STRIATED MUSCLE cell components which anchor the MYOFIBRILS from the Z-bands to the SARCOLEMMA and EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. Costameric proteins include the proteins of FOCAL ADHESIONS.
A cytoskeletal protein associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The amino acid sequence of human vinculin has been determined. The protein consists of 1066 amino acid residues and its gene has been assigned to chromosome 10.
The excitable plasma membrane of a muscle cell. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)
An intermediate filament protein found predominantly in smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle cells. Localized at the Z line. MW 50,000 to 55,000 is species dependent.
A muscle protein localized in surface membranes which is the product of the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy gene. Individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy usually lack dystrophin completely while those with Becker muscular dystrophy have dystrophin of an altered size. It shares features with other cytoskeletal proteins such as SPECTRIN and alpha-actinin but the precise function of dystrophin is not clear. One possible role might be to preserve the integrity and alignment of the plasma membrane to the myofibrils during muscle contraction and relaxation. MW 400 kDa.
The long cylindrical contractile organelles of STRIATED MUSCLE cells composed of ACTIN FILAMENTS; MYOSIN filaments; and other proteins organized in arrays of repeating units called SARCOMERES .
Cytoplasmic filaments intermediate in diameter (about 10 nanometers) between the microfilaments and the microtubules. They may be composed of any of a number of different proteins and form a ring around the cell nucleus.
The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.
A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.
The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.
Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.
Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
A system of therapeutics founded by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843), based on the Law of Similars where "like cures like". Diseases are treated by highly diluted substances that cause, in healthy persons, symptoms like those of the disease to be treated.
Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.
"In the context of medical records, 'archives' refers to the storage and preservation of inactive patient records that are no longer in regular use but are required to be kept for legal, administrative, or historical purposes."
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)
Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.
A heterogeneous group of inherited MYOPATHIES, characterized by wasting and weakness of the SKELETAL MUSCLE. They are categorized by the sites of MUSCLE WEAKNESS; AGE OF ONSET; and INHERITANCE PATTERNS.

An ankyrin-based mechanism for functional organization of dystrophin and dystroglycan. (1/10)

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Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene-1 (FRG-1) is an actin-bundling protein associated with muscle-attachment sites. (2/10)

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Ankyrin-B interactions with spectrin and dynactin-4 are required for dystrophin-based protection of skeletal muscle from exercise injury. (3/10)

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Desmoplakin and talin2 are novel mRNA targets of fragile X-related protein-1 in cardiac muscle. (4/10)

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The Mef2A transcription factor coordinately regulates a costamere gene program in cardiac muscle. (5/10)

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Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K(p110alpha)) directly regulates key components of the Z-disc and cardiac structure. (6/10)

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Cardiac-specific deletion of the microtubule-binding protein CENP-F causes dilated cardiomyopathy. (7/10)

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Substrate stiffness affects sarcomere and costamere structure and electrophysiological function of isolated adult cardiomyocytes. (8/10)

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Costameres are specialized structures found in muscle cells, specifically at the sarcolemma-sarcomere interface. The term "costamere" is derived from the Greek words "kosta," meaning coast or shore, and "meros," meaning part. These structures were first described by Dr. Seiji Ishikawa in 1981.

Costameres are composed of a network of proteins that connect the extracellular matrix to the contractile apparatus of muscle cells. They primarily consist of integrin complexes, vinculin, talin, and dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC). Integrins, which are transmembrane receptors, connect the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton by interacting with intracellular proteins like talin and vinculin. The DGC, on the other hand, links the actin cytoskeleton to the sarcolemma, providing structural support and protection to muscle cells.

Costameres play a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of muscle fibers during contraction and force transmission. They also contribute to signaling pathways that regulate muscle cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Mutations or dysfunctions in costamere-associated proteins can lead to various muscular disorders, such as muscular dystrophies and myopathies.

Vinculin is a protein found in many types of cells, including muscle and endothelial cells. It is primarily located at the sites of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, where it plays important roles in cell adhesion, mechanotransduction, and cytoskeletal organization. Vinculin interacts with several other proteins, including actin, talin, and integrins, to form a complex network that helps regulate the connection between the extracellular matrix and the intracellular cytoskeleton. Mutations in the vinculin gene have been associated with certain inherited diseases, such as muscular dystrophy-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

Sarcolemma is the medical term for the cell membrane that surrounds a muscle fiber or a skeletal muscle cell. It is responsible for providing protection and structure to the muscle fiber, as well as regulating the movement of ions and other molecules in and out of the cell. The sarcolemma plays a crucial role in the excitation-contraction coupling process that allows muscles to contract and relax.

The sarcolemma is composed of two main layers: the outer plasma membrane, which is similar to the cell membranes of other cells, and the inner basal lamina, which provides structural support and helps to anchor the muscle fiber to surrounding tissues. The sarcolemma also contains various ion channels, receptors, and transporters that are involved in regulating muscle function and communication with other cells.

Damage to the sarcolemma can lead to a variety of muscle disorders, including muscular dystrophy and myasthenia gravis.

Desmin is a type of intermediate filament protein that is primarily found in the cardiac and skeletal muscle cells, as well as in some types of smooth muscle cells. It is an important component of the cytoskeleton, which provides structural support to the cell and helps maintain its shape. Desmin plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of the sarcomere, which is the basic contractile unit of the muscle fiber. Mutations in the desmin gene can lead to various forms of muscular dystrophy and other inherited muscle disorders.

Dystrophin is a protein that provides structural stability to muscle fibers. It is an essential component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, which helps maintain the integrity of the sarcolemma (the membrane surrounding muscle cells) during muscle contraction and relaxation. Dystrophin plays a crucial role in connecting the cytoskeleton of the muscle fiber to the extracellular matrix, allowing for force transmission and protecting the muscle cell from damage.

Mutations in the DMD gene, which encodes dystrophin, can lead to various forms of muscular dystrophy, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). In DMD, a severe form of the disease, genetic alterations typically result in little or no production of functional dystrophin, causing progressive muscle weakness, wasting, and degeneration. In BMD, a milder form of the disorder, partially functional dystrophin is produced, leading to less severe symptoms and later onset of the disease.

Myofibrils are the basic contractile units of muscle fibers, composed of highly organized arrays of thick and thin filaments. They are responsible for generating the force necessary for muscle contraction. The thick filaments are primarily made up of the protein myosin, while the thin filaments are mainly composed of actin. Myofibrils are surrounded by a membrane called the sarcolemma and are organized into repeating sections called sarcomeres, which are the functional units of muscle contraction.

Intermediate filaments (IFs) are a type of cytoskeletal filament found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, including animal cells. They are called "intermediate" because they are smaller in diameter than microfilaments and larger than microtubules, two other types of cytoskeletal structures.

Intermediate filaments are composed of fibrous proteins that form long, unbranched, and flexible filaments. These filaments provide structural support to the cell and help maintain its shape. They also play a role in cell-to-cell adhesion, intracellular transport, and protection against mechanical stress.

Intermediate filaments are classified into six types based on their protein composition: Type I (acidic keratins), Type II (neutral/basic keratins), Type III (vimentin, desmin, peripherin), Type IV (neurofilaments), Type V (lamins), and Type VI (nestin). Each type of intermediate filament has a specific function and is expressed in different cell types. For example, Type I and II keratins are found in epithelial cells, while vimentin is expressed in mesenchymal cells.

Overall, intermediate filaments play an essential role in maintaining the structural integrity of cells and tissues, and their dysfunction has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and genetic disorders.

Muscle proteins are a type of protein that are found in muscle tissue and are responsible for providing structure, strength, and functionality to muscles. The two major types of muscle proteins are:

1. Contractile proteins: These include actin and myosin, which are responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscles. They work together to cause muscle movement by sliding along each other and shortening the muscle fibers.
2. Structural proteins: These include titin, nebulin, and desmin, which provide structural support and stability to muscle fibers. Titin is the largest protein in the human body and acts as a molecular spring that helps maintain the integrity of the sarcomere (the basic unit of muscle contraction). Nebulin helps regulate the length of the sarcomere, while desmin forms a network of filaments that connects adjacent muscle fibers together.

Overall, muscle proteins play a critical role in maintaining muscle health and function, and their dysregulation can lead to various muscle-related disorders such as muscular dystrophy, myopathies, and sarcopenia.

Skeletal muscle, also known as striated or voluntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is attached to bones by tendons or aponeuroses and functions to produce movements and support the posture of the body. It is composed of long, multinucleated fibers that are arranged in parallel bundles and are characterized by alternating light and dark bands, giving them a striped appearance under a microscope. Skeletal muscle is under voluntary control, meaning that it is consciously activated through signals from the nervous system. It is responsible for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and lifting objects.

The cytoskeleton is a complex network of various protein filaments that provides structural support, shape, and stability to the cell. It plays a crucial role in maintaining cellular integrity, intracellular organization, and enabling cell movement. The cytoskeleton is composed of three major types of protein fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. These filaments work together to provide mechanical support, participate in cell division, intracellular transport, and help maintain the cell's architecture. The dynamic nature of the cytoskeleton allows cells to adapt to changing environmental conditions and respond to various stimuli.

The Fluorescent Antibody Technique (FAT) is a type of immunofluorescence assay used in laboratory medicine and pathology for the detection and localization of specific antigens or antibodies in tissues, cells, or microorganisms. In this technique, a fluorescein-labeled antibody is used to selectively bind to the target antigen or antibody, forming an immune complex. When excited by light of a specific wavelength, the fluorescein label emits light at a longer wavelength, typically visualized as green fluorescence under a fluorescence microscope.

The FAT is widely used in diagnostic microbiology for the identification and characterization of various bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. It has also been applied in the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases and certain cancers by detecting specific antibodies or antigens in patient samples. The main advantage of FAT is its high sensitivity and specificity, allowing for accurate detection and differentiation of various pathogens and disease markers. However, it requires specialized equipment and trained personnel to perform and interpret the results.

Actin is a type of protein that forms part of the contractile apparatus in muscle cells, and is also found in various other cell types. It is a globular protein that polymerizes to form long filaments, which are important for many cellular processes such as cell division, cell motility, and the maintenance of cell shape. In muscle cells, actin filaments interact with another type of protein called myosin to enable muscle contraction. Actins can be further divided into different subtypes, including alpha-actin, beta-actin, and gamma-actin, which have distinct functions and expression patterns in the body.

The myocardium is the middle layer of the heart wall, composed of specialized cardiac muscle cells that are responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It forms the thickest part of the heart wall and is divided into two sections: the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, and the right ventricle, which pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs.

The myocardium contains several types of cells, including cardiac muscle fibers, connective tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. The muscle fibers are arranged in a highly organized pattern that allows them to contract in a coordinated manner, generating the force necessary to pump blood through the heart and circulatory system.

Damage to the myocardium can occur due to various factors such as ischemia (reduced blood flow), infection, inflammation, or genetic disorders. This damage can lead to several cardiac conditions, including heart failure, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy.

Homeopathy is a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) system, developed in the late 18th century by Samuel Hahnemann, based on the principle of "like cures like." This concept suggests that a substance that causes symptoms in a healthy person can be used in very dilute quantities to treat similar symptoms in illness. The dilutions are so extreme that no molecules of the original substance remain, leading to significant controversy and skepticism over any potential therapeutic effect. Homeopathic remedies are typically made from plants, minerals, or animals, and are often highly individualized for each patient based on their specific symptoms, mental and emotional state, and overall constitution. Despite its widespread use, homeopathy lacks robust scientific evidence supporting its efficacy beyond placebo effects, and it is not considered a mainstream medical practice in most countries.

Speech Therapy, also known as Speech-Language Pathology, is a medical field that focuses on the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of communication and swallowing disorders in children and adults. These disorders may include speech sound production difficulties (articulation disorders or phonological processes disorders), language disorders (expressive and/or receptive language impairments), voice disorders, fluency disorders (stuttering), cognitive-communication disorders, and swallowing difficulties (dysphagia).

Speech therapists, who are also called speech-language pathologists (SLPs), work with clients to improve their communication abilities through various therapeutic techniques and exercises. They may also provide counseling and education to families and caregivers to help them support the client's communication development and management of the disorder.

Speech therapy services can be provided in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, schools, private practices, and long-term care facilities. The specific goals and methods used in speech therapy will depend on the individual needs and abilities of each client.

In the context of medicine, "archives" typically refers to the collection and preservation of medical records or documents that are no longer in active use but still need to be retained for legal, historical, or research purposes. These archived materials may include patient records, clinical trial data, hospital reports, correspondence, images, and other forms of documentation. The purpose of maintaining medical archives is to ensure the availability and integrity of this information for future reference, as well as to comply with regulatory requirements related to record-keeping and privacy.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "parents" is not a term that has a medical definition. In general usage, parents are the two people (typically) who bring up and care for a child, or who have given birth to or adopted a child. They are responsible for the child's housing, food, clothing, education, and medical care. Is there a specific medical or healthcare-related context you had in mind? I would be happy to help further if I can.

Dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental disorder that impairs an individual's ability to read, write, and spell, despite having normal intelligence and adequate education. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and fluent word recognition, poor decoding and spelling abilities, and often accompanied by problems with reading comprehension and reduced reading experience. Dyslexia is not a result of low intelligence, lack of motivation, or poor instruction, but rather a specific learning disability that affects the way the brain processes written language. It is typically diagnosed in children, although it can go unnoticed until adulthood, and there are effective interventions and accommodations to help individuals with dyslexia overcome their challenges and achieve academic and professional success.

"Materia Medica" is a term that comes from the Latin language, where "materia" means "substance" or "material," and "medica" refers to "medical." In a medical context, Materia Medica historically refers to a collection of detailed descriptions of substances that are used for medicinal purposes.

It is essentially a comprehensive reference book that describes the properties, actions, uses, dosages, potential side effects, and contraindications of various drugs or medicinal agents. The information in a Materia Medica is typically based on historical use, experimental pharmacological data, clinical trials, and other scientific research.

Modern Materia Medica has evolved to become more specialized, with separate references for different types of medicinal substances, such as botanical (herbal) medicine, homeopathic remedies, or conventional pharmaceuticals. These resources are often used by healthcare professionals, including physicians, pharmacists, and nurses, to guide their prescribing decisions and ensure the safe and effective use of medications for their patients.

Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that primarily affect skeletal muscles, causing progressive weakness and degeneration. They are characterized by the lack or deficiency of a protein called dystrophin, which is essential for maintaining the integrity of muscle fibers. The most common form is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but there are many other types with varying symptoms and severity. Over time, muscle wasting and weakness can lead to disability and shortened lifespan, depending on the type and progression of the disease. Treatment typically focuses on managing symptoms, maintaining mobility, and supporting quality of life.

Costameres are dynamic structures. Several studies have suggested that costameres are responsive to mechanical, electrical, and ... The costamere is a structural-functional component of striated muscle cells which connects the sarcomere of the muscle to the ... Costameres are highly complex networks of proteins and glycoproteins, and can be considered as consisting of two major protein ... Costameres at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Srivastava, D.; Yu, S (2006). "Stretching ...
Actin, gamma 1, encoded by this gene, is found in non-muscle cells in the cytoplasm, and in muscle cells at costamere ... In myocytes, sarcomeres adhere to the sarcolemma via costameres, which align at Z-discs and M-lines. The two primary ... Danowski BA, Imanaka-Yoshida K, Sanger JM, Sanger JW (Sep 1992). "Costameres are sites of force transmission to the substratum ... It has been shown that gamma-actin interacting with another costameric protein dystrophin is critical for costameres forming ...
... is expressed at focal adhesions of non-striated cells and at costameres of striated muscle cells, and it functions to ... Costameric proteins redistribute to form mature costameres. While the precise functions of paxillin in this process are still ... In striated muscle cells, paxillin is important in costamerogenesis, or the formation of costameres, which are specialized ... Premyofibrils become nascent myofibrils, which progressively align to form mature myofibrils and nascent costamere structures ...
PKCε binds RACK2 at Z-lines with an EC50 of 86 nM; PKCε also binds at costameres to syndecan-4. PKCε has been shown to bind F- ... A role for focal adhesion kinase at costameres in strain-sensing and modulation of sarcomere length has been linked to ... "Localization of the transmembrane proteoglycan syndecan-4 and its regulatory kinases in costameres of rat cardiomyocytes: a ...
In muscle, CAP/Ponsin plays a role in the formation of mature costameres from focal adhesion-like contacts during assembly of ... it is localized to costamere structures. CAP/Ponsin may exist as thirteen alternatively-spliced isoforms, ranging from 81 kDa ... "Paxillin and ponsin interact in nascent costameres of muscle cells". Journal of Molecular Biology. 369 (3): 665-82. doi:10.1016 ...
The costamere attaches the sarcomere to the sarcolemma. Every single organelle and macromolecule of a muscle fiber is arranged ...
Costamare Inc > 'Containerships Fleet Employment' webpage, Costamere.com, October 26, 2021. Retrieved 2021-12-20. Winton, ...
At the costameres, another region implicated in force transmission, MLP is thought to be contributing in mechanosensing through ... However, the precise role of MLP at the costameres has not been extensively investigated yet. At the microfilaments, MLP is ... the costameres, and the microfilaments. At the Z-line, MLP interacts with different Z-line components and acts as a scaffold ... costameres, where it binds to zyxin, integrin linked kinase (ILK) and beta1-spectrin; intercalated discs, where it associates ...
Wu JC, Sung HC, Chung TH, DePhilip RM (2002). "Role of N-cadherin- and integrin-based costameres in the development of rat ... Talin-1 is ubiquitously expressed, and is localized to costamere structures in cardiac and skeletal muscle cells, and to focal ... Mondello MR, Bramanti P, Cutroneo G, Santoro G, Di Mauro D, Anastasi G (Jul 1996). "Immunolocalization of the costameres in ... talin-1 is found complexed to integrins and localized to intercalated discs of cardiac muscle and to costamere structures of ...
The costamere is a different component that connects the sarcomere to the sarcolemma. Two of the important proteins are myosin ...
... contributes to linkage between costameres and the contractile apparatus in skeletal muscle of synemin null animals. ...
This has been shown in recent studies where biomechanical properties of the sarcolemma and its links through costameres to the ... García-Pelagio KP, Bloch RJ, Ortega A, González-Serratos H (March 2011). "Biomechanics of the sarcolemma and costameres in ... This complex is variously known as the costamere or the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC). Many muscle proteins, ... colocalize with dystrophin at the costamere. It has a molecular weight of 427 kDa Dystrophin is coded for by the DMD gene - the ...
Bloch, R.J., Gonzalez-Serratos, H. (2003). Lateral force transmission across costameres in skeletal muscle, Exercise and Sport ...
Galie PA, Khalid N, Carnahan KE, Westfall MV, Stegemann JP (2013). "Substrate stiffness affects sarcomere and costamere ... is localized to Z-discs and costamere structures, bound to the four and one half LIM domain proteins, FHL1 and FHL2. It has ... and localizes to Z-disc and costamere structures. Mutations in ITGA7 have been associated with congenital myopathies and ...
Knockout of FXR1 upregulates talin-2 protein, which disrupts the architecture of desmosomes and costameres in cardiac muscle. ... In mature cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle, talin-2 is expressed at costameres and intercalated discs, thus demonstrating ... levels in cardiac muscle and functions to provide linkages between the extracellular matrix and actin cytoskeleton at costamere ...
... is a protein that binds to dystrophin in the costamere of skeletal muscle cells. In humans, there are at least two ...
It is one of the two protein complexes that make up the costamere in striated muscle cells. The other complex is the integrin- ... It is one of two protein complexes found in the costamere in striated muscle fibres. Many forms of muscular dystrophy are ...
Ankyrin-B has also been identified to associate at sarcomeric M-lines and costameres in cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle, ... as well as in costamere structures. Mutations in ANK2 cause a dominantly-inherited, cardiac arrhythmia syndrome known as long ... which is required for proper localization and functioning of the dystrophin complex and costamere structures, as well as ...
... and costameres in skeletal muscles. Metavinculin tail domain has a lower affinity for the head as compared with the vinculin ...
In cardiac tissue, alpha II-spectrin is found in myocytes at Z-discs, costameres, and the sarcolemma membrane, and in cardiac ... costameres and at the sarcolemma membrane. Mutations in alpha II-spectrin have been associated with early infantile epileptic ...
Integrin beta-1D is specifically localized to costameres and intercalated discs of cardiac muscle and costameres, myotendinous ... In cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle, the integrin beta-1D isoform is specifically expressed, and localizes to costameres, ...
Costamere Shadrin, I. Y.; Khodabukus, A.; Bursac, N. (June 6, 2016). "Striated muscle function, regeneration, and repair". ...
Costameres are dynamic structures. Several studies have suggested that costameres are responsive to mechanical, electrical, and ... The costamere is a structural-functional component of striated muscle cells which connects the sarcomere of the muscle to the ... Costameres are highly complex networks of proteins and glycoproteins, and can be considered as consisting of two major protein ... Costameres at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Srivastava, D.; Yu, S (2006). "Stretching ...
Link to all annotated objects annotated to costamere. Link to all direct and indirect annotations to costamere. Link to all ... costamere. Ontology. cellular_component. Synonyms. None. Alternate IDs. None. Definition. Regular periodic sub membranous ... direct and indirect annotations download (limited to first 10,000) for costamere. Feedback. Contact the Planteome feedback if ...
Costameres are subsarcolemmal protein assemblies in striated muscle cells that circumferentially align in register with the Z ... Costamere Defects in Muscular Dystrophies Ervasti, James M. University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN, United States ... Costameres are subsarcolemmal protein assemblies in striated muscle cells that circumferentially align in register with the Z ... Costameres are clearly important for normal muscle function because several constituent proteins are the primary sites of ...
Desmin is important to the ultrastructure of muscle as it is a constituent of costameres and intermediate filaments that anchor ...
... fascia adherens junction and costamere/plasma membrane proteins) structures within cardiomyocytes were not significantly ...
... costameres, and intercalated discs in addition to the IFs closely associated with mitochondria (Capetanaki et al., 2015). ...
Microvilli are covered in plasma membrane, which encloses cytoplasm and microfilaments. Though these are cellular extensions, there are little or no cellular organelles present in the microvilli. Each microvillus has a dense bundle of cross-linked actin filaments, which serves as its structural core. 20 to 30 tightly bundled actin filaments are cross-linked by bundling proteins fimbrin (or plastin-1), villin and espin to form the core of the microvilli. In the enterocyte microvillus, the structural core is attached to the plasma membrane along its length by lateral arms made of myosin 1a and Ca2+ binding protein calmodulin. Myosin 1a functions through a binding site for filamentous actin on one end and a lipid binding domain on the other. The plus ends of the actin filaments are located at the tip of the microvillus and are capped, possibly by capZ proteins,[2] while the minus ends are anchored in the terminal web composed of a complicated set of proteins including spectrin and myosin II. The ...
... associated with the Z-disk and costamere-like structures known as dense bodies. Functionally, we demonstrate that FRG-1 is an F ... associated with the Z-disk and costamere-like structures known as dense bodies. Functionally, we demonstrate that FRG-1 is an F ... associated with the Z-disk and costamere-like structures known as dense bodies. Functionally, we demonstrate that FRG-1 is an F ... associated with the Z-disk and costamere-like structures known as dense bodies. Functionally, we demonstrate that FRG-1 is an F ...
costamere. *. cuticular plate. *. Cyanelle. *. cyclin-dependent protein kinase holoenzyme complex. *. Cytolytic granule. ...
Together with KRT19, helps to link the contractileapparatus to dystrophin at the costameres of striated muscle. ...
Costameres, focal adhesions, and cardiomyocyte mechanotransduction. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2005;289(6):H2291-301. 37 ... the z-disk and costamere have been documented as key complexes involved in sensing mechanical stress and converting this to ...
co-localizing with metaVCL to intercalated disc and costameres. * cytoskeletal protein associated with focal adhesion and ...
Costamere is an integral component in maintaining structural-functional integrity of striated muscle cells. As Costamere are ... So costamere connects sarcomere through sarcolemma to the extracellular matrix. So mutation in gene responsible for expressing ... Various proteins colocalises with dystrophin to form Dystrophin-Associated Protein Complex or Costamere. ...
costamere cytoophidium cytoplasm acetolactate synthase complex acetyl-CoA carboxylase complex acidocalcisome ADPG ...
Since cardiac muscle is myogenic, the pacemaker serves only to modulate and coordinate contractions. The cardiac muscle cells would still fire in the absence of a functioning SA node pacemaker, albeit in a chaotic and ineffective manner. This condition is known as fibrillation. Note that the heart can still beat properly even if its connections to the central nervous system are completely severed ...
Together with KRT8, helps to link the contractile apparatus to dystrophin at the costameres of striated muscle. [UniProt]. ...
Is the fundamental pathology in Duchennes muscular dystrophy caused by a failure of glycogenolysis-glycolysis in costameres? ...
The changes at costameres are likely to account in part for the increased susceptibility to injury and to muscle weakness, both ... We have learned that the organization of structural proteins at the sarcolemma, and especially at costameres, is affected in ... to identify the proteins responsible for the altered costameres. The gels, which we typically analyze in quadrants (see figure ...
... curcumin only partially prevented the age-related changes in protein level and subcellular distribution of major costamere ...
Synemin may function to directly link muscle cell intermediate filaments to both myofibrillar Z-lines and costameres. J Biol ... components based on the fact that it interacts with several proteins involved in the organization of the costameres, ...
... around the Z-line or in costameres. Desmin is up-regulated in muscle-derived cellular adaptations, including conductive fibers ...
... intercalated discs and T-tubules and was recognized in the costameres, rib-like perisarcolemmal multiprotein complexes that ...
Costameres are sites of force transmission to the substratum in adult rat cardiomyocytes. ...
  • The dysfunction of the proteins involved in costameres contributes to some muscular diseases, including muscular dystrophies and cardiomyopathies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Costameres are clearly important for normal muscle function because several constituent proteins are the primary sites of defect in human muscular dystrophies and dilated cardiomyopathies. (grantome.com)
  • Costameres are highly complex networks of proteins and glycoproteins, and can be considered as consisting of two major protein complexes: the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) and the integrin-vinculin-talin complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, mechanical tension is critical in regulating costameric protein expression, stability, and organization, and dystrophin deficient costameres may sense increased mechanical stress and attempt to compensate with filament recruitment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Costameres are sub-sarcolemmal protein assemblies circumferentially aligned in register with the Z-disk of peripheral myofibrils. (wikipedia.org)
  • Costameres are subsarcolemmal protein assemblies in striated muscle cells that circumferentially align in register with the Z disk of peripheral myofibrils and physically couple force-generating sarcomeres with the sarcolemma. (grantome.com)
  • The vinculin and talin components of the integrin-vinculin-talin complex are cytoskeletal proteins physically anchored to the costamere as a whole via the integrin components, which are transmembrane proteins that interact directly with filamin C of the Z disk. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been suggested that synemin could function as a linker between different cytoskeletal components based on the fact that it interacts with several proteins involved in the organization of the costameres, neuromuscular and myotendinous junctions within striated muscle cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The costamere is a structural-functional component of striated muscle cells which connects the sarcomere of the muscle to the cell membrane (i.e. the sarcolemma). (wikipedia.org)
  • Costameres also transmit forces in the opposite direction, transmitting the forces of external mechanical stress from the sarcolemma to the Z-disk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Costameres are also involved in protecting the relatively weak and labile sarcolemma from the mechanical stresses of contraction and stretching. (wikipedia.org)
  • We have learned that the organization of structural proteins at the sarcolemma, and especially at costameres , is affected in several forms of muscular dystrophy. (blochlab.com)
  • Cav3 appears in the cardiomyocyte sarcolemma, intercalated discs and T-tubules and was recognized in the costameres, rib-like perisarcolemmal multiprotein complexes that align with Z disks and T-tubules and function in cell adhesion, stretch-sensing and pressure transmission [28], [29]. (sdfca.org)
  • Costameres are dynamic structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • and cytoplasmic FRG-1, associated with the Z-disk and costamere-like structures known as dense bodies. (illinois.edu)
  • Desmin IFs are present throughout smooth, cardiac and skeletal muscle cells, but can be more concentrated in some particular structures, such as dense bodies, around the nuclei, around the Z-line or in costameres. (biologicalworld.com)
  • Several studies have suggested that costameres are responsive to mechanical, electrical, and chemical stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finally, we will assess the role of y-actin in costamere assembly and mechanical function by characterizing new lines of mice where it is specifically ablated in striated muscle. (grantome.com)
  • The sarcoglycans of the DGC and the integrins of the integrin-vinculin-talin complex attach directly to filamin C, a component of the Z-disk, linking these protein complexes of costameres to complexes of the Z-disk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Restated, filamin C physically links the two complexes that constitute the costamere to sarcomeres by interacting with the sarcoglycans in the DGC and the integrins of the integrin-vinculin-talin complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • Link to all annotated objects annotated to costamere. (cyverse.org)
  • Link to all direct and indirect annotations to costamere. (cyverse.org)
  • Link to all direct and indirect annotations download (limited to first 10,000) for costamere. (cyverse.org)
  • The vinculin and talin components of the integrin-vinculin-talin complex are cytoskeletal proteins physically anchored to the costamere as a whole via the integrin components, which are transmembrane proteins that interact directly with filamin C of the Z disk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paxillin and ponsin interact in nascent costameres of muscle cells. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Moreover, the costameres at the cell surface interact with the repeating Z-disc component of the intracellular sarcomere, the contractile unit in muscle, through the actin cytoskeleton. (nature.com)
  • The dysfunction of the proteins involved in costameres contributes to some muscular diseases, including muscular dystrophies and cardiomyopathies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Costameres are sub-sarcolemmal protein assemblies circumferentially aligned in register with the Z-disk of peripheral myofibrils. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sarcoglycans of the DGC and the integrins of the integrin-vinculin-talin complex attach directly to filamin C, a component of the Z-disk, linking these protein complexes of costameres to complexes of the Z-disk. (wikipedia.org)
  • We identified an interaction of paxillin with the vinexin adaptor protein family member ponsin in nascent costameres during muscle differentiation, which is mediated by an interaction of the second src homology domain 3 (SH3) domain of ponsin with the proline-rich region of paxillin. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Restated, filamin C physically links the two complexes that constitute the costamere to sarcomeres by interacting with the sarcoglycans in the DGC and the integrins of the integrin-vinculin-talin complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 71 integrin is hugely expressed in skeletal muscle fibers and particularly localizes at costameres and myotendinous junctions [142], exactly where it physically connects the ECM towards the sarcomeric contractile apparatus [143]. (squalene-epoxidase.com)
  • 15. Distribution of formins in cardiac muscle: FHOD1 is a component of intercalated discs and costameres. (nih.gov)