rural areas or those prone to power cuts, up to half of vaccine doses are 'spoilt' because the cold chain is broken or faulty. (wellcome.ac.uk)
  • Two vaccines were recently introduced to the market, but their introduction in countries lags, as does awareness of the true burden of the disease. (sabin.org)
  • Immunization programs have reduced the disease burden in many countries. (springer.com)
  • Countries with a low HDI carry a disproportionately greater burden of SSI than countries with a middle or high HDI and might have higher rates of antibiotic resistance," the authors write. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The disease burden has been substantially reduced in countries where rotavirus vaccines are used. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • Both grants awarded today will be used to bring together experts in research, regulation, marketing and manufacturing to address potential obstacles such as lack of disease burden data and vaccine efficacy, uncertain market demand, and regulatory processes that could delay approval of vaccines for the developing world. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • In a published response to the Global Burden Disease group's work, Boston University global health researchers commented good public health data are lacking in several countries included in the study. (npr.org)
  • Today, Bangladesh's coverage for ORS is 77 percent, the best of the high-burden countries. (nextbillion.net)
  • This is a significant economic burden in Tunisia, where a safe and effective vaccine is available but not yet introduced to the immunization schedule. (who.int)
  • A universal rotavirus immunization program offered to all children has the potential to prevent moderate to severe forms of the disease associated with rotavirus, with associated decreased disease burden and health care costs. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In a recent paper published in Pediatric Clinics of North America , "The Burden and Etiology of Diarrheal Illness in Developing Countries," Karen Kotloff, MD, Professor of Pediatrics and Head of the Division of Infectious Disease and Tropical Pediatrics at UM SOM, outlined the impact and challenges of diarrheal diseases, identified the key pathogens responsible and discussed the interventions to prevent and treat this serious issue. (medindia.net)
  • Among diarrheal diseases, rotavirus is an exception to the management rules. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although most diarrheal diseases can be managed without a specific drug by making sure that hydration is maintained, rotavirus also causes vomiting, which results in additional fluid loss and makes it difficult to treat a child except by giving intravenous fluids. (wsj.com)
  • These pathogens rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigellaand enterotoxigenic Esherichia coli (ETEC) are responsible for most diarrheal illnesses, according to Dr. Kotloff, drawing from research conducted under the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS, the largest study of childhood diarrheal diseases conducted in a developing country setting. (medindia.net)
  • We are on the cusp of a dramatic shift in the epidemiology of pediatric diarrheal diseases since rotavirus vaccines became available," Dr. Kotloff said. (medindia.net)
  • I'm old enough to remember when the polio vaccine was still new. (scienceblogs.com)
  • OPV contains three vaccine strain polioviruses given orally by liquid drops in the mouth and public health officials adopted the Sabin live attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) as the preferred polio vaccine because OPV not only vaccinated the recipient but also "passively" vaccinated those coming in close contact with a recently vaccinated child shedding vaccine strain live polioviruses in the stool, saliva and nasal secretions. (globalresearch.ca)
  • In 2008, U.S. and European health officials analyzed eight outbreaks of paralytic polio between 2000 and 2005 in Hispaniola, Indonesia, Egypt, Philippines, Madagascar (2), China and Cambodia that were caused by circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV). (globalresearch.ca)
  • Because polio is among the more than 200 related viruses in the Picornaviridae family of enteroviruses, the doctors suggested that public health officials investigate " the influence of strain shifts of enteropathogens induced by the [polio] vaccine given practically every month. (globalresearch.ca)
  • Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) is recommending inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) use as one of the potential strategies to respond to outbreaks of type 2 wild type and/or circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The investigators will assess the usability and immune response following fractional dose inactivated polio virus vaccine (fIPV) administration with two novel intradermal adapters (ID adap. (bioportfolio.com)
  • From the time VWA was started in 2003, more than 640 million people in the Region of the Americas have been vaccinated under the umbrella of VWA activities, against many dangerous diseases - including polio, measles, rubella, rotavirus, human papilloma virus (HPV), influenza, and yellow fever. (paho.org)
  • The polio vaccine has prevented 15 million cases of paralysis worldwide, and it is estimated that its eradication will result in economic savings of some $40-50 billion dollars. (paho.org)
  • By December 2016, 31 (66%) of 47 countries in the WHO African Region had introduced rotavirus vaccine, including 26 that introduced RV1 and five that introduced RV5. (cdc.gov)
  • Rotavirus surveillance data were collected through sentinel hospitals participating in the African Rotavirus Surveillance Network (ARSN), which was established in four countries in 2006 and had expanded to 29 countries by 2016 ( Figure ) ( 6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • In this report, the global Oral Rotavirus Vaccine market is valued at USD XX million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. (researchmoz.us)
  • Since 2000, PATH expanded from about 300 employees and an annual budget of $60 million to, in 2016, a payroll of 1,600 people working in 70+ countries and a budget of $305 million. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2009, the FDA also okayed GlaxoSmithKline's HPV vaccine, Cervarix, but Merck's FDA-facilitated stranglehold on the market prompted the company to withdraw Cervarix from the U.S. in 2016. (infowars.com)
  • Because of these findings and the global IPV shortage, the most recent WHO position paper suggests that countries consider administering two fIPV at 6 and 14 weeks of age as an alternative to one IPV after the OPV2 cessation in April 2016. (bioportfolio.com)
  • in 2015, the Americas put an end to rubella and congenital rubella syndrome, and in 2016, the countries eliminated measles transmission. (paho.org)
  • For the new study, the researchers analyzed surveillance data from February 2012 through December 2016 from hospitals in seven sub-Saharan African countries that were among the first to start using the vaccine: Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. (umn.edu)
  • In 2015 CDC and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) participated in two studies to examine the impact and effectiveness of the vaccine. (cdc.gov)
  • The data from CDC surveillance is a crucial tool used to measure the real-world effectiveness of the vaccine so that Kenya and other countries can see its results before investing their money into the project. (cdc.gov)
  • Having strong and verifiable data about a vaccine's effectiveness in other countries, as well as complete information of the costs associated with starting and continuing a vaccine program, are critical in a country's assessment and decision. (cdc.gov)
  • That will make it possible to determine vaccine coverage and effectiveness. (cdc.gov)
  • When introducing a new vaccine, it is crucial to conduct studies evaluating the vaccination's impact and effectiveness in order to decide on recommendations for its future use. (europa.eu)
  • Combined vaccine effectiveness including both groups was 63% (95% CI, 34% to 80%) at 18 months. (healio.com)
  • Here I describe studies with a live oral cholera vaccine that include older children no longer deriving immune support from breast milk or maternal antibodies and that identify some of the factors accounting for the lower immunogenicity, as well as suggesting counter-measures that may enhance the effectiveness of oral immunization in developing countries. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Assessment of effectiveness of UNICEF vaccine procurement Principles & Objectives? (slideserve.com)
  • Dr. Kotloff and her team are studying the effectiveness and safety of a new enhanced thermostable formulation of a rotavirus vaccine called RotaTeqTM in Mali, which is intended to be more resistant to temperature fluctuations. (medindia.net)
  • In order to develop such an alternative therapy, the effectiveness of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG to produce and display a VHH antibody fragment (referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 [ARP on the surface was investigated. (diva-portal.org)
  • This decision of the economic cost of vaccine compared to the physical cost in terms of illness and death is a difficult one for any country. (cdc.gov)
  • The next goal for the Kenya Ministry of Health is to ensure that this support is sustained through using data showing reduced illness and death from rotavirus. (cdc.gov)
  • Children with laboratory-confirmed rotavirus AGE (cases) were matched according to date of birth and onset of illness to 2 sets of controls: children with rotavirus-negative AGE and children with ARI. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Children in developing countries are more vulnerable to severe and fatal illness. (news-medical.net)
  • Glaxo's vaccine has been used in millions of children worldwide, including 1 million in the U.S., with no signs of safety problems - and the pig virus isn't known to cause any kind of illness in people or animals, said Dr. Margaret Hamburg, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. (ageofautism.com)
  • Studies show the drug can cut rotavirus illness in half. (deseretnews.com)
  • in those settings, the pre-vaccine impact of the two conditions was largely measured in terms of "healthcare costs, missed daycare, and loss of time from work for parents/guardians" rather than in terms of serious illness or mortality. (infowars.com)
  • Even if children don't die, the diarrheal illness due to rotavirus can be severe, resulting in rapid dehydration, metabolic disturbances and possible long-term consequences of malnutrition and a damaged gut. (wsj.com)
  • Many bacteria cause more illness in developing countries [than in developed countries]. (asm.org)
  • Nearly every child in the world is infected with rotavirus at least once before they are five years old. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Nearly every child in the world has been infected with rotavirus at least once by the age of five. (stanford.edu)