A species of gram-positive, asporogenous bacteria that was originally isolated from necrotic areas in the kidney of a sheep. It may cause ulcerative lymphangitis, abscesses, and other chronic purulent infections in sheep, horses, and other warm-blooded animals. Human disease may form from contact with infected animals.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CORYNEBACTERIUM.
A genus of asporogenous bacteria that is widely distributed in nature. Its organisms appear as straight to slightly curved rods and are known to be human and animal parasites and pathogens.
A human and animal pathogen causing mesenteric lymphadenitis, diarrhea, and bacteremia.
Inflammation of the lymph nodes.
Infections with bacteria of the species YERSINIA PSEUDOTUBERCULOSIS.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
A species of gram-positive, asporogenous, non-pathogenic, soil bacteria that produces GLUTAMIC ACID.
Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.
Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.
A species of gram-positive, asporogenous bacteria in which three cultural types are recognized. These types (gravis, intermedius, and mitis) were originally given in accordance with the clinical severity of the cases from which the different strains were most frequently isolated. This species is the causative agent of DIPHTHERIA.
An enzyme found mostly in plant tissue. It hydrolyzes glycerophosphatidates with the formation of a phosphatidic acid and a nitrogenous base such as choline. This enzyme also catalyzes transphosphatidylation reactions. EC 3.1.4.4.
Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.
The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod- to coccobacillus-shaped bacteria that occurs in a broad spectrum of habitats.
The etiologic agent of PLAGUE in man, rats, ground squirrels, and other rodents.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Suspensions of attenuated or killed bacteria administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious bacterial disease.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Infections with bacteria of the genus YERSINIA.

Identification of nonlipophilic corynebacteria isolated from dairy cows with mastitis. (1/64)

Nonlipophilic corynebacteria associated with clinical and subclinical mastitis in dairy cows were found to belong to four species: Corynebacterium amycolatum, Corynebacterium ulcerans, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, and Corynebacterium minutissimum. These species may easily be confused. However, clear-cut differences between C. ulcerans and C. pseudotuberculosis were found in their acid production from maltotriose and ethylene glycol, susceptibility to vibriostatic agent O129, and alkaline phosphatase. Absence of growth at 20 degrees C and lack of alpha-glucosidase and 4MU-alpha-D-glycoside hydrolysis activity differentiated C. amycolatum from C. pseudotuberculosis and C. ulcerans. The mastitis C. pseudotuberculosis strains differed from the biovar equi and ovis reference strains and from caprine field strains in their colony morphologies and in their reduced inhibitory activity on staphylococcal beta-hemolysin. C. amycolatum was the most frequently isolated nonlipophilic corynebacterium.  (+info)

Targeting improves the efficacy of a DNA vaccine against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in sheep. (2/64)

A large-scale DNA vaccination trial was performed with sheep to investigate whether an antigen targeted by CTLA-4 enhanced and accelerated the humoral immune response. Vaccination with genetically detoxified phospholipase D (DeltaPLD) has been shown to be effective, at least partially, against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the causal agent of caseous lymphadenitis in sheep. CTLA-4 binds to B7 on antigen-presenting cells and thus was used to direct the fusion antigens to sites of immune induction. Here we demonstrated that targeting DeltaPLD as a CTLA-4 fusion protein significantly enhanced the speed, magnitude, and longevity of the antibody response compared to that obtained with DNA encoding DeltaPLD. While all groups of sheep vaccinated with DNA encoding DeltaPLD were afforded better protection against an experimental challenge with C. pseudotuberculosis than those immunized with an irrelevant plasmid or those left unimmunized, the best protection was provided by the targeted DNA vaccine. We propose that targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells offers a generic strategy for enhancing the efficacy of DNA vaccines.  (+info)

Tumor necrosis factor alpha and gamma interferon are required for the development of protective immunity to secondary Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in mice. (3/64)

The production and role of endogenous cytokines during the course of secondary Corynebacterium (C.) pseudotuberculosis infection were investigated in mice. When immunized mice were challenged on day 28 after primary infection, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) were found to appear at 3 hr and to reach the maximum at 24 hr after challenge. Spleen cells of mice primarily infected from 2 to 8 weeks before produced a significant amount of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma when stimulated with formalin-killed bacteria. However, they could not produce detectable amounts of IL-4. The administration of anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (MAb) and IFN-gamma MAb increased bacterial proliferation in the organs of immune mice and exacerbated the secondary infection. Injection of anti-CD4 MAb alone or anti-CD4 plus anti-CD8 MAbs resulted in significantly increased mortality and a marked suppression of bacterial elimination as well as cytokine production of secondarily infected mice, while the treatment with anti-CD8 MAb alone showed no effect on either the resistance or cytokine production of mice. These results suggest that CD4, probably Th1 T cells, play an important role for establishment of protective immunity against secondary C. pseudotuberculosis infection by secreting TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma.  (+info)

Characterization of United Kingdom isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. (4/64)

Caseous lymphadenitis is a chronic suppurative disease caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and is responsible for serious economic losses to the sheep and goat industry. Caseous lymphadenitis was first reported for goats in the United Kingdom in 1990 and for sheep in 1991. Recent evidence suggests that the prevalence of the disease within the national flock is increasing. Fifty isolates of C. pseudotuberculosis from the United Kingdom comprising sheep and horse isolates, the original goat outbreak strain, and the type strain were characterized by biotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility, production of phospholipase D, and genotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis using SfiI and SmaI. All of the isolates were confirmed as C. pseudotuberculosis, and all produced phospholipase D but none reduced nitrate. Restriction with SfiI generated 16 to 18 bands between 48.5 and 290 kb and differentiated six pulsotypes. We conclude that 80% of the strains tested were epidemiologically related to the outbreak strain and that the equine profile was distinct both phenotypically and genotypically.  (+info)

Mechanism of induction of complement susceptibility of erythrocytes by spider and bacterial sphingomyelinases. (5/64)

We have recently shown that the sphingomyelinase toxins P1 and P2 from the venom of the spider Loxosceles intermedia induce complement (C)-dependent lysis of autologous erythrocytes by induction of the cleavage of cell surface glycophorins through activation of an endogenous metalloproteinase facilitating the activation of the alternative pathway of C. Phospholipase D (PLD) from Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis shows some degree of homology with the spider sphingomyelinases and can induce similar clinical symptoms to those observed after spider envenomation. The aim of this study was to investigate if the bacterial PLD-induced haemolysis of human erythrocytes was C dependent and if cleavage of glycophorins occurred. We show here that haemolysis of both PLD- and P1-treated human erythrocytes was C dependent, but while PLD-mediated haemolysis was dependent on activation of the classical pathway of C, P1 induced lysis via both the classical and alternative pathways. P1, but not PLD, induced cleavage of glycophorins and no change in expression of complement regulators was induced by either of the toxins. In both cases, annexin V binding sites were exposed, suggesting that the membrane asymmetry had been disturbed causing exposure of phosphatidylserine to the cell surface. Our results suggest that C susceptibility induced by L. intermedia and C. pseudotuberculosis PLD is a result of exposure of phosphatidylserine, and the higher potency of P1 toxin can be explained by its additional effect of cleavage of glycophorins.  (+info)

Ovine mononuclear phagocytes in situ: identification by monoclonal antibodies and involvement in experimental pyogranulomas. (6/64)

In order to characterize in situ the macrophages present in experimental pyogranulomas induced in lambs with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, a set of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was produced following immunization of BALB/c mice with alveolar macrophages from healthy sheep. Three MAbs were retained after two steps of screening using alveolar macrophages, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes as target cells. Their reactivity was tested not only on macrophages in pyogranulomas but also on sections of various organs in steady-state conditions. One MAb, termed OM1, recognized the monocytes and the majority of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system in lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. The two other MAbs, OM2 and OM3, reacted with a subpopulation of alveolar macrophages and with other cell types in tissues, in particular with endothelial cells for the MAb OM2. On sections of experimental pyogranulomas that developed in lymph nodes draining the C. pseudotuberculosis-injected sites, MAb OM1 reacted with all the macrophages distributed in a palisade surrounding the necrotic center of the lesion from day 6 to day 28 postinoculation. The two other MAbs, OM2 and OM3, enabled two types of granulomas to be distinguished: one type was characterized by a large number of epithelioid cells stained by OM2; and the other was characterized by a few OM2-positive macrophages, whereas the OM3-positive cells were more numerous. These results show that macrophages are predominant cells in pyogranulomas and suggest two different histological patterns in the evolution of pyogranulomas induced by C. pseudotuberculosis, according to the immunological status of the host.  (+info)

Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in Israeli dairy cattle. (7/64)

Two forms of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in Israeli dairy cattle herds during a survey period of 13 years (1989-2001) are described. The more common form, which was diagnosed in 45 herds, was characterized by ulcerative granulomatous lesions which occurred either sporadically--in 26 herds (with a morbidity rate of up to 5%)--or in an epidemic course in 19 herds. Most (80.6%) of the affected animals were cows; the rest were first-calving cows (16.2%) and heifers (3.2%). The morbidity occurred mostly during the summer months. The ulcerative granulomatous lesions appeared in three clinical forms: cutaneous, mastitic and visceral. Mixed forms were also observed. The morbidity rate was 6.4% and the culling rate reached 16.3% of the affected animals. Most of the strains of C. pseudotuberculosis which were isolated from the abscesses in the cutaneous form of the disease and from milk samples failed to reduce nitrate. A decrease in milk production (6%) and an increase in bulk-milk somatic cell count were noted. Necrotic and ulcerative dermatitis on the heel of the foot occurred in an epidemic course in heifers in only two herds during the winter months, with morbidity rates of 7.5 and 76.2%, respectively. C. pseudotuberculosis isolates from skin lesions and from the soil did reduce nitrate. Clinical, epizootiological and microbiological aspects of the infection are described.  (+info)

Rational attenuation of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis: potential cheesy gland vaccine and live delivery vehicle. (8/64)

The phospholipase D (PLD) gene (pld) has been deleted from the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis chromosome by using site-specific mutagenesis. Sheep infection trials indicate that the PLD-negative C. pseudotuberculosis strain (Toxminus) is incapable of inducing caseous lymphadentis (cheesy gland) even at doses two logs higher than that at which the wild-type strain produces the disease. This clearly establishes PLD as a major C. pseudotuberculosis virulence factor. Vaccination of sheep with live Toxminus C. pseudotuberculosis elicits strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and protects the animals from wild-type challenge.  (+info)

'Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis' is a gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, diphtheroid bacterium that is the causative agent of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in sheep and goats. It can also cause chronic, granulomatous infections in other animals, including horses, cattle, and humans. The bacteria are typically transmitted through contact with infected animals or contaminated environmental sources, such as soil or water. Infection can lead to the formation of abscesses in the lymph nodes, particularly in the head and neck region, as well as other organs.

In humans, 'Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis' infection is rare but can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including chronic lymphadenitis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, and septicemia. The disease is often referred to as "pseudotuberculosis" or "pigeon breast" in humans, due to the characteristic swelling of the chest that can occur with infection.

Diagnosis of 'Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis' infection typically involves the isolation and identification of the bacteria from clinical samples, such as pus or tissue biopsies. Treatment may involve surgical drainage of abscesses, along with antibiotic therapy. The choice of antibiotics depends on the severity and location of the infection, as well as the susceptibility of the bacterial strain.

Corynebacterium infections are caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Corynebacterium, which are gram-positive, rod-shaped organisms that commonly inhabit the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. While many species of Corynebacterium are harmless commensals, some can cause a range of infections, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems or underlying medical conditions.

The most common Corynebacterium species that causes infection is C. diphtheriae, which is responsible for diphtheria, a potentially life-threatening respiratory illness characterized by the formation of a thick, grayish membrane in the throat and upper airways. Other Corynebacterium species, such as C. jeikeium, C. urealyticum, and C. striatum, can cause various types of healthcare-associated infections, including bacteremia, endocarditis, pneumonia, and skin and soft tissue infections.

Corynebacterium infections are typically treated with antibiotics, such as penicillin, erythromycin, or vancomycin, depending on the species of bacteria involved and the patient's medical history. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to drain abscesses or remove infected tissue. Preventive measures, such as vaccination against C. diphtheriae and good hygiene practices, can help reduce the risk of Corynebacterium infections.

Corynebacterium is a genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. Some species of Corynebacterium can cause disease in humans, including C. diphtheriae, which causes diphtheria, and C. jeikeium, which can cause various types of infections in immunocompromised individuals. Other species are part of the normal flora and are not typically pathogenic. The bacteria are characterized by their irregular, club-shaped appearance and their ability to form characteristic arrangements called palisades. They are facultative anaerobes, meaning they can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen.

"Yersinia pseudotuberculosis" is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that is facultatively anaerobic, meaning it can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. It is a causative agent of gastrointestinal illness in humans and animals, known as yersiniosis. The infection can cause symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and vomiting.

The bacterium is commonly found in the environment, particularly in soil and water, and can be transmitted to humans through contaminated food or water. It can also be spread through contact with infected animals, including birds and mammals.

Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is closely related to Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague, but it is generally less virulent in humans. However, in rare cases, it can cause severe illness, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

Lymphadenitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of one or more lymph nodes, which are small, bean-shaped glands that are part of the body's immune system. Lymph nodes contain white blood cells called lymphocytes, which help fight infection and disease.

Lymphadenitis can occur as a result of an infection in the area near the affected lymph node or as a result of a systemic infection that has spread through the bloodstream. The inflammation causes the lymph node to become swollen, tender, and sometimes painful to the touch.

The symptoms of lymphadenitis may include fever, fatigue, and redness or warmth in the area around the affected lymph node. In some cases, the overlying skin may also appear red and inflamed. Lymphadenitis can occur in any part of the body where there are lymph nodes, including the neck, armpits, groin, and abdomen.

The underlying cause of lymphadenitis must be diagnosed and treated promptly to prevent complications such as the spread of infection or the formation of an abscess. Treatment may include antibiotics, pain relievers, and warm compresses to help reduce swelling and discomfort.

"Yersinia pseudotuberculosis" infections refer to illnesses caused by the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. This gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium is found in the environment, particularly in soil and water contaminated with animal feces. It can cause gastrointestinal infection in humans, leading to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and vomiting. In severe cases, it can spread beyond the intestines and cause complications like skin lesions, joint inflammation, and spread to the bloodstream (septicemia). The incubation period for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infections is typically 5-10 days. Diagnosis is usually made through culture of the bacterium from stool or other bodily fluids, and treatment typically involves antibiotics. Prevention measures include good hygiene practices, such as proper handwashing and avoiding consumption of contaminated food and water.

I'm happy to help, but I want to clarify that the term "sheep diseases" refers to a wide range of health issues that can affect sheep populations. It's not a single medical condition with a specific definition. Here are some examples of common diseases that can affect sheep:

1. Ovine Johne's Disease (OJD): A chronic, infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. It affects the intestines and can cause weight loss, diarrhea, and death.
2. Footrot: A highly contagious bacterial infection that affects the feet of sheep, causing lameness, swelling, and pain. It's caused by the bacteria Dichelobacter nodosus.
3. Caseous Lymphadenitis (CL): A chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. It affects the lymph nodes and can cause abscesses, weight loss, and death.
4. Contagious Ecthyma (Orf): A highly contagious viral infection that affects the skin and mucous membranes of sheep, causing sores and lesions.
5. Mastitis: An inflammation of the mammary gland in sheep, usually caused by a bacterial infection. It can cause decreased milk production, fever, and loss of appetite.
6. Pneumonia: A respiratory infection that can affect sheep, causing coughing, difficulty breathing, and fever. It can be caused by various bacteria or viruses.
7. Enterotoxemia: A potentially fatal disease caused by the overproduction of toxins in the intestines of sheep, usually due to a bacterial infection with Clostridium perfringens.
8. Polioencephalomalacia (PEM): A neurological disorder that affects the brain of sheep, causing symptoms such as blindness, circling, and seizures. It's often caused by a thiamine deficiency or excessive sulfur intake.
9. Toxoplasmosis: A parasitic infection that can affect sheep, causing abortion, stillbirth, and neurological symptoms.
10. Blue tongue: A viral disease that affects sheep, causing fever, respiratory distress, and mouth ulcers. It's transmitted by insect vectors and is often associated with climate change.

'Corynebacterium glutamicum' is a species of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the environment, particularly in soil and water. It is a facultative anaerobe, which means it can grow with or without oxygen. The bacterium is non-pathogenic and has been widely studied and used in biotechnology due to its ability to produce various amino acids and other industrially relevant compounds.

The name 'Corynebacterium glutamicum' comes from its discovery as a bacterium that can ferment the amino acid glutamate, which is why it has been extensively used in the industrial production of L-glutamate, an important ingredient in many food products and feed additives.

In recent years, 'Corynebacterium glutamicum' has also gained attention as a potential platform organism for the production of various biofuels and biochemicals, including alcohols, organic acids, and hydrocarbons. Its genetic tractability and ability to utilize a wide range of carbon sources make it an attractive candidate for biotechnological applications.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. "Goat diseases" refers to illnesses that affect goats specifically. It does not mean diseases that are caused by goats or related to them in some way. Here are some examples of goat diseases:

1. Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis (CAE): A viral disease that affects goats, causing arthritis, pneumonia, and sometimes encephalitis.
2. Caseous Lymphadenitis (CL): A bacterial disease that causes abscesses in the lymph nodes of goats.
3. Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia (CCPP): A contagious respiratory disease caused by mycoplasma bacteria.
4. Johne's Disease: A chronic wasting disease caused by a type of bacterium called Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.
5. Pasteurellosis: A bacterial disease that can cause pneumonia, septicemia, and other infections in goats.
6. Salmonellosis: A bacterial disease caused by Salmonella bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, fever, and septicemia in goats.
7. Soremouth (Orf): A viral disease that causes sores and scabs around the mouth and nose of goats.

These are just a few examples of diseases that can affect goats. If you have any specific questions about goat health or diseases, I would recommend consulting with a veterinarian who specializes in small ruminants.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "goats" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is a common noun referring to the domesticated animal species Capra aegagrus hircus. If you have any questions about a specific medical condition or term, please provide that and I would be happy to help.

'Corynebacterium diphtheriae' is a gram-positive, rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria that can cause the disease diphtheria. It is commonly found in the upper respiratory tract and skin of humans and can be transmitted through respiratory droplets or direct contact with contaminated objects. The bacterium produces a potent exotoxin that can cause severe inflammation and formation of a pseudomembrane in the throat, leading to difficulty breathing and swallowing. In severe cases, the toxin can spread to other organs, causing serious complications such as myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle) and peripheral neuropathy (damage to nerves outside the brain and spinal cord). The disease is preventable through vaccination with the diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine.

Phospholipase D is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine and other glycerophospholipids to produce phosphatidic acid and a corresponding alcohol. This reaction plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, membrane trafficking, and lipid metabolism. There are several isoforms of Phospholipase D identified in different tissues and organisms, each with distinct regulatory mechanisms and functions. The enzyme's activity can be modulated by various factors such as calcium ions, protein kinases, and G proteins, making it a critical component in the regulation of cellular homeostasis.

I understand you are asking for a medical definition of "Horse Diseases." However, it's important to note that there isn't a specific medical field dedicated to horse diseases as we typically categorize medical fields by human diseases and conditions. Veterinary medicine is the field responsible for studying, diagnosing, and treating diseases in animals, including horses.

Here's a general definition of 'Horse Diseases':

Horse diseases are health issues or medical conditions that affect equine species, particularly horses. These diseases can be caused by various factors such as bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections; genetic predispositions; environmental factors; and metabolic disorders. Examples of horse diseases include Strangles (Streptococcus equi), Equine Influenza, Equine Herpesvirus, West Nile Virus, Rabies, Potomac Horse Fever, Lyme Disease, and internal or external parasites like worms and ticks. Additionally, horses can suffer from musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis, laminitis, and various injuries. Regular veterinary care, preventative measures, and proper management are crucial for maintaining horse health and preventing diseases.

A bacterial genome is the complete set of genetic material, including both DNA and RNA, found within a single bacterium. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the bacterium to grow, reproduce, and survive in its environment. The bacterial genome typically includes circular chromosomes, as well as plasmids, which are smaller, circular DNA molecules that can carry additional genes. These genes encode various functional elements such as enzymes, structural proteins, and regulatory sequences that determine the bacterium's characteristics and behavior.

Bacterial genomes vary widely in size, ranging from around 130 kilobases (kb) in Mycoplasma genitalium to over 14 megabases (Mb) in Sorangium cellulosum. The complete sequencing and analysis of bacterial genomes have provided valuable insights into the biology, evolution, and pathogenicity of bacteria, enabling researchers to better understand their roles in various diseases and potential applications in biotechnology.

I apologize, but "sheep" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a common animal with the scientific name Ovis aries. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

"Yersinia" is a genus of gram-negative bacteria that includes several species capable of causing human diseases. The most notable species are:

1. Yersinia pestis: This is the causative agent of plague, a severe and potentially fatal infectious disease. Plague can manifest in different forms, such as bubonic, septicemic, or pneumonic plague, depending on the route of infection. Historically, it has been associated with major pandemics like the Justinian Plague and the Black Death.

2. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: This species is responsible for causing a gastrointestinal illness known as pseudoappendicitis or mesenteric adenitis, which can mimic appendicitis symptoms. Infection often results from consuming contaminated food or water.

3. Yersinia enterocolitica: Similar to Y. pseudotuberculosis, this species causes gastrointestinal infections, typically presenting as enterocolitis or terminal ileitis. Symptoms may include diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever. In rare cases, it can lead to severe complications like sepsis or extraintestinal infections.

These bacteria are primarily transmitted through the fecal-oral route, either by consuming contaminated food or water or coming into contact with infected animals or their excrement. Proper hygiene practices and adequate cooking of food can help prevent Yersinia infections.

"Yersinia pestis" is a bacterial species that is the etiological agent (cause) of plague. Plague is a severe and often fatal infectious disease that can take various forms, including bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plagues. The bacteria are typically transmitted to humans through the bites of infected fleas, but they can also be spread by direct contact with infected animals or by breathing in droplets from an infected person's cough.

The bacterium is named after Alexandre Yersin, a Swiss-French bacteriologist who discovered it in 1894 during an epidemic of bubonic plague in Hong Kong. The disease has had a significant impact on human history, causing widespread pandemics such as the Justinian Plague in the 6th century and the Black Death in the 14th century, which resulted in millions of deaths across Europe and Asia.

Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative, non-motile, coccobacillus that can survive in various environments, including soil and water. It has several virulence factors that contribute to its ability to cause disease, such as the production of antiphagocytic capsules, the secretion of proteases, and the ability to resist phagocytosis by host immune cells.

Modern antibiotic therapy can effectively treat plague if diagnosed early, but without treatment, the disease can progress rapidly and lead to severe complications or death. Preventive measures include avoiding contact with infected animals, using insect repellent and protective clothing in areas where plague is endemic, and seeking prompt medical attention for any symptoms of infection.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Bacterial vaccines are types of vaccines that are created using bacteria or parts of bacteria as the immunogen, which is the substance that triggers an immune response in the body. The purpose of a bacterial vaccine is to stimulate the immune system to develop protection against specific bacterial infections.

There are several types of bacterial vaccines, including:

1. Inactivated or killed whole-cell vaccines: These vaccines contain entire bacteria that have been killed or inactivated through various methods, such as heat or chemicals. The bacteria can no longer cause disease, but they still retain the ability to stimulate an immune response.
2. Subunit, protein, or polysaccharide vaccines: These vaccines use specific components of the bacterium, such as proteins or polysaccharides, that are known to trigger an immune response. By using only these components, the vaccine can avoid using the entire bacterium, which may reduce the risk of adverse reactions.
3. Live attenuated vaccines: These vaccines contain live bacteria that have been weakened or attenuated so that they cannot cause disease but still retain the ability to stimulate an immune response. This type of vaccine can provide long-lasting immunity, but it may not be suitable for people with weakened immune systems.

Bacterial vaccines are essential tools in preventing and controlling bacterial infections, reducing the burden of diseases such as tuberculosis, pneumococcal disease, meningococcal disease, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease. They work by exposing the immune system to a harmless form of the bacteria or its components, which triggers the production of antibodies and memory cells that can recognize and fight off future infections with that same bacterium.

It's important to note that while vaccines are generally safe and effective, they may cause mild side effects such as pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site, fever, or fatigue. Serious side effects are rare but can occur, so it's essential to consult with a healthcare provider before receiving any vaccine.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "horses" is not a medical term. It is the common name given to the species *Equus ferus caballus*, which are large domesticated mammals used for transportation, work, and recreation. If you have any questions about horses or a related topic that you would like a medical perspective on, please let me know and I'd be happy to help!

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Yersinia infections are caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia, with Y. pestis (causing plague), Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis being the most common species associated with human illness. These bacteria can cause a range of symptoms depending on the site of infection.

Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis primarily infect the gastrointestinal tract, causing yersiniosis. Symptoms may include diarrhea (often containing blood), abdominal pain, fever, vomiting, and inflammation of the lymph nodes in the abdomen. In severe cases, these bacteria can spread to other parts of the body, leading to more serious complications such as sepsis or meningitis.

Y. pestis is infamous for causing plague, which can manifest as bubonic, septicemic, or pneumonic forms. Bubonic plague results from the bite of an infected flea and causes swollen, painful lymph nodes (buboes) in the groin, armpits, or neck. Septicemic plague occurs when Y. pestis spreads through the bloodstream, causing fever, chills, extreme weakness, and potential organ failure. Pneumonic plague is a severe respiratory infection caused by inhaling infectious droplets from an infected person or animal; it can lead to rapidly progressing pneumonia, sepsis, and respiratory failure if left untreated.

Proper diagnosis of Yersinia infections typically involves laboratory testing of bodily fluids (e.g., blood, stool) or tissue samples to identify the bacteria through culture, PCR, or serological methods. Treatment usually consists of antibiotics such as doxycycline, fluoroquinolones, or aminoglycosides, depending on the severity and type of infection. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, prompt treatment of infected individuals, and vector control to reduce the risk of transmission.

... is a Gram-positive bacterium known globally to infect ruminants, horses, and rarely people. ... "Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection of Horses and Cattle - Circulatory System". Merck Veterinary Manual. Retrieved ... Baird, G.J.; Fontaine, M.C. (2007). "Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and its Role in Ovine Caseous Lymphadenitis". Journal ... Baird, G. J.; Fontaine, M. C. (2007-11-01). "Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and its Role in Ovine Caseous Lymphadenitis". ...
... and in cultures of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The two enzyme toxins have different evolutionary origins but are ... "Comparative Toxinology of Loxosceles reclusa and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis". Science. 228 (4699): 590-591. doi:10.1126 ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis has also been isolated from occurring in other species such as such as deer, cattle, pigs, ... The biotype of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis affecting horses and cattle is distinguishable from the biotype that infects ... Baird, G.J.; Fontaine, M.C. (2007). "Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and its Role in Ovine Caseous Lymphadenitis". Journal ... Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, that affects ...
Corbeil, LE; Morrissey, JF; Léguillette, R (October 2016). "Is Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection (pigeon fever) in ... "Frequency of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in horses across the United States during a 10-year period". Journal ... "Experimental transmission of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis biovar equi in horses by house flies". Journal of Veterinary ... caused by the Gram-positive bacteria Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis biovar equi. Infected horses commonly have swelling in ...
2019 C. pseudotuberculosis (Buchanan 1911) Eberson 1918 (Approved Lists 1980) C. pyruviciproducens Tong et al. 2010 C. ... 1998). "Note: Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii sp. nov., a novel corynebacterium that does not contain mycolic acids". ... Corynebacterium species occur commonly in nature in soil, water, plants, and food products. The non-diphtheroid Corynebacterium ... Corynebacterium [1] Khamis, A.; Raoult, D.; Scola, B. La (2004). "rpoB gene sequencing for identification of Corynebacterium ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis has been cultured from some cases (particularly of ulcerative lymphangitis, but in others, a ... However, intracellular organisms such as Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis will be susceptible to certain antibiotics in vitro ...
Corynebacterium pseudo tuberculosis I19 as a case study. Journal of Microbiological Methods, 86(2), 218-223. doi:10.1016/j. ... pseudotuberculosis was assembled twice: once using a classical reference genome approach, and once using a hybrid approach. The ...
... secreted mainly by Corynebacterium diphtheriae but also by Corynebacterium ulcerans and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the ... Murphy JR (1996). "Corynebacterium Diphtheriae: Diphtheria Toxin Production". In Baron S, et al. (eds.). Medical microbiology ( ... Freeman VJ (June 1951). "Studies on the virulence of bacteriophage-infected strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae". Journal of ... "Further observations on the change to virulence of bacteriophage-infected a virulent strains of Corynebacterium diphtheria". ...
Corynebacterium ulcerans Coxiella burnetii or Q fever Plesiomonas shigelloides In addition to disease caused by direct ... including O1 and non-O1 Vibrio parahaemolyticus Vibrio vulnificus Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Less ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (causative agent of pigeon fever), equine influenza virus, or equine herpes virus type 1, or ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis MeSH B03.510.024.049.180.625 - Corynebacterium pyogenes MeSH B03.510.024.049.250 - Frankia ... Corynebacterium glutamicum MeSH B03.510.460.400.400.200.600 - Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis MeSH B03.510.460.400.400.200. ... Corynebacterium MeSH B03.510.024.049.180.100 - Brevibacterium flavum MeSH B03.510.024.049.180.150 - Corynebacterium diphtheriae ... Corynebacterium MeSH B03.510.460.400.400.200.150 - Corynebacterium diphtheriae MeSH B03.510.460.400.400.200.300 - ...
... an infectious disease caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Codices Latini Antiquiores, a catalogue of surviving ...
Clostridium tetani Corynebacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae Corynebacterium fusiforme Coxiella burnetii Ehrlichia ... parahaemolyticus Vibrio vulnificus Wolbachia Yersinia Yersinia enterocolitica Yersinia pestis Yersinia pseudotuberculosis List ...
... corynebacterium infections MeSH C01.252.410.040.246.388 - diphtheria MeSH C01.252.410.040.246.430 - erythrasma MeSH C01.252. ... yersinia pseudotuberculosis infections MeSH C01.252.400.349 - flavobacteriaceae infections MeSH C01.252.400.368 - ...
2005). "Complete genome sequence and analysis of the multiresistant nosocomial pathogen Corynebacterium jeikeium K411, a lipid- ... 2004). "Insights into the evolution of Yersinia pestis through whole-genome comparison with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis". Proc ... 2003). "The complete genome sequence and analysis of Corynebacterium diphtheriae NCTC13129". Nucleic Acids Res. 31 (22): 6516- ... complete genome sequence analysis of the amino acid replacements responsible for the thermostability of Corynebacterium ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a Gram-positive bacterium known globally to infect ruminants, horses, and rarely people. ... "Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection of Horses and Cattle - Circulatory System". Merck Veterinary Manual. Retrieved ... Baird, G.J.; Fontaine, M.C. (2007). "Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and its Role in Ovine Caseous Lymphadenitis". Journal ... Baird, G. J.; Fontaine, M. C. (2007-11-01). "Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and its Role in Ovine Caseous Lymphadenitis". ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, caseous lymphadenitis, genomes, phylogenetics, diagnostic. Subjects:. Q Science , QH ... This study set out to sequence the genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) 3/99-5, an ovine strain isolated from a ... Pethick, Florence Elizabeth (2013) Comparative genomic analyses of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. PhD thesis, University ... Phylogenetic analyses of the Corynebacterium genus were performed using house-keeping loci but also secreted protein loci from ...
Results-Internal C pseudotuberculosis infection was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs, diagnostic imaging, and ... and long-term antimicrobial treatment were important for a successful outcome in horses with internal C pseudotuberculosis ... and outcome in horses with internal Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection. Design-Retrospective study. Animals-30 horses ... and outcome in horses with internal infection caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis: 30 cases (1995-2003) ...
An optimized protocol of three-phase partitioning (TPP) was used to obtain the C. pseudotuberculosis exoproteins, and a newly ... In total, 93 different extracellular proteins of C. pseudotuberculosis were identified with high confidence by this strategy; ... Comparative analyses of the exoproteomes of two C. pseudotuberculosis strains, in addition to comparison with other ... a combined approach for characterizing the entire exoproteome of the pathogenic bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, ...
Corynebacterium diphtheriae. *C. ulcerans. *C. pseudotuberculosis. The laboratory serves as a resource and outbreak support for ... CDC is actively researching new laboratory methods to better identify and characterize other Bordetella and Corynebacterium ... Isolation and identification of Bordetella and Corynebacterium organisms from clinical specimens. *Detection of organisms by ...
C. pseudotuberculosis. NCTC 3450T. Sheep gland. Unknown. GQ118342. GQ409651. ND. C. ulcerans. NCTC 12077. Human throat. Unknown ... Novel Corynebacterium diphtheriae in Domestic Cats Aron J. Hall. , Pamela K. Cassiday, Kathryn A. Bernard, Frances Bolt, Arnold ... Feline Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolates and reference strains used for comparison, West Virginia, 2008* ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the causative agent of caseous lymphadenitis, a bacterial infection that can affect ... A Seroepidemiological Survey of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection in South Tyrol, Italy.. Bettini, Astrid; Mancin, ...
The genus contains the species Corynebacterium diphtheriae and the nondiphtherial corynebacteria, collectively referred to as ... Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and its role in ovine caseous lymphadenitis. J Comp Pathol. 2007 Nov. 137(4):179-210. [QxMD ... in cattle due to infection with Corynebacterium renale, Corynebacterium cystidis, Corynebacterium pilosum, and Corynebacterium ... Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis necrotizing lymphadenitis in a twelve-year-old patient. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2006 Sep. 25(9 ...
Categories: Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Learn about coronavirus, EPM, Lyme disease, influenza, and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.. Read More ...
Volume 241: Issue 6 (Sep 2012) published on 15 Sep 2012 by American Veterinary Medical Association.
Corynebacterium pseudodiptheriticum (also called Corynebacterium hofmannii). *Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (also called ... Corynebacterium diphtheriae. *Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the cause of diphtheria in humans.. Nondiphtheriae Corynebacteria ( ... Corynebacterium striatum, (Axillary odor [2]). *Corynebacterium tenuis (Trichomycosis palmellina, Trichomycosis axillaris) [3] ... year by Corynebacterium. The metabolic pathways of Corynebacterium have been further manipulated to produce L-Lysine and L- ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis has been cultured from some cases (particularly of ulcerative lymphangitis, but in others, a ... intracellular organisms such as Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis will be susceptible to certain antibiotics in vitro that are ...
Identification of new Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis antigens by immunoscreening of gene expression library  Galvão, ...
Walker, Caray A. (2009) Iron-dependent regulation of gene expression in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. PhD thesis, ... Pethick, Florence Elizabeth (2013) Comparative genomic analyses of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. PhD thesis, University ...
23.11.2004 Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis outbreak causes skin lesions and mastitis*18.11.2004 15 beef cattle in North ... 02.06.2012 First description of a Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis-associated Otitis media/interna in a horse. *27.05.2012 ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis - Caprine/Ovine (SHI). Detection of antibodies to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis - Caprine/Ovine (SHI). Detection of antibodies to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the ...
Isolation of other toxigenic Corynebacterium species (C. ulcerans or C. pseudotuberculosis) from an appropriate clinical ... Screening for Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans in patients with upper respiratory tract infections 2007 ... Human clinical isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans collected in Canada from 1999 to 2003 but ... diphtheriae or other Corynebacterium species (C. ulcerans or C. pseudotuberculosis) isolated from an appropriate clinical ...
Veterinary bacteriology: information about important bacteria.
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in highland alpacas (Lama pacos) in Peru. Braga, W. U., Chavera, A. & Gonzalez, A. ... Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in highland alpacas (Lama pacos) in Peru. Braga, W. U., Chavera, A. & Gonzalez, A. ... Clinical, humoral and pathologic findings in adult alpacas with experimentally induced Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis ...
Culture of active lesions for Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is diagnostically definitive. When eliminating animals from ... Caseous lymphadenitis (CL) is a chronic, contagious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. ... C pseudotuberculosis is hardy in the environment and can survive on fomites such as bedding and wood for 2 months and in soil ... C pseudotuberculosis is a gram-positive, facultative, intracellular coccobacillus. Two biotypes have been identified based on ...
... including neoplasia or abscesses due to metastatic Streptococcus equi subspecies equi or Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (organism) Code System Concept Status. Published. Code System Preferred Concept Name. ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. A new cause of infectious and eosinophilic pneumonia. Am J Med. 1979 Aug. 67(2):228-31. [ ...
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis was isolated from 32(84.2%) of the 38 samples, followed by Staphylococcus aureus 4/38 (10.5 ... In vitro antibiogram studies of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis isolates were found to be complete susceptible to ... Keywords: antimicrobial susceptibility; Caseous lymphadenitis; Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis; sheep. Date published: 2018- ... in sheep in Kosovo and to determine the susceptibility of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis isolates to some antimicrobial ...
  • Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that belongs to the so-called CMN ( Corynebacterium-Mycobacterium-Nocardia ) group, a distinct subgroup of the Actinobacteria that also includes other highly important bacterial pathogens, such as Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis . (biomedcentral.com)
  • The genus contains the species Corynebacterium diphtheriae and the nondiphtherial corynebacteria, collectively referred to as diphtheroids. (medscape.com)
  • In some endemic locations, such as India, 44% of throat and nasal swabs tested positive for C diphtheriae and Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum . (medscape.com)
  • Corynebacterium diphtheriae , the cause of diphtheria in humans. (wikidoc.org)
  • Corynebacterium diphtheriae is responsible for both endemic and epidemic diphtheria. (who.int)
  • Corynebacterium diphtheriae est responsable à la fois de la diphtérie endémique et épidémique. (who.int)
  • Case series from Canada, consistent with global surveillance, have found that the disease burden is increasingly attributed to cutaneous, non-pseudomembranous respiratory and systemic disease from toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and C. ulcerans Footnote 2 Footnote 3 Footnote 4 Footnote 5 Footnote 6 Footnote 7 Footnote 8 . (canada.ca)
  • In addition to disease burden, other toxigenic Corynebacteria ( C. ulcerans or C. pseudotuberculosis ) and non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae may serve to maintain a reservoir for toxigenic respiratory diphtheria Footnote 2 Footnote 4 Footnote 8 . (canada.ca)
  • Pôvodcom nákazy je výlučne ľudský patogén Corynebacterium diphtheriae , grampozitívna fakultatívne anaeróbna, pleomorfná baktéria (obrázok 1) . (newslab.sk)
  • In small ruminants, C. pseudotuberculosis causes a disease called caseous lymphadenitis characterized by pyogranulomatous abscess formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Distribution of C. pseudotuberculosis is mostly traced by examining prevalence of caseous lymphadenitis, the bacterium's main pathological disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study set out to sequence the genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) 3/99-5, an ovine strain isolated from a naturally-occurring case of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in Scotland. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Hence, we sought to implement a combined approach for characterizing the entire exoproteome of the pathogenic bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis , the etiological agent of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in sheep and goats. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the causative agent of caseous lymphadenitis , a bacterial infection that can affect livestock . (bvsalud.org)
  • Detection of antibodies to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the causative agent of caseous lymphadenitis, by synergistic hemolysis inhibition. (tamu.edu)
  • Caseous lymphadenitis (CL) is a chronic, contagious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis . (msdvetmanual.com)
  • The aim of the study was to estimate the frequency of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in sheep in Kosovo and to determine the susceptibility of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis isolates to some antimicrobial agents. (agrojournal.org)
  • citation needed] C. pseudotuberculosis also causes disease in horses, and should be considered prevalent in areas where cases of "pigeon fever" and "ulcerative lymphadenitis" have been recorded. (wikipedia.org)
  • Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a Gram-positive bacterium known globally to infect ruminants, horses, and rarely people. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Shortly after, it was sampled from abscesses in a sheep by Hugo von Preisz [hu], and the bacterium was named the "Preisz-Nocard" bacillus until further work by German microbiologists in the mid-1900s, when it was recategorized into the Corynebacterium genus. (wikipedia.org)
  • C. pseudotuberculosis is a Gram-positive bacterium that can be either coccoid or filamentous rods, which can be organized into palisades. (wikipedia.org)
  • This bacterium is grown at 37 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, thus C. pseudotuberculosis is a facultative anaerobe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comparative analyses of the exoproteomes of two C. pseudotuberculosis strains, in addition to comparison with other experimentally determined corynebacterial exoproteomes, were helpful to gain novel insights into the contribution of the exported proteins in the virulence of this bacterium. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Caseuous lymphadentitis (CLA or 'cheesy gland') is a highly contagious disease caused by the bacterium C. pseudotuberculosis (ovis). (virbac.com)
  • Pigeon fever in horses is caused by a bacterium called Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. (todaysequine.net)
  • The present study examined the possibilities that: (i) careful examination of Gram-stained sputum and culture plates may reveal a predominant bacterium such as Corynebacterium spp. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A disease known as ulcerative lymphagenitis can also result from infection with C. pseudotuberculosis in the distal limbs of horses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Objective -To determine clinical signs, results of diagnostic testing, and outcome in horses with internal Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection. (avma.org)
  • Results -Internal C pseudotuberculosis infection was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs, diagnostic imaging, and clinicopathologic data, including results of serologic tests and bacterial culture. (avma.org)
  • Conclusions and Clinical Relevance -Early diagnosis and long-term antimicrobial treatment were important for a successful outcome in horses with internal C pseudotuberculosis infection. (avma.org)
  • A Seroepidemiological Survey of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection in South Tyrol, Italy. (bvsalud.org)
  • and urinary tract infections and mastitis (affecting milk production) in cattle due to infection with Corynebacterium renale , Corynebacterium cystidis , Corynebacterium pilosum , and Corynebacterium bovis . (medscape.com)
  • Pigeon Fever is a bacterial infection caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. (sweetriverequineclinic.com)
  • Infection of the lymphatic system develops following contamination of skin wounds by various bacteria, most commonly Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (the causative agent of ulcerative lymphangitis/pigeon fever). (uky.edu)
  • citation needed] It was finally renamed Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in 1948, to reflect that the clinical disease signs were similar to disease caused by M. tuberculosis species. (wikipedia.org)
  • CDC is actively researching new laboratory methods to better identify and characterize other Bordetella and Corynebacterium species. (cdc.gov)
  • Some nondiphtheria species of Corynebacterium produce disease in specific animal species, and some of these are also human pathogens . (wikidoc.org)
  • Some species of Corynebacterium have sequenced genomes that range in size from 2.5 - 3 Mbp. (wikidoc.org)
  • Species of Corynebacterium have been used in the mass production of various amino acids including L-Glutamic Acid , a popular food additive that is made at a rate of 1.5 million tons/ year by Corynebacterium. (wikidoc.org)
  • Auwaerter, Paul G. "Corynebacterium Species. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Pediatrics Central , peds.unboundmedicine.com/pedscentral/view/Johns_Hopkins_ABX_Guide/540637/3.0/Corynebacterium_species. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • A total of 56 bacterial isolates were recovered and most predominant were Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (n = 48), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (n = 5), and Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 3). (agrojournal.org)
  • Phylogenetic analyses of the Corynebacterium genus were performed using house-keeping loci but also secreted protein loci from Cp 3/99-5. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Corynebacterium is a genus of Gram-positive , facultatively anaerobic , non- motile , rod-shaped actinobacteria . (wikidoc.org)
  • citation needed] Although few recent studies have been conducted into its prevalence, data from slaughterhouses in Australia in the late 1980s suggested that C. pseudotuberculosis was affecting 50-60% of sheep. (wikipedia.org)
  • These bacteria are now known as Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, and are thought to be associated with diaper rash due to their ability to convert urine to ammonia. (microgeninc.com)
  • 44 proteins were commonly identified in two different strains, isolated from distinct hosts, then composing a core C. pseudotuberculosis exoproteome. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This program would be of great importance, especially for those farms dedicated to the production of milk and dairy products , as some manufacturing practices may increase the risk of transmission of zoonotic pathogens such as C. pseudotuberculosis to humans . (bvsalud.org)
  • [3] However, intracellular organisms such as Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis will be susceptible to certain antibiotics in vitro that are not effective for the specific organism in the horse. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rectal palpation can reveal abdominal masses including neoplasia or abscesses due to metastatic Streptococcus equi subspecies equi or Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infections. (dvm360.com)
  • Based on this reclassification, for example, Corynebacterium haemolyticum became Arcanobacterium haemolyticum and the JK group became Corynebacterium jeikeium . (medscape.com)
  • Identifying the Growth Modulon of Corynebacterium glutamicum. (uni-bielefeld.de)
  • Deciphering the Adaptation of Corynebacterium glutamicum in Transition from Aerobiosis via Microaerobiosis to Anaerobiosis. (uni-bielefeld.de)
  • Comparative analysis of the Corynebacterium glutamicum transcriptome in response to changes in dissolved oxygen levels. (uni-bielefeld.de)
  • Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis has been cultured from some cases (particularly of ulcerative lymphangitis, but in others, a bacterial culture is negative. (wikipedia.org)
  • An optimized protocol of three-phase partitioning (TPP) was used to obtain the C. pseudotuberculosis exoproteins, and a newly introduced method of data-independent MS acquisition (LC-MS E ) was employed for protein identification and label-free quantification. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Culture of active lesions for Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is diagnostically definitive. (msdvetmanual.com)
  • When identified as the predominant isolate in sputum from a patient with CAP, Corynebacterium spp. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As vector patterns change with warming temperatures, C. pseudotuberculosis in horses is re-emerging in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first isolation of C. pseudotuberculosis came from a cow lymph node in 1888, by French bacteriologist Edmond Nocard. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] C. pseudotuberculosis can survive in soil for up to 8 months and contaminate bedding and indoor handling facilities for several weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • For the prevention of cheesy gland (C. pseudotuberculosis), pulpy kidney (Cl. (virbac.com)