Costus: A plant genus of the family Costaceae (sometimes classified in Zingiberaceae), order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). It is a source of SAPONINS and furostanol glycosides.Spirostans: Cholestane derivatives containing a fused lactone ring at the 16,17-position and a spiroglycosidic linkage at C-22. Members include sarsaponin, DIOSGENIN and yamogenin.Dominican Republic: A republic in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Santo Domingo. With Haiti, it forms the island of Hispaniola - the Dominican Republic occupying the eastern two thirds, and Haiti, the western third. It was created in 1844 after a revolt against the rule of President Boyer over the entire island of Hispaniola, itself visited by Columbus in 1492 and settled the next year. Except for a brief period of annexation to Spain (1861-65), it has been independent, though closely associated with the United States. Its name comes from the Spanish Santo Domingo, Holy Sunday, with reference to its discovery on a Sunday. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p338, 506 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p151)Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.AfricaEntomology: A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.p120 GTPase Activating Protein: A 120-kDa RAS GTPase-activating protein that binds to tyrosine phosphoproteins through its SH2 domains. The 100-kDa RNA-splicing variant (p100 GAP protein) is expressed in placenta.Resedaceae: A plant family of the order Capparales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is a small family of herbs and shrubs. Some produce GLUCOSINOLATES.Acari: A large, subclass of arachnids comprising the MITES and TICKS, including parasites of plants, animals, and humans, as well as several important disease vectors.Ginger: Deciduous plant rich in volatile oil (OILS, VOLATILE). It is used as a flavoring agent and has many other uses both internally and topically.Phlebotomus: A genus of PSYCHODIDAE which functions as the vector of a number of pathogenic organisms, including LEISHMANIA DONOVANI; LEISHMANIA TROPICA; Bartonella bacilliformis, and the Pappataci fever virus (SANDFLY FEVER NAPLES VIRUS).Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Educational Technology: Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)Yin-Yang: In Chinese philosophy and religion, two principles, one negative, dark, and feminine (yin) and one positive, bright, and masculine (yang), from whose interaction all things are produced and all things are dissolved. As a concept the two polar elements referred originally to the shady and sunny sides of a valley or a hill but it developed into the relationship of any contrasting pair: those specified above (female-male, etc.) as well as cold-hot, wet-dry, weak-strong, etc. It is not a distinct system of thought by itself but permeates Chinese life and thought. A balance of yin and yang is essential to health. A deficiency of either principle can manifest as disease. (Encyclopedia Americana)Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.YY1 Transcription Factor: A ubiquitously expressed zinc finger-containing protein that acts both as a repressor and activator of transcription. It interacts with key regulatory proteins such as TATA-BINDING PROTEIN; TFIIB; and ADENOVIRUS E1A PROTEINS.Lightning Injuries: Accidental injuries caused by brief high-voltage electrical discharges during thunderstorms. Cardiopulmonary arrest, coma and other neurologic symptoms, myocardial necrosis, and dermal burns are common. Prompt treatment of the acute sequelae, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is indicated for survival.Zingiberaceae: A plant family of the order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida. It includes plants which have both flavoring and medicinal properties such as GINGER; turmeric (CURCUMA), and cardamom (ELETTARIA).Scarlet Fever: Infection with group A streptococci that is characterized by tonsillitis and pharyngitis. An erythematous rash is commonly present.Lightning: An abrupt high-current electric discharge that occurs in the ATMOSPHERE and that has a path length ranging from hundreds of feet to tens of miles. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)SingaporeCasuistry: A method of ETHICAL ANALYSIS that emphasizes practical problem solving through examining individual cases that are considered to be representative; sometimes used to denote specious argument or rationalization. Differentiate from casuistics, which is the recording and study of cases and disease.Pimpinella: A plant genus in the family APIACEAE (Umbelliferae) that is used in SPICES and is a source of anethole.Pesticide Synergists: Chemicals that, while not possessing inherent pesticidal activity, nonetheless promote or enhance the effectiveness of other pesticides when combined.Naturopathy: A drugless system of therapy, making use of physical forces such as air, light, water, heat, massage. Treatments are often diet- and nutrition-oriented with attention given to the patient's personal history and lifestyle. (From Cassileth, Alternative Medicine Handbook, 1998, p329)Piperonyl Butoxide: An insecticide synergist, especially for pyrethroids and ROTENONE.Scalp DermatosesMalathion: A wide spectrum aliphatic organophosphate insecticide widely used for both domestic and commercial agricultural purposes.Cuba: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies, south of Florida. With the adjacent islands it forms the Republic of Cuba. Its capital is Havana. It was discovered by Columbus on his first voyage in 1492 and conquered by Spain in 1511. It has a varied history under Spain, Great Britain, and the United States but has been independent since 1902. The name Cuba is said to be an Indian name of unknown origin but the language that gave the name is extinct, so the etymology is a conjecture. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p302 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p132)Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Intellectual Property: Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.Molluginaceae: A plant family of the order Caryophyllales, subclass Caryophyllidae, class Magnoliopsida. Some members contain triterpenoid saponins.Drugs, Generic: Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Butterflies: Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly colored and patterned.Anniversaries and Special Events: Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.Plants, Edible: An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.Bulimia: Eating an excess amount of food in a short period of time, as seen in the disorder of BULIMIA NERVOSA. It is caused by an abnormal craving for food, or insatiable hunger also known as "ox hunger".Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Beer: An alcoholic beverage usually made from malted cereal grain (as barley), flavored with hops, and brewed by slow fermentation.Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.

Molecular cloning and functional expression of cDNAs encoding oxidosqualene cyclases from Costus speciosus. (1/7)

Costus speciosus produces a large quantity of steroidal glycosides derived from the sole aglycone, diosgenin. Cycloartenol, a product of oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC), is postulated to be a common intermediate for phytosterols of primary metabolism and diosgenin of secondary metabolism, possibly providing a metabolic branch point. Two cDNAs, CSOSC1 and CSOSC2, were cloned from C. speciosus by RT-PCR and cDNA library screening. Both cDNAs encode 759 amino acids with high mutual identity (74%), resembling (>55% identity) the known OSCs. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that the gene products occupy distinct positions from those of cycloartenol synthases (CASs) and triterpene synthases from dicotyledonous plants. By functional expression in yeast, CSOSC1 and CSOSC2 were proved to encode a CAS and a multifunctional triterpene synthase, respectively. The present result is the first demonstration of the functional expression of OSCs from monocotyledonous plants.  (+info)

Costus spicatus tea failed to improve diabetic progression in C57BLKS/J db/db mice, a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. (2/7)

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The evolution of postpollination reproductive isolation in Costus. (3/7)

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Changes in expression pattern of the teosinte branched1-like genes in the Zingiberales provide a mechanism for evolutionary shifts in symmetry across the order. (4/7)

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Aqueous fraction from Costus spiralis (Jacq.) Roscoe leaf reduces contractility by impairing the calcium inward current in the mammalian myocardium. (5/7)

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Antimicrobial activity of sesquiterpene lactones isolated from traditional medicinal plant, Costus speciosus (Koen ex.Retz.) Sm. (6/7)

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Next generation sequencing and de novo transcriptome analysis of Costus pictus D. Don, a non-model plant with potent anti-diabetic properties. (7/7)

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  • Thus, the phytochemical constituents of aqueous and ethanolic leaves extracts of Costus afer and their effects on lipid profile of female albino wistar rats were determined. (codemint.net)
  • The results of the phytochemical analysis showed that, Costus afer aqueous leaves extract contained cardiac glycosides and terpenes while the ethanolic extract contained tannins, phlobatannins, steroids and alkaloids. (codemint.net)
  • Groups II, III, IV, and V were fed with water, normal rat feed and in addition, were administered Costus afer extracts for 14 days. (codemint.net)
  • 250mg/kg and 500 mg/kg aqueous Costus afer leaves extracts were administered to group II and III respectively. (codemint.net)
  • The present study demonstrates that Costus afer extracts possess lipid lowering activity, thus suggesting its beneficial role in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. (codemint.net)
  • Chamaecostus cuspidatus , common name Fiery Costus or Spiral Flag , is a species of herbaceous plant in the Costaceae family native to eastern Brazil (States of Bahia and Espirito Santo). (hortiasia.com)
  • The long red flower spikes of Costus pulverulentus are unique to the family and they are sure to create interest in the garden. (hortiasia.com)
  • A furostanol glycoside from rhizomes of Costus spicatus. (semanticscholar.org)
  • A new furostanol glycoside was isolated from the rhizomes of Costus spicatus. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Costus Spicatus can be found in humid coastal forests, as well as the Atlantic Forest and the Amazon region. (rterraherbs.com)
  • Triagem fitoquímica e atividade antioxidante de Costus spicatus (Jacq. (bvsalud.org)
  • S. w / Phytochemical screening and antioxidant activity of Costus spicatus (Jacq. (bvsalud.org)
  • O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o perfil fitoquímico e a atividade antioxidante comparando-se os resultados obtidos entre diferentes órgãos da Costus spicatus. (bvsalud.org)
  • Foram utilizados caules, folhas e flores da Costus spicatus, colhidos na Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, no município de Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ. (bvsalud.org)
  • Concluiu-se que a Costus spicatus apresentou todas as classes de metabólitos pesquisadas, dentre as quais, algumas possuem atividade biológica já conhecida, fazendo-se necessária a realização de estudos quantitativos e pesquisas que demonstrem seus efeitos farmacológicos, contribuindo para o desenvolvimento de novos fármacos . (bvsalud.org)
  • The objective of this work was to evaluate the phytochemical profile and the antioxidant activity comparing the results between different organs of Costus spicatus . (bvsalud.org)
  • We used the stems, leaves and flowers of Costus spicatus harvested at the State University of Norte Fluminense "Darcy Ribeiro" in the city of Campos dos Goytacazes, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil . (bvsalud.org)
  • We concluded that Costus spicatus presented all classes of metabolites studied, among which some already have their biological activity known by the literature , being necessary the performance of quantitative and research studies that demonstrate their pharmacological effects, thus contributing to the development of new drugs . (bvsalud.org)
  • The following list helps to identify if Amol Pharmaceuticals Pvt Ltd Costus Extract Powder /lib/jquery-ui-1.11.1/jquery-ui.css is kosher or not. (iskosher.com)
  • if you cannot find Amol Pharmaceuticals Pvt Ltd Costus Extract Powder /lib/jquery-ui-1.11.1/jquery-ui.css in the list, it might be, that it is not kosher or was not included in our databases. (iskosher.com)
  • Is Amol Pharmaceuticals Pvt Ltd Costus Extract Powder /lib/jquery-ui-1.11.1/jquery-ui.css Kosher? (iskosher.com)
  • Find if Amol Pharmaceuticals Pvt Ltd Costus Extract Powder /lib/jquery-ui-1.11.1/jquery-ui.css is kosher in your region. (iskosher.com)
  • The aim of the present study was to investigate the preventive effect of Costus pictus leaf extract in experimental hypothyroidism. (phcogres.com)
  • Zaïre, Congo Rep, Angola Costus pictus D.Don - Mexico, Central America Costus plicatus Maas - Costa Rica, Panama Costus plowmanii Maas - Colombia Costus productus Gleason ex Maas - Peru Costus pulverulentus C.Presl - from Tamaulipas to Ecuador Costus quasi-appendiculatus Woodson ex Maas - Bolivia Costus ricus Maas & H.Maas - Costa Rica Costus rumphianus Valeton ex K.Heyne - Maluku Costus sarmentosus Bojer - Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi Costus scaber Ruiz & Pav. (wikipedia.org)
  • Costus pictus D Don (caña mexicana) es una especie cultivada como ornamental y la decocción de hojas y tallos frescos se emplea tradicionalmente para afecciones urinarias, como infecciones , litiasis y cólicos renales en Cuba . (bvsalud.org)
  • Costus pictus D Don (Mexican reed) is a species for decorative purposes and the decoction of leaves and fresh stems is traditionally used for urinary disorders like infections , lithiasis and renal colic in Cuba . (bvsalud.org)
  • In Trinidad and Tobago, a mix of Costus scaber juice and crushed Renealmia alpinia berries is used to treat dogs bitten by snakes. (wikipedia.org)
  • from Honduras to Ecuador Costus loangensis H.Maas & Maas - Gabon Costus longebracteolatus Maas - N South America Costus lucanusianus J.Braun & K.Schum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maas - Colombia, Peru, N Brazil Costus adolphi-friderici Loes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cameroon Costus bracteatus Rowlee - - S Central America Costus bullatus Meekiong, Muliati & Ipor - Sarawak Costus chartaceus Maas - Christmas costus - Colombia, Ecuador Costus chrysocephalus K.Schum. (wikipedia.org)
  • São Tomé, Príncipe, Annobón, Cameroon Costus glaucus Maas - from Nicaragua to Colombia Costus guanaiensis Rusby - Latin America, West Indies Costus juruanus K.Schum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cameroon Costus leucanthus Maas - Colombia, Ecuador Costus ligularis Baker - Cameroon, Gabon, Congo Rep Costus lima K.Schum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Borneo Costus montanus Maas - Costa Rica Costus mosaicus W.Bull - Zaïre Costus muluensis Meekiong, Ipor & Tawan - Sarawak Costus mulus Meekiong, Ipor & Tawan - Sarawak Costus nemotrichus K.Schum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cameroon Costus nitidus Maas - Costa Rica, Panama Costus nudicaulis Baker - Gabon Costus oblongus S.Q.Tong - Tibet, Yunnan Costus oligophyllus K.Schum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other common names for this essential oil areKuth oil, Costus oil, Costus root oil, Costus root essential oil, Costus Root Absolute and Mu xiang oil. (healthbenefitstimes.com)