The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.
Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.
The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).
The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.
The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Costs which are directly identifiable with a particular service.
Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
The assignment, to each of several particular cost-centers, of an equitable proportion of the costs of activities that serve all of them. Cost-center usually refers to institutional departments or services.
Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.
That portion of total HEALTH CARE COSTS borne by an individual's or group's employing organization.
A measurement index derived from a modification of standard life-table procedures and designed to take account of the quality as well as the duration of survival. This index can be used in assessing the outcome of health care procedures or services. (BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1994)
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.
Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.
The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.
Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.
A stochastic process such that the conditional probability distribution for a state at any future instant, given the present state, is unaffected by any additional knowledge of the past history of the system.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.
A graphic device used in decision analysis, series of decision options are represented as branches (hierarchical).
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.
Amounts charged to the patient or third-party payer for medication. It includes the pharmacist's professional fee and cost of ingredients, containers, etc.
Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.
Mathematical or statistical procedures used as aids in making a decision. They are frequently used in medical decision-making.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.
Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.
System of recording financial transactions.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
Economic aspects of the fields of pharmacy and pharmacology as they apply to the development and study of medical economics in rational drug therapy and the impact of pharmaceuticals on the cost of medical care. Pharmaceutical economics also includes the economic considerations of the pharmaceutical care delivery system and in drug prescribing, particularly of cost-benefit values. (From J Res Pharm Econ 1989;1(1); PharmacoEcon 1992;1(1))
Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.
Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.
A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.
Those funds disbursed for facilities and equipment, particularly those related to the delivery of health care.
Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.
Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.
Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Amounts charged to the patient as payer for medical services.
The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.
Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.
Chronic absence from work or other duty.
The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'England' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, cultural heritage, and contributions to medical science. However, in a medical context, it may refer to the location of a patient, healthcare provider, or research study, but it is not a term with a specific medical meaning.
Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.
An examination, review and verification of all financial accounts.
Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.
Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
Formal programs for assessing drug prescription against some standard. Drug utilization review may consider clinical appropriateness, cost effectiveness, and, in some cases, outcomes. Review is usually retrospective, but some analysis may be done before drugs are dispensed (as in computer systems which advise physicians when prescriptions are entered). Drug utilization review is mandated for Medicaid programs beginning in 1993.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.
An interval of care by a health care facility or provider for a specific medical problem or condition. It may be continuous or it may consist of a series of intervals marked by one or more brief separations from care, and can also identify the sequence of care (e.g., emergency, inpatient, outpatient), thus serving as one measure of health care provided.
Economic aspects of the nursing profession.
A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.
The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.
Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.
Total pharmaceutical services provided by qualified PHARMACISTS. In addition to the preparation and distribution of medical products, they may include consultative services provided to agencies and institutions which do not have a qualified pharmacist.
Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Cost-sharing mechanisms that provide for payment by the insured of some portion of covered expenses. Deductibles are the amounts paid by the insured under a health insurance contract before benefits become payable; coinsurance is the provision under which the insured pays part of the medical bill, usually according to a fixed percentage, when benefits become payable.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)
Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "California" is a place, specifically a state on the western coast of the United States, and not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
Evaluation of biomedical technology in relation to cost, efficacy, utilization, etc., and its future impact on social, ethical, and legal systems.
Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.
A method of examining and setting levels of payments.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Germany" is a country and not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition. It is located in Central Europe and is known for its advanced medical research and facilities.
Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.
Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.
The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.
The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.
An increase in the volume of money and credit relative to available goods resulting in a substantial and continuing rise in the general price level.
Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.
The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.
Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.
The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.
The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.
A broad approach to appropriate coordination of the entire disease treatment process that often involves shifting away from more expensive inpatient and acute care to areas such as preventive medicine, patient counseling and education, and outpatient care. This concept includes implications of appropriate versus inappropriate therapy on the overall cost and clinical outcome of a particular disease. (From Hosp Pharm 1995 Jul;30(7):596)
An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.
Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.
A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.
Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.
Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
The condition in which individuals are financially unable to access adequate medical care without depriving themselves and their dependents of food, clothing, shelter, and other essentials of living.
Organized services for the purpose of providing diagnosis to promote and maintain health.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
The obtaining and management of funds for institutional needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
'Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over' refers to the maximum number of hospital beds equaling or exceeding 500 that are medically staffed and equipped to provide patient care and accommodation within a healthcare facility.
Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.
Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.
Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.
Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.
Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
Diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests and x-rays, routinely performed on all individuals or specified categories of individuals in a specified situation, e.g., patients being admitted to the hospital. These include routine tests administered to neonates.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context. It is a geographical location, referring to the Republic of India, a country in South Asia. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help with those!
Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Switzerland" is a country located in Europe and not a term used in medical definitions. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I'd be happy to help answer those!
In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)
Institutions with permanent facilities and organized medical staff which provide the full range of hospital services primarily to a neighborhood area.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Massachusetts" is a geographical location and not a medical term or concept. It is a state located in the northeastern region of the United States. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like me to define, please let me know!
Facilities equipped for performing surgery.
Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.
An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.
The room or rooms in which the physician and staff provide patient care. The offices include all rooms in the physician's office suite.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Michigan" is not a medical concept or condition that has a defined meaning within the medical field. It refers to a state in the United States, and does not have a direct medical connotation.
Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.
The capability of an organism to survive and reproduce. The phenotypic expression of the genotype in a particular environment determines how genetically fit an organism will be.
That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.
Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.
Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.
Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.
Nursing care given to an individual in the home. The care may be provided by a family member or a friend. Home nursing as care by a non-professional is differentiated from HOME CARE SERVICES provided by professionals: visiting nurse, home health agencies, hospital, or other organized community group.
Any system which allows payors to share some of the financial risk associated with a particular patient population with providers. Providers agree to adhere to fixed fee schedules in exchange for an increase in their payor base and a chance to benefit from cost containment measures. Common risk-sharing methods are prospective payment schedules (PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM), capitation (CAPITATION FEES), diagnosis-related fees (DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUPS), and pre-negotiated fees.
A system wherein reimbursement rates are set, for a given period of time, prior to the circumstances giving rise to actual reimbursement claims.
The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.
Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.
Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.
A stand-alone drug plan offered by insurers and other private companies to beneficiaries that receive their Medicare Part A and/or B benefits through the Original Medicare Plan. It includes Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans that do not offer prescription drug coverage and Medicare Cost Plans offering Medicare prescription drug coverage. The plan was enacted as the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 with coverage beginning January 1, 2006.
The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.
Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.
The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.
Excessive, under or unnecessary utilization of health services by patients or physicians.
Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Major administrative divisions of the hospital.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.

Financial incentives and drug spending in managed care. (1/393)

This study estimates the impact of patient financial incentives on the use and cost of prescription drugs in the context of differing physician payment mechanisms. A large data set was developed that covers persons in managed care who pay varying levels of cost sharing and whose physicians are compensated under two different models: independent practice association (IPA)-model and network-model health maintenance organizations (HMOs). Our results indicate that higher patient copayments for prescription drugs are associated with lower drug spending in IPA models (in which physicians are not at risk for drug costs) but have little effect in network models (in which physicians bear financial risk for all prescribing behavior).  (+info)

Who bears the burden of Medicaid drug copayment policies? (2/393)

This DataWatch examines the impact of Medicaid prescription drug copayment policies in thirty-eight states using survey data from the 1992 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Findings indicate that elderly and disabled Medicaid recipients who reside in states with copay provisions have significantly lower rates of drug use than their counterparts in states without copayments. After controlling for other factors, we find that the primary effect of copayments is to reduce the likelihood that Medicaid recipients fill any prescription during the year. This burden falls disproportionately on recipients in poor health.  (+info)

User charges in government health facilities in Kenya: effect on attendance and revenue. (3/393)

In this paper we study demand effects of user charges in a district health care system using cross-sectional data from household and facility surveys. The effects are examined in public as well as in private health facilities. We also look briefly at the impact of fees on revenue and service quality in government facilities. During the period of cost-sharing in public clinics, attendance dropped by about 50%. This drop prompted the government to suspend the fees for approximately 20 months. Over the 7 months after suspension of fees, attendance at government health centres increased by 41%. The suspension further caused a notable movement of patients from the private sector to government health facilities. The revenue generated by user fees covered 2.4% of the recurrent health budget. Some 40% of the facilities did not spend the fee revenue they collected, mainly due to cumbersome procedures of expenditure approvals. The paper concludes with lessons from Kenya's experience with user charges.  (+info)

The impact of alternative cost recovery schemes on access and equity in Niger. (4/393)

The authors examine accessibility and the sustainability of quality health care in a rural setting under two alternative cost recovery methods, a fee-for-service method and a type of social financing (risk-sharing) strategy based on an annual tax+fee-for-service. Both methods were accompanied by similar interventions aimed at improving the quality of primary health services. Based on pilot tests of cost recovery in the non-hospital sector in Niger, the article presents results from baseline and final survey data, as well as from facility utilization, cost, and revenue data collected in two test districts and a control district. Cost recovery accompanied by quality improvements increases equity and access to health care and the type of cost recovery method used can make a difference. In Niger, higher access for women, children, and the poor resulted from the tax+fee method, than from the pure fee-for-service method. Moreover, revenue generation per capita under the tax+fee method was two times higher than under the fee-for-service method, suggesting that the prospects of sustainability were better under the social financing strategy. However, sustainability under cost recovery and improved quality depends as much on policy measures aimed at cost containment, particularly for drugs, as on specific cost recovery methods.  (+info)

Protecting the poor under cost recovery: the role of means testing. (5/393)

In African health sectors, the importance of protecting the very poor has been underscored by increased reliance on user fees to help finance services. This paper presents a conceptual framework for understanding the role means testing can play in promoting equity under health care cost recovery. Means testing is placed in the broader context of targeting and contrasted with other mechanisms. Criteria for evaluating outcomes are established and used to analyze previous means testing experience in Africa. A survey of experience finds a general pattern of informal, low-accuracy, low-cost means testing in Africa. Detailed household data from a recent cost recovery experiment in Niger, West Africa, provides an unusual opportunity to observe outcomes of a characteristically informal means testing system. Findings from Niger suggest that achieving both the revenue raising and equity potential of cost recovery in sub-Saharan Africa will require finding ways to improve informal means testing processes.  (+info)

Improving quality through cost recovery in Niger. (6/393)

New evidence on the quality of health care from public services in Niger is discussed in terms of the relationships between quality, costs, cost-effectiveness and financing. Although structural attributes of quality appeared to improve with the pilot project in Niger, significant gaps in the implementation of diagnostic and treatment protocols were observed, particularly in monitoring vital signs, diagnostic examination and provider-patient communications. Quality improvements required significant investments in both fixed and variable costs; however, many of these costs were basic input requirements for operation. It is likely that optimal cost-effectiveness of services was not achieved because of the noted deficiencies in quality. In the test district of Boboye, the revenues from the copayments alone covered about 34% of the costs of medicines or about 20% of costs of drugs and administration. In Say, user fees covered about 50-55% of the costs of medicines or 35-40% of the amount spent on medicines and cost-recovery administration. In Boboye, taxes plus the additional copayments covered 120-180% of the cost of medicines, or 75-105% of the cost of medicines plus administration of cost recovery. Decentralized management and legal conditions in the pilot districts appeared to provide the necessary structure to ensure that the revenues and taxes collected would be channelled to pay for quality improvements.  (+info)

R(7/393)

esearch note: does cost recovery for curative care affect preventive care utilization?  (+info)

Research note: price uncertainty and the demand for health care.(8/393)

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Health care costs refer to the expenses incurred for medical services, treatments, procedures, and products that are used to maintain or restore an individual's health. These costs can be categorized into several types:

1. Direct costs: These include payments made for doctor visits, hospital stays, medications, diagnostic tests, surgeries, and other medical treatments and services. Direct costs can be further divided into two subcategories:
* Out-of-pocket costs: Expenses paid directly by patients, such as co-payments, deductibles, coinsurance, and any uncovered medical services or products.
* Third-party payer costs: Expenses covered by insurance companies, government programs (like Medicare, Medicaid), or other entities that pay for health care services on behalf of patients.
2. Indirect costs: These are the expenses incurred as a result of illness or injury that indirectly impact an individual's ability to work and earn a living. Examples include lost productivity, absenteeism, reduced earning capacity, and disability benefits.
3. Non-medical costs: These are expenses related to caregiving, transportation, home modifications, assistive devices, and other non-medical services required for managing health conditions or disabilities.

Health care costs can vary significantly depending on factors such as the type of medical service, geographic location, insurance coverage, and individual health status. Understanding these costs is essential for patients, healthcare providers, policymakers, and researchers to make informed decisions about treatment options, resource allocation, and health system design.

Costs refer to the total amount of resources, such as money, time, and labor, that are expended in the provision of a medical service or treatment. Costs can be categorized into direct costs, which include expenses directly related to patient care, such as medication, supplies, and personnel; and indirect costs, which include overhead expenses, such as rent, utilities, and administrative salaries.

Cost analysis is the process of estimating and evaluating the total cost of a medical service or treatment. This involves identifying and quantifying all direct and indirect costs associated with the provision of care, and analyzing how these costs may vary based on factors such as patient volume, resource utilization, and reimbursement rates.

Cost analysis is an important tool for healthcare organizations to understand the financial implications of their operations and make informed decisions about resource allocation, pricing strategies, and quality improvement initiatives. It can also help policymakers and payers evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different treatment options and develop evidence-based guidelines for clinical practice.

"Drug costs" refer to the amount of money that must be paid to acquire and use a particular medication. These costs can include the following:

1. The actual purchase price of the drug, which may vary depending on factors such as the dosage form, strength, and quantity of the medication, as well as whether it is obtained through a retail pharmacy, mail-order service, or other distribution channel.
2. Any additional fees or charges associated with obtaining the drug, such as shipping and handling costs, insurance copayments or coinsurance amounts, and deductibles.
3. The cost of any necessary medical services or supplies that are required to administer the drug, such as syringes, needles, or alcohol swabs for injectable medications, or nebulizers for inhaled drugs.
4. The cost of monitoring and managing any potential side effects or complications associated with the use of the drug, which may include additional medical appointments, laboratory tests, or other diagnostic procedures.

It is important to note that drug costs can vary widely depending on a variety of factors, including the patient's insurance coverage, the pharmacy where the drug is obtained, and any discounts or rebates that may be available. Patients are encouraged to shop around for the best prices and to explore all available options for reducing their out-of-pocket costs, such as using generic medications or participating in manufacturer savings programs.

"Cost of Illness" is a medical-economic concept that refers to the total societal cost associated with a specific disease or health condition. It includes both direct and indirect costs. Direct costs are those that can be directly attributed to the illness, such as medical expenses for diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and medications. Indirect costs include productivity losses due to morbidity (reduced efficiency while working) and mortality (lost earnings due to death). Other indirect costs may encompass expenses related to caregiving or special education needs. The Cost of Illness is often used in health policy decision-making, resource allocation, and evaluating the economic impact of diseases on society.

Cost control in a medical context refers to the strategies and practices employed by healthcare organizations to manage and reduce the costs associated with providing patient care while maintaining quality and safety. The goal is to optimize resource allocation, increase efficiency, and contain expenses without compromising the standard of care. This may involve measures such as:

1. Utilization management: Reviewing and monitoring the use of medical services, tests, and treatments to ensure they are necessary, appropriate, and evidence-based.
2. Case management: Coordinating patient care across various healthcare providers and settings to improve outcomes, reduce unnecessary duplication of services, and control costs.
3. Negotiating contracts with suppliers and vendors to secure favorable pricing for medical equipment, supplies, and pharmaceuticals.
4. Implementing evidence-based clinical guidelines and pathways to standardize care processes and reduce unwarranted variations in practice that can drive up costs.
5. Using technology such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telemedicine to streamline operations, improve communication, and reduce errors.
6. Investing in preventive care and wellness programs to keep patients healthy and reduce the need for costly interventions and hospitalizations.
7. Continuously monitoring and analyzing cost data to identify trends, opportunities for improvement, and areas of potential waste or inefficiency.

Direct service costs are expenses that can be directly attributed to the delivery of a specific service or program. These costs are typically related to items such as personnel, supplies, and equipment that are used exclusively for the provision of that service. Direct service costs can be contrasted with indirect costs, which are expenses that are not easily linked to a particular service or program and may include things like administrative overhead, rent, and utilities.

Examples of direct service costs in a healthcare setting might include:

* Salaries and benefits for medical staff who provide patient care, such as doctors, nurses, and therapists
* Costs of medications and supplies used to treat patients
* Equipment and supplies needed to perform diagnostic tests or procedures, such as X-ray machines or surgical instruments
* Rent or lease payments for space that is dedicated to providing patient care services.

It's important to accurately track direct service costs in order to understand the true cost of delivering a particular service or program, and to make informed decisions about resource allocation and pricing.

Cost sharing in a medical or healthcare context refers to the portion of health care costs that are paid by the patient or health plan member, rather than by their insurance company. Cost sharing can take various forms, including deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments.

A deductible is the amount that a patient must pay out of pocket for medical services before their insurance coverage kicks in. For example, if a health plan has a $1,000 deductible, the patient must pay the first $1,000 of their medical expenses before their insurance starts covering costs.

Coinsurance is the percentage of medical costs that a patient is responsible for paying after they have met their deductible. For example, if a health plan has 20% coinsurance, the patient would pay 20% of the cost of medical services, and their insurance would cover the remaining 80%.

Copayments are fixed amounts that patients must pay for specific medical services, such as doctor visits or prescription medications. Copayments are typically paid at the time of service and do not count towards a patient's deductible.

Cost sharing is intended to encourage patients to be more cost-conscious in their use of healthcare services, as they have a financial incentive to seek out lower-cost options. However, high levels of cost sharing can also create barriers to accessing necessary medical care, particularly for low-income individuals and families.

Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is a systematic process used to compare the costs and benefits of different options to determine which one provides the greatest net benefit. In a medical context, CBA can be used to evaluate the value of medical interventions, treatments, or policies by estimating and monetizing all the relevant costs and benefits associated with each option.

The costs included in a CBA may include direct costs such as the cost of the intervention or treatment itself, as well as indirect costs such as lost productivity or time away from work. Benefits may include improved health outcomes, reduced morbidity or mortality, and increased quality of life.

Once all the relevant costs and benefits have been identified and quantified, they are typically expressed in monetary terms to allow for a direct comparison. The option with the highest net benefit (i.e., the difference between total benefits and total costs) is considered the most cost-effective.

It's important to note that CBA has some limitations and can be subject to various biases and assumptions, so it should be used in conjunction with other evaluation methods to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the value of medical interventions or policies.

Cost allocation is the process of distributing or assigning costs to different departments, projects, products, or services within an organization. The goal of cost allocation is to more accurately determine the true cost of producing a product or providing a service, taking into account all related expenses. This can help organizations make better decisions about pricing, resource allocation, and profitability analysis.

There are various methods for allocating costs, including activity-based costing (ABC), which assigns costs based on the activities required to produce a product or provide a service; traditional costing, which uses broad categories such as direct labor, direct materials, and overhead; and causal allocation, which assigns costs based on a specific cause-and-effect relationship.

In healthcare, cost allocation is particularly important for determining the true cost of patient care, including both direct and indirect costs. This can help hospitals and other healthcare organizations make informed decisions about resource allocation, pricing, and reimbursement strategies.

Economic models in the context of healthcare and medicine are theoretical frameworks used to analyze and predict the economic impact and cost-effectiveness of healthcare interventions, treatments, or policies. These models utilize clinical and epidemiological data, as well as information on resource use and costs, to estimate outcomes such as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), and budget impacts. The purpose of economic models is to inform decision-making and allocate resources in an efficient and evidence-based manner. Examples of economic models include decision tree analysis, Markov models, and simulation models.

Employer health costs refer to the financial expenses incurred by employers for providing healthcare benefits to their employees. These costs can include premiums for group health insurance plans, payments towards self-insured health plans, and other out-of-pocket expenses related to employee healthcare. Employer health costs also encompass expenses related to workplace wellness programs, occupational health services, and any other initiatives aimed at improving the health and well-being of employees. These costs are a significant component of overall employee compensation packages and can have substantial impacts on both employer profitability and employee access to quality healthcare services.

Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) is a measure of health outcomes that combines both the quality and quantity of life lived in a single metric. It is often used in economic evaluations of healthcare interventions to estimate their value for money. QALYs are calculated by multiplying the number of years of life gained by a weighting factor that reflects the quality of life experienced during those years, typically on a scale from 0 (representing death) to 1 (representing perfect health). For example, if a healthcare intervention extends a person's life by an additional five years but they experience only 80% of full health during that time, the QALY gain would be 4 (5 x 0.8). This measure allows for comparisons to be made between different interventions and their impact on both length and quality of life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Health resources refer to the personnel, facilities, equipment, and supplies that are used in the delivery of healthcare services. This includes:

1. Human resources: Healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and allied health professionals.

2. Physical resources: Hospitals, clinics, laboratories, and other healthcare facilities.

3. Technological resources: Medical equipment and technology used for diagnosis and treatment, such as MRI machines, CT scanners, and electronic health records.

4. Financial resources: Funding for healthcare services, including public and private insurance, government funding, and out-of-pocket payments.

5. Informational resources: Research findings, evidence-based practices, and health education materials that inform healthcare decision-making.

The adequate availability, distribution, and utilization of these health resources are crucial for ensuring access to quality healthcare services and improving population health outcomes.

Hospitalization is the process of admitting a patient to a hospital for the purpose of receiving medical treatment, surgery, or other health care services. It involves staying in the hospital as an inpatient, typically under the care of doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. The length of stay can vary depending on the individual's medical condition and the type of treatment required. Hospitalization may be necessary for a variety of reasons, such as to receive intensive care, to undergo diagnostic tests or procedures, to recover from surgery, or to manage chronic illnesses or injuries.

Managed care programs are a type of health insurance plan that aims to control healthcare costs and improve the quality of care by managing the utilization of healthcare services. They do this by using a network of healthcare providers who have agreed to provide services at reduced rates, and by implementing various strategies such as utilization review, case management, and preventive care.

In managed care programs, there is usually a primary care physician (PCP) who acts as the patient's main doctor and coordinates their care within the network of providers. Patients may need a referral from their PCP to see specialists or access certain services. Managed care programs can take various forms, including Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs), Point-of-Service (POS) plans, and Exclusive Provider Organizations (EPOs).

The goal of managed care programs is to provide cost-effective healthcare services while maintaining or improving the quality of care. They can help patients save money on healthcare costs by providing coverage for a range of services at lower rates than traditional fee-for-service plans, but they may also limit patient choice and require prior authorization for certain procedures or treatments.

In a medical context, efficiency generally refers to the ability to achieve a desired outcome with minimal waste of time, effort, or resources. It can be applied to various aspects of healthcare, including the delivery of clinical services, the use of medical treatments and interventions, and the operation of health systems and organizations. High levels of efficiency can help to improve patient outcomes, increase access to care, and reduce costs.

"Length of Stay" (LOS) is a term commonly used in healthcare to refer to the amount of time a patient spends receiving care in a hospital, clinic, or other healthcare facility. It is typically measured in hours, days, or weeks and can be used as a metric for various purposes such as resource planning, quality assessment, and reimbursement. The length of stay can vary depending on the type of illness or injury, the severity of the condition, the patient's response to treatment, and other factors. It is an important consideration in healthcare management and can have significant implications for both patients and providers.

An insurance claim review is the process conducted by an insurance company to evaluate a claim made by a policyholder for coverage of a loss or expense. This evaluation typically involves examining the details of the claim, assessing the damages or injuries incurred, verifying the coverage provided by the policy, and determining the appropriate amount of benefits to be paid. The insurance claim review may also include investigating the circumstances surrounding the claim to ensure its validity and confirming that it complies with the terms and conditions of the insurance policy.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Markov Chains" is a term from the field of mathematics and probability theory, not medicine. Markov Chains are mathematical systems that undergo transitions from one state to another according to certain probabilistic rules. They are named after Russian mathematician Andrey Markov. These chains are used in various fields, including computer science, physics, economics, and engineering, but not commonly in medical definitions or contexts.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Ambulatory care is a type of health care service in which patients are treated on an outpatient basis, meaning they do not stay overnight at the medical facility. This can include a wide range of services such as diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care for various medical conditions. The goal of ambulatory care is to provide high-quality medical care that is convenient, accessible, and cost-effective for patients.

Examples of ambulatory care settings include physician offices, community health centers, urgent care centers, outpatient surgery centers, and diagnostic imaging facilities. Patients who receive ambulatory care may have a variety of medical needs, such as routine checkups, chronic disease management, minor procedures, or same-day surgeries.

Overall, ambulatory care is an essential component of modern healthcare systems, providing patients with timely and convenient access to medical services without the need for hospitalization.

A decision tree is a graphical representation of possible solutions to a decision based on certain conditions. It is a predictive modeling tool commonly used in statistics, data mining, and machine learning. In the medical field, decision trees can be used for clinical decision-making and predicting patient outcomes based on various factors such as symptoms, test results, or demographic information.

In a decision tree, each internal node represents a feature or attribute, and each branch represents a possible value or outcome of that feature. The leaves of the tree represent the final decisions or predictions. Decision trees are constructed by recursively partitioning the data into subsets based on the most significant attributes until a stopping criterion is met.

Decision trees can be used for both classification and regression tasks, making them versatile tools in medical research and practice. They can help healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care, identify high-risk patients, and develop personalized treatment plans. However, it's important to note that decision trees are only as good as the data they are trained on, and their accuracy may be affected by biases or limitations in the data.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

In medical terminology, a budget is not explicitly defined. However, in a general sense, it refers to a financial plan that outlines the anticipated costs and expenses for a specific period. In healthcare, budgets can be used by hospitals, clinics, or other medical facilities to plan for and manage their finances.

A healthcare organization's budget may include expenses related to:

* Salaries and benefits for staff
* Equipment and supply costs
* Facility maintenance and improvements
* Research and development expenses
* Insurance and liability coverage
* Marketing and advertising costs

Budgets can help healthcare organizations manage their finances effectively, allocate resources efficiently, and make informed decisions about spending. They may also be used to plan for future growth and expansion.

Pharmaceutical fees are charges that healthcare professionals or institutions may impose on patients for various services related to the prescribing and dispensing of medications. These fees can include costs associated with medication therapy management, drug monitoring, medication reconciliation, and other clinical services provided by pharmacists or other healthcare providers.

It's important to note that these fees are separate from the cost of the medication itself and may not be covered by insurance. Patients should always ask about any potential fees before receiving pharmaceutical services and clarify whether they will be responsible for paying them out-of-pocket.

Personal Financing is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it refers to the management of an individual's financial resources, such as income, assets, liabilities, and debts, to meet their personal needs and goals. This can include budgeting, saving, investing, planning for retirement, and managing debt.

In the context of healthcare, personal financing may refer to the ability of individuals to pay for their own medical care expenses, including health insurance premiums, deductibles, co-pays, and out-of-pocket costs. This can be a significant concern for many people, particularly those with chronic medical conditions or disabilities who may face ongoing healthcare expenses.

Personal financing for healthcare may involve various strategies, such as setting aside savings, using health savings accounts (HSAs) or flexible spending accounts (FSAs), purchasing health insurance policies with lower premiums but higher out-of-pocket costs, or negotiating payment plans with healthcare providers. Ultimately, personal financing for healthcare involves making informed decisions about how to allocate financial resources to meet both immediate and long-term medical needs while also balancing other financial goals and responsibilities.

Decision support techniques are methods used to help individuals or groups make informed and effective decisions in a medical context. These techniques can involve various approaches, such as:

1. **Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS):** Computerized systems that provide clinicians with patient-specific information and evidence-based recommendations to assist in decision-making. CDSS can be integrated into electronic health records (EHRs) or standalone applications.

2. **Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM):** A systematic approach to clinical decision-making that involves the integration of best available research evidence, clinician expertise, and patient values and preferences. EBM emphasizes the importance of using high-quality scientific studies to inform medical decisions.

3. **Diagnostic Reasoning:** The process of formulating a diagnosis based on history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. Diagnostic reasoning techniques may include pattern recognition, hypothetico-deductive reasoning, or a combination of both.

4. **Predictive Modeling:** The use of statistical models to predict patient outcomes based on historical data and clinical variables. These models can help clinicians identify high-risk patients and inform treatment decisions.

5. **Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA):** An economic evaluation technique that compares the costs and benefits of different medical interventions to determine which option provides the most value for money. CEA can assist decision-makers in allocating resources efficiently.

6. **Multicriteria Decision Analysis (MCDA):** A structured approach to decision-making that involves identifying, evaluating, and comparing multiple criteria or objectives. MCDA can help clinicians and patients make complex decisions by accounting for various factors, such as efficacy, safety, cost, and patient preferences.

7. **Shared Decision-Making (SDM):** A collaborative approach to decision-making that involves the clinician and patient working together to choose the best course of action based on the available evidence, clinical expertise, and patient values and preferences. SDM aims to empower patients to participate actively in their care.

These techniques can be used individually or in combination to support medical decision-making and improve patient outcomes.

Health services refer to the delivery of healthcare services, including preventive, curative, and rehabilitative services. These services are typically provided by health professionals such as doctors, nurses, and allied health personnel in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, community health centers, and long-term care facilities. Health services may also include public health activities such as health education, surveillance, and health promotion programs aimed at improving the health of populations. The goal of health services is to promote and restore health, prevent disease and injury, and improve the quality of life for individuals and communities.

Pharmaceutical services insurance refers to a type of coverage that helps individuals and families pay for their prescription medications. This type of insurance is often offered as part of a larger health insurance plan, but can also be purchased as a standalone policy.

The specifics of pharmaceutical services insurance coverage can vary widely depending on the policy. Some plans may cover only generic medications, while others may cover both brand-name and generic drugs. Additionally, some policies may require individuals to pay a portion of the cost of their prescriptions in the form of copays or coinsurance, while others may cover the full cost of medications.

Pharmaceutical services insurance can be especially important for individuals who have chronic medical conditions that require ongoing treatment with expensive prescription medications. By helping to offset the cost of these medications, pharmaceutical services insurance can make it easier for people to afford the care they need to manage their health and improve their quality of life.

Hospital economics refers to the study and application of economic principles and concepts in the management and operation of hospitals and healthcare organizations. This field examines issues such as cost containment, resource allocation, financial management, reimbursement systems, and strategic planning. The goal of hospital economics is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of hospital operations while maintaining high-quality patient care. It involves understanding and analyzing various economic factors that affect hospitals, including government regulations, market forces, technological advancements, and societal values. Hospital economists may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, consulting firms, academic institutions, and government agencies.

In the medical field, "accounting" generally refers to the process of tracking, analyzing, and reporting financial transactions related to the operation of a healthcare organization or practice. This can include recording revenue from patient services, managing expenses for supplies and personnel, ensuring compliance with government regulations, and producing financial statements for decision-making and tax purposes.

Some specific areas of accounting that are relevant to healthcare include:

* Revenue Cycle Management (RCM): the process of tracking and collecting payments for medical services provided to patients. This includes billing, coding, and managing insurance claims.
* Cost Accounting: the process of analyzing and allocating costs associated with providing medical services, including direct costs (such as supplies and labor) and indirect costs (such as rent and utilities).
* Financial Reporting: the process of producing financial statements that provide an overview of a healthcare organization's financial performance and position. This can include balance sheets, income statements, and cash flow statements.
* Compliance Accounting: the process of ensuring that a healthcare organization is following all relevant laws and regulations related to financial management, including those related to Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement, tax reporting, and fraud prevention.

It's important to note that accounting in healthcare is a complex field that requires specialized knowledge and skills, and it is typically overseen by certified public accountants (CPAs) or other financial professionals who specialize in healthcare finance.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

Pharmaceutical economics is a branch of economics that focuses on the production and distribution of pharmaceutical products and services. It involves the analysis of various factors that influence the development, pricing, and accessibility of medications, including issues related to healthcare policy, regulation, reimbursement, and market competition.

Pharmaceutical economists study topics such as:

1. The research and development (R&D) process for new drugs, including the costs, risks, and uncertainties associated with bringing a new drug to market.
2. The pricing of pharmaceuticals, taking into account factors such as production costs, R&D expenses, market competition, and the value that medications provide to patients and society.
3. The impact of government regulations and policies on the pharmaceutical industry, including issues related to intellectual property protection, drug safety, and efficacy testing.
4. The role of health insurance and other third-party payers in shaping the demand for and access to pharmaceuticals.
5. The evaluation of pharmaceutical interventions' cost-effectiveness and their impact on healthcare outcomes and patient well-being.
6. The analysis of market structures, competitive dynamics, and strategic decision-making within the pharmaceutical industry.
7. The assessment of globalization, international trade, and cross-border collaboration in the pharmaceutical sector.

Pharmaceutical economics plays a crucial role in informing healthcare policy decisions, improving patient access to essential medications, and promoting sustainable and innovative practices within the pharmaceutical industry.

Medical economics is a branch of economics that deals with the application of economic principles and concepts to issues related to health and healthcare. It involves the study of how medical care is produced, distributed, consumed, and financed, as well as the factors that influence these processes. The field encompasses various topics, including the behavior of healthcare providers and consumers, the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare systems, the impact of health policies on outcomes, and the allocation of resources within the healthcare sector. Medical economists may work in academia, government agencies, healthcare organizations, or consulting firms, contributing to research, policy analysis, and program evaluation.

Fees and charges in a medical context refer to the costs that patients are required to pay for healthcare services, treatments, or procedures. These may include:

1. Professional fees: The amount charged by healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, or therapists for their time, expertise, and services provided during consultations, examinations, or treatments.

2. Hospital charges: The costs associated with a patient's hospital stay, including room and board, nursing care, medications, and diagnostic tests.

3. Facility fees: Additional charges levied by hospitals, clinics, or ambulatory surgery centers to cover the overhead expenses of maintaining the facility and its equipment.

4. Procedure or treatment-specific fees: Costs directly related to specific medical procedures, surgeries, or treatments, such as anesthesia, radiology services, laboratory tests, or surgical supplies.

5. Ancillary fees: Additional costs for items like crutches, slings, or durable medical equipment that patients may need during their recovery process.

6. Insurance copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles: The portion of healthcare expenses that patients are responsible for paying based on their insurance policy terms.

It is essential for patients to understand the fees and charges associated with their medical care to make informed decisions about their treatment options and manage their healthcare costs effectively.

"State Medicine" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it can refer to the organization, financing, and delivery of healthcare services and resources at the national or regional level, overseen and managed by the government or state. This can include public health initiatives, regulation of healthcare professionals and institutions, and the provision of healthcare services through publicly funded programs.

In some contexts, "State Medicine" may also refer to the practice of using medical treatments or interventions as a means of achieving political or social objectives, such as reducing crime rates or improving economic productivity. However, this usage is less common and more controversial.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Health Insurance is a type of insurance that covers the whole or a part of the risk of a person incurring medical expenses, spreading the risk over a large number of persons. By purchasing health insurance, insured individuals pay a premium to an insurance company, which then pools those funds with other policyholders' premiums to pay for the medical care costs of individuals who become ill or injured. The coverage can include hospitalization, medical procedures, prescription drugs, and preventive care, among other services. The goal of health insurance is to provide financial protection against unexpected medical expenses and to make healthcare services more affordable.

Capital expenditures, also known as capital expenses or CapEx, refer to the funds used by a company to acquire, upgrade, and maintain physical assets such as property, buildings, machinery, and equipment. These expenditures are considered long-term investments and are intended to enhance the company's ability to generate future revenue and profits.

Capital expenditures are typically significant in amount and are recorded on a company's balance sheet as assets, rather than being expensed immediately on the income statement. Instead, the cost of these assets is gradually expensed over their useful life through depreciation or amortization.

Examples of capital expenditures include purchasing new manufacturing equipment, constructing a new building, renovating an existing facility, or upgrading computer systems and software. These types of expenses are often necessary for a company to remain competitive and grow its business over time.

Medicaid is a joint federal-state program that provides health coverage for low-income individuals, including children, pregnant women, elderly adults, and people with disabilities. Eligibility, benefits, and administration vary by state, but the program is designed to ensure that low-income individuals have access to necessary medical services. Medicaid is funded jointly by the federal government and the states, and is administered by the states under broad federal guidelines.

Medicaid programs must cover certain mandatory benefits, such as inpatient and outpatient hospital services, laboratory and X-ray services, and physician services. States also have the option to provide additional benefits, such as dental care, vision services, and prescription drugs. In addition, many states have expanded their Medicaid programs to cover more low-income adults under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Medicaid is an important source of health coverage for millions of Americans, providing access to necessary medical care and helping to reduce financial burden for low-income individuals.

Medical mass screening, also known as population screening, is a public health service that aims to identify and detect asymptomatic individuals in a given population who have or are at risk of a specific disease. The goal is to provide early treatment, reduce morbidity and mortality, and prevent the spread of diseases within the community.

A mass screening program typically involves offering a simple, quick, and non-invasive test to a large number of people in a defined population, regardless of their risk factors or symptoms. Those who test positive are then referred for further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical interventions. Examples of mass screening programs include mammography for breast cancer detection, PSA (prostate-specific antigen) testing for prostate cancer, and fecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer.

It is important to note that mass screening programs should be evidence-based, cost-effective, and ethically sound, with clear benefits outweighing potential harms. They should also consider factors such as the prevalence of the disease in the population, the accuracy and reliability of the screening test, and the availability and effectiveness of treatment options.

A generic drug is a medication that contains the same active ingredients as an originally marketed brand-name drug, known as its "innovator" or "reference listed" drug. The active ingredient is the component of the drug that is responsible for its therapeutic effect. Generic drugs are required to have the same quality, strength, purity, and stability as their brand-name counterparts. They must also meet the same rigorous Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards regarding safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing.

Generic drugs are typically less expensive than their brand-name equivalents because generic manufacturers do not have to repeat the costly clinical trials that were required for the innovator drug. Instead, they demonstrate through bioequivalence studies that their product is therapeutically equivalent to the reference listed drug. This means that the generic drug delivers the same amount of active ingredient into a patient's bloodstream in the same timeframe as the brand-name drug.

In summary, generic drugs are copies of brand-name drugs with the same active ingredients, dosage forms, strengths, routes of administration, and intended uses. They must meet FDA regulations for safety, efficacy, and manufacturing standards, ensuring that they provide patients with the same therapeutic benefits as their brand-name counterparts at a more affordable price.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

The "delivery of health care" refers to the process of providing medical services, treatments, and interventions to individuals in order to maintain, restore, or improve their health. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including:

1. Preventive care: Routine check-ups, screenings, immunizations, and counseling aimed at preventing illnesses or identifying them at an early stage.
2. Diagnostic services: Tests and procedures used to identify and understand medical conditions, such as laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies.
3. Treatment interventions: Medical, surgical, or therapeutic treatments provided to manage acute or chronic health issues, including medications, surgeries, physical therapy, and psychotherapy.
4. Acute care services: Short-term medical interventions focused on addressing immediate health concerns, such as hospitalizations for infections, injuries, or complications from medical conditions.
5. Chronic care management: Long-term care and support provided to individuals with ongoing medical needs, such as those living with chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.
6. Rehabilitation services: Programs designed to help patients recover from illnesses, injuries, or surgeries, focusing on restoring physical, cognitive, and emotional function.
7. End-of-life care: Palliative and hospice care provided to individuals facing terminal illnesses, with an emphasis on comfort, dignity, and quality of life.
8. Public health initiatives: Population-level interventions aimed at improving community health, such as disease prevention programs, health education campaigns, and environmental modifications.

The delivery of health care involves a complex network of healthcare professionals, institutions, and systems working together to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This includes primary care physicians, specialists, nurses, allied health professionals, hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and public health organizations. Effective communication, coordination, and collaboration among these stakeholders are essential for high-quality, patient-centered care.

Energy metabolism is the process by which living organisms produce and consume energy to maintain life. It involves a series of chemical reactions that convert nutrients from food, such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, into energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

The process of energy metabolism can be divided into two main categories: catabolism and anabolism. Catabolism is the breakdown of nutrients to release energy, while anabolism is the synthesis of complex molecules from simpler ones using energy.

There are three main stages of energy metabolism: glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle), and oxidative phosphorylation. Glycolysis occurs in the cytoplasm of the cell and involves the breakdown of glucose into pyruvate, producing a small amount of ATP and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The citric acid cycle takes place in the mitochondria and involves the further breakdown of pyruvate to produce more ATP, NADH, and carbon dioxide. Oxidative phosphorylation is the final stage of energy metabolism and occurs in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It involves the transfer of electrons from NADH and other electron carriers to oxygen, which generates a proton gradient across the membrane. This gradient drives the synthesis of ATP, producing the majority of the cell's energy.

Overall, energy metabolism is a complex and essential process that allows organisms to grow, reproduce, and maintain their bodily functions. Disruptions in energy metabolism can lead to various diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Medical fees are the charges for services provided by medical professionals and healthcare facilities. These fees can vary widely depending on the type of service, the provider, and the geographic location. They may include charges for office visits, procedures, surgeries, hospital stays, diagnostic tests, and prescribed medications. In some cases, medical fees may be covered in part or in full by health insurance, but in other cases patients may be responsible for paying these fees out of pocket. It is important for patients to understand the fees associated with their medical care and to ask questions about any charges that they do not understand.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Salaries and Fringe Benefits" is not a medical term or concept.

Salaries and fringe benefits are terms used in the context of employment and compensation. A salary is the amount of money or other forms of compensation paid to an employee by an employer in return for work performed. It is usually expressed as a monthly or annual sum.

Fringe benefits, on the other hand, are additional benefits that employers may provide to their employees, such as health insurance, retirement plans, vacation and sick leave, and other perks. These benefits are offered in addition to the employee's regular salary or wages.

In a medical setting, healthcare professionals may receive salaries and fringe benefits as part of their employment compensation package, but the terms themselves do not have specific medical meanings.

A Health Benefit Plan for Employees refers to a type of insurance policy that an employer provides to their employees as part of their benefits package. These plans are designed to help cover the costs of medical care and services for the employees and sometimes also for their dependents. The specific coverage and details of the plan can vary depending on the terms of the policy, but they typically include a range of benefits such as doctor visits, hospital stays, prescription medications, and preventative care. Employers may pay all or part of the premiums for these plans, and employees may also have the option to contribute to the cost of coverage. The goal of health benefit plans for employees is to help protect the financial well-being of workers by helping them manage the costs of medical care.

Absenteeism is a term used in the medical and occupational health fields to describe the habitual pattern of absence from work or school. It refers to an employee or student's repeated failure to show up for scheduled work or classes without a valid reason or excuse. Absenteeism can have various causes, including physical illness or injury, mental health issues, stress, burnout, disengagement, and poor job or school satisfaction. Chronic absenteeism can lead to negative consequences such as decreased productivity, increased healthcare costs, and reduced academic performance.

Organizational efficiency is a management concept that refers to the ability of an organization to produce the desired output with minimal waste of resources such as time, money, and labor. It involves optimizing processes, structures, and systems within the organization to achieve its goals in the most effective and efficient manner possible. This can be achieved through various means, including the implementation of best practices, the use of technology to automate and streamline processes, and the continuous improvement of skills and knowledge among employees. Ultimately, organizational efficiency is about creating value for stakeholders while minimizing waste and maximizing returns on investment.

Quality of Life (QOL) is a broad, multidimensional concept that usually includes an individual's physical health, psychological state, level of independence, social relationships, personal beliefs, and their relationship to salient features of their environment. It reflects the impact of disease and treatment on a patient's overall well-being and ability to function in daily life.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines QOL as "an individual's perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." It is a subjective concept, meaning it can vary greatly from person to person.

In healthcare, QOL is often used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and other research studies to assess the impact of interventions or treatments on overall patient well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "England" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom, along with Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. England is located in the southern part of Great Britain, which is the largest island of the British Isles.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

A formulary is a list of prescription drugs, both generic and brand-name, that are approved for use in a specific health plan or healthcare system. The formulary includes information on the preferred drugs within each therapeutic class, along with any restrictions or limitations on their use. Formularies are developed and maintained by a committee of healthcare professionals, including pharmacists and physicians, who evaluate the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of different medications.

The purpose of a formulary is to promote the appropriate use of medications, improve patient outcomes, and manage healthcare costs. By establishing a preferred list of drugs, health plans and healthcare systems can negotiate better prices with pharmaceutical manufacturers and ensure that patients receive high-quality, evidence-based care.

Formularies may include various types of medications, such as oral solid dosage forms, injectables, inhalants, topicals, and others. They are typically organized by therapeutic class, and each drug is assigned a tier based on its cost and clinical value. Tier 1 drugs are usually preferred generics or lower-cost brand-name medications, while Tier 2 drugs may be higher-cost brand-name medications that have no generic equivalent. Tier 3 drugs are typically specialty medications that are used to treat complex or rare conditions and are often associated with high costs.

Healthcare providers are encouraged to prescribe drugs that are listed on the formulary, as these medications have been thoroughly reviewed and deemed safe and effective for use in their patient population. However, there may be situations where a non-formulary medication is necessary to treat a particular patient's condition. In such cases, healthcare providers can request an exception or prior authorization to prescribe the non-formulary drug.

Formularies are regularly updated to reflect new drugs that come on the market, changes in clinical guidelines, and shifts in the therapeutic landscape. Health plans and healthcare systems may also modify their formularies in response to feedback from patients and providers or to address concerns about safety, efficacy, or cost.

In summary, a formulary is a comprehensive list of prescription drugs that are approved for use in a specific health plan or healthcare system. Formularies promote the appropriate use of medications, improve patient outcomes, and manage costs by encouraging the prescribing of safe and effective drugs that have been thoroughly reviewed and deemed appropriate for their patient population.

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

'Government Financing' in the context of healthcare refers to the role of government in funding healthcare services, programs, and infrastructure. This can be achieved through various mechanisms such as:

1. Direct provision of healthcare services: The government operates and funds its own hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, where it employs healthcare professionals to deliver care.
2. Public insurance programs: The government establishes and manages health insurance programs, like Medicare and Medicaid in the United States, which provide coverage for specific populations and reimburse healthcare providers for services delivered to enrollees.
3. Tax subsidies and incentives: Governments may offer tax breaks or other financial incentives to encourage private investments in healthcare infrastructure, research, and development.
4. Grants and loans: Government agencies can provide funding to healthcare organizations, researchers, and educational institutions in the form of grants and loans for specific projects, programs, or initiatives.
5. Public-private partnerships (PPPs): Governments collaborate with private entities to jointly fund and manage healthcare services, facilities, or infrastructure projects.

Government financing plays a significant role in shaping healthcare systems and ensuring access to care for vulnerable populations. The extent of government involvement in financing varies across countries, depending on their political, economic, and social contexts.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Financial Audit" is not a medical term. It belongs to the field of accounting and finance. A financial audit is an independent examination of an organization's financial records, statements, and accounting practices to ensure that they are accurate, complete, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. This process is conducted by professional auditors who are unbiased and independent from the organization being audited.

Home care services, also known as home health care, refer to a wide range of health and social services delivered at an individual's residence. These services are designed to help people who have special needs or disabilities, those recovering from illness or surgery, and the elderly or frail who require assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) or skilled nursing care.

Home care services can include:

1. Skilled Nursing Care: Provided by registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), or licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to administer medications, wound care, injections, and other medical treatments. They also monitor the patient's health status, provide education on disease management, and coordinate with other healthcare professionals.
2. Therapy Services: Occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists help patients regain strength, mobility, coordination, balance, and communication skills after an illness or injury. They develop personalized treatment plans to improve the patient's ability to perform daily activities independently.
3. Personal Care/Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs): Home health aides and personal care assistants provide assistance with bathing, dressing, grooming, toileting, and other personal care tasks. They may also help with light housekeeping, meal preparation, and shopping.
4. Social Work Services: Provided by licensed social workers who assess the patient's psychosocial needs, connect them to community resources, and provide counseling and support for patients and their families.
5. Nutritional Support: Registered dietitians evaluate the patient's nutritional status, develop meal plans, and provide education on special diets or feeding techniques as needed.
6. Telehealth Monitoring: Remote monitoring of a patient's health status using technology such as video conferencing, wearable devices, or mobile apps to track vital signs, medication adherence, and symptoms. This allows healthcare providers to monitor patients closely and adjust treatment plans as necessary without requiring in-person visits.
7. Hospice Care: End-of-life care provided in the patient's home to manage pain, provide emotional support, and address spiritual needs. The goal is to help the patient maintain dignity and quality of life during their final days.
8. Respite Care: Temporary relief for family caregivers who need a break from caring for their loved ones. This can include short-term stays in assisted living facilities or hiring professional caregivers to provide in-home support.

Health care reform refers to the legislative efforts, initiatives, and debates aimed at improving the quality, affordability, and accessibility of health care services. These reforms may include changes to health insurance coverage, delivery systems, payment methods, and healthcare regulations. The goals of health care reform are often to increase the number of people with health insurance, reduce healthcare costs, and improve the overall health outcomes of a population. Examples of notable health care reform measures in the United States include the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicare for All proposals.

Program Evaluation is a systematic and objective assessment of a healthcare program's design, implementation, and outcomes. It is a medical term used to describe the process of determining the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of a program in achieving its goals and objectives. Program evaluation involves collecting and analyzing data related to various aspects of the program, such as its reach, impact, cost-effectiveness, and quality. The results of program evaluation can be used to improve the design and implementation of existing programs or to inform the development of new ones. It is a critical tool for ensuring that healthcare programs are meeting the needs of their intended audiences and delivering high-quality care in an efficient and effective manner.

A Drug Utilization Review (DUR) is a systematic retrospective examination of a patient's current and past use of medications to identify medication-related problems, such as adverse drug reactions, interactions, inappropriate dosages, duplicate therapy, and noncompliance with the treatment plan. The goal of DUR is to optimize medication therapy, improve patient outcomes, reduce healthcare costs, and promote safe and effective use of medications.

DUR is typically conducted by pharmacists, physicians, or other healthcare professionals who review medication records, laboratory results, and clinical data to identify potential issues and make recommendations for changes in medication therapy. DUR may be performed manually or using automated software tools that can analyze large datasets of medication claims and electronic health records.

DUR is an important component of medication management programs in various settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, managed care organizations, and ambulatory care clinics. It helps ensure that patients receive the right medications at the right doses for the right indications, and reduces the risk of medication errors and adverse drug events.

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

Disposable equipment in a medical context refers to items that are designed to be used once and then discarded. These items are often patient-care products that come into contact with patients or bodily fluids, and are meant to help reduce the risk of infection transmission. Examples of disposable medical equipment include gloves, gowns, face masks, syringes, and bandages.

Disposable equipment is intended for single use only and should not be reused or cleaned for reuse. This helps ensure that the equipment remains sterile and free from potential contaminants that could cause harm to patients or healthcare workers. Proper disposal of these items is also important to prevent the spread of infection and maintain a safe and clean environment.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

The term "developing countries" is a socio-economic classification used to describe nations that are in the process of industrialization and modernization. This term is often used interchangeably with "low and middle-income countries" or "Global South." The World Bank defines developing countries as those with a gross national income (GNI) per capita of less than US $12,695.

In the context of healthcare, developing countries face unique challenges including limited access to quality medical care, lack of resources and infrastructure, high burden of infectious diseases, and a shortage of trained healthcare professionals. These factors contribute to significant disparities in health outcomes between developing and developed nations.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

The term "Theoretical Models" is used in various scientific fields, including medicine, to describe a representation of a complex system or phenomenon. It is a simplified framework that explains how different components of the system interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall behavior of the system. Theoretical models are often used in medical research to understand and predict the outcomes of diseases, treatments, or public health interventions.

A theoretical model can take many forms, such as mathematical equations, computer simulations, or conceptual diagrams. It is based on a set of assumptions and hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms that drive the system. By manipulating these variables and observing the effects on the model's output, researchers can test their assumptions and generate new insights into the system's behavior.

Theoretical models are useful for medical research because they allow scientists to explore complex systems in a controlled and systematic way. They can help identify key drivers of disease or treatment outcomes, inform the design of clinical trials, and guide the development of new interventions. However, it is important to recognize that theoretical models are simplifications of reality and may not capture all the nuances and complexities of real-world systems. Therefore, they should be used in conjunction with other forms of evidence, such as experimental data and observational studies, to inform medical decision-making.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

A drug prescription is a written or electronic order provided by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse, to a pharmacist that authorizes the preparation and dispensing of a specific medication for a patient. The prescription typically includes important information such as the patient's name and date of birth, the name and strength of the medication, the dosage regimen, the duration of treatment, and any special instructions or precautions.

Prescriptions serve several purposes, including ensuring that patients receive the appropriate medication for their medical condition, preventing medication errors, and promoting safe and effective use of medications. They also provide a legal record of the medical provider's authorization for the pharmacist to dispense the medication to the patient.

There are two main types of prescriptions: written prescriptions and electronic prescriptions. Written prescriptions are handwritten or printed on paper, while electronic prescriptions are transmitted electronically from the medical provider to the pharmacy. Electronic prescriptions are becoming increasingly common due to their convenience, accuracy, and security.

It is important for patients to follow the instructions provided on their prescription carefully and to ask their healthcare provider or pharmacist any questions they may have about their medication. Failure to follow a drug prescription can result in improper use of the medication, which can lead to adverse effects, treatment failure, or even life-threatening situations.

An "episode of care" is a term commonly used in the healthcare industry to describe the period of time during which a patient receives medical treatment for a specific condition, injury, or health issue. It typically includes all the services provided by one or more healthcare professionals or facilities during the course of treating that particular condition or health problem. This may include various aspects such as diagnosis, treatment, follow-up care, and any necessary readmissions related to that specific condition.

The purpose of defining an episode of care is to help measure the quality, effectiveness, and cost of healthcare services for a given condition or procedure. By analyzing data from episodes of care, healthcare providers, payers, and policymakers can identify best practices, improve patient outcomes, and make more informed decisions about resource allocation and reimbursement policies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Economics, Nursing" is not a standard medical or nursing term or concept. Economics is the social science that deals with the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, while nursing is a field of healthcare concerned with the care of individuals, families, and communities to achieve, maintain, or recover optimal health and quality of life.

If you're looking for information on how economics intersects with nursing or healthcare more broadly, there is a subfield of study known as "health economics" that examines issues related to the financing, delivery, and consumption of healthcare resources. However, I would need more context to provide a more specific definition or explanation.

An algorithm is not a medical term, but rather a concept from computer science and mathematics. In the context of medicine, algorithms are often used to describe step-by-step procedures for diagnosing or managing medical conditions. These procedures typically involve a series of rules or decision points that help healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care.

For example, an algorithm for diagnosing a particular type of heart disease might involve taking a patient's medical history, performing a physical exam, ordering certain diagnostic tests, and interpreting the results in a specific way. By following this algorithm, healthcare professionals can ensure that they are using a consistent and evidence-based approach to making a diagnosis.

Algorithms can also be used to guide treatment decisions. For instance, an algorithm for managing diabetes might involve setting target blood sugar levels, recommending certain medications or lifestyle changes based on the patient's individual needs, and monitoring the patient's response to treatment over time.

Overall, algorithms are valuable tools in medicine because they help standardize clinical decision-making and ensure that patients receive high-quality care based on the latest scientific evidence.

Drug utilization refers to the use of medications by patients or healthcare professionals in a real-world setting. It involves analyzing and evaluating patterns of medication use, including prescribing practices, adherence to treatment guidelines, potential duplications or interactions, and outcomes associated with drug therapy. The goal of drug utilization is to optimize medication use, improve patient safety, and minimize costs while achieving the best possible health outcomes. It can be studied through various methods such as prescription claims data analysis, surveys, and clinical audits.

Life expectancy is a statistical measure that indicates the average amount of time a person is expected to live, based on their current age and other demographic factors such as sex, health status, and geographical location. It is often calculated using data from population studies and represents the number of years of life remaining at a given age, assuming that current mortality rates continue to apply.

For example, if the life expectancy at birth in a particular population is 80 years, it means that on average, newborns in that population are expected to live to be 80 years old. However, it's important to note that life expectancy is a statistical measure and does not predict the exact lifespan of any individual person.

A factual database in the medical context is a collection of organized and structured data that contains verified and accurate information related to medicine, healthcare, or health sciences. These databases serve as reliable resources for various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, researchers, students, and patients, to access evidence-based information for making informed decisions and enhancing knowledge.

Examples of factual medical databases include:

1. PubMed: A comprehensive database of biomedical literature maintained by the US National Library of Medicine (NLM). It contains citations and abstracts from life sciences journals, books, and conference proceedings.
2. MEDLINE: A subset of PubMed, MEDLINE focuses on high-quality, peer-reviewed articles related to biomedicine and health. It is the primary component of the NLM's database and serves as a critical resource for healthcare professionals and researchers worldwide.
3. Cochrane Library: A collection of systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on evidence-based medicine. The library aims to provide unbiased, high-quality information to support clinical decision-making and improve patient outcomes.
4. OVID: A platform that offers access to various medical and healthcare databases, including MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. It facilitates the search and retrieval of relevant literature for researchers, clinicians, and students.
5. ClinicalTrials.gov: A registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies conducted around the world. The platform aims to increase transparency and accessibility of clinical trial data for healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients.
6. UpToDate: An evidence-based, physician-authored clinical decision support resource that provides information on diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of medical conditions. It serves as a point-of-care tool for healthcare professionals to make informed decisions and improve patient care.
7. TRIP Database: A search engine designed to facilitate evidence-based medicine by providing quick access to high-quality resources, including systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, and practice recommendations.
8. National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC): A database of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and related documents developed through a rigorous review process. The NGC aims to provide clinicians, healthcare providers, and policymakers with reliable guidance for patient care.
9. DrugBank: A comprehensive, freely accessible online database containing detailed information about drugs, their mechanisms, interactions, and targets. It serves as a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and students in the field of pharmacology and drug discovery.
10. Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): A database that provides centralized information about genetic tests, test developers, laboratories offering tests, and clinical validity and utility of genetic tests. It serves as a resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients to make informed decisions regarding genetic testing.

Pharmaceutical services refer to the direct patient care activities conducted by licensed pharmacists, which include but are not limited to:

1. Medication therapy management: This involves reviewing a patient's medications to ensure they are appropriate, effective, and safe. Pharmacists may make recommendations to the prescriber about changes to medication therapy as needed.
2. Patient education: Pharmacists provide education to patients about their medications, including how to take them, potential side effects, and storage instructions. They also provide information on disease prevention and management.
3. Immunizations: Many pharmacists are trained to administer vaccines, which can help increase access to this important preventive health service.
4. Monitoring and evaluation: Pharmacists monitor patients' responses to medication therapy and make adjustments as needed. They also evaluate the effectiveness of medication therapy and make recommendations for changes if necessary.
5. Clinical services: Pharmacists may provide a range of clinical services, such as managing anticoagulation therapy, providing diabetes education, or conducting medication reconciliation after hospital discharge.
6. Collaborative practice: Pharmacists work collaboratively with other healthcare providers to optimize medication therapy and improve patient outcomes. This may involve participating in multidisciplinary teams, consulting with prescribers, or sharing information with other healthcare professionals.

Overall, pharmaceutical services aim to improve patient outcomes by ensuring that medications are used safely and effectively.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "investments" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is an economic and financial term that refers to the allocation of resources, usually money, with the expectation of receiving future returns or benefits. This could include purchasing stocks, bonds, real estate, or other assets with the goal of generating income or appreciating in value over time.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related concepts, I'd be happy to help!

Primary health care is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as:

"Essential health care that is based on practical, scientifically sound and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community through their full participation and at a cost that the community and country can afford. It forms an integral part both of the country's health system, of which it is the central function and main focus, and of the overall social and economic development of the community. It is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work, and constitutes the first element of a continuing health care process."

Primary health care includes a range of services such as preventive care, health promotion, curative care, rehabilitation, and palliative care. It is typically provided by a team of health professionals including doctors, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, and other community health workers. The goal of primary health care is to provide comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated care to individuals and families in a way that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive.

A deductible is a specific amount of money that a patient must pay out of pocket before their health insurance starts covering the costs of medical services. For example, if a patient has a $1000 deductible, they must pay the first $1000 of their medical bills themselves before the insurance begins to cover the remaining costs. Deductibles are annual, meaning they reset every year.

Coinsurance is the percentage of costs for a covered medical service that a patient is responsible for paying after they have met their deductible. For example, if a patient has a 20% coinsurance rate, they will be responsible for paying 20% of the cost of each medical service, while their insurance covers the remaining 80%. Coinsurance rates vary depending on the health insurance plan and the specific medical service being provided.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Quality of health care is a term that refers to the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge. It encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Clinical effectiveness: The use of best available evidence to make decisions about prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care. This includes considering the benefits and harms of different options and making sure that the most effective interventions are used.
2. Safety: Preventing harm to patients and minimizing risks associated with healthcare. This involves identifying potential hazards, implementing measures to reduce errors, and learning from adverse events to improve systems and processes.
3. Patient-centeredness: Providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values. This includes ensuring that patients are fully informed about their condition and treatment options, involving them in decision-making, and providing emotional support throughout the care process.
4. Timeliness: Ensuring that healthcare services are delivered promptly and efficiently, without unnecessary delays. This includes coordinating care across different providers and settings to ensure continuity and avoid gaps in service.
5. Efficiency: Using resources wisely and avoiding waste, while still providing high-quality care. This involves considering the costs and benefits of different interventions, as well as ensuring that healthcare services are equitably distributed.
6. Equitability: Ensuring that all individuals have access to quality healthcare services, regardless of their socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, age, or other factors. This includes addressing disparities in health outcomes and promoting fairness and justice in healthcare.

Overall, the quality of health care is a multidimensional concept that requires ongoing evaluation and improvement to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

Insurance coverage, in the context of healthcare and medicine, refers to the financial protection provided by an insurance policy that covers all or a portion of the cost of medical services, treatments, and prescription drugs. The coverage is typically offered by health insurance companies, employers, or government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid.

The specific services and treatments covered by insurance, as well as the out-of-pocket costs borne by the insured individual, are determined by the terms of the insurance policy. These terms may include deductibles, copayments, coinsurance, and coverage limits or exclusions. The goal of insurance coverage is to help individuals manage the financial risks associated with healthcare expenses and ensure access to necessary medical services.

Long-term care (LTC) is a term used to describe various medical and support services that are required by individuals who need assistance with activities of daily living (such as bathing, dressing, using the toilet) or who have chronic health conditions that require ongoing supervision and care. LTC can be provided in a variety of settings, including nursing homes, assisted living facilities, adult day care centers, and private homes.

The goal of LTC is to help individuals maintain their independence and quality of life for as long as possible, while also ensuring that they receive the necessary medical and support services to meet their needs. LTC can be provided on a short-term or long-term basis, depending on the individual's needs and circumstances.

LTC is often required by older adults who have physical or cognitive limitations, but it can also be needed by people of any age who have disabilities or chronic illnesses that require ongoing care. LTC services may include nursing care, therapy (such as occupational, physical, or speech therapy), personal care (such as help with bathing and dressing), and social activities.

LTC is typically not covered by traditional health insurance plans, but it may be covered by long-term care insurance policies, Medicaid, or other government programs. It's important to plan for LTC needs well in advance, as the cost of care can be significant and can have a major impact on an individual's financial resources.

"California" is a geographical location and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located on the west coast of the United States, known for its diverse landscape including mountains, beaches, and forests. However, in some contexts, "California" may refer to certain medical conditions or situations that are associated with the state, such as:

* California encephalitis: a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes that is common in California and other western states.
* California king snake: a non-venomous snake species found in California and other parts of the southwestern United States, which can bite and cause allergic reactions in some people.
* California roll: a type of sushi roll that originated in California and is made with avocado, cucumber, and crab meat, which may pose an allergy risk for some individuals.

It's important to note that these uses of "California" are not medical definitions per se, but rather descriptive terms that refer to specific conditions or situations associated with the state.

Technology Assessment, Biomedical is defined as the systematic evaluation of biomedical technologies and techniques for their scientific validity, efficacy, effectiveness, cost-benefit, and impact on patient care, health system, and society. It involves a multidisciplinary and systematic approach to examining the medical, social, ethical, and economic implications of the use of new and existing biomedical technologies. The goal is to provide unbiased, evidence-based information to healthcare providers, patients, policymakers, and other stakeholders to inform decision making about the adoption, implementation, and dissemination of these technologies in clinical practice and health policy.

Physician's practice patterns refer to the individual habits and preferences of healthcare providers when it comes to making clinical decisions and managing patient care. These patterns can encompass various aspects, such as:

1. Diagnostic testing: The types and frequency of diagnostic tests ordered for patients with similar conditions.
2. Treatment modalities: The choice of treatment options, including medications, procedures, or referrals to specialists.
3. Patient communication: The way physicians communicate with their patients, including the amount and type of information shared, as well as the level of patient involvement in decision-making.
4. Follow-up care: The frequency and duration of follow-up appointments, as well as the monitoring of treatment effectiveness and potential side effects.
5. Resource utilization: The use of healthcare resources, such as hospitalizations, imaging studies, or specialist consultations, and the associated costs.

Physician practice patterns can be influenced by various factors, including medical training, clinical experience, personal beliefs, guidelines, and local availability of resources. Understanding these patterns is essential for evaluating the quality of care, identifying potential variations in care, and implementing strategies to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs.

A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a type of clinical study in which participants are randomly assigned to receive either the experimental intervention or the control condition, which may be a standard of care, placebo, or no treatment. The goal of an RCT is to minimize bias and ensure that the results are due to the intervention being tested rather than other factors. This design allows for a comparison between the two groups to determine if there is a significant difference in outcomes. RCTs are often considered the gold standard for evaluating the safety and efficacy of medical interventions, as they provide a high level of evidence for causal relationships between the intervention and health outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Netherlands" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Western Europe, known for its artistic heritage, elaborate canal system, and legalized marijuana and prostitution. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

"Rate setting and review" is not a commonly used medical term with a specific definition in the field. However, I can provide you with information about what these terms might refer to in a broader healthcare context:

Rate setting generally refers to the process of determining the payment rates for healthcare services, programs, or products. This could involve setting reimbursement rates for medical procedures, medications, or durable medical equipment under government-funded health insurance programs like Medicare and Medicaid, or in the private insurance sector. Rate setting can be influenced by various factors, including the cost of providing care, resource utilization, quality metrics, and market competition.

Review, in this context, typically refers to the process of evaluating and assessing healthcare services, programs, or products to ensure their quality, effectiveness, and efficiency. This could involve reviewing medical records, clinical outcomes, and financial data to determine if the care provided is consistent with evidence-based guidelines, industry best practices, and regulatory requirements. Regular reviews are essential for maintaining high standards of care, identifying areas for improvement, and ensuring that resources are allocated efficiently.

Together, "rate setting and review" may refer to a comprehensive approach to managing healthcare costs and quality by establishing appropriate payment rates while continuously monitoring and improving the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare services.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Germany" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of a country in central Europe. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Fee-for-service (FFS) plans are a type of medical reimbursement model in which healthcare providers are paid for each specific service or procedure they perform. In this system, the patient or their insurance company is charged separately for each appointment, test, or treatment, and the provider receives payment based on the number and type of services delivered.

FFS plans can be either traditional fee-for-service or modified fee-for-service. Traditional FFS plans offer providers more autonomy in setting their fees but may lead to higher healthcare costs due to potential overutilization of services. Modified FFS plans, on the other hand, involve pre-negotiated rates between insurance companies and healthcare providers, aiming to control costs while still allowing providers to be compensated for each service they deliver.

It is important to note that FFS plans can sometimes create financial incentives for healthcare providers to perform more tests or procedures than necessary, potentially leading to increased healthcare costs and potential overtreatment. As a result, alternative payment models like capitation, bundled payments, and value-based care have emerged as alternatives to address these concerns.

Reproduction, in the context of biology and medicine, refers to the process by which organisms produce offspring. It is a complex process that involves the creation, development, and growth of new individuals from parent organisms. In sexual reproduction, this process typically involves the combination of genetic material from two parents through the fusion of gametes (sex cells) such as sperm and egg cells. This results in the formation of a zygote, which then develops into a new individual with a unique genetic makeup.

In contrast, asexual reproduction does not involve the fusion of gametes and can occur through various mechanisms such as budding, fragmentation, or parthenogenesis. Asexual reproduction results in offspring that are genetically identical to the parent organism.

Reproduction is a fundamental process that ensures the survival and continuation of species over time. It is also an area of active research in fields such as reproductive medicine, where scientists and clinicians work to understand and address issues related to human fertility, contraception, and genetic disorders.

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Private Sector" is not a medical definition. It is an economic and sociopolitical term that refers to businesses and organizations which are not owned or controlled by the government. They can be privately owned and operated for profit, such as corporations, partnerships, and sole proprietorships, or they can be non-profit organizations, such as charities and advocacy groups. The private sector is distinct from the "Public Sector," which includes entities that are owned and controlled by the government, like public schools, hospitals, and other services provided by the state.

A computer simulation is a process that involves creating a model of a real-world system or phenomenon on a computer and then using that model to run experiments and make predictions about how the system will behave under different conditions. In the medical field, computer simulations are used for a variety of purposes, including:

1. Training and education: Computer simulations can be used to create realistic virtual environments where medical students and professionals can practice their skills and learn new procedures without risk to actual patients. For example, surgeons may use simulation software to practice complex surgical techniques before performing them on real patients.
2. Research and development: Computer simulations can help medical researchers study the behavior of biological systems at a level of detail that would be difficult or impossible to achieve through experimental methods alone. By creating detailed models of cells, tissues, organs, or even entire organisms, researchers can use simulation software to explore how these systems function and how they respond to different stimuli.
3. Drug discovery and development: Computer simulations are an essential tool in modern drug discovery and development. By modeling the behavior of drugs at a molecular level, researchers can predict how they will interact with their targets in the body and identify potential side effects or toxicities. This information can help guide the design of new drugs and reduce the need for expensive and time-consuming clinical trials.
4. Personalized medicine: Computer simulations can be used to create personalized models of individual patients based on their unique genetic, physiological, and environmental characteristics. These models can then be used to predict how a patient will respond to different treatments and identify the most effective therapy for their specific condition.

Overall, computer simulations are a powerful tool in modern medicine, enabling researchers and clinicians to study complex systems and make predictions about how they will behave under a wide range of conditions. By providing insights into the behavior of biological systems at a level of detail that would be difficult or impossible to achieve through experimental methods alone, computer simulations are helping to advance our understanding of human health and disease.

Economic competition in the context of healthcare and medicine generally refers to the rivalry among healthcare providers, organizations, or pharmaceutical companies competing for patients, resources, market share, or funding. This competition can drive innovation, improve quality of care, and increase efficiency. However, it can also lead to cost-containment measures that may negatively impact patient care and safety.

In the pharmaceutical industry, economic competition exists between different companies developing and marketing similar drugs. This competition can result in lower prices for consumers and incentives for innovation, but it can also lead to unethical practices such as price gouging or misleading advertising.

Regulation and oversight are crucial to ensure that economic competition in healthcare and medicine promotes the well-being of patients and the public while discouraging harmful practices.

Insurance claim reporting is the process of informing an insurance company about a potential claim that an insured individual or business intends to make under their insurance policy. This report typically includes details about the incident or loss, such as the date, time, location, and type of damage or injury, as well as any relevant documentation, such as police reports or medical records.

The purpose of insurance claim reporting is to initiate the claims process and provide the insurance company with the necessary information to evaluate the claim and determine coverage. The insured individual or business may be required to submit additional information or evidence to support their claim, and the insurance company will conduct an investigation to assess the validity and value of the claim.

Prompt and accurate reporting of insurance claims is important to ensure that the claim is processed in a timely manner and to avoid any potential delays or denials of coverage based on late reporting. It is also important to provide complete and truthful information during the claims process, as misrepresentations or false statements can lead to claim denials or even fraud investigations.

I apologize for the confusion, but "inflation" is an economic term and not a medical one. Here's a simple explanation of what it means:

Economic inflation is a rise in the general price level of goods and services in an economy over a period of time. When the overall prices of these items increase, each unit of currency buys fewer goods and services; consequently, inflation reflects a reduction in the purchasing power of money – a loss of real value in the medium of exchange and unit of account within an economic system. This is typically measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI) or the Producer Price Index (PPI), and central banks attempt to limit inflation, and avoid deflation, in order to keep the economy running smoothly.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Australia" is not a medical term or concept. It is the world's largest island and smallest continent, located in the Southern Hemisphere, surrounded by the Pacific and Indian Oceans. It is composed of many diverse ecosystems, including deserts, rainforests, and coastal areas, and is home to a wide variety of unique plant and animal species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you!

A "University Hospital" is a type of hospital that is often affiliated with a medical school or university. These hospitals serve as major teaching institutions where medical students, residents, and fellows receive their training and education. They are equipped with advanced medical technology and resources to provide specialized and tertiary care services. University hospitals also conduct research and clinical trials to advance medical knowledge and practices. Additionally, they often treat complex and rare cases and provide a wide range of medical services to the community.

A Public Sector, in the context of healthcare, refers to the portion of a country's health system that is managed and funded by the government. This sector provides medical services through state-owned hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, as well as through publicly financed programs such as Medicare and Medicaid in the United States or the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom. The public sector aims to ensure that all citizens have access to necessary medical care, regardless of their ability to pay. It is often funded through taxes and is accountable to the public for its performance.

Drug therapy, also known as pharmacotherapy, refers to the use of medications to treat, cure, or prevent a disease or disorder. It is a crucial component of medical treatment and involves the prescription, administration, and monitoring of drugs to achieve specific therapeutic goals. The choice of drug therapy depends on various factors, including the patient's age, sex, weight, overall health status, severity of the condition, potential interactions with other medications, and personal preferences.

The goal of drug therapy is to alleviate symptoms, reduce the risk of complications, slow down disease progression, or cure a disease. It can be used as a standalone treatment or in combination with other therapies such as surgery, radiation therapy, or lifestyle modifications. The effectiveness of drug therapy varies depending on the condition being treated and the individual patient's response to the medication.

Drug therapy requires careful monitoring to ensure its safety and efficacy. Patients should be informed about the potential benefits and risks associated with the medication, including side effects, contraindications, and interactions with other drugs or foods. Regular follow-up appointments with healthcare providers are necessary to assess the patient's response to the therapy and make any necessary adjustments.

In summary, drug therapy is a medical intervention that involves the use of medications to treat, cure, or prevent diseases or disorders. It requires careful consideration of various factors, including the patient's individual needs and preferences, and ongoing monitoring to ensure its safety and effectiveness.

Disease management is a proactive, planned approach to identify and manage patients with chronic medical conditions. It involves a systematic and coordinated method of delivering care to patients with the goal of improving clinical outcomes, enhancing quality of life, and reducing healthcare costs. This approach typically includes elements such as evidence-based care guidelines, patient education, self-management support, regular monitoring and follow-up, and collaboration between healthcare providers and specialists.

The objective of disease management is to improve the overall health and well-being of patients with chronic conditions by providing them with the necessary tools, resources, and support to effectively manage their condition and prevent complications. By implementing a comprehensive and coordinated approach to care, disease management can help reduce hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and other costly healthcare services while improving patient satisfaction and overall health outcomes.

Utilization review (UR) is a comprehensive process used by healthcare insurance companies to evaluate the medical necessity, appropriateness, and efficiency of the healthcare services and treatments that have been rendered, are currently being provided, or are being recommended for members. The primary goal of utilization review is to ensure that patients receive clinically necessary and cost-effective care while avoiding unnecessary or excessive treatments.

The utilization review process may involve various steps, including:

1. Preauthorization (also known as precertification): A prospective review to approve or deny coverage for specific services, procedures, or treatments before they are provided. This step helps ensure that the planned care aligns with evidence-based guidelines and medical necessity criteria.
2. Concurrent review: An ongoing evaluation of a patient's treatment during their hospital stay or course of therapy to determine if the services remain medically necessary and consistent with established clinical pathways.
3. Retrospective review: A retrospective analysis of healthcare services already provided to assess their medical necessity, appropriateness, and quality. This step may lead to adjustments in reimbursement or require the provider to justify the rendered services.

Utilization review is typically conducted by a team of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and case managers, who apply their clinical expertise and adhere to established criteria and guidelines. The process aims to promote high-quality care, reduce wasteful spending, and safeguard patients from potential harm caused by inappropriate or unnecessary treatments.

An inpatient, in medical terms, refers to a person who has been admitted to a hospital or other healthcare facility for the purpose of receiving medical treatment and who is expected to remain there for at least one night. Inpatients are typically cared for by a team of healthcare professionals, including doctors, nurses, and therapists, and may receive various treatments, such as medications, surgeries, or rehabilitation services.

Inpatient care is generally recommended for patients who require close monitoring, frequent assessments, or intensive medical interventions that cannot be provided in an outpatient setting. The length of stay for inpatients can vary widely depending on the nature and severity of their condition, as well as their individual treatment plan.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

"Forecasting" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a general term used in various fields, including finance, economics, and meteorology, to describe the process of making predictions or estimates about future events or trends based on historical data, trends, and other relevant factors. In healthcare and public health, forecasting may be used to predict the spread of diseases, identify potential shortages of resources such as hospital beds or medical equipment, or plan for future health care needs. However, there is no medical definition for "forecasting" itself.

Health care surveys are research tools used to systematically collect information from a population or sample regarding their experiences, perceptions, and knowledge of health services, health outcomes, and various other health-related topics. These surveys typically consist of standardized questionnaires that cover specific aspects of healthcare, such as access to care, quality of care, patient satisfaction, health disparities, and healthcare costs. The data gathered from health care surveys are used to inform policy decisions, improve healthcare delivery, identify best practices, allocate resources, and monitor the health status of populations. Health care surveys can be conducted through various modes, including in-person interviews, telephone interviews, mail-in questionnaires, or online platforms.

Community health services refer to a type of healthcare delivery that is organized around the needs of a specific population or community, rather than individual patients. These services are typically focused on preventive care, health promotion, and improving access to care for underserved populations. They can include a wide range of services, such as:

* Primary care, including routine check-ups, immunizations, and screenings
* Dental care
* Mental health and substance abuse treatment
* Public health initiatives, such as disease prevention and health education programs
* Home health care and other supportive services for people with chronic illnesses or disabilities
* Health services for special populations, such as children, the elderly, or those living in rural areas

The goal of community health services is to improve the overall health of a population by addressing the social, economic, and environmental factors that can impact health. This approach recognizes that healthcare is just one factor in determining a person's health outcomes, and that other factors such as housing, education, and income also play important roles. By working to address these underlying determinants of health, community health services aim to improve the health and well-being of entire communities.

The term "Integrated Delivery of Healthcare" refers to a coordinated and seamless approach to providing healthcare services, where different providers and specialists work together to provide comprehensive care for patients. This model aims to improve patient outcomes by ensuring that all aspects of a person's health are addressed in a holistic and coordinated manner.

Integrated delivery of healthcare may involve various components such as:

1. Primary Care: A primary care provider serves as the first point of contact for patients and coordinates their care with other specialists and providers.
2. Specialty Care: Specialists provide care for specific medical conditions or diseases, working closely with primary care providers to ensure coordinated care.
3. Mental Health Services: Mental health providers work alongside medical professionals to address the mental and emotional needs of patients, recognizing that mental health is an essential component of overall health.
4. Preventive Care: Preventive services such as screenings, vaccinations, and health education are provided to help prevent illnesses and promote overall health and well-being.
5. Chronic Disease Management: Providers work together to manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer, using evidence-based practices and coordinated care plans.
6. Health Information Technology: Electronic health records (EHRs) and other health information technologies are used to facilitate communication and coordination among providers, ensuring that all members of the care team have access to up-to-date patient information.
7. Patient Engagement: Patients are actively engaged in their care, with education and support provided to help them make informed decisions about their health and treatment options.

The goal of integrated delivery of healthcare is to provide high-quality, cost-effective care that meets the unique needs of each patient, while also improving overall population health.

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "income" is not a medical term. Income is an economic term that refers to the inflow of monetary resources or earnings that an individual or household receives from various sources, such as employment, investments, or government benefits. It is typically used in financial and economic contexts rather than medical ones. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

A Severity of Illness Index is a measurement tool used in healthcare to assess the severity of a patient's condition and the risk of mortality or other adverse outcomes. These indices typically take into account various physiological and clinical variables, such as vital signs, laboratory values, and co-morbidities, to generate a score that reflects the patient's overall illness severity.

Examples of Severity of Illness Indices include the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) system, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), and the Mortality Probability Model (MPM). These indices are often used in critical care settings to guide clinical decision-making, inform prognosis, and compare outcomes across different patient populations.

It is important to note that while these indices can provide valuable information about a patient's condition, they should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decision-making. Rather, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as the patient's overall clinical presentation, treatment preferences, and goals of care.

Statistical models are mathematical representations that describe the relationship between variables in a given dataset. They are used to analyze and interpret data in order to make predictions or test hypotheses about a population. In the context of medicine, statistical models can be used for various purposes such as:

1. Disease risk prediction: By analyzing demographic, clinical, and genetic data using statistical models, researchers can identify factors that contribute to an individual's risk of developing certain diseases. This information can then be used to develop personalized prevention strategies or early detection methods.

2. Clinical trial design and analysis: Statistical models are essential tools for designing and analyzing clinical trials. They help determine sample size, allocate participants to treatment groups, and assess the effectiveness and safety of interventions.

3. Epidemiological studies: Researchers use statistical models to investigate the distribution and determinants of health-related events in populations. This includes studying patterns of disease transmission, evaluating public health interventions, and estimating the burden of diseases.

4. Health services research: Statistical models are employed to analyze healthcare utilization, costs, and outcomes. This helps inform decisions about resource allocation, policy development, and quality improvement initiatives.

5. Biostatistics and bioinformatics: In these fields, statistical models are used to analyze large-scale molecular data (e.g., genomics, proteomics) to understand biological processes and identify potential therapeutic targets.

In summary, statistical models in medicine provide a framework for understanding complex relationships between variables and making informed decisions based on data-driven insights.

Patient satisfaction is a concept in healthcare quality measurement that reflects the patient's perspective and evaluates their experience with the healthcare services they have received. It is a multidimensional construct that includes various aspects such as interpersonal mannerisms of healthcare providers, technical competence, accessibility, timeliness, comfort, and communication.

Patient satisfaction is typically measured through standardized surveys or questionnaires that ask patients to rate their experiences on various aspects of care. The results are often used to assess the quality of care provided by healthcare organizations, identify areas for improvement, and inform policy decisions. However, it's important to note that patient satisfaction is just one aspect of healthcare quality and should be considered alongside other measures such as clinical outcomes and patient safety.

Health care rationing refers to the deliberate limitation or restriction of medical services, treatments, or resources provided to patients based on specific criteria or guidelines. These limitations can be influenced by various factors such as cost-effectiveness, scarcity of resources, evidence-based medicine, and clinical appropriateness. The primary goal of health care rationing is to ensure fair distribution and allocation of finite medical resources among a population while maximizing overall health benefits and minimizing harm.

Rationing can occur at different levels within the healthcare system, including individual patient care decisions, insurance coverage policies, and governmental resource allocation. Examples of rationing include prioritizing certain treatments based on their proven effectiveness, restricting access to high-cost procedures with limited clinical benefits, or setting age limits for specific interventions.

It is important to note that health care rationing remains a controversial topic due to ethical concerns about potential disparities in care and the balance between individual patient needs and societal resource constraints.

Organizational models in the context of medicine refer to frameworks that are used to describe, analyze, and improve the structure, processes, and outcomes of healthcare organizations. These models provide a systematic way of understanding how different components of an organization interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall performance of the system.

Examples of organizational models in healthcare include:

1. The Donabedian model: This model focuses on the structure, process, and outcome of healthcare as interrelated components that influence the quality of care.
2. The Baldrige Performance Excellence Program: This model provides a framework for organizations to evaluate their performance and identify areas for improvement in seven categories: leadership, strategic planning, customer focus, measurement, analysis, and knowledge management; workforce focus; process management; and results.
3. The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) six aims for improvement: The IOM has identified six aims that should be the focus of healthcare quality improvement efforts: safety, timeliness, patient-centeredness, effectiveness, efficiency, and equity.
4. The Lean management system: This model is a process improvement approach that focuses on eliminating waste and maximizing value for customers through continuous improvement and respect for people.
5. The Six Sigma methodology: This model is a data-driven approach to quality improvement that seeks to reduce variation and defects in processes through the use of statistical tools and techniques.

These are just a few examples of organizational models used in healthcare. Each model has its own strengths and limitations, and organizations may choose to adopt one or more models depending on their specific needs and goals.

Resource allocation in a medical context refers to the process of distributing and managing healthcare resources, such as budget, staff, equipment, and supplies, in an efficient and equitable manner to meet the health needs of a population. This involves prioritizing the use of resources to maximize benefits, improve patient outcomes, and ensure fair access to healthcare services. It is a critical aspect of healthcare planning and management, particularly in situations where resources are limited or there are competing demands for them.

Family practice, also known as family medicine, is a medical specialty that provides comprehensive and continuous care to patients of all ages, genders, and stages of life. Family physicians are trained to provide a wide range of services, including preventive care, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of complex medical conditions, and providing health education and counseling.

Family practice emphasizes the importance of building long-term relationships with patients and their families, and takes into account the physical, emotional, social, and psychological factors that influence a person's health. Family physicians often serve as the primary point of contact for patients within the healthcare system, coordinating care with other specialists and healthcare providers as needed.

Family practice is a broad and diverse field, encompassing various areas such as pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and behavioral health. The goal of family practice is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the unique needs and preferences of each individual patient and their family.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

"Public hospitals" are defined as healthcare institutions that are owned, operated, and funded by government entities. They provide medical services to the general public, regardless of their ability to pay. Public hospitals can be found at the local, regional, or national level and may offer a wide range of services, including emergency care, inpatient and outpatient care, specialized clinics, and community health programs. These hospitals are accountable to the public and often have a mandate to serve vulnerable populations, such as low-income individuals, uninsured patients, and underserved communities. Public hospitals may receive additional funding from various sources, including patient fees, grants, and donations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Linear Models" is actually a term from the field of statistics and machine learning, rather than medicine. A linear model is a type of statistical model that is used to analyze the relationship between two or more variables. In a linear model, the relationship between the dependent variable (the outcome or result) and the independent variable(s) (the factors being studied) is assumed to be linear, meaning that it can be described by a straight line on a graph.

The equation for a simple linear model with one independent variable (x) and one dependent variable (y) looks like this:

y = β0 + β1*x + ε

In this equation, β0 is the y-intercept or the value of y when x equals zero, β1 is the slope or the change in y for each unit increase in x, and ε is the error term or the difference between the actual values of y and the predicted values of y based on the linear model.

Linear models are widely used in medical research to study the relationship between various factors (such as exposure to a risk factor or treatment) and health outcomes (such as disease incidence or mortality). They can also be used to adjust for confounding variables, which are factors that may influence both the independent variable and the dependent variable, and thus affect the observed relationship between them.

An emergency service in a hospital is a department that provides immediate medical or surgical care for individuals who are experiencing an acute illness, injury, or severe symptoms that require immediate attention. The goal of an emergency service is to quickly assess, stabilize, and treat patients who require urgent medical intervention, with the aim of preventing further harm or death.

Emergency services in hospitals typically operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and are staffed by teams of healthcare professionals including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other allied health professionals. These teams are trained to provide rapid evaluation and treatment for a wide range of medical conditions, from minor injuries to life-threatening emergencies such as heart attacks, strokes, and severe infections.

In addition to providing emergency care, hospital emergency services also serve as a key point of entry for patients who require further hospitalization or specialized care. They work closely with other departments within the hospital, such as radiology, laboratory, and critical care units, to ensure that patients receive timely and appropriate treatment. Overall, the emergency service in a hospital plays a crucial role in ensuring that patients receive prompt and effective medical care during times of crisis.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

Medical indigence is a term used to describe a person's inability to pay for necessary medical care due to financial constraints. This can occur when an individual lacks sufficient health insurance coverage, has limited financial resources, or both. In many cases, medical indigence can lead to delayed or avoided medical treatment, which can result in more severe health conditions and higher healthcare costs in the long run.

In some jurisdictions, laws have been enacted to provide relief for medically indigent individuals by requiring hospitals or healthcare providers to provide care regardless of a patient's ability to pay. These programs are often funded through a combination of government funding, hospital funds, and charitable donations. The goal of these programs is to ensure that all individuals have access to necessary medical care, regardless of their financial situation.

Diagnostic services refer to medical tests, procedures, and evaluations performed by healthcare professionals to identify the nature and cause of a patient's health condition or symptom. These services may include various imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, MRI, and ultrasound; laboratory tests such as blood tests, urine tests, and cultures; genetic testing; and specialized diagnostic procedures such as endoscopy, colonoscopy, and biopsy.

The goal of diagnostic services is to provide accurate and timely information about a patient's health status, which can help healthcare providers make informed decisions about treatment plans, monitor disease progression, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. Diagnostic services are an essential component of modern medicine and play a critical role in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of various medical conditions.

A research design in medical or healthcare research is a systematic plan that guides the execution and reporting of research to address a specific research question or objective. It outlines the overall strategy for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to draw valid conclusions. The design includes details about the type of study (e.g., experimental, observational), sampling methods, data collection techniques, data analysis approaches, and any potential sources of bias or confounding that need to be controlled for. A well-defined research design helps ensure that the results are reliable, generalizable, and relevant to the research question, ultimately contributing to evidence-based practice in medicine and healthcare.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

Health services needs refer to the population's requirement for healthcare services based on their health status, disease prevalence, and clinical guidelines. These needs can be categorized into normative needs (based on expert opinions or clinical guidelines) and expressed needs (based on individuals' perceptions of their own healthcare needs).

On the other hand, health services demand refers to the quantity of healthcare services that consumers are willing and able to pay for, given their preferences, values, and financial resources. Demand is influenced by various factors such as price, income, education level, and cultural beliefs.

It's important to note that while needs represent a population's requirement for healthcare services, demand reflects the actual utilization of these services. Understanding both health services needs and demand is crucial in planning and delivering effective healthcare services that meet the population's requirements while ensuring efficient resource allocation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pilot projects" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine, to describe a small-scale initiative that is implemented on a temporary basis to evaluate its feasibility, effectiveness, or impact before deciding whether to expand or continue it.

In the context of healthcare, pilot projects might involve testing new treatment protocols, implementing innovative care models, or introducing technology solutions in a limited setting to assess their potential benefits and drawbacks. The results of these projects can help inform decisions about broader implementation and provide valuable insights for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare services.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "France" is not a medical term or concept. France is the largest country in Western Europe and the third-largest in Europe after Russia and Ukraine. It has been a major player in world affairs for centuries, with a significant cultural and artistic influence. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those for you.

**Referral:**
A referral in the medical context is the process where a healthcare professional (such as a general practitioner or primary care physician) sends or refers a patient to another healthcare professional who has specialized knowledge and skills to address the patient's specific health condition or concern. This could be a specialist, a consultant, or a facility that provides specialized care. The referral may involve transferring the patient's care entirely to the other professional or may simply be for a consultation and advice.

**Consultation:**
A consultation in healthcare is a process where a healthcare professional seeks the opinion or advice of another professional regarding a patient's medical condition. This can be done in various ways, such as face-to-face meetings, phone calls, or written correspondence. The consulting professional provides their expert opinion to assist in the diagnosis, treatment plan, or management of the patient's condition. The ultimate decision and responsibility for the patient's care typically remain with the referring or primary healthcare provider.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Financial Management" is not a medical term. Financial management refers to the process of managing the financial resources, such as budgeting, investing, raising funds, and planning for an organization or individual. It involves the application of management principles to the financial functions of an organization.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

Biological evolution is the change in the genetic composition of populations of organisms over time, from one generation to the next. It is a process that results in descendants differing genetically from their ancestors. Biological evolution can be driven by several mechanisms, including natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow, and mutation. These processes can lead to changes in the frequency of alleles (variants of a gene) within populations, resulting in the development of new species and the extinction of others over long periods of time. Biological evolution provides a unifying explanation for the diversity of life on Earth and is supported by extensive evidence from many different fields of science, including genetics, paleontology, comparative anatomy, and biogeography.

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is a viral illness that progressively attacks and weakens the immune system, making individuals more susceptible to other infections and diseases. The virus primarily infects CD4+ T cells, a type of white blood cell essential for fighting off infections. Over time, as the number of these immune cells declines, the body becomes increasingly vulnerable to opportunistic infections and cancers.

HIV infection has three stages:

1. Acute HIV infection: This is the initial stage that occurs within 2-4 weeks after exposure to the virus. During this period, individuals may experience flu-like symptoms such as fever, fatigue, rash, swollen glands, and muscle aches. The virus replicates rapidly, and the viral load in the body is very high.
2. Chronic HIV infection (Clinical latency): This stage follows the acute infection and can last several years if left untreated. Although individuals may not show any symptoms during this phase, the virus continues to replicate at low levels, and the immune system gradually weakens. The viral load remains relatively stable, but the number of CD4+ T cells declines over time.
3. AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome): This is the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by a severely damaged immune system and numerous opportunistic infections or cancers. At this stage, the CD4+ T cell count drops below 200 cells/mm3 of blood.

It's important to note that with proper antiretroviral therapy (ART), individuals with HIV infection can effectively manage the virus, maintain a healthy immune system, and significantly reduce the risk of transmission to others. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for improving long-term health outcomes and reducing the spread of HIV.

A "Teaching Hospital" is a healthcare institution that provides medical education and training to future healthcare professionals, such as medical students, residents, and fellows. These hospitals are often affiliated with medical schools or universities and have a strong focus on research and innovation in addition to patient care. They typically have a larger staff of specialized doctors and medical professionals who can provide comprehensive care for complex and rare medical conditions. Teaching hospitals also serve as important resources for their communities, providing access to advanced medical treatments and contributing to the development of new healthcare technologies and practices.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over" is not a medical term or concept itself. However, I can provide some context related to hospital bed capacity in general.

Hospital bed capacity refers to the total number of beds that are available for patients in a healthcare facility. This includes both regular beds and any specialized beds, such as intensive care unit (ICU) beds.

When we say "500 and over," it's simply indicating a threshold for the size of the hospital. A hospital with a bed capacity of 500 or more is considered a large hospital. This can have implications for the range of services offered, the complexity of cases handled, and the resources available. However, it doesn't change the basic definition or nature of what a hospital bed capacity is.

I hope this helps! If you have any other questions about medical definitions or concepts, feel free to ask.

Preventive health services refer to measures taken to prevent diseases or injuries rather than curing them or treating their symptoms. These services include screenings, vaccinations, and counseling aimed at preventing or identifying illnesses in their earliest stages. Examples of preventive health services include:

1. Screenings for various types of cancer (e.g., breast, cervical, colorectal)
2. Vaccinations against infectious diseases (e.g., influenza, pneumococcal pneumonia, human papillomavirus)
3. Counseling on lifestyle modifications to reduce the risk of chronic diseases (e.g., smoking cessation, diet and exercise counseling, alcohol misuse screening and intervention)
4. Screenings for cardiovascular disease risk factors (e.g., cholesterol levels, blood pressure, body mass index)
5. Screenings for mental health conditions (e.g., depression)
6. Preventive medications (e.g., aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in certain individuals)

Preventive health services are an essential component of overall healthcare and play a critical role in improving health outcomes, reducing healthcare costs, and enhancing quality of life.

"Health services for the aged" is a broad term that refers to medical and healthcare services specifically designed to meet the unique needs of elderly individuals. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), health services for the aged should be "age-friendly" and "person-centered," meaning they should take into account the physical, mental, and social changes that occur as people age, as well as their individual preferences and values.

These services can include a range of medical and healthcare interventions, such as:

* Preventive care, including vaccinations, cancer screenings, and other routine check-ups
* Chronic disease management, such as treatment for conditions like diabetes, heart disease, or arthritis
* Rehabilitation services, such as physical therapy or occupational therapy, to help elderly individuals maintain their mobility and independence
* Palliative care and end-of-life planning, to ensure that elderly individuals receive compassionate and supportive care in their final days
* Mental health services, including counseling and therapy for conditions like depression or anxiety
* Social services, such as transportation assistance, meal delivery, or home care, to help elderly individuals maintain their quality of life and independence.

Overall, the goal of health services for the aged is to promote healthy aging, prevent disease and disability, and provide high-quality, compassionate care to elderly individuals, in order to improve their overall health and well-being.

In the context of medical terminology, "office visits" refer to patients' appointments or consultations with healthcare professionals in their respective offices or clinics. These visits may include various services such as physical examinations, diagnosis, treatment planning, prescribing medications, providing referrals, and offering counseling or education on health-related topics. Office visits can be for routine checkups, follow-up appointments, or addressing acute or chronic medical concerns. It is important to note that office visits do not include services provided in a hospital setting, emergency department, or other healthcare facilities.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

Patient readmission refers to the event when a patient who was previously discharged from a hospital or healthcare facility returns for further treatment, often within a specified period. It is measured as a percentage of patients who are readmitted within a certain time frame, such as 30, 60, or 90 days after discharge. Readmissions may be planned or unplanned and can occur due to various reasons, including complications from the initial illness or treatment, inadequate post-discharge follow-up care, or the patient's inability to manage their health conditions effectively at home. High readmission rates are often considered an indicator of the quality of care provided during the initial hospitalization and may also signify potential issues with care coordination and transitions between healthcare settings.

A nursing home, also known as a skilled nursing facility, is a type of residential healthcare facility that provides round-the-clock care and assistance to individuals who require a high level of medical care and support with activities of daily living. Nursing homes are designed for people who cannot be cared for at home or in an assisted living facility due to their complex medical needs, mobility limitations, or cognitive impairments.

Nursing homes provide a range of services, including:

1. Skilled nursing care: Registered nurses and licensed practical nurses provide 24-hour medical care and monitoring for residents with chronic illnesses, disabilities, or those recovering from surgery or illness.
2. Rehabilitation services: Physical, occupational, and speech therapists help residents regain strength, mobility, and communication skills after an injury, illness, or surgery.
3. Personal care: Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) help residents with activities of daily living, such as bathing, dressing, grooming, and using the bathroom.
4. Meals and nutrition: Nursing homes provide three meals a day, plus snacks, and accommodate special dietary needs.
5. Social activities: Recreational programs and social events are organized to help residents stay active and engaged with their peers.
6. Hospice care: Some nursing homes offer end-of-life care for residents who require palliative or comfort measures.
7. Secure environments: For residents with memory impairments, specialized units called memory care or Alzheimer's units provide a secure and structured environment to help maintain their safety and well-being.

When selecting a nursing home, it is essential to consider factors such as the quality of care, staff-to-resident ratio, cleanliness, and overall atmosphere to ensure the best possible experience for the resident.

Quality Assurance in the context of healthcare refers to a systematic approach and set of activities designed to ensure that health care services and products consistently meet predetermined standards of quality and safety. It includes all the policies, procedures, and processes that are put in place to monitor, assess, and improve the quality of healthcare delivery.

The goal of quality assurance is to minimize variability in clinical practice, reduce medical errors, and ensure that patients receive evidence-based care that is safe, effective, timely, patient-centered, and equitable. Quality assurance activities may include:

1. Establishing standards of care based on best practices and clinical guidelines.
2. Developing and implementing policies and procedures to ensure compliance with these standards.
3. Providing education and training to healthcare professionals to improve their knowledge and skills.
4. Conducting audits, reviews, and evaluations of healthcare services and processes to identify areas for improvement.
5. Implementing corrective actions to address identified issues and prevent their recurrence.
6. Monitoring and measuring outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of quality improvement initiatives.

Quality assurance is an ongoing process that requires continuous evaluation and improvement to ensure that healthcare delivery remains safe, effective, and patient-centered.

Clinical protocols, also known as clinical practice guidelines or care paths, are systematically developed statements that assist healthcare professionals and patients in making decisions about the appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence and consist of a set of recommendations that are designed to optimize patient outcomes, improve the quality of care, and reduce unnecessary variations in practice. Clinical protocols may cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and disease prevention, and are developed by professional organizations, government agencies, and other groups with expertise in the relevant field.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

'Diagnostic tests, routine' is a medical term that refers to standard or commonly used tests that are performed to help diagnose, monitor, or manage a patient's health condition. These tests are typically simple, non-invasive, and safe, and they may be ordered as part of a regular check-up or when a patient presents with specific symptoms.

Routine diagnostic tests may include:

1. Complete Blood Count (CBC): A test that measures the number of red and white blood cells, platelets, and hemoglobin in the blood. It can help diagnose conditions such as anemia, infection, and inflammation.
2. Urinalysis: A test that examines a urine sample for signs of infection, kidney disease, or other medical conditions.
3. Blood Chemistry Tests: Also known as a chemistry panel or comprehensive metabolic panel, this test measures various chemicals in the blood such as glucose, electrolytes, and enzymes to evaluate organ function and overall health.
4. Electrocardiogram (ECG): A test that records the electrical activity of the heart, which can help diagnose heart conditions such as arrhythmias or heart attacks.
5. Chest X-ray: An imaging test that creates pictures of the structures inside the chest, including the heart, lungs, and bones, to help diagnose conditions such as pneumonia or lung cancer.
6. Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT): A test that checks for hidden blood in the stool, which can be a sign of colon cancer or other gastrointestinal conditions.
7. Pap Smear: A test that collects cells from the cervix to check for abnormalities that may indicate cervical cancer or other gynecological conditions.

These are just a few examples of routine diagnostic tests that healthcare providers may order. The specific tests ordered will depend on the patient's age, sex, medical history, and current symptoms.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country in South Asia, the second-most populous country in the world, known for its rich history, diverse culture, and numerous contributions to various fields including medicine. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

In medical terms, "outpatients" refers to individuals who receive medical care or treatment at a hospital or clinic without being admitted as inpatients. This means that they do not stay overnight or for an extended period; instead, they visit the healthcare facility for specific services such as consultations, diagnostic tests, treatments, or follow-up appointments and then return home afterward. Outpatient care can include various services like primary care, specialty clinics, dental care, physical therapy, and more. It is often more convenient and cost-effective than inpatient care, as it allows patients to maintain their daily routines while receiving necessary medical attention.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "South Africa" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located at the southernmost tip of the African continent. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Switzerland" is not a medical term or concept. Switzerland is a country in Europe, known officially as the Swiss Confederation. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to try and help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the "Monte Carlo method" is actually a term from the field of mathematics and computer science, not medicine. It refers to a statistical technique that allows for the modeling of complex systems by running multiple simulations with random inputs. This method is widely used in various fields such as physics, engineering, and finance, but it is not a medical concept or term.

Community hospitals are healthcare facilities that provide a range of medical services to the local population in a given geographic area. They are typically smaller than major teaching or tertiary care hospitals and offer a more personalized level of care. The services provided by community hospitals may include general medical, surgical, obstetrical, and pediatric care, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic services such as laboratory testing, imaging, and rehabilitation.

Community hospitals often play an important role in providing access to healthcare for underserved populations and may offer specialized programs to address the specific health needs of the communities they serve. They may also collaborate with other healthcare providers, such as primary care physicians, specialists, and long-term care facilities, to provide coordinated care and improve outcomes for patients.

Overall, community hospitals are an essential component of the healthcare system and play a vital role in providing high-quality, accessible care to local populations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Massachusetts" is not a medical term. It is the name of a state located in the northeastern region of the United States. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

An operating room, also known as an operating theatre or surgery suite, is a specially equipped and staffed hospital department where surgical procedures are performed. It is a sterile environment with controlled temperature, humidity, and air quality to minimize the risk of infection during surgeries. The room is typically equipped with medical equipment such as an operating table, surgical lights, anesthesia machines, monitoring equipment, and various surgical instruments. Access to the operating room is usually restricted to trained medical personnel to maintain a sterile environment and ensure patient safety.

Patient compliance, also known as medication adherence or patient adherence, refers to the degree to which a patient's behavior matches the agreed-upon recommendations from their healthcare provider. This includes taking medications as prescribed (including the correct dosage, frequency, and duration), following dietary restrictions, making lifestyle changes, and attending follow-up appointments. Poor patient compliance can negatively impact treatment outcomes and lead to worsening of symptoms, increased healthcare costs, and development of drug-resistant strains in the case of antibiotics. It is a significant challenge in healthcare and efforts are being made to improve patient education, communication, and support to enhance compliance.

"Sick leave" is not a medical term, but rather a term used in the context of employment and human resources. It refers to the time off from work that an employee is allowed to take due to illness or injury, for which they may still receive payment. The specific policies regarding sick leave, such as how much time is granted and whether it is paid or unpaid, can vary based on the employer's policies, labor laws, and collective bargaining agreements.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

An insurance carrier, also known as an insurer or a policy issuer, is a company or organization that provides insurance coverage to individuals and businesses in exchange for premium payments. The insurance carrier assumes the financial risk associated with the policies it issues, agreeing to pay for covered losses or expenses as outlined in the insurance contract, such as a health insurance policy, car insurance policy, or life insurance policy.

Insurance carriers can be divided into two main categories: life and health insurance companies and property and casualty insurance companies. Life and health insurance companies focus on providing coverage for medical expenses, disability, long-term care, and death benefits, while property and casualty insurance companies offer protection against losses or damages to property (home, auto, etc.) and liabilities (personal injury, professional negligence, etc.).

The primary role of an insurance carrier is to manage the risks it assumes by pooling resources from its policyholders. This allows the company to pay for claims when they arise while maintaining a stable financial position. Insurance carriers also engage in various risk management practices, such as underwriting, pricing, and investment strategies, to ensure their long-term sustainability and ability to meet their obligations to policyholders.

Patient acceptance of health care refers to the willingness and ability of a patient to follow and engage in a recommended treatment plan or healthcare regimen. This involves understanding the proposed medical interventions, considering their potential benefits and risks, and making an informed decision to proceed with the recommended course of action.

The factors that influence patient acceptance can include:

1. Patient's understanding of their condition and treatment options
2. Trust in their healthcare provider
3. Personal beliefs and values related to health and illness
4. Cultural, linguistic, or socioeconomic barriers
5. Emotional responses to the diagnosis or proposed treatment
6. Practical considerations, such as cost, time commitment, or potential side effects

Healthcare providers play a crucial role in facilitating patient acceptance by clearly communicating information, addressing concerns and questions, and providing support throughout the decision-making process. Encouraging shared decision-making and tailoring care plans to individual patient needs and preferences can also enhance patient acceptance of health care.

Workers' compensation is a form of insurance that provides medical benefits, wage replacement, and rehabilitation expenses to employees who are injured or become ill as a direct result of their job. It is designed to compensate the employee for lost wages and cover medical expenses due to work-related injuries or illnesses, while also protecting employers from potential lawsuits. Workers' compensation laws vary by state but generally require employers to carry this insurance and provide coverage for eligible employees. The program is typically funded through employer premiums and is administered by individual states.

"Physicians' Offices" is a general term that refers to the physical location where medical doctors or physicians practice their profession and provide healthcare services to patients. These offices can vary in size and setting, ranging from a single physician's small private practice to large, multi-specialty clinics.

In a physicians' office, medical professionals typically deliver outpatient care, which means that patients visit the office for appointments rather than staying overnight. The services provided may include routine check-ups, diagnosing and treating illnesses or injuries, prescribing medications, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, providing preventive care, and coordinating with other healthcare providers for specialist referrals or additional treatments.

The facilities in a physicians' office usually consist of examination rooms, a waiting area, nursing stations, and administrative support spaces. Some may also have on-site laboratory or diagnostic equipment, such as X-ray machines or ultrasound devices. The specific layout and amenities will depend on the size, specialty, and patient population of the practice.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Michigan" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical location, referring to the state of Michigan in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Spain" is not a medical term. It is a country located in southwestern Europe. If you have any questions about medical terms or topics, I would be happy to help answer them.

Genetic fitness is a term used in the field of genetics and evolutionary biology to describe the ability of an individual organism to survive and reproduce, passing its genes on to the next generation. An organism that is highly genetically fit has a greater likelihood of producing offspring that will also survive and reproduce, thereby ensuring the survival of its genetic traits in the population.

In the context of human genetics, genetic fitness may refer to the ability of an individual to pass on their genes to future generations due to certain genetic traits or characteristics that enhance their chances of survival and reproduction. However, it is important to note that the concept of "fitness" in this context does not necessarily imply superiority or inferiority, but rather a measure of reproductive success.

It's also worth noting that genetic fitness can be influenced by various factors such as environmental conditions, cultural practices, and social structures, which can all interact with an individual's genetic traits to affect their overall fitness.

The "drug industry" is also commonly referred to as the "pharmaceutical industry." It is a segment of the healthcare sector that involves the research, development, production, and marketing of medications or drugs. This includes both prescription and over-the-counter medicines used to treat, cure, or prevent diseases and medical conditions in humans and animals.

The drug industry comprises various types of organizations, such as:

1. Research-based pharmaceutical companies: These are large corporations that focus on the research and development (R&D) of new drugs, clinical trials, obtaining regulatory approvals, manufacturing, and marketing their products globally. Examples include Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, Roche, and Merck.

2. Generic drug manufacturers: After the patent for a brand-name drug expires, generic drug manufacturers can produce and sell a similar version of the drug at a lower cost. These companies must demonstrate that their product is bioequivalent to the brand-name drug in terms of safety, quality, and efficacy.

3. Biotechnology companies: These firms specialize in developing drugs using biotechnological methods, such as recombinant DNA technology, gene therapy, or monoclonal antibodies. Many biotech companies focus on specific therapeutic areas, like oncology, immunology, or neurology.

4. Contract research organizations (CROs): CROs provide various services to the drug industry, including clinical trial management, data analysis, regulatory affairs support, and pharmacovigilance. They work with both large pharmaceutical companies and smaller biotech firms to help streamline the drug development process.

5. Drug delivery system companies: These organizations focus on developing innovative technologies for delivering drugs more effectively and safely to patients. Examples include transdermal patches, inhalers, or long-acting injectables.

6. Wholesalers and distributors: Companies that purchase drugs from manufacturers and distribute them to pharmacies, hospitals, and other healthcare providers.

The drug industry plays a crucial role in improving public health by discovering, developing, and delivering new treatments for various diseases and medical conditions. However, it is also subject to criticism and regulation due to concerns about high drug prices, marketing practices, and the potential for conflicts of interest between industry and healthcare professionals.

I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term "contract services" is more commonly used in business and healthcare administration than in clinical medicine. It generally refers to an agreement between a healthcare provider or organization and another entity for the delivery of specific medical services over a defined period of time. The contract outlines the scope, expectations, and compensation for these services.

For example, a hospital may have a contract with a staffing agency to provide nursing personnel on a temporary basis. Or, an insurance company might have a contract with a network of healthcare providers to deliver medical care to their policyholders at agreed-upon rates. These arrangements can help ensure consistent quality and cost control in the delivery of healthcare services.

Medication adherence, also known as medication compliance, refers to the degree or extent of conformity to a treatment regimen as prescribed by a healthcare provider. This includes taking medications at the right time, in the correct dosage, and for the designated duration. Poor medication adherence can lead to worsening health conditions, increased hospitalizations, and higher healthcare costs.

"Evaluation studies" is a broad term that refers to the systematic assessment or examination of a program, project, policy, intervention, or product. The goal of an evaluation study is to determine its merits, worth, and value by measuring its effects, efficiency, and impact. There are different types of evaluation studies, including formative evaluations (conducted during the development or implementation of a program to provide feedback for improvement), summative evaluations (conducted at the end of a program to determine its overall effectiveness), process evaluations (focusing on how a program is implemented and delivered), outcome evaluations (assessing the short-term and intermediate effects of a program), and impact evaluations (measuring the long-term and broad consequences of a program).

In medical contexts, evaluation studies are often used to assess the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of new treatments, interventions, or technologies. These studies can help healthcare providers make informed decisions about patient care, guide policymakers in developing evidence-based policies, and promote accountability and transparency in healthcare systems. Examples of evaluation studies in medicine include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compare the outcomes of a new treatment to those of a standard or placebo treatment, observational studies that examine the real-world effectiveness and safety of interventions, and economic evaluations that assess the costs and benefits of different healthcare options.

Home nursing, also known as home health care or homecare nursing, refers to medical care or assistance provided by registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, or nursing assistants in the patient's home. This type of care is often prescribed for patients who are recovering from surgery, illness, or injury and require skilled nursing services, wound care, medication management, pain control, or other health-related services. Home nursing can also include assistance with personal care tasks such as bathing, dressing, and grooming. The goal of home nursing is to help patients manage their health conditions, recover more quickly, and maintain their independence while receiving high-quality medical care in the comfort of their own homes.

"Financial Risk Sharing" in a medical context generally refers to the allocation of financial risk between parties involved in the provision, financing, or coverage of healthcare services. This can include arrangements such as capitation payments, where healthcare providers receive a set amount of money per patient enrolled in their care, regardless of the number of services provided; or reinsurance, where insurance companies share the risk of large claims with other insurers. The goal of financial risk sharing is to create incentives for efficient and cost-effective care while also protecting against unexpectedly high costs.

A Prospective Payment System (PPS) is a method of reimbursement in which the payment for a specific service is determined before the service is provided. It is commonly used in healthcare systems, including hospitals and post-acute care facilities, to control costs and promote efficiency. Under this system, providers are paid a predetermined amount based on the patient's diagnosis or the type of procedure being performed, rather than being reimbursed for each individual service provided. This encourages providers to deliver care in the most cost-effective manner possible while still meeting quality standards. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) uses PPS for many of its payment models, including the Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) and the Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS).

In the context of medicine, the term "ownership" is not typically used as a formal medical definition. However, it may be used informally to refer to the responsibility and authority that a healthcare provider has in managing a patient's care. For example, a physician may say that they "take ownership" of a patient's care, meaning that they will oversee and coordinate all aspects of the patient's medical treatment. Additionally, in medical research or clinical trials, "data ownership" refers to who has the rights to access, use, and share the data collected during the study.

Patient selection, in the context of medical treatment or clinical research, refers to the process of identifying and choosing appropriate individuals who are most likely to benefit from a particular medical intervention or who meet specific criteria to participate in a study. This decision is based on various factors such as the patient's diagnosis, stage of disease, overall health status, potential risks, and expected benefits. The goal of patient selection is to ensure that the selected individuals will receive the most effective and safe care possible while also contributing to meaningful research outcomes.

Clinical laboratory techniques are methods and procedures used in medical laboratories to perform various tests and examinations on patient samples. These techniques help in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases by analyzing body fluids, tissues, and other specimens. Some common clinical laboratory techniques include:

1. Clinical chemistry: It involves the analysis of bodily fluids such as blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid to measure the levels of chemicals, hormones, enzymes, and other substances in the body. These measurements can help diagnose various medical conditions, monitor treatment progress, and assess overall health.

2. Hematology: This technique focuses on the study of blood and its components, including red and white blood cells, platelets, and clotting factors. Hematological tests are used to diagnose anemia, infections, bleeding disorders, and other hematologic conditions.

3. Microbiology: It deals with the identification and culture of microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Microbiological techniques are essential for detecting infectious diseases, determining appropriate antibiotic therapy, and monitoring the effectiveness of treatment.

4. Immunology: This technique involves studying the immune system and its response to various antigens, such as bacteria, viruses, and allergens. Immunological tests are used to diagnose autoimmune disorders, immunodeficiencies, and allergies.

5. Histopathology: It is the microscopic examination of tissue samples to identify any abnormalities or diseases. Histopathological techniques are crucial for diagnosing cancer, inflammatory conditions, and other tissue-related disorders.

6. Molecular biology: This technique deals with the study of DNA, RNA, and proteins at the molecular level. Molecular biology tests can be used to detect genetic mutations, identify infectious agents, and monitor disease progression.

7. Cytogenetics: It involves analyzing chromosomes and genes in cells to diagnose genetic disorders, cancer, and other diseases. Cytogenetic techniques include karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

8. Flow cytometry: This technique measures physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles as they flow through a laser beam. Flow cytometry is used to analyze cell populations, identify specific cell types, and detect abnormalities in cells.

9. Diagnostic radiology: It uses imaging technologies such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound to diagnose various medical conditions.

10. Clinical chemistry: This technique involves analyzing body fluids, such as blood and urine, to measure the concentration of various chemicals and substances. Clinical chemistry tests are used to diagnose metabolic disorders, electrolyte imbalances, and other health conditions.

Multivariate analysis is a statistical method used to examine the relationship between multiple independent variables and a dependent variable. It allows for the simultaneous examination of the effects of two or more independent variables on an outcome, while controlling for the effects of other variables in the model. This technique can be used to identify patterns, associations, and interactions among multiple variables, and is commonly used in medical research to understand complex health outcomes and disease processes. Examples of multivariate analysis methods include multiple regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis.

A pharmacy is a retail store or a healthcare facility where medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, are sold or dispensed. Pharmacies are staffed by professional pharmacists who provide medication therapy management services, including reviewing the patient's medication history, checking for potential drug interactions, dosage adjustments, and providing education to patients on the safe and effective use of their medications.

Pharmacies may also offer other health-related products such as medical supplies, vitamins, and personal care items. Some pharmacies are part of a larger healthcare system, such as hospitals or clinics, while others are standalone retail stores. In addition to traditional brick-and-mortar locations, there are also online pharmacies that operate over the internet.

It's important for patients to only obtain medications from licensed and reputable pharmacies to ensure their safety and the effectiveness of their treatment.

Medicare Part D is a voluntary program within the U.S. Medicare system that provides prescription drug coverage to beneficiaries. It is offered through private insurance companies approved by and contracting with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

Medicare Part D has two primary components: the Prescription Drug Plans (PDPs) and the Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans (MA-PDs). PDPs are standalone drug plans that can be added to Original Medicare or certain Medicare Cost Plans, Private Fee-for-Service Plans, and Medical Savings Account Plans. MA-PDs combine medical and prescription drug coverage in a single plan offered by private insurance companies approved by CMS.

Beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare Part D plans pay premiums, deductibles, coinsurance, or copayments for their covered medications, depending on the specific plan they choose. Additionally, there is an annual out-of-pocket spending limit called the "catastrophic coverage threshold" that provides some financial protection for beneficiaries with high drug costs.

Patient discharge is a medical term that refers to the point in time when a patient is released from a hospital or other healthcare facility after receiving treatment. This process typically involves the physician or healthcare provider determining that the patient's condition has improved enough to allow them to continue their recovery at home or in another appropriate setting.

The discharge process may include providing the patient with instructions for ongoing care, such as medication regimens, follow-up appointments, and activity restrictions. The healthcare team may also provide educational materials and resources to help patients and their families manage their health conditions and prevent complications.

It is important for patients and their families to understand and follow the discharge instructions carefully to ensure a smooth transition back to home or another care setting and to promote continued recovery and good health.

A hospital is a healthcare facility where patients receive medical treatment, diagnosis, and care for various health conditions, injuries, or diseases. It is typically staffed with medical professionals such as doctors, nurses, and other healthcare workers who provide round-the-clock medical services. Hospitals may offer inpatient (overnight) stays or outpatient (same-day) services, depending on the nature of the treatment required. They are equipped with various medical facilities like operating rooms, diagnostic equipment, intensive care units (ICUs), and emergency departments to handle a wide range of medical situations. Hospitals may specialize in specific areas of medicine, such as pediatrics, geriatrics, oncology, or trauma care.

"Employment" is a term that is commonly used in the context of social sciences and law rather than medicine. It generally refers to the state or condition of being employed, which means an individual is engaged in a job or occupation, providing services to an employer in exchange for compensation, such as wages or salary. Employment may involve various types of work arrangements, including full-time, part-time, temporary, contract, or freelance positions.

In the context of medicine and public health, employment is often discussed in relation to its impact on health outcomes, healthcare access, and socioeconomic status. For instance, research has shown that unemployment or underemployment can negatively affect mental and physical health, while stable employment can contribute to better health outcomes and overall well-being. Additionally, employment may influence an individual's ability to afford healthcare, medications, and other essential needs, which can impact their health status.

In summary, the medical definition of 'employment' pertains to the state or condition of being engaged in a job or occupation, providing services to an employer for compensation. Employment has significant implications for health outcomes, healthcare access, and socioeconomic status.

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is a medical approach that combines the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise and patient values to make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. It emphasizes the use of systematic research, including randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, to guide clinical decision making. EBM aims to provide the most effective and efficient care while minimizing variations in practice, reducing errors, and improving patient outcomes.

A physician is a healthcare professional who practices medicine, providing medical care and treatment to patients. Physicians may specialize in various fields of medicine, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, or radiology, among others. They are responsible for diagnosing and treating illnesses, injuries, and disorders; prescribing medications; ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests; providing counseling and education to patients; and collaborating with other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care. Physicians may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, and academic medical centers. To become a physician, one must complete a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree program and pass licensing exams to practice medicine in their state.

An outpatient clinic in a hospital setting is a department or facility where patients receive medical care without being admitted to the hospital. These clinics are typically designed to provide specialized services for specific medical conditions or populations. They may be staffed by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who work on a part-time or full-time basis.

Outpatient clinics offer a range of services, including diagnostic tests, consultations, treatments, and follow-up care. Patients can visit the clinic for routine checkups, management of chronic conditions, rehabilitation, and other medical needs. The specific services offered at an outpatient clinic will depend on the hospital and the clinic's specialty.

Outpatient clinics are often more convenient and cost-effective than inpatient care because they allow patients to receive medical treatment while continuing to live at home. They also help reduce the burden on hospitals by freeing up beds for patients who require more intensive or emergency care. Overall, outpatient clinics play an essential role in providing accessible and high-quality healthcare services to patients in their communities.

Health services misuse is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it generally refers to the inappropriate or unnecessary use of health services, resources, or treatments. This can include overutilization, underutilization, or incorrect utilization of healthcare services. Examples may include ordering unnecessary tests or procedures, using emergency department services for non-urgent conditions, or failing to seek timely and appropriate medical care when needed. Health services misuse can result in harm to patients, increased healthcare costs, and decreased efficiency in the delivery of healthcare services.

A database, in the context of medical informatics, is a structured set of data organized in a way that allows for efficient storage, retrieval, and analysis. Databases are used extensively in healthcare to store and manage various types of information, including patient records, clinical trials data, research findings, and genetic data.

As a topic, "Databases" in medicine can refer to the design, implementation, management, and use of these databases. It may also encompass issues related to data security, privacy, and interoperability between different healthcare systems and databases. Additionally, it can involve the development and application of database technologies for specific medical purposes, such as clinical decision support, outcomes research, and personalized medicine.

Overall, databases play a critical role in modern healthcare by enabling evidence-based practice, improving patient care, advancing medical research, and informing health policy decisions.

There seems to be a misunderstanding in your question. "Hospital Departments" is not a medical term or diagnosis, but rather an organizational structure used by hospitals to divide their services and facilities into different units based on medical specialties or patient populations. Examples of hospital departments include internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, emergency medicine, radiology, and pathology. Each department typically has its own staff, equipment, and facilities to provide specialized care for specific types of patients or medical conditions.

Cooperative behavior, in a medical or healthcare context, refers to the actions and attitudes displayed by individuals or groups working together to achieve a common goal related to health and well-being. This may involve patients following their healthcare providers' advice, healthcare professionals collaborating to diagnose and treat medical conditions, or communities coming together to promote healthy behaviors and environments. Cooperative behavior is essential for positive health outcomes, as it fosters trust, communication, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers, and helps to ensure that everyone involved in the care process is working towards the same goal.

Feeding behavior refers to the various actions and mechanisms involved in the intake of food and nutrition for the purpose of sustaining life, growth, and health. This complex process encompasses a coordinated series of activities, including:

1. Food selection: The identification, pursuit, and acquisition of appropriate food sources based on sensory cues (smell, taste, appearance) and individual preferences.
2. Preparation: The manipulation and processing of food to make it suitable for consumption, such as chewing, grinding, or chopping.
3. Ingestion: The act of transferring food from the oral cavity into the digestive system through swallowing.
4. Digestion: The mechanical and chemical breakdown of food within the gastrointestinal tract to facilitate nutrient absorption and eliminate waste products.
5. Assimilation: The uptake and utilization of absorbed nutrients by cells and tissues for energy production, growth, repair, and maintenance.
6. Elimination: The removal of undigested material and waste products from the body through defecation.

Feeding behavior is regulated by a complex interplay between neural, hormonal, and psychological factors that help maintain energy balance and ensure adequate nutrient intake. Disruptions in feeding behavior can lead to various medical conditions, such as malnutrition, obesity, eating disorders, and gastrointestinal motility disorders.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poverty" is not a medical condition or term. It is a social condition defined by the World Bank as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," and measured through indicators such as income, consumption, and access to basic services. Poverty can have significant impacts on health outcomes and healthcare access, but it is not considered a medical diagnosis. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try my best to help answer them!

A feasibility study is a preliminary investigation or analysis conducted to determine the viability of a proposed project, program, or product. In the medical field, feasibility studies are often conducted before implementing new treatments, procedures, equipment, or facilities. These studies help to assess the practicality and effectiveness of the proposed intervention, as well as its potential benefits and risks.

Feasibility studies in healthcare typically involve several steps:

1. Problem identification: Clearly define the problem that the proposed project, program, or product aims to address.
2. Objectives setting: Establish specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) objectives for the study.
3. Literature review: Conduct a thorough review of existing research and best practices related to the proposed intervention.
4. Methodology development: Design a methodology for data collection and analysis that will help answer the research questions and achieve the study's objectives.
5. Resource assessment: Evaluate the availability and adequacy of resources, including personnel, time, and finances, required to carry out the proposed intervention.
6. Risk assessment: Identify potential risks and challenges associated with the implementation of the proposed intervention and develop strategies to mitigate them.
7. Cost-benefit analysis: Estimate the costs and benefits of the proposed intervention, including direct and indirect costs, as well as short-term and long-term benefits.
8. Stakeholder engagement: Engage relevant stakeholders, such as patients, healthcare providers, administrators, and policymakers, to gather their input and support for the proposed intervention.
9. Decision-making: Based on the findings of the feasibility study, make an informed decision about whether or not to proceed with the proposed project, program, or product.

Feasibility studies are essential in healthcare as they help ensure that resources are allocated efficiently and effectively, and that interventions are evidence-based, safe, and beneficial for patients.

'Equipment and Supplies' is a term used in the medical field to refer to the physical items and materials needed for medical care, treatment, and procedures. These can include a wide range of items, such as:

* Medical equipment: This includes devices and machines used for diagnostic, monitoring, or therapeutic purposes, such as stethoscopes, blood pressure monitors, EKG machines, ventilators, and infusion pumps.
* Medical supplies: These are consumable items that are used once and then discarded, such as syringes, needles, bandages, gowns, gloves, and face masks.
* Furniture and fixtures: This includes items such as hospital beds, examination tables, chairs, and cabinets that are used to create a functional medical space.

Having the right equipment and supplies is essential for providing safe and effective medical care. The specific items needed will depend on the type of medical practice or facility, as well as the needs of individual patients.

Nursing services refer to the health care activities and practices performed by registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), and other nursing professionals. These services encompass various aspects of patient care, including:

1. Assessment: Nurses evaluate a patient's physical, psychological, social, and emotional status to identify their healthcare needs and establish individualized care plans.
2. Diagnosis: Based on the assessment data, nurses formulate nursing diagnoses that describe the patient's response to health conditions or situations.
3. Outcome identification: Nurses determine expected outcomes for each nursing diagnosis based on evidence-based practice guidelines and best available research.
4. Planning: Nurses develop a plan of care that outlines interventions, resources, and strategies to achieve desired patient outcomes.
5. Implementation: Nurses execute the plan of care by providing direct patient care, administering medications, performing treatments, and coordinating with other healthcare team members.
6. Evaluation: Nurses assess the effectiveness of the interventions and modify the plan of care as needed to ensure optimal patient outcomes.
7. Patient education: Nurses teach patients, families, and caregivers about self-care, disease processes, medication management, and healthy lifestyle choices to promote wellness and prevent complications.
8. Case management: Nurses coordinate services across the healthcare continuum, including referrals to specialists, home health care, and community resources, to ensure comprehensive and cost-effective care.
9. Advocacy: Nurses advocate for patients' rights, preferences, and values in decision-making processes related to their healthcare.
10. Collaboration: Nurses collaborate with other healthcare professionals, such as physicians, social workers, and therapists, to provide integrated and coordinated care.

Nursing services can be provided in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, community health centers, and patients' homes. The primary goal of nursing services is to promote, maintain, or restore patients' health, well-being, and quality of life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ontario" is not a medical term. It is the name of a province in Canada, similar to how "California" is the name of a state in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

'Nesting behavior' is not a term typically used in medical definitions. However, it can be described as a type of behavior often observed in pregnant women, particularly close to their due date, where they have an intense desire to clean and organize their living space in preparation for the arrival of their baby. This behavior is considered a normal part of pregnancy and is not usually regarded as a medical condition.

In some cases, healthcare providers may use the term 'nesting' to describe a symptom of certain mental health disorders such as Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) or Mania, where an individual may experience an intense urge to clean and organize their environment, but it is often accompanied by other symptoms that interfere with daily functioning.

Therefore, the definition of 'nesting behavior' can vary depending on the context in which it is used.

Patient admission in a medical context refers to the process by which a patient is formally accepted and registered into a hospital or healthcare facility for treatment or further medical care. This procedure typically includes the following steps:

1. Patient registration: The patient's personal information, such as name, address, contact details, and insurance coverage, are recorded in the hospital's system.
2. Clinical assessment: A healthcare professional evaluates the patient's medical condition to determine the appropriate level of care required and develop a plan for treatment. This may involve consulting with other healthcare providers, reviewing medical records, and performing necessary tests or examinations.
3. Bed assignment: Based on the clinical assessment, the hospital staff assigns an appropriate bed in a suitable unit (e.g., intensive care unit, step-down unit, general ward) for the patient's care.
4. Informed consent: The healthcare team explains the proposed treatment plan and associated risks to the patient or their legal representative, obtaining informed consent before proceeding with any invasive procedures or significant interventions.
5. Admission orders: The attending physician documents the admission orders in the medical chart, specifying the diagnostic tests, medications, treatments, and care plans for the patient during their hospital stay.
6. Notification of family members or caregivers: Hospital staff informs the patient's emergency contact or next of kin about their admission and provides relevant information regarding their condition, treatment plan, and any necessary follow-up instructions.
7. Patient education: The healthcare team educates the patient on what to expect during their hospital stay, including potential side effects, self-care strategies, and discharge planning.

The goal of patient admission is to ensure a smooth transition into the healthcare facility, providing timely and appropriate care while maintaining open communication with patients, families, and caregivers throughout the process.

Critical pathways, also known as clinical pathways or care maps, are specialized treatment plans for specific medical conditions. They are designed to standardize and improve the quality of care by providing evidence-based guidelines for each stage of a patient's treatment, from diagnosis to discharge. Critical pathways aim to reduce variations in care, promote efficient use of resources, and enhance communication among healthcare providers. These pathways may include recommendations for medications, tests, procedures, and follow-up care based on best practices and current research evidence. By following critical pathways, healthcare professionals can ensure that patients receive timely, effective, and coordinated care, which can lead to better outcomes and improved patient satisfaction.

"State Health Plans" is a general term that refers to the healthcare coverage programs offered or managed by individual states in the United States. These plans can be divided into two main categories: Medicaid and state-based marketplaces.

1. **Medicaid**: This is a joint federal-state program that provides healthcare coverage to low-income individuals, families, and qualifying groups, such as pregnant women, children, elderly people, and people with disabilities. Each state administers its own Medicaid program within broad federal guidelines, and therefore, the benefits, eligibility criteria, and enrollment processes can vary from state to state.

2. **State-based Marketplaces (SBMs)**: These are online platforms where individuals and small businesses can compare and purchase health insurance plans that meet the standards set by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). SBMs operate in accordance with federal regulations, but individual states have the flexibility to design their own marketplace structure, manage their own enrollment process, and determine which insurers can participate.

It is important to note that state health plans are subject to change based on federal and state laws, regulations, and funding allocations. Therefore, it is always recommended to check the most recent and specific information from the relevant state agency or department.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Postal Service" is not a term used in medical definitions. It generally refers to the system for delivering mail and packages, such as the United States Postal Service (USPS). If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help answer those!

Hospital-based home care services refer to medical care and support provided to patients in their own homes by healthcare professionals, with the coordination and oversight coming from a hospital-based organization. These services are typically for patients who require skilled nursing or therapy services following a hospital stay, but who do not need to be in a hospital or skilled nursing facility. The goal of hospital-based home care services is to provide high-quality, cost-effective care in the most appropriate setting, which is often the patient's home. Services may include wound care, medication management, pain management, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology. Hospital-based home care services are designed to promote recovery, maintain independence, and improve quality of life for patients.

Proprietary health facilities are privately owned and operated healthcare facilities. These facilities are typically motivated by profit and can take various forms such as hospitals, clinics, diagnostic centers, rehabilitation facilities, and long-term care centers. They can be owned and managed by a single individual, a group of investors, or a corporation.

Proprietary health facilities may provide a range of medical services, from routine check-ups to complex procedures, depending on their size, staffing, and equipment. They are subject to state and federal regulations regarding patient safety, quality of care, and billing practices. Patients who choose to receive care at proprietary health facilities typically pay out-of-pocket or through private insurance, although some may also accept Medicare and Medicaid payments.

A Patient Care Team is a group of healthcare professionals from various disciplines who work together to provide comprehensive, coordinated care to a patient. The team may include doctors, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, physical therapists, dietitians, and other specialists as needed, depending on the patient's medical condition and healthcare needs.

The Patient Care Team works collaboratively to develop an individualized care plan for the patient, taking into account their medical history, current health status, treatment options, and personal preferences. The team members communicate regularly to share information, coordinate care, and make any necessary adjustments to the care plan.

The goal of a Patient Care Team is to ensure that the patient receives high-quality, safe, and effective care that is tailored to their unique needs and preferences. By working together, the team can provide more comprehensive and coordinated care, which can lead to better outcomes for the patient.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Multi-Institutional Systems" is not a commonly used medical term or concept. It may refer to systems that involve multiple institutions, such as healthcare networks or electronic health records that are shared among several hospitals or clinics. However, it is not a standardized term with a specific medical definition. If you could provide more context or clarify what you're looking for, I would be happy to help further!

Prescription drugs are medications that are only available to patients with a valid prescription from a licensed healthcare professional, such as a doctor or nurse practitioner. These drugs cannot be legally obtained over-the-counter and require a prescription due to their potential for misuse, abuse, or serious side effects. They are typically used to treat complex medical conditions, manage symptoms of chronic illnesses, or provide necessary pain relief in certain situations.

Prescription drugs are classified based on their active ingredients and therapeutic uses. In the United States, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) categorizes them into five schedules (I-V) depending on their potential for abuse and dependence. Schedule I substances have the highest potential for abuse and no accepted medical use, while schedule V substances have a lower potential for abuse and are often used for legitimate medical purposes.

Examples of prescription drugs include opioid painkillers like oxycodone and hydrocodone, stimulants such as Adderall and Ritalin, benzodiazepines like Xanax and Ativan, and various other medications used to treat conditions such as epilepsy, depression, anxiety, and high blood pressure.

It is essential to use prescription drugs only as directed by a healthcare professional, as misuse or abuse can lead to severe health consequences, including addiction, overdose, and even death.

... can be audited and must be allowable under cost principles and verifiable to records. A cost-sharing mechanism is ... "Cost Sharing". Healthcare.gov. "What is Cost Sharing". UC Davis Accounting and Financial Services. October 2018. v t e (Health ... In health care, cost sharing occurs when patients pay for a portion of health care costs not covered by health insurance. The " ... In accounting, cost sharing or matching means that portion of project or program costs not borne by the funding agency. It ...
Cost(Alice), Cost(Both)/2, Cost(Both)-Cost(George)], Payment(George,Both) = median[Cost(George), Cost(Both)/2, Cost(Both)-Cost( ... Cost(Both)+Cost(Alice)-Cost(George)]/2, Payment(George,Both) = [Cost(Both)+Cost(George)-Cost(Alice)]/2. The egalitarian ... Cost(Q) = the cost of producing Q units of the product. A solution to a cost-sharing problem is defined by a payment Pay ( i ... Cost-sharing becomes more interesting when the marginal cost is not constant. With increasing marginal costs, the agents impose ...
The cost sharing reductions (CSR) subsidy is the smaller of two subsidies paid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care ... Trump announced on October 12, 2017 he would end the smaller of the two types of subsidies under the ACA, the cost sharing ... "The Effects of Terminating Payments for Cost-Sharing Reductions , Congressional Budget Office". www.cbo.gov. "CBO says Trump's ... "The Effects of Ending the Affordable Care Act's Cost-Sharing Reduction Payments". April 25, 2017. Thomas Kaplan; Robert Pear. " ...
In the United States, Restoration Cost-sharing Agreements are an enrollment option of less than 30 years under the Wetland ...
Universal International Shared Cost Number, an international shared-cost numbering scheme ITU ISCS page (Articles with short ... Shared cost numbers normally enable non-geographical or long-distance calls that are priced to the caller as if they were local ... Shared-cost service is a type of telephone call billing where the charge for calling a particular telephone number is partially ...
Shared-cost service List of country calling codes "International Shared Cost Number (ISCN)". ITU. Retrieved 6 June 2023. ( ... An international shared-cost number allows the calling party to make the call at national rates, since the costs of any ... Universal International Shared Cost Number (UISCN) is part of the E.164 telephone numbering space that includes international ... telephone numbers where the call costs are split between the caller and the called. ...
Cost reduction influences the sharing component of P2P communities. Users who share do so to attempt "to reduce...costs" as ... Internet portal Anonymous P2P Comparison of file-sharing applications Disk sharing File sharing in Canada File sharing in Japan ... with peer to peer file sharing: total cost = filesize customers × cost-per-byte {\displaystyle {\text{total cost}}={\frac {\ ... file sharing is economically efficient and that the users pay the full transaction cost and marginal cost of such sharing even ...
... going into decline because of radiation safety concerns and major construction cost overruns. The Electric Bond and Share Group ... Share Co. 1937 - Appeal & Counterclaim: Electric Bond & Share Co v. Securities & Exchange Commission 1938 - Supreme Court ... the Electric Bond and Share Group. In 1917, Electric Bond and Share Group's first major foreign electric acquisition, at the ... "Electric Bond and Share is Leader in its Unique Field". New York evening post. April 10, 1926. Retrieved February 23, 2019. " ...
... is the sharing of the direct operating costs of non-commercial general aviation aircraft flights between a ... The sharing of flight operational costs between a pilot and their passengers is permitted on a non-commercial certificate basis ... Yodice, Kathy (March 2007). "AOPA Legal Briefing: Sharing the cost of flying". AOPA. Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. ... flight costs may be shared and not cause the flight to be classified as commercial regulated carrier activity. However, the ...
The film cost an estimated £380,000 to make. An upper-class white Englishman is forced to confront his own feelings and ... "Two Gentlemen Sharing". Variety. 1 January 1969. Two Gentlemen Sharing at IMDb v t e (Articles with short description, Short ... Two Gentlemen Sharing is a 1969 British drama film directed by Ted Kotcheff, written by Evan Jones, and starring Robin Phillips ... "Two Gentlemen Sharing (1969)". Archived from the original on 16 January 2009. Alexander Walker, Hollywood, England, Stein and ...
The pathway overall cost $44.3 million to construct. The pathway has attracted criticism from public transport advocates, both ... The New Lynn to Avondale shared path (Māori: Te Ara o New Lynn ki Avondale), also known as the NL2A path, is a shared path in ... "New Lynn to Avondale Shared Path Newsletter" (PDF). Auckland Transport. Retrieved 2022-06-08. "New Lynn To Avondale Shared Path ... "UCF projects: Waterview Shared Path PLUS". Bike Auckland. 2015-07-06. Retrieved 2022-06-08. "All aboard the New Lynn to ...
As a result, he directed the company to pay Pacific Internet's legal costs of S$20,000. Following the ruling, some downloaders ... Interest of SGD$15,095.58 and legal costs of SGD$12,263.76 was also awarded in favour of Japanese copyright owners.[citation ... Koshy noted that Odex had cited a legal provision intended to regulate people's file sharing for monetary gain rather than ... Another netizen created a video parody, entitled Xedo Holocaust, and uploaded it to YouTube and other video-sharing websites. A ...
Reported cost reductions of costs of services organized in shared service center are as high as 70% of the original costs, but ... As shared services centers are often cost centers, they are quite cost-sensitive also in terms of their headcount, labour costs ... It is better to cost charge out on time-driven activity based costing. The superior solution for cost charge out is cost ... In the accounting system a shared service usually will have the status of cost and investment center. As some shared-service ...
Health care sharing ministries (HCSM) are organizations in the United States in which health care costs are shared among ... For example, the State of Oklahoma contested Medi-Share in 2007 for marketing information that promoted the cost-sharing option ... and that monthly cost of membership in a health care sharing ministry is generally lower than the cost of insurance rates. The ... "Ministries allow Christians to share health-care costs". Washington Post. Boyd, Benjamin (2013). "Health Care Sharing ...
"Ottawa's IT system overhaul yet to show any cost savings". CBC. 2016-09-19. Shared Services Canada official website v t e ( ... Shared Services Canada. 2017-10-05. Retrieved 21 December 2017. "RCMP again complains about Shared Services Canada's ... Shared Services Canada (SSC; French: Services partagés Canada (SPC)) is an agency of the Government of Canada responsible for ... SSC's mandate came into force 4 August 2011 as part of the passage of the Shared Services Canada Act, which established SSC as ...
The total revenue share is the percentage of direct cost associated with revenue. Direct cost consists of both product cost and ... It is a ratio of costs required to fulfill an order. The remainder is considered gross margin. v t e (Articles lacking sources ...
... with first-year operating costs of US$2.3 million for 100 stations. CaBi was operated by Alta Bicycle Share (now Motivate ... "La Crosse bike share and ride rental program re-launches for second year". 22 April 2022. "Metro Bike Share". Metro Bike Share ... "Explore Bike Share". Explore Bike Share. Risher, Wayne (24 May 2018) [online date 23 May]. "Memphis bike-sharing system has ... In January 2018, Chinese bicycle-sharing company Ofo launched a dockless bicycle-sharing services in Pune. Bicycle-sharing ...
Shared web hosting can also be done privately by sharing the cost of running a server in a colocation center; this is called ... The overall cost of server maintenance is spread over many customers. By using shared hosting, the website will share a ... Shared hosting usually has usage limits and hosting providers should have extensive reliability features in place. Shared ... Shared web hosting services In shared hosting, the provider is generally responsible for managing servers, installing server ...
"Major TN cities to focus on cost-effective modes of transport". Business Line. Chennai. The Hindu. 23 January 2014. Retrieved ... Tiruchirappalli Bicycle Share is a new proposed bicycle sharing system for the city of Tiruchirappalli. In November 2013, the ... As of December 2019, the Trichy City Corporation has dropped its bicycle sharing project. List of bicycle sharing systems ... Karthik, Deepak (25 December 2019). "It's official: Corporation has shelved cycle sharing project". The Times of India. TNN. ...
"Melbourne Bike Share Costs for Bike Hire Plans". @RACV. Moore, Tony (8 August 2011). "CityCycle won't follow Melbourne's $5 ... List of bicycle sharing systems "Melbourne Bike Share". www.melbournebikeshare.com.au. "FAQ". Melbourne Bike Share. Archived ... The helmet subsidy added an additional A$5 million to the cost of the bike share programme. After the introduction of ... "Bike share scheme disappointing". The Sydney Morning Herald. 31 May 2011. "Bike share scheme saddles up slowly in bleak weather ...
The quoted repayments, including the initial loan and the shared appreciation, but not including any legal fees or other costs ... "Appreciation share : loan" is the ratio of the lender's percentage share of the appreciation to the percentage of the initial ... A shared appreciation mortgage differs from an equity-sharing agreement in that the principal of the loan is an unconditional ... Shared appreciation clauses are also used by non-profits and local governmental agencies. These shared appreciation loans are ...
There are also avoidable traps, which come from parameter restrictions such as cost. These can be overcome by reconsidering the ... There are three main shared risk groups: Shared risk link group (SRLG) Shared risk node group (SRNG) Shared risk equipment ... Shared risk resource group (commonly referred to as shared risk group or SRG) is a concept in optical mesh network routing that ... Shared risk group also extends within a node itself-in particular nodes that contain multi-port network cards. Dense wavelength ...
Owners received sixty percent of the rental cost and also received liability insurance. Vehicles had to be newer model GM ... Maven provided car sharing services, including car sharing for personal use and rentals for drivers of gig economy professions ... It provided services such as carsharing and peer-to-peer car sharing for personal use and also rented to drivers of gig economy ... It had also entered the Australian market where it initially provided gig-economy rentals prior to adding personal car sharing ...
"Reality check: Public bike sharing costs the public virtually nothing - Better Bike Share". Better Bike Share. 8 August 2016. ... A bicycle-sharing system, bike share program, public bicycle scheme, or public bike share (PBS) scheme, is a shared transport ... Cost and time are primary motivators for using bike-sharing programs, in particular the perceived cost of travel and time saved ... The cost of annual membership in the US varies between $100 and about $170. Europe Bike riders shared in Europe usually pay ...
When the costs incurred are smaller than the cost stop, the difference between the costs and the cost stop is called "excess ... The amount of costs recoverable is often limited to an amount called "cost stop". If the costs incurred by the company are ... If the recoverable costs are higher than the cost stop the contract is defined as saturated. The cost stop gives to the ... The cost stop can be a fixed amount, but in most case it is a percentage of the cost of the crude. First implemented in ...
Cost-sharing mechanism - a similar problem in which the goal is to share costs. Frederic G. Mather, Both sides of profit ... Equal sharing: each agent i gets ui+s/n, that is, each agent gets an equal share of the surplus. Proportional sharing: each ... Surplus sharing is a kind of a fair division problem where the goal is to share the financial benefits of cooperation (the " ... Kolm calls the equal sharing "leftist" and the proportional sharing "rightist". Chun presents a characterization of the ...
Empirical evidence has shown that fisheries become more profitable, as the costs of fishing are reduced, and dockside prices ... By providing secure shares of quota to fishermen, individuals or groups, it is argued that catch share programs have the ... Catch share fisheries can result in greater capitalization of the fishing fleet when the capital required to purchase shares is ... Many catch share programs allow for voluntary trading, a process that allows operators to purchase shares, temporarily or ...
... unit cost' tells you nothing about overall costs. Overall costs include 'failure demand', which is defined as a failure to do ... The key here is the idea of 'sharing' within an organization or group. This sharing needs to fundamentally include shared ... shared services , InfoWorld , Column , 2006-05-30 , By Ephraim Schwartz Archived 2008-01-15 at the Wayback Machine Shared ... Traditionally the development of a shared-service organization (SSO) or shared-service centre (SSC) within an organization is ...
"The Complete Cost Keeper"; by Horace L. Arnold. Published by The Engineering Magazine Co., 1900. "Cost Accounts of an Engineer ... "Gain Sharing"; a paper by Henry R. Towne; presented at the May, 1889, meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ... "Cost Accounts"; by C. A. Millener. The Hunter Rose Co., Ltd., Toronto, 1901. "A Bonus System of Rewarding Labor"; a paper by H ... "Profit Sharing between Employer and Employee. A Study in the Evolution of the Wage System"; by Nicolas Paine Oilman. "The ...
Peer-to-peer photo sharing often carries a small one-time cost for the software. Some sites allow you to post your pictures ... Image sharing, or photo sharing, is the publishing or transfer of digital photos online. Image sharing websites offer services ... The advantages of peer-to-peer sharing are reduced hosting costs and no loss of control to a central service. The downsides are ... Image sharing sites can be broadly broken up into two groups: sites that offer photo sharing for free and sites that charge ...
McGrath, Matt (June 17, 2009). "Fusion falters under soaring costs". BBC. Retrieved February 6, 2013. "ITER Procurement Sharing ... Estimates of the total cost of clean-up were into the hundreds of millions of US dollars. The five older reactors were ... Research also takes place into higher efficiency solar panels, geothermal electricity and heating, lower cost wind generators ... the result has better high-temperature properties and is easier to cast at a similar cost. In 2003 the partners received an R&D ...
Reducing maintenance costs by revealing their own developments. If organizations extensively modify the software and opt to ... In a 43-minute broadcast video, Boris Renski shed some light on OpenStack coopetition politics and shared a subjective view on ... Sharing maintenance responsibilities. Organizations working only downstream (i.e., just taking the software without ...
Cost plus profit (murabahah); Debt (al-Qard); Hiring/leasing (al-Ijarah); Lending (al-I'arah); Agency (wakalah); Mortgage (al- ... Rahn); Partnership (Musharakah); Profit Sharing (Mudarabah). IBFIM and Majallah al-Ahkam al-Adliyyah divide fiqh into Fiqh ...
Share on Facebook. Opens in a new window. Share on Twitter. Opens in a new window. Email. Opens in a new window. ... Section 7: Employee Cost Sharing - 2018. Section 7: Employee Cost Sharing - 2018. Published: Aug 03, 2018 ...
The Health Costs of Cost-Sharing Amitabh Chandra, Evan Flack & Ziad Obermeyer ... cost-sharing causes patients to miss opportunities to purchase health at low cost ($11,321 per life-year). ... of the cost-as a function of their birth month. We find that an exogenous $100 per month decrease in this budget (a 24.4% ... are the health consequences when patients reduce their use of prescribed medications in response to higher out-of-pocket costs ...
Adjusted for one-time gains and costs, earnings came to 79 cents per share. That met the expectations of analysts surveyed by ... Shares dropped 8 percent in Wednesday premarket trading.. For the period ended Feb. 25, General Mills Inc. earned $941.4 ... To help deal with increasing freight costs, General Mills said that it'll boost the number of qualified freight carriers ... General Mills' fiscal third-quarter results were mixed as the company dealt with rising freight and commodity costs. The ...
Cost Share Programs - Agriculture Cost Share Program (ACSP) The major cause of water quality problems in North Carolina and in ... There are some cost share and acreage restrictions depending on the BMPs used, the type of operation involved, or policy set by ... Cost share incentive payments are also available to encourage the use of certain agronomic best management practices. ... The North Carolina Agriculture Cost Share Program is successful because of the grassroots efforts of your local soil and water ...
Cost(Alice), Cost(Both)/2, Cost(Both)-Cost(George)], Payment(George,Both) = median[Cost(George), Cost(Both)/2, Cost(Both)-Cost( ... Cost(Both)+Cost(Alice)-Cost(George)]/2, Payment(George,Both) = [Cost(Both)+Cost(George)-Cost(Alice)]/2. The egalitarian ... Cost(Q) = the cost of producing Q units of the product. A solution to a cost-sharing problem is defined by a payment Pay ( i ... Cost-sharing becomes more interesting when the marginal cost is not constant. With increasing marginal costs, the agents impose ...
They found cost-sharing under marketplace plans remained essentially unchanged from 2014 to 2015. ... the authors analyzed changes in cost-sharing under health plans offered to individuals and families through state and federal ... Consumer Cost-Sharing in Marketplace vs. Employer Health Insurance Plans, 2015. Toplines. * Cost-sharing for marketplace health ... Cost-sharing has been at the center of health care policy debates for more than 45 years. Proponents of cost-sharing maintain ...
... sparking a sell-off in its shares. Caterpillars shares were the biggest drag on the Dow Jones Industrial Average on Friday, ... The company said materials and freight costs will be higher in the second half of the year. ... Inc on Friday reported higher quarterly earnings but said profits will suffer in the current quarter because of rising costs, ... Caterpillars shares drag on Dow as cost increases set to hurt profits. ...
Counting On star Jill Duggars memoir Counting The Cost is releasing in less than two months, leading to some big emotions. ... Jill Duggar shares emotions as Counting The Cost release date nears. Thu Jul 20, 2023 at 11:26am ET. By Tiffany Bailey ... Jill Duggar shares emotions ahead of book release On her Instagram, Jill Duggar shared a selfie with her book clipped into ... but this book will share more details and the journey they took to break free from the stronghold Jim Bob Duggar had on their ...
... Shares fall on revised guidance ... Shares in the firm fell 6% or $3.14 to $46.70 on the New York Stock Exchange following the new guidance. Average unit net cash ... costs in first-quarter 2022 were $1.33 per pound of copper and are expected... ...
Cost Shares Breakdown report (5848) in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009. ... Material := "Direct Cost" - (Capacity + Subcontracted);. // End of the deleted line.. IF TotalCost ,, 0 THEN. "Share of Cost in ... "New Direct Cost" := "New Direct Cost" + CostShare * FromCostShareBuf."New Direct Cost";. "New Capacity" := "New Capacity" + ... "New Direct Cost" := "New Direct Cost" + CostShare * FromCostShareBuf."New Direct Cost";. "New Capacity" := "New Capacity" + ...
Cost-sharing Research and Literature" (as of June 2011); Katherine Swartz, "Cost-Sharing: Effects on Spending and Outcomes" ( ... Decades of research confirm that higher cost sharing deters access to both needed and unneeded care indiscriminately and most ... Letter to Ways & Means Committee re: Cost Sharing Proposals. August 16, 2013. ... The additional upfront costs of a higher Part B deductible for physician visits and other outpatient services will make ...
Only 6 weeks old with ple… Summer Morris needs your support for Funeral costs for baby A ... To help cover the costs of a funeral and memorial for baby A were asking everyone if you could please share and donate where ...
Thinking like an insurer - cost sharing on vasectomies edition. Thinking like an insurer - cost sharing on vasectomies edition ... Typically they cost between $1,000 and $3,000. This runs into a churn problem. Individuals routinely switch insurance companies ... They are not guaranteed to be paying for any pre-natal care, or labor and delivery costs of the pregnant woman. The insurer ... Argiope: The churn and "SEP" field problems disappear in single payer, but the "is this cost effective and targeted relative to ...
... which is why many local consumers created cost-effective plans for their Thanksgiving dinners. ... Local consumers share cost-effective plans for Thanksgiving. Consumers found themselves making some hard choices. ... We get one of the gift bags for other people and we donate to various charities, so trying to share what we have," Peck said. ... According to the National Farm Bureau, this years Thanksgiving dinner cost-average, $64.05, has increased by 20% compared to ...
Trump announced that the Administration would stop making the cost-sharing reduction payments to insurance carriers selling ... Cost-Sharing Subsidy Update. by Christoper E. Condeluci, Principal and sole shareholder of CC Law & Policy PLLC in Washington, ... Analysis: Look, I am by no means applauding the decision to cancel the cost-sharing subsidy payments. Due to the long-standing ... Speaking of the CBO report on cancelling the cost-sharing subsidies, back in August - when the CBO report was released - I ...
We find that private plans set higher consumer cost-sharing for drugs or classes with more elastic demand. Our findings suggest ... We investigate how private drug plans set cost-sharing in the context of Medicare Part D. We document substantial heterogeneity ... as well as substantial heterogeneity in the cost-sharing for different drugs within privately-provided plans. ... yet publicly-provided drug coverage typically involves uniform cost-sharing across drugs. ...
... quantifiable cost-sharing included in any part of the submitted proposal), PIs/PDs will complete a cost-share commitment form ... wherein the cost-share is verified and identified through: indicating the cost center and account the cost-share will be funded ... When an award is received with committed cost-share ( ... indicating the cost center and account the cost-share will be ... When an award is received with committed cost-share (quantifiable cost-sharing included in any part of the submitted proposal ...
Dutch patients may also choose to expose themselves to other forms of cost-sharing depending on their choice of policy. "In- ... This fourth contribution to this blog series has provided a general overview of the Dutch health-care system, its cost-sharing ... Understanding universal health care, Part 4: Cost-Sharing for Patients in the Netherlands. - April 25, 2023 ... Deductibles are the major form of cost-sharing for core services. In 2020, Dutch residents were expected to pay an annual ...
... ... Department of Energys Office of Manufacturing and Energy Supply Chains mutually agreed to end their cost-shared demonstration ...
A fully franked interim dividend of 3¢ per share was declared and Evolutions share price had gained 2 per cent to $4.02 ... despite becoming the latest miner to reveal higher costs and flagging a further 5 per cent jump in labour costs in the next ... Along with higher costs and lower gold volumes, Evolutions results were muddied by a busy period of mergers and acquisitions, ... In the half to December 31, Evolution produced 318,766 ounces of gold at an all-in sustaining cost (AISC) of $1381 per ounce - ...
For instance, if Marketing accounts for 20% of total non-shared AWS costs, it will pay for 20% of the shared costs. This ... Other customers decide to allocate shared costs back based on a proportion of all non-shared AWS costs. ... Central IT covers the costs. Customers decide they will pay for shared costs out of the central IT budget and account for it ... Based on what customers have shared at Peer Connect, here are the three most common ways they deal with allocating shared costs ...
COST SHARING FOR SEAWAY DRAUGHT STUDY. (SHIP SQUAT MEASUREMENTS). OCEAN SHIPS ONLY. Due to lower than expected ocean traffic ... The total cost of the implementation of the AIS is shared equally between the Seaway entities and the shipowners. The ... Cost Sharing For Automatic Identification System - Extension. February 20, 2002. *** EXTENSION TO JUNE 30, 2002 ***. Agreement ... Due to low traffic levels in 2001, the amount collected to date is $132,000 short of the agreed cost sharing formula. Therefore ...
8.4 million through cost-share funding. On farmland funded through cost-share, the public cost of avoiding nitrogen loss beyond ... Using state data for cover crop cost-share expenditures and cover crop acreage, we estimate that cost-share programs led to 172 ... We calculate that 54% of cost-share funded acres were additional, meaning that over half of farmland in cost-share programs ... The question remains: are cost-share programs effective at increasing cover crop use or would the participants of cost-share ...
... including Medicare Part D plan features and costs. Free Medicare Part D Newsletter, Use the Online Caculators, FAQs or contact ... Cost-Sharing Details and detailed information on the Medicare Part D prescription drug and Medicare Advantage plans for every ... Cost-Sharing. 90-Day Supply. Cost-Sharing. Preferred Pharmacy. Standard Pharmacy. Mail- Order*. Preferred Pharmacy. Standard ... The mail-order cost-sharing is the plans preferred mail-order cost-sharing. (E) Drugs on this tier are excluded from the ...
Shares of Peloton Gain Today as It Tries to Optimize Its Cost Structure. By Jon Quast - Jul 12, 2022 at 11:52AM ... Shares of connected-fitness company Peloton Interactive (PTON -2.92%) were up slightly on Tuesday morning even though the ... It appears the market appreciates this attempt from Peloton to potentially improve its cost structure. And thats why this out- ... and is outsourcing manufacturing to improve its cost structure. ...
4. Cost Sharing Sources. Cost sharing sources may include:. 4.1 Expenses funded from UNH accounts (e.g., educational and ... 2.1.2 Voluntary cost sharing means cost sharing pledged on a voluntary basis in the proposals budget that becomes a binding ... 1.1 Requirements for including cost sharing in proposals;. 1.2 The management of cost sharing according to Federal requirements ... 2.1.1 Mandated cost sharing means cost sharing which is explicitly required, as reflected in the sponsors notice of funding ...
Costs Permissible as Cost Share and Limitations. Effort Related Cost Share. UW Cost Share is commonly provided through a ... Subaward Cost Share. Subaward Cost Share is a cost share commitment by a subaward recipient that is either required by the UW ... Follow all UW GCA Cost Share procedures for documenting cost share. *Assure that proposed or actual Cost Share is necessary and ... Learn more about UIDC and Cost Share.. Reductions to Cost Share Commitment. Reduction to Cost Share commitments, both Mandatory ...
Ag Cost-Share Program Governing Board Directive. Irrigation Water Conservation Cost-Share. Funding is available to producers ... Precision Agricultural Cost-Share. Cost-share is available to producers interested in implementing precision agricultural ... Dairy Wastewater System Improvement Cost-Share. Cost-share is available to any dairies interested in projects to conserve water ... Agricultural Cost Share Program The Districts agricultural team is available to help agricultural operations needing ...
Fannie Maes latest working paper focuses on the different components of housing costs. ... Mortgage costs as a share of housing costs-placing the cost of credit in broader context. ... Mortgage costs as a share of housing costs-placing the cost of credit in broader context ... It also found that transaction costs at purchase and sale comprise roughly 20 percent of total costs, with the broker fees at ...
Does the Soil & Water office cost share on building ponds?. April 26, 2017. building COST Office ponds share soil water ... At one time the USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service (our partners) did cost share on the construction of ponds for ... What was the cost per square foot to construct compared to the cost of standard office building? ... How much should it cost to receive professional assistance in buying, building, or leasing office space for a professional ...
  • The White House celebrated the decision as a win for taxpayers: after all, they pointed out, the 10 selected drugs were responsible for one-fifth of all Medicare Part D prescription costs between June 1, 2022, and May 31, 2023. (wnd.com)
  • These tests should be covered without any patient cost-sharing consistent with the 2022 FAQ specifying no patient cost-sharing for follow-up colonoscopy after a positive non-colonoscopy colorectal cancer screening examination, and in accordance with the requirements of PHS Act section 2713 and its implementing regulations. (cancer.org)
  • August 5, 2022 - Implementation Details for the NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy. (nih.gov)
  • The rising cost-of-living appears to have been a driver for this, with 27 per cent of respondents saying they cancelled due to the subscription being too expensive (23 per cent in 2022), and 24 per cent cancelling due to rising costs elsewhere (21 per cent in 2022). (advanced-television.com)
  • South Dakota Corn Growers Association (SDCGA) President Dave Ellens of Madison shares, "We are pleased to get confirmation that eligible growers are able to apply for cost-share assistance concerning permanent or temporary on-farm grain storage facilities and drying and handling equipment that were destroyed by a derecho on May 12, 2022 is now open for eligible South Dakota farmers to apply. (sdcorn.org)
  • This natural disaster caused an incredible strain for corn farmers who were already battling high input costs and a drought that reduced corn production by 10% from 2021 to 2022. (sdcorn.org)
  • OAKLAND, Calif., May 10, 2022 - The Integrated Healthcare Association released the most recent results of its California Regional Healthcare Cost & Quality Atlas , a key statewide source for comparative healthcare performance information. (iha.org)
  • Inflation and continued supply-chain problems are forcing prices up for many goods and services, including the cost of fireworks for the upcoming Riverfest 2022 Fourth of July celebration. (srpressgazette.com)
  • Finnish tax administration has issued guidance on 30 September 2022 regarding the split of acquisition cost of shares after the demerger of 30 June 2022. (yahoo.com)
  • Effective for applications submitted for due dates on or after October 5, 2023, NIH will no longer require the use of the single DMS cost line item. (nih.gov)
  • Oppenheimer analyst Hartaj Singh also said the company could have "negative earnings" in 2023, putting the share price at risk this year and next. (medscape.com)
  • Whether insurers continue to participate in the ACA marketplaces and what consumers - and federal taxpayers - ultimately pay could depend on the actions of 50 different state insurance commissioners (plus D.C.). Yet, as noted, these state regulators and insurers are in a race against the clock to develop, review, and implement 2018 premium rates that reflect insurers' likely costs as accurately as possible. (commonwealthfund.org)
  • South Korea in 2018 provided about $830 million, covering roughly 40 percent of the cost of the U.S. troop deployment that year. (defensenews.com)
  • However, states have allowed insurers to increase premiums for 2018 to reflect the greater cost of coverage without the government's cost-sharing payments. (dwt.com)
  • The move may also leave insurers reluctant to participate in the Exchanges after 2018 without resumption of these cost-sharing reduction payments. (dwt.com)
  • The available presentations from the EBC Dam Management Program - Innovations in Fish Passage - Concepts, Costs, and Conflicts completed on April 19, 2018, can be viewed below. (ebcne.org)
  • Health insurance cost sharing is the portion of your medical bill the insurance company shares with you after you meet your own out-of-pocket payment responsibilities ( deductibles , coinsurance and copays). (ramseysolutions.com)
  • But before we compare the two types of cost sharing in more detail, let's review health insurance out-of-pocket costs (deductibles, copays and coinsurance) to see how they fit into traditional cost sharing. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • The dollars you spend on out-of-pocket costs like deductibles, copays and coinsurance are actually part of the deal you made with the insurance company when you bought your policy. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • Earlier in October, the Trump Administration announced it would immediately terminate payments to insurers to offset the costs of ACA-mandated discounts on co-payments and deductibles for low-income consumers. (dwt.com)
  • One component of the ACA requires insurers to provide reduced out-of-pocket limits, deductibles, and other cost-sharing for low-income individuals. (dwt.com)
  • Analysts estimate the company's losing billions in revenue due to password sharing. (fool.com)
  • You can see in the table above that your total cost sharing obligation for the heart procedure is $2,400 and the insurance company's cost sharing obligation is $8,000. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • An insurance company's cost-sharing policy can exploit customers either by collecting an unfairly large amount of money from them or by unfairly deterring them from making claims for resources they medically need. (nih.gov)
  • Shares are down about 5% for the year after the broader health-care sector took a beating in June, putting the company's market value at around $60 billion. (espotting.com)
  • Now let's add up all the costs (deductible, copayments and coinsurance) we've been using to show the medical cost sharing scenario for a $10,000 heart procedure. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • This year the Farm Service Agency increased the cost share amount under the Organic Certification Cost Share Program (OCCSP). (govdelivery.com)
  • The USDA Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) released a notice of funds availability for the Agricultural Management Assistance (AMA) Organic Certification Cost-Share Program earlier this week in the Federal Register. (hortidaily.com)
  • Normally, this organic certification cost-share program run through AMA is administered alongside a national program - the National Organic Certification Cost-Share Program - that provides cost-share to organic producers in the other 34 States and organic handlers. (hortidaily.com)
  • The Senate-passed version of the 2013 Farm Bill streamlined organic certification cost-share by combining the AMA program with the larger National Organic Certification Cost-Share Program. (hortidaily.com)
  • As outlined in the Final NIH Policy on Data Management and Sharing (DMS) , costs associated with data management and data sharing may be allowable under the budget for the proposed project. (nih.gov)
  • Propose only what you can cost share, that is costs that adhere to the cost principles of allowable, allocable, and reasonable. (stanford.edu)
  • You can propose cost sharing for only those expenses that would qualify as allowable project costs. (stanford.edu)
  • These proposals may be for equipment or instrumentation grants, where the purpose of the grant is to buy equipment and we are required to share the cost with the sponsor, or research-oriented grants or contracts where the purchase of equipment required for the research is an allowable expense included in the proposal and award. (stanford.edu)
  • Costs contributed as cost share must be considered "allowable" by the sponsor. (ncsu.edu)
  • The program offers 60% cost share of expenses to add grazing infrastructure to cropland and to purchase cover crop seed. (farmprogress.com)
  • It's important to understand the health insurance industry considers out-of-pocket costs as cost sharing expenses. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • This means that you agreed to share a portion of the cost of your medical bills by paying specific out-of-pocket expenses (in addition to your premium). (ramseysolutions.com)
  • Therefore, in line with our standard budget instructions, DMS costs must be requested in the appropriate cost category, e.g., personnel, equipment, supplies, and other expenses, following the instructions for the R&R Budget Form or PHS 398 Modular Budget Form, as applicable. (nih.gov)
  • Paying for College: The Rising Cost of Higher Education shows that families with students attending private colleges in New England are spending a third (33 percent) of their annual income on tuition, required fees, and living expenses. (massinc.org)
  • You have to learn to live with [it] because there's so much legitimate password sharing," CEO Reed Hastings said in 2016. (fool.com)
  • The turbulent negotiations come at a delicate time for the allies, which face a growing North Korean threat and have squabbled over Seoul's declaration to terminate a 2016 military intelligence-sharing pact with Japan amid a bilateral row. (defensenews.com)
  • Cost sharing varies with different types of health plans, but most will have a copayment , coinsurance or deductible amount. (healthychildren.org)
  • Montpelier, VT - Governor Phil Scott and the Department of Financial Regulation (DFR) today announced an emergency regulation requiring commercial insurers to waive cost-sharing requirements, such as co-payments, coinsurance or deductible requirements, for the diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19. (vermont.gov)
  • Washington and Seoul in February signed a new cost-sharing deal for 2019 that required South Korea to pay about 1.04 trillion won ($890 million), shortly before a summit in Vietnam between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un that collapsed over disagreements in exchanging sanctions relief and disarmament. (defensenews.com)
  • Sharing of medical bills is completely voluntary. (startribune.com)
  • The NSF (National Science Foundation) will not accept proposals with voluntary committed cost sharing unless it is specified in the notice of funding opportunity. (stanford.edu)
  • and voluntary uncommitted cost sharing. (ncsu.edu)
  • Mandatory or voluntary committed cost share that must be documented by the department and reported to the sponsor by Contracts and Grants. (ncsu.edu)
  • Voluntary uncommitted cost sharing that must be documented by the department and is not reported to the sponsor. (ncsu.edu)
  • The Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI) wants to remind growers and handlers of organic agricultural products that they can recover part of the cost of their USDA certification. (southeastagnet.com)
  • According to the USDA, the Emergency Grain Storage Facility Assistance program (EGSFP) will assist eligible producers who were hard-hit by natural disaster events with cost-share assistance for grain storage capacity and drying and handling needs. (sdcorn.org)
  • For many farmers, the transition period before attaining organic certification can be cost-prohibitive, so USDA is also helping mitigate the risk involved for farmers who want to be able to grow and market organic crops. (govdelivery.com)
  • Prepare a budget that Includes Indirect Costs. (stanford.edu)
  • Unrecovered indirect costs - aka facilities and administrative F&A costs - equates to the difference between the amount charged to the federal award and the amount which could have been charged to the federal award under the nonfederal entity's approved negotiated indirect costs rate. (ncsu.edu)
  • Sponsor must approve the use of unrecovered indirect costs (F&A) as cost sharing. (ncsu.edu)
  • The proposed change in methodology is expected to result in higher annual cost-sharing limits and employer-shared responsibility (ESR) assessments for large-employer plans than under the current method used to determine the annual premium adjustment percentage. (mercer.com)
  • This plan effectively cushions the impact by requiring the MSAD 58 towns to bear a larger proportion of the total local share percentage. (dailybulldog.com)
  • Clinical quality composite rates for providers with full financial risk were 6.2 percentage points higher than providers not sharing risk. (iha.org)
  • Cost share as a percentage or dollar equivalency relative to the agency-provided budget. (ncsu.edu)
  • The lender's percentage share was three times the percentage of the value of the property that was originally borrowed. (wikipedia.org)
  • So if the property was sold for less than the valuation, the borrower's percentage share would be further reduced. (wikipedia.org)
  • On these mortgages the maximum loan was 75% of the value of the property (compared with 25% for a zero-interest SAM), and the lender's percentage share of the appreciation was the same as the percentage of the loan to the original value of the property (compared with three times the percentage for a zero-interest SAM). (wikipedia.org)
  • the government then reimburses insurers for the higher cost of those plans. (commonwealthfund.org)
  • Insurers must cover and should not impose cost-sharing for these recommended examinations, regardless of the patient's designated risk. (cancer.org)
  • March 6, 2020: DFR issued an emergency bulletin requiring insurers to cover the cost of COVID-19 testing . (vermont.gov)
  • Some good theological questions come to mind that apparently don't pop up enough to be listed in the frequently asked questions, like why there's no ethical obligation to pick up part of the health cost burden of a neighbor literally next door rather than a Medi-Share member in another town. (startribune.com)
  • U.S. negotiator James DeHart said the U.S. side decided to cut short a meeting that lasted less than two hours because Seoul's proposals "were not responsive to our request for fair and equitable burden sharing. (defensenews.com)
  • My guess is that it would be a more equitable sharing of the financial burden," an ACEA spokesperson told edie . (edie.net)
  • Christian Care Ministry and the Medi-Share program are not registered or licensed by any insurance entity, nor are we required to be. (startribune.com)
  • This nonprofit's Medi-Share cost-sharing program draws its inspiration from the communal lifestyle of the early Christian church as described in the Bible . (startribune.com)
  • CROPLAND GRAZING: Money for the cost-share program comes from the North Dakota Outdoor Heritage Fund. (farmprogress.com)
  • This Program requires cost sharing, matching, or leveraging as described below. (huduser.gov)
  • FSA will cover up to 75% of costs associated with organic certification, up to $750 for crops, wild crops, livestock, processing/handling and state organic program fees (California only). (govdelivery.com)
  • What is the Pend Oreille Cost Share Program? (pendoreilleco.org)
  • PUD provides funds to be distributed through the neighborhood cost share program, however, this is for work that takes a non-herbicide approach to control aquatic noxious or nuisance weeds in the Pend Oreille River it is reimbursed at 100% with a maximum reimbursement of $500.00/individual and $1000.00/group. (pendoreilleco.org)
  • The program helps defray costs of organic certification for organic crop and livestock producers. (hortidaily.com)
  • For example, although the YMCA program costs $360 per person (10) for the duration of the core program (amounting to 16 sessions) (Appendix Table A.1), the pilot is offered at no charge. (cdc.gov)
  • Cost sharing is required by the terms of the sponsored program and must be included and budgeted for as part of the sponsored award. (ncsu.edu)
  • Cost sharing is not required by the terms of the sponsored program but is included and budgeted for as part of the sponsored award. (ncsu.edu)
  • ENDs cites an EC official who estimates the average recycling cost at 80 euros or less per vehicle. (edie.net)
  • Because funding requests for the EGSFP are subject to the availability of funding and will be funded in the order in which they are approved, it's critical that eligible producers get their cost estimates as soon as possible. (sdcorn.org)
  • The retailer reported $4.86 earnings per share for the quarter, topping analysts' consensus estimates of $4.79 by $0.07. (etfdailynews.com)
  • This month, the federal government announced cost estimates for the project had reached $12.6 billion. (cbc.ca)
  • The company posted a profit of $3.61 per share, well below analysts' estimates of $4.68, according to Refinitiv data. (medscape.com)
  • According to a 2020 study, which covered some 632 new therapeutic drugs and biologic agents approved by the FDA, the "estimated median capitalized research and development cost per product was $985 million, counting expenditures on failed trials. (wnd.com)
  • Consistent with prior years, the results released for 2020 show that better care and lower costs typically result when plans and providers share in the financial risk through a capitation arrangement compared to fee-for-service models. (iha.org)
  • ABSTRACT For EMR countries to deliver the expectations of the Global Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 & the ongoing move towards universal health coverage, all health & social care providers need to innovate and transform their services to provide evidence-based health care that is accessible, cost-effective & with the best patient outcomes. (who.int)
  • with decreasing marginal costs, the agents impose a positive externality on each other (see example below). (wikipedia.org)
  • By using information on the minimum reimbursement rate at which public health agencies would be prepared to provide the 3 models, we estimated the marginal costs per person of supplying the programs. (cdc.gov)
  • In particular, state officials are struggling to keep their insurance markets afloat in the face of the Trump administration's continued indecision over whether to reimburse insurance companies for Affordable Care Act (ACA) cost-sharing reduction (CSR) plans. (commonwealthfund.org)
  • Back in 2013 the Obama administration decided it had the authority to make such payments, which became known as cost-sharing reduction payments, or CSRs. (dwt.com)
  • Today we shared details of a proposed cost reduction plan with employees at GoCardless. (gocardless.com)
  • Technology companies such as Tesla Inc , Apple , Microsoft , and Facebook are some of the trader's favorite shares to trade according to Investing.com. (fpmarkets.com)
  • Costs must be allocable to the project. (ncsu.edu)
  • The DOE reported back that, unlike previously calculated results based on the 2007-2008 data, MSAD 9 would now absorb a large amount of MSAD 58's local share of funding for education. (dailybulldog.com)
  • Cost sharing is required for research projects to be eligible for funding through HUD's noncompetitive cooperative agreement authority. (huduser.gov)
  • Research projects submitted by all eligible applicants must include at least a 50 percent match toward the cost of the project. (huduser.gov)
  • Eligible producers can receive up to 75 percent of the certification costs, up to a maximum of $750. (hortidaily.com)
  • 4930 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 19 / Monday, January 30, 2006 / Notices Consistent with the requirement that Federal assistance be supplemental, any Federal funds provided for Public Assistance, Hazard Mitigation, and Other Needs Assistance as authorized by the Stafford Act will be limited to 75 percent of the total eligible costs. (justia.com)
  • Other examples of a cash contribution include the purchasing of equipment by the institution or other eligible sponsor for the benefit of the project requiring cost sharing. (ncsu.edu)
  • In other words, in the first year the cost sharing plan effectively prevents any shifting of costs from MSAD 58 to MSAD 9. (dailybulldog.com)
  • Or, no one attempting to connect to the circuit may be able to afford the cost of upgrades, effectively closing the circuit. (irecusa.org)
  • Conversely, in the unlikely event that the value of property had remained the same or reduced, the shared appreciation mortgage would have effectively been interest-free. (wikipedia.org)
  • For the latest study, researchers led by Robin Yabroff, Ph.D., assessed the prevalence of material (e.g., problems paying medical bills), psychological (e.g., worry about medical bills) and behavioral (delaying or forgoing medical care because of cost) domains of financial hardship using data from the 2015-2017 National Health Interview Survey. (cancer.org)
  • In the long run, the elimination of cost sharing in a decentralized, fee-for-service system is likely to generate unacceptably high total expenditures for national health care. (rand.org)
  • Over the past 15 years, many healthcare plans have increased beneficiary cost sharing for prescription drugs as a mechanism to contain healthcare spending, and literature suggests that less generous prescription drug coverage reduces drug expenditures for healthcare plans. (ajmc.com)
  • Cost sharing of direct expenditures represents a redirection of departmental or school resources from teaching or other departmental and school activities to support sponsored agreements. (stanford.edu)
  • For-profit managed care organizations face decisions about cost sharing that can involve a tradeoff between the interests of investors and the interests of patients. (nih.gov)
  • This additional service may or may not involve an extra cost. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Florenz has proposed a system whereby producers, dealers and vehicle owners would share the cost of ELV recycling, with producers responsible for about a third. (edie.net)
  • Organic certification is an annual process and cost for organic producers and handlers. (hortidaily.com)
  • While the single cost line item is no longer required, NIH will require applicants to specify estimated DMS cost details within the Budget Justification attachment of the R&R Budget Form or Additional Narrative Justification attachment of the PHS 398 Modular Budget Form, pursuant to the instructions. (nih.gov)
  • Access also resulted in more than 400 fewer patient admissions during the period, accounting for 97.6% of the total cost savings. (medscape.com)
  • So if there are three agents whose demands are 3 and 6 and 10, then the total cost is $100. (wikipedia.org)
  • These challenges shined a new light on what our Atlas data has consistently shown us - when health plans and providers share financial risk, patients benefit from coordinated, integrated care that improves outcomes and lowers total cost of care," says Anna Lee Amarnath, MD, MPH, General Manager of IHA's Align. (iha.org)
  • Total cost of care was 4.9% lower when providers shared financial risk. (iha.org)
  • Those sums bring the total cost of taxpayers' investment in the Trans Mountain expansion to more than $17 billion. (cbc.ca)
  • The authors report that the total cost of management of patients with thyroid cancer was about €200 million, of which between €60 million and €116 million (or between 29% and 57% of the total cost) was attributable to treatment of overdiagnosed cases. (who.int)
  • Overdiagnosis and corresponding associated treatments play an important role in the total cost of thyroid cancer management. (who.int)
  • Thus, development and evaluation of the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of strategies to minimize medical financial hardship will be important. (cancer.org)
  • Health information technology advocates have claimed for years that hospitals that adopt electronic health information systems will improve patient care and save on healthcare costs. (medscape.com)
  • Atlas is a valuable tool for identifying and reducing discrepancies in healthcare costs and quality, pointing the industry in the right direction toward healthier futures for Californians. (iha.org)
  • The Atlas uses over two dozen metrics, such as preventive screenings, care for chronic conditions, emergency department visits, and member cost-sharing, to examine performance across a wide range of clinical quality, hospital utilization, insurance type, and cost of care topics. (iha.org)
  • If cost sharing is eliminated in a national health insurance plan, substantial demand will be generated for services such as physician office visits. (rand.org)
  • The DPP's high programmatic costs and frequency of ongoing face-to-face visits have made it challenging to implement routinely in reality (8). (cdc.gov)
  • The higher-than-expected duty rise, coupled with increased costs for bottles, packaging and fuel because of the pound's slump since the EU referendum, is understood to be behind the Heineken's decision to ask for higher prices. (pinboard.in)
  • The university proposes that her total salary would be unchanged, but a cost equal to the cost of one preparation and one committee would be charged against the grant. (huduser.gov)
  • In contrast to your deductible, the out-of-pocket maximum refers to your cost sharing arrangement after your deductible has been met. (healthychildren.org)
  • Cost sharing" refers to the portion of the total sponsored project costs that are not paid by the sponsoring agency. (ncsu.edu)
  • Committed cost share that is quantified in a federal proposal is auditable. (ncsu.edu)
  • The thing is, an organization set up to have everybody pay into a pot of money to share equally in health care costs for the group's members looks an awful lot like a traditional insurance company. (startribune.com)
  • Here's one marketing claim of a cost-sharing firm called Knew Health: "It's not insurance. (startribune.com)
  • There is no pooling of funds as practiced by insurance groups," is how Christian Care Ministry described its Medi-Share service. (startribune.com)
  • The appeal of a way to pay for health care that seems to cost a lot less money than an insurance plan is obvious. (startribune.com)
  • There was news this fall that the average annual cost of a family insurance plan in the U.S. finally broke $20,000, although many American employers pick up a big chunk of the cost. (startribune.com)
  • Medi-Share generally stays away from insurance terms. (startribune.com)
  • All health insurance requires consumers to pay some of the cost of covered health care services. (healthychildren.org)
  • In the health insurance industry, that's exactly what cost sharing means. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • So, what is cost sharing in health insurance? (ramseysolutions.com)
  • Probably because this sharing strategy has been part of the insurance industry forever. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • Here's some encouraging news for anyone who's been confused and frustrated by traditional insurance cost sharing-there's a new way of sharing health care costs that's cheaper and simpler. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • In other words, you're splitting the cost of medical services with your health insurance until you reach your out-of-pocket maximum. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • OMDG and the increased cost share build on several other programs offered under USDA's Organic Transition Initiative, which range from conservation assistance to improved crop insurance options. (govdelivery.com)
  • As we work to expand testing to more Vermonters with symptoms of COVID-19, it is critical that our efforts to help control the spread of the virus are not affected by insurance costs. (vermont.gov)
  • Users can access the interactive web tool to compare year-over-year results, as well as results across insurance type, regions, and provider risk-sharing categories. (iha.org)
  • How does quality and cost for Covered California compare to other commercial insurance? (iha.org)
  • Many cost-sharing programs seem to be organized around a segment of the population that might be considered a community already, such as Florida-based Christian Care Ministry. (startribune.com)
  • Take a deep dive with Steve Riggins and Doug Roupp into the state-funded cost-share programs that are available through your local U.S. Department of Agriculture Service Center. (practicalfarmers.org)
  • We assessed willingness to pay for DPPs from the perspective of potential recipients and the cost of providing these programs from the perspective of community health centers and local health departments in North Carolina. (cdc.gov)
  • Sponsor must approve the use of costs associated with other sponsored programs as cost sharing. (ncsu.edu)
  • Two important proposals on how to share the cost are the egalitarian and the proportional solutions. (ua.es)
  • In this paper we obtain a family of (compromise) solutions associated to the Perron's eigenvectors of Levinger's transformations of a characteristics matrix A. This family includes both the egalitarian and proportional solutions, as well as a set of suitable intermediate proposals, which we analyze in some specific contexts, as claims problems and inventory cost games. (ua.es)
  • European car manufacturers continue to resist EU proposals to charge them with recycling end of life vehicles (ELV) produced prior to 2006, but they may support a bid to share the cost of recycling newer cars with dealers and owners. (edie.net)
  • Thank you for your patience over the last few weeks as we have worked through the details of our proposals to reduce costs and put ourselves on a faster path to profitability. (gocardless.com)
  • Proposals which include the acquisition of special-purpose equipment as a direct cost may include an offer of University funds to pay for all or part of the cost of such equipment. (stanford.edu)
  • Cost sharing or matching means the portion of project costs not paid by Federal funds (unless otherwise authorized by Federal statute). (huduser.gov)
  • Matching supply and demand, we estimated the degree of cost sharing between recipients and providers. (cdc.gov)
  • These cost-sharing groups aren't exactly new but have lately gotten more prominent thanks in part to their marketing during this season of open enrollment for health care plans. (startribune.com)
  • Health plans have increasingly shifted costs of medical care and medications to their beneficiaries, resulting in repercussions for the management of chronic disease. (ajmc.com)
  • Health share plans are like cooperatives where members cover a portion of each other's medical costs. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • In those states, although the cost of silver plans will increase, premium tax credits will also be increased to account for the increased premium costs, such that individuals who receive premium tax credits will not be affected. (dwt.com)
  • In some cases, other types of plans may become even more affordable as a result of the increased premium tax credits, and individuals may be able to purchase better coverage for the same or less cost. (dwt.com)
  • Health plans, providers, purchasers, policymakers, and consumers can use the Atlas to compare quality and cost of care provided to Californians. (iha.org)
  • These plans will see us reduce our cost base by ~15% and will affect 17% of the roles at GoCardless. (gocardless.com)
  • We have now finalised our plans to focus on fewer things and the resulting reductions to our cost base in order to get to profitability faster. (gocardless.com)
  • This interest is extending into improving or renewing the organisation's ICT infrastructure and reducing investment costs and using the shared ICT service to support sharing of wider service processes. (publicnet.co.uk)
  • HSBC began coverage on shares of Costco Wholesale in a research report on Friday, September 22nd. (etfdailynews.com)
  • By using willingness to pay to understand demand for DPPs and computing the provider's marginal cost of providing these services, we can estimate cost sharing and market coverage of these services and thus compare the viability of alternate approaches to scaling up and sustaining DPPs with available resources. (cdc.gov)
  • It's much closer when people, who might not have been aware, get that new cost estimate. (cbc.ca)
  • Several equities analysts have commented on COST shares. (etfdailynews.com)
  • Shares are also known as stocks or equities. (fpmarkets.com)
  • A quite simple way to explain what a stock is is basically when a company divides itself into several shares and then it makes a part of these equities available to the public, at a price. (fpmarkets.com)
  • November 10, 2011 - When doctors at 12 Memphis, Tennessee, emergency departments (EDs) voluntarily accessed patient medical records through a health information exchange (HIE), they reduced the number of hospital admissions and diagnostic tests and reduced costs by almost $2 million during a 13-month period, researchers reported in an article published online November 4 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association . (medscape.com)
  • Cite this: Health Information Sharing Renders Cost Savings - Medscape - Nov 10, 2011. (medscape.com)
  • Newhouse, Joseph P., Health Care Cost Sharing and Cost Containment. (rand.org)
  • Sedera is an example of cost-sharing, a still unusual but growing way to finance health care. (startribune.com)
  • To understand how hard it is going to be to control health care costs , one merely has to consider the outrage surrounding TSA's recent roll-out of "enhanced security" measures - measures which include 'enhanced pat downs' and full body scans. (kevinmd.com)
  • Increased out-of-pocket costs for antiepileptic drugs were associated with decreased adherence, higher healthcare utilization, and higher spending among US commercial health plan beneficiaries with epilepsy. (ajmc.com)
  • To examine the association between health plan out-of-pocket (OOP) costs for antiepileptic drugs and healthcare utilization (HCU) and overall plan spending among US-based commercial health plan beneficiaries with epilepsy. (ajmc.com)
  • We'll dive into both and then talk about how the new kind of health cost sharing can benefit you. (ramseysolutions.com)
  • You might've heard it called health sharing or health cost sharing . (ramseysolutions.com)
  • shares rose Wednesday after the health insurer said medical costs came in lower than expected during its second-quarter earnings report . (espotting.com)
  • Leaders of public health agencies (n = 27) reported up to a 40% difference in the cost of providing the DPP, depending on the delivery model. (cdc.gov)
  • Moderna also reported a fourth-quarter profit that missed Wall Street expectations by a wide margin, saying the results were hurt by a newly-disclosed royalty payment to the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) related to development of the COVID-19 vaccine as well as other costs. (medscape.com)
  • Carefully weigh the cost/benefit of each potential cost sharing commitment because the increased administrative requirements and responsibilities inherent in the cost sharing commitment. (stanford.edu)
  • Once cost sharing is proposed and agreed to, the PI must fulfill the commitment in the performance of that project. (stanford.edu)
  • By signing the PDRF, the department chair or designee approves the cost sharing commitment. (stanford.edu)
  • The Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, set forth in 2 CFR part 200, shall apply to this Federal award. (huduser.gov)
  • These costs include initial configuration, training, and technical support. (stanford.edu)
  • But he said Washington has demanded Seoul cover a broader range of costs than what it has been providing, which includes the wages of South Korean employees at U.S. bases and costs for facility construction and logistics support. (defensenews.com)
  • Currently, the NIH How to Apply - Application Guide states that costs to support activities described in the DMS plan, including personnel costs, must be noted on the R&R Budget Form as a single line item titled Data Management and Sharing Costs. (nih.gov)
  • Interconnecting DERs to the distribution grid is generally a "cost-causer pays" system: consumers who want solar pay for necessary distribution system upgrades, even when the upgrades will likely support future interconnection projects. (irecusa.org)
  • The portion of the purchase price paid by the University must be charged directly to a cost-sharing account in support of the award. (stanford.edu)
  • The produced unit and its cost are divided equally among all agents in the room. (wikipedia.org)
  • As SVoD providers look to implement tighter guidelines around sharing to boost subscriber numbers and revenues, consumers are being faced with the choice of paying more, moving to lower-cost 'with-ads' packages, or foregoing their access altogether," said Paul Lee, Partner and Global Head of Technology, Media and Telecommunications Research at Deloitte. (advanced-television.com)
  • In economics and mechanism design, a cost-sharing mechanism is a process by which several agents decide on the scope of a public product or service, and how much each agent should pay for it. (wikipedia.org)
  • The goal of a cost-sharing mechanism is to divide this externality among the agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2 CFR 200.306 dictates the terms by which in-kind contributions are valued for the purpose of fulfilling cost sharing obligations. (ncsu.edu)
  • Increases in beneficiaries' OOP costs led to higher overall spending and lower PDC. (ajmc.com)
  • Higher OOP costs were associated with increased total healthcare spending. (ajmc.com)
  • 1 This principle also applies to asymptomatic adults who have been designated as higher risk based on risk factors or prior screening examination findings, and thus have faced cost-sharing for regular interval screening, more frequent screening, supplemental imaging, or surveillance examinations. (cancer.org)
  • Restrictions on sharing may well lead to a growth in subscribers and higher revenues. (advanced-television.com)
  • According to Dr. Long, "As the cost of higher education increases, it affects who goes to college. (massinc.org)
  • The average costs of tuition and fees at public colleges in Massachusetts are higher than the national averages. (massinc.org)
  • In 2005-06, the average cost of state's private four-year colleges was $27,780, 31 percent higher than the national average. (massinc.org)
  • The average cost of the state's community colleges was $3,477, which is 59 percent higher than the national average. (massinc.org)
  • On average, clinical quality was higher for commercially insured members cared for by providers sharing financial risk. (iha.org)
  • Each agent is pays at least its stand-alone cost - the cost he would have paid without the existence of other agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it has a disadvantage: An agent might pay more than its unanimous cost - the cost he would have paid if all other agents had the same demand. (wikipedia.org)
  • This method guarantees that an agents pays at most its unanimous cost - the cost he would have paid if all other agents had the same demand. (wikipedia.org)
  • This would represent a 10.2 percent increase over the $3,495,139 it actually paid this year, as its local share. (dailybulldog.com)
  • What this does is increase Strong's total local share to $633,300, which is exactly what it paid this year in an unconsolidated MSAD 58. (dailybulldog.com)
  • Among respondents who are currently using a service paid for by someone outside their household, the majority (57 per cent) say that they would stop consuming the service if subscription sharing was banned. (advanced-television.com)
  • On average, patients cared for by risk-sharing providers paid $246 per year in out-of-pocket medical costs compared to $636 per year for patients who were not. (iha.org)
  • The interest was paid by monthly instalments, and the final repayment was the original amount borrowed plus the lender's share of the appreciation. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the referendum passes and Newry votes to terminate withdrawal, Bethel and Woodstock would have a 1 percent tax increase per year over the nine years, according to Stockmeyer, because some of Newry's share would shift to those towns. (sunjournal.com)
  • Initially, Rier shared the concept of a more dramatic cost shift with only Cormier, who had been his original contact over the Weld matter. (dailybulldog.com)
  • More than a third (35 per cent) of people with access to a SVoD service in the UK are sharing at least one of their services with others outside their home, according to a Deloitte report. (advanced-television.com)
  • Sharing is an increasingly important element of local public services sourcing strategy with benefits extending well beyond cost saving says latest Socitm Pocket Guide. (publicnet.co.uk)
  • The guide says that shared services may be prompted by organisations themselves operating collaboratively, or even merging. (publicnet.co.uk)
  • Sharing ICT systems and embedded processes, as a first step, paves the way for future sharing of other employees and services. (publicnet.co.uk)
  • The Guide covers the topic of shared services in two sections. (publicnet.co.uk)