Infections with bacteria of the genus CORYNEBACTERIUM.
A genus of asporogenous bacteria that is widely distributed in nature. Its organisms appear as straight to slightly curved rods and are known to be human and animal parasites and pathogens.
A species of gram-positive, asporogenous, non-pathogenic, soil bacteria that produces GLUTAMIC ACID.
A species of gram-positive, asporogenous bacteria in which three cultural types are recognized. These types (gravis, intermedius, and mitis) were originally given in accordance with the clinical severity of the cases from which the different strains were most frequently isolated. This species is the causative agent of DIPHTHERIA.
A species of gram-positive, asporogenous bacteria that was originally isolated from necrotic areas in the kidney of a sheep. It may cause ulcerative lymphangitis, abscesses, and other chronic purulent infections in sheep, horses, and other warm-blooded animals. Human disease may form from contact with infected animals.
A bacteria isolated from normal skin, intestinal contents, wounds, blood, pus, and soft tissue abscesses. It is a common contaminant of clinical specimens, presumably from the skin of patients or attendants.
A localized infection of mucous membranes or skin caused by toxigenic strains of CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE. It is characterized by the presence of a pseudomembrane at the site of infection. DIPHTHERIA TOXIN, produced by C. diphtheriae, can cause myocarditis, polyneuritis, and other systemic toxic effects.
A species of CORYNEBACTERIUM isolated from abscesses of warm-blooded animals.
An ADP-ribosylating polypeptide produced by CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE that causes the signs and symptoms of DIPHTHERIA. It can be broken into two unequal domains: the smaller, catalytic A domain is the lethal moiety and contains MONO(ADP-RIBOSE) TRANSFERASES which transfers ADP RIBOSE to PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTOR 2 thereby inhibiting protein synthesis; and the larger B domain that is needed for entry into cells.
A gram-positive organism found in dairy products, fresh and salt water, marine organisms, insects, and decaying organic matter.
Mycolic acids are complex, long-chain fatty acids that are a major component of the cell wall of Mycobacterium species, including the causative agents of tuberculosis and leprosy, providing them with unique characteristics such as resistance to acid-alkali stability, pigmentation, and protection against host immune responses.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
Inflammation of the lymph nodes.
An antitoxin produced against the toxin of CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE that is used for the treatment of DIPHTHERIA.

Sex differences in susceptibility of ICR mice to oral infection with Corynebacterium kutscheri. (1/263)

Sex difference in susceptibility to oral infection with Corynebacterium (C.) kutscheri was experimentally studied in ICR mice. Immature (4-week-old) and adult (14-week-old) mice were inoculated with two infecting doses of C. kutscheri, and necropsied for bacteriological and serological survey 4 weeks after the bacterial infection. No macroscopic lesions at necropsy were demonstrated, except for one adult male given 10(9) bacteria. In immature mice, C. Kutscheri isolated from the oral cavity and cecum with FNC agar, were recovered in only 40.0% of female mice but in 90.0% of male mice given 10(6) bacteria (p < 0.05), and in only 55.6% of female mice but in 80.0% male mice given 10(8) bacteria. In adult mice given 10(9) bacteria, the organism were recovered in only 45.5% of female mice but in 90.9% of male mice (p < 0.05), furthermore, the mean number of organisms in the cecum of male mice harboring the organism was significantly higher than that in females (p < 0.01). Castration caused an increase in host resistance in adult male mice. These results indicated that ICR male mice were more susceptible than females, in terms of bacterial colonization in the cecum and the oral cavity, to oral infection with C. kutscheri.  (+info)

Corynebacterium sundsvallense sp. nov., from human clinical specimens. (2/263)

Three strains of a previously undescribed catalase-positive non-lipophilic coryneform bacterium isolated from human clinical specimens were characterized by phenotypic and molecular taxonomic methods. Morphologically the unknown bacterium consisted of pleomorphic rods, some of which displayed bulges/knobs at their ends. All three strains were similar in that they produced acid from fructose, glucose, maltose and sucrose and were urease-positive. Chemotaxonomic investigations revealed the presence of meso-diaminopimelic acid and short-chain mycolic acids consistent with the genus Corynebacterium sensu stricto. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the three strains are genealogically highly related and constitute a new subline within the genus Corynebacterium, displaying > 3% sequence divergence with recognized species. The unknown bacterium was distinguished from currently validly published Corynebacterium species by phenotypic tests, including electrophoretic analysis of whole-cell proteins. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium from clinical specimens be classified as Corynebacterium sundsvallense sp. nov. The type strain is CCUG 36622T.  (+info)

Emergence of related nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae biotype mitis strains in Western Europe. (3/263)

We report on 17 isolates of Corynebacterium diphtheriae biotype mitis with related ribotypes from Switzerland, Germany, and France. Isolates came from skin and subcutaneous infections of injecting drug users, homeless persons, prisoners, and elderly orthopedic patients with joint prostheses or primary joint infections. Such isolates had only been observed in Switzerland.  (+info)

Bacterial conjunctivitis in Muc1 null mice. (4/263)

PURPOSE: In contrast to wild-type mice, genetically engineered Mucin1 (Muc1) null animals display a marked propensity for development of blepharitis and conjunctivitis. Molecular approaches confirmed the presence of Muc1 mRNA and protein in the conjunctival tissue of wild-type mice and identified the bacterial species in Muc1 null symptomatic mice. METHODS: Muc1 null animals housed in a conventional facility were examined for visually apparent inflammation of the eye and surrounding tissue. Blood taken from overtly affected animals was assayed for antibodies to common murine viral agents. Swabs of infected eyes and whole eye preparations were used to detect and speciate bacterial pathogens. Frozen sections of whole eye, lid margin, and Harderian gland were immunostained with antibodies to Muc1 and cytokeratin 14, both epithelial cell markers. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed on RNA isolated from conjunctiva and Harderian gland of wild-type mice to compare relative levels of transcript. RESULTS: Student's unpaired t-test performed on the eye inflammation frequency of Muc1 null mice confirmed a statistical significance (P < 0.01) when compared to wild-type background animals housed in the same room. Analysis of blood samples from affected Muc1 null animals detected no common murine viral pathogens. Bacterial analysis of conjunctival swabs and whole eye preparations demonstrated the presence of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Streptococcus type alpha, and Corynebacterium group G2. Muc1 antibody staining of wild-type sections revealed the presence of Muc1 on conjunctival goblet and non-goblet cells and on the epithelium of the Harderian gland. Serial sections stained with cytokeratin 14 antibody confirmed the epithelial nature of cells expressing the Muc1 protein. RNA from conjunctiva and Harderian gland subjected to RT-PCR and northern blot analysis showed an abundance of Muc1 transcript in these tissues. CONCLUSIONS: Muc1 mRNA and protein are present in murine conjunctival and Harderian gland epithelia. Animals lacking Muc1 mRNA and protein are predisposed to developing eye inflammation when compared to wild-type animals with an intact Muc1 gene. Muc1 appears to play a critical protective role at the ocular surface, presumably by acting as a barrier to infection by certain bacterial strains.  (+info)

Randomized, double-blind trial of an antibiotic-lock technique for prevention of gram-positive central venous catheter-related infection in neutropenic patients with cancer. (5/263)

The aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of an antibiotic-lock technique in preventing endoluminal catheter-related infection with gram-positive bacteria in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies. Patients with nontunneled, multilumen central venous catheters were assigned in a randomized, double-blinded manner to receive either 10 U of heparin per ml (57 patients) or 10 U of heparin per ml and 25 microg of vancomycin per ml (60 patients), which were instilled in the catheter lumen and which were allowed to dwell in the catheter lumen for 1 h every 2 days. Insertion-site and hub swabs were taken twice weekly. The primary and secondary end points of the trial were significant colonization of the catheter hub and catheter-related bacteremia, respectively. Significant colonization of the catheter hub occurred in nine (15.8%) patients receiving heparin (seven patients were colonized with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one patient was colonized with Staphylococcus capitis, and one patient was colonized with Corynebacterium sp.), whereas the catheter hubs of none of the patients receiving heparin and vancomycin were colonized (P = 0.001). Catheter-related bacteremia developed in four (7%) patients receiving heparin (three patients had S. epidermidis bacteremia and one patient had S. capitis bacteremia), whereas none of the patients in the heparin and vancomycin group had catheter-related bacteremia (P = 0.05). The times to catheter hub colonization and to catheter-related bacteremia by the Kaplan-Meier method were longer in patients receiving heparin and vancomycin than in patients receiving heparin alone (P = 0.004 and P = 0.06, respectively). Our study shows that a solution containing heparin and vancomycin administered by using an antibiotic-lock technique effectively prevents catheter hub colonization with gram-positive bacteria and subsequent bacteremia during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in patients with hematologic malignancy.  (+info)

Targeting improves the efficacy of a DNA vaccine against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in sheep. (6/263)

A large-scale DNA vaccination trial was performed with sheep to investigate whether an antigen targeted by CTLA-4 enhanced and accelerated the humoral immune response. Vaccination with genetically detoxified phospholipase D (DeltaPLD) has been shown to be effective, at least partially, against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the causal agent of caseous lymphadenitis in sheep. CTLA-4 binds to B7 on antigen-presenting cells and thus was used to direct the fusion antigens to sites of immune induction. Here we demonstrated that targeting DeltaPLD as a CTLA-4 fusion protein significantly enhanced the speed, magnitude, and longevity of the antibody response compared to that obtained with DNA encoding DeltaPLD. While all groups of sheep vaccinated with DNA encoding DeltaPLD were afforded better protection against an experimental challenge with C. pseudotuberculosis than those immunized with an irrelevant plasmid or those left unimmunized, the best protection was provided by the targeted DNA vaccine. We propose that targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells offers a generic strategy for enhancing the efficacy of DNA vaccines.  (+info)

Tumor necrosis factor alpha and gamma interferon are required for the development of protective immunity to secondary Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in mice. (7/263)

The production and role of endogenous cytokines during the course of secondary Corynebacterium (C.) pseudotuberculosis infection were investigated in mice. When immunized mice were challenged on day 28 after primary infection, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) were found to appear at 3 hr and to reach the maximum at 24 hr after challenge. Spleen cells of mice primarily infected from 2 to 8 weeks before produced a significant amount of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma when stimulated with formalin-killed bacteria. However, they could not produce detectable amounts of IL-4. The administration of anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (MAb) and IFN-gamma MAb increased bacterial proliferation in the organs of immune mice and exacerbated the secondary infection. Injection of anti-CD4 MAb alone or anti-CD4 plus anti-CD8 MAbs resulted in significantly increased mortality and a marked suppression of bacterial elimination as well as cytokine production of secondarily infected mice, while the treatment with anti-CD8 MAb alone showed no effect on either the resistance or cytokine production of mice. These results suggest that CD4, probably Th1 T cells, play an important role for establishment of protective immunity against secondary C. pseudotuberculosis infection by secreting TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma.  (+info)

CT and MRI findings in primitive pituitary abscess: a case report and review of literature. (8/263)

Pituitary abscess is not rare. Clinical and radiological features in a primitive pituitary abscess are reported. Transphenoidal surgery revealed an abscess. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess remains difficult. Sellar round cystic mass isointense to grey matter on T1, high intensity signal on T2, with a peripheral rim enhancement following gadolinium injection associated with thickened stalk and diabetes insipidus may be suggestive of pituitary abscess.  (+info)

Corynebacterium infections are caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Corynebacterium, which are gram-positive, rod-shaped organisms that commonly inhabit the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. While many species of Corynebacterium are harmless commensals, some can cause a range of infections, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems or underlying medical conditions.

The most common Corynebacterium species that causes infection is C. diphtheriae, which is responsible for diphtheria, a potentially life-threatening respiratory illness characterized by the formation of a thick, grayish membrane in the throat and upper airways. Other Corynebacterium species, such as C. jeikeium, C. urealyticum, and C. striatum, can cause various types of healthcare-associated infections, including bacteremia, endocarditis, pneumonia, and skin and soft tissue infections.

Corynebacterium infections are typically treated with antibiotics, such as penicillin, erythromycin, or vancomycin, depending on the species of bacteria involved and the patient's medical history. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to drain abscesses or remove infected tissue. Preventive measures, such as vaccination against C. diphtheriae and good hygiene practices, can help reduce the risk of Corynebacterium infections.

Corynebacterium is a genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. Some species of Corynebacterium can cause disease in humans, including C. diphtheriae, which causes diphtheria, and C. jeikeium, which can cause various types of infections in immunocompromised individuals. Other species are part of the normal flora and are not typically pathogenic. The bacteria are characterized by their irregular, club-shaped appearance and their ability to form characteristic arrangements called palisades. They are facultative anaerobes, meaning they can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen.

'Corynebacterium glutamicum' is a species of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the environment, particularly in soil and water. It is a facultative anaerobe, which means it can grow with or without oxygen. The bacterium is non-pathogenic and has been widely studied and used in biotechnology due to its ability to produce various amino acids and other industrially relevant compounds.

The name 'Corynebacterium glutamicum' comes from its discovery as a bacterium that can ferment the amino acid glutamate, which is why it has been extensively used in the industrial production of L-glutamate, an important ingredient in many food products and feed additives.

In recent years, 'Corynebacterium glutamicum' has also gained attention as a potential platform organism for the production of various biofuels and biochemicals, including alcohols, organic acids, and hydrocarbons. Its genetic tractability and ability to utilize a wide range of carbon sources make it an attractive candidate for biotechnological applications.

'Corynebacterium diphtheriae' is a gram-positive, rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria that can cause the disease diphtheria. It is commonly found in the upper respiratory tract and skin of humans and can be transmitted through respiratory droplets or direct contact with contaminated objects. The bacterium produces a potent exotoxin that can cause severe inflammation and formation of a pseudomembrane in the throat, leading to difficulty breathing and swallowing. In severe cases, the toxin can spread to other organs, causing serious complications such as myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle) and peripheral neuropathy (damage to nerves outside the brain and spinal cord). The disease is preventable through vaccination with the diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine.

'Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis' is a gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, diphtheroid bacterium that is the causative agent of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in sheep and goats. It can also cause chronic, granulomatous infections in other animals, including horses, cattle, and humans. The bacteria are typically transmitted through contact with infected animals or contaminated environmental sources, such as soil or water. Infection can lead to the formation of abscesses in the lymph nodes, particularly in the head and neck region, as well as other organs.

In humans, 'Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis' infection is rare but can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including chronic lymphadenitis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, and septicemia. The disease is often referred to as "pseudotuberculosis" or "pigeon breast" in humans, due to the characteristic swelling of the chest that can occur with infection.

Diagnosis of 'Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis' infection typically involves the isolation and identification of the bacteria from clinical samples, such as pus or tissue biopsies. Treatment may involve surgical drainage of abscesses, along with antibiotic therapy. The choice of antibiotics depends on the severity and location of the infection, as well as the susceptibility of the bacterial strain.

Propionibacterium acnes is a gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium that naturally colonizes the skin, predominantly in areas with a high density of sebaceous glands such as the face, back, and chest. It is part of the normal skin flora but can contribute to the development of acne vulgaris when it proliferates excessively and clogs the pilosebaceous units (hair follicles).

The bacterium metabolizes sebum, producing propionic acid and other short-chain fatty acids as byproducts. In acne, these byproducts can cause an inflammatory response in the skin, leading to the formation of papules, pustules, and nodules. Propionibacterium acnes has also been implicated in various other skin conditions and occasionally in opportunistic infections in other parts of the body, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or following surgical procedures.

Diphtheria is a serious bacterial infection caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae. It typically affects the respiratory system, including the nose, throat, and windpipe (trachea), causing a thick gray or white membrane to form over the lining of these areas. This can lead to breathing difficulties, heart complications, and neurological problems if left untreated.

The bacteria can also produce a powerful toxin that can cause damage to other organs in the body. Diphtheria is usually spread through respiratory droplets from an infected person's cough or sneeze, or by contact with contaminated objects or surfaces. The disease is preventable through vaccination.

Corynebacterium pyogenes is a gram-positive, catalase-positive, non-motile, and non-spore-forming rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the respiratory tract and on the skin of animals. It can cause purulent infections such as abscesses, mastitis, pneumonia, and septicemia in various animal species, including cattle, sheep, goats, and swine.

In humans, Corynebacterium pyogenes is considered a rare cause of infection, and it has been isolated from cases of endocarditis, meningitis, and soft tissue infections. However, its clinical significance in human infections remains unclear, and further studies are needed to establish its role as a human pathogen.

It's important to note that Corynebacterium pyogenes is different from Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus), which is a major human pathogen causing various infections such as pharyngitis, impetigo, and necrotizing fasciitis.

Diphtheria toxin is a potent exotoxin produced by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae, which causes the disease diphtheria. This toxin is composed of two subunits: A and B. The B subunit helps the toxin bind to and enter host cells, while the A subunit inhibits protein synthesis within those cells, leading to cell damage and tissue destruction.

The toxin can cause a variety of symptoms depending on the site of infection. In respiratory diphtheria, it typically affects the nose, throat, and tonsils, causing a thick gray or white membrane to form over the affected area, making breathing and swallowing difficult. In cutaneous diphtheria, it infects the skin, leading to ulcers and necrosis.

Diphtheria toxin can also have systemic effects, such as damage to the heart, nerves, and kidneys, which can be life-threatening if left untreated. Fortunately, diphtheria is preventable through vaccination with the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP or Tdap) vaccine.

Brevibacterium is a genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in nature, particularly in soil, water, and various types of decaying organic matter. Some species of Brevibacterium can also be found on the skin of animals and humans, where they play a role in the production of body odor.

Brevibacterium species are known for their ability to produce a variety of enzymes that allow them to break down complex organic compounds into simpler molecules. This makes them useful in a number of industrial applications, such as the production of cheese and other fermented foods, as well as in the bioremediation of contaminated environments.

In medical contexts, Brevibacterium species are rarely associated with human disease. However, there have been occasional reports of infections caused by these bacteria, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or who have undergone surgical procedures. These infections can include bacteremia (bloodstream infections), endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves), and soft tissue infections. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics that are effective against Gram-positive bacteria, such as vancomycin or teicoplanin.

Mycolic acids are complex, long-chain fatty acids that are a major component of the cell wall in mycobacteria, including the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis and leprosy. These acids contribute to the impermeability and resistance to chemical agents of the mycobacterial cell wall, making these organisms difficult to eradicate. Mycolic acids are unique to mycobacteria and some related actinomycetes, and their analysis can be useful in the identification and classification of these bacteria.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Gene expression regulation in bacteria refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins from specific genes. This regulation allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions and ensure the appropriate amount of protein is produced at the right time.

Bacteria have a variety of mechanisms for regulating gene expression, including:

1. Operon structure: Many bacterial genes are organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule. The expression of these genes can be coordinately regulated by controlling the transcription of the entire operon.
2. Promoter regulation: Transcription is initiated at promoter regions upstream of the gene or operon. Bacteria have regulatory proteins called sigma factors that bind to the promoter and recruit RNA polymerase, the enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into RNA. The binding of sigma factors can be influenced by environmental signals, allowing for regulation of transcription.
3. Attenuation: Some operons have regulatory regions called attenuators that control transcription termination. These regions contain hairpin structures that can form in the mRNA and cause transcription to stop prematurely. The formation of these hairpins is influenced by the concentration of specific metabolites, allowing for regulation of gene expression based on the availability of those metabolites.
4. Riboswitches: Some bacterial mRNAs contain regulatory elements called riboswitches that bind small molecules directly. When a small molecule binds to the riboswitch, it changes conformation and affects transcription or translation of the associated gene.
5. CRISPR-Cas systems: Bacteria use CRISPR-Cas systems for adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids. These systems incorporate short sequences from foreign DNA into their own genome, which can then be used to recognize and cleave similar sequences in invading genetic elements.

Overall, gene expression regulation in bacteria is a complex process that allows them to respond quickly and efficiently to changing environmental conditions. Understanding these regulatory mechanisms can provide insights into bacterial physiology and help inform strategies for controlling bacterial growth and behavior.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Lymphadenitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of one or more lymph nodes, which are small, bean-shaped glands that are part of the body's immune system. Lymph nodes contain white blood cells called lymphocytes, which help fight infection and disease.

Lymphadenitis can occur as a result of an infection in the area near the affected lymph node or as a result of a systemic infection that has spread through the bloodstream. The inflammation causes the lymph node to become swollen, tender, and sometimes painful to the touch.

The symptoms of lymphadenitis may include fever, fatigue, and redness or warmth in the area around the affected lymph node. In some cases, the overlying skin may also appear red and inflamed. Lymphadenitis can occur in any part of the body where there are lymph nodes, including the neck, armpits, groin, and abdomen.

The underlying cause of lymphadenitis must be diagnosed and treated promptly to prevent complications such as the spread of infection or the formation of an abscess. Treatment may include antibiotics, pain relievers, and warm compresses to help reduce swelling and discomfort.

Diphtheria Antitoxin is a medication used to treat diphtheria, a serious bacterial infection that can affect the nose, throat, and skin. It is made from the serum of animals (such as horses) that have been immunized against diphtheria. The antitoxin works by neutralizing the harmful effects of the diphtheria toxin produced by the bacteria, which can cause tissue damage and other complications.

Diphtheria Antitoxin is usually given as an injection into a muscle or vein, and it should be administered as soon as possible after a diagnosis of diphtheria has been made. It is important to note that while the antitoxin can help prevent further damage caused by the toxin, it does not treat the underlying infection itself, which requires antibiotics for proper treatment.

Like any medication, Diphtheria Antitoxin can have side effects, including allergic reactions, serum sickness, and anaphylaxis. It should only be administered under the supervision of a healthcare professional who is experienced in its use and can monitor the patient for any adverse reactions.

Corynebacterium infections are related to excessive sweating; for this reason, deodorants containing an aluminum chloride ... "Corynebacterium-associated skin infections". International Journal of Dermatology. 47 (9): 884-90. doi:10.1111/j.1365-4632.2008 ... but because it is a bacterial infection and not a fungal infection, it should be called trichobacteriosis. It is characterized ... The infection is diagnosed by close examination of the hair shafts where brown to yellow material called concretions are seen. ...
Cutaneous diphtheria is an infection of the skin by Corynebacterium diphtheriae.: 265 It is also known as "desert sore". ...
Infections of this type have been described as a local infection or they can progress into a larger disseminated infection ... Other documented infections include osteomyelitis, an infection of the bone that can occur through blood born infection or ... "Respiratory infection by Corynebacterium striatum: epidemiological and clinical determinants". New Microbes and New Infections ... More recently Corynebacterium striatum was found to in fact be the cause of infection and disease, given the opportunity. Early ...
"Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection of Horses and Cattle - Circulatory System". Merck Veterinary Manual. Retrieved ... Spier, S. J.; Azevedo, V. (2017-08-09). "Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in horses: Increasing frequency and ... Though vaccination will not prevent infection in a flock, it does minimize the severity of infection, so can have positive ... when it was recategorized into the Corynebacterium genus.[citation needed] It was finally renamed Corynebacterium ...
Diphtheria is an infection caused by the bacteria Corynebacterium diphtheria. It is spread through respiratory droplets from ... It can also help prevent ear infections. Previous infection from the disease does not grant immunity from future infection ... People who are in close contact with someone who has the disease are at increased risk of infection. In the case of infection, ... It prevents meningitis, Hib pneumonia, Hib epiglottitis (severe throat infection) and other infections that are a result of ...
... is an infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Most infections are asymptomatic or have a mild ... Previous infection may not protect against infection. A diphtheria vaccine is effective for prevention, and is available in a ... malignant throat infection, gangrenous throat infection, etc.] Paris, France: Crevot. A condensed version of this work is ... Indirect infections can occur, as well. If an infected individual touches a surface or object, the bacteria can be left behind ...
Dias, Meena; Rao, Suresh D.; Shet, Dinesh (2010). "Corynebacterium macginleyi'a rare bacteria causing infection in an ... "Corynebacterium macginleyi" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN Type strain of Corynebacterium macginleyi at BacDive - the ... "Surgical Site Infection by Corynebacterium macginleyi in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1". Case Reports in Infectious ... Corynebacterium macginleyi is a species of bacteria with type strain JCL-2 (CIP 104099). It is considered pathogenic. Riegel, P ...
Corbeil, LE; Morrissey, JF; Léguillette, R (October 2016). "Is Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection (pigeon fever) in ... "Frequency of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in horses across the United States during a 10-year period". Journal ... "Bayesian geostatistical analysis and ecoclimatic determinants of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection among horses". ... As long a horse is eating and drinking, the infection must run its course, much like a common cold virus. Over time, a horse ...
... infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare or Corynebacterium equi (pneumonia-causing bacteria); Campylobacter jejuni ( ... causes gastroenteritis); Lysinibacillus sphaericus (previously termed Bacillus sphaericus, a rare cause of lung infections and ...
By contracting this skin infection, patients become more vulnerable to contracting infections from other bacteria that exist ... Corynebacterium ulcerans is a rod-shaped, aerobic, and Gram-positive bacterium. Most Corynebacterium species are harmless, but ... "Infection of the Skin Caused by Corynebacterium ulcerans and Mimicking Classical Cutaneous Diphtheria". Clinical Infectious ... C. ulcerans can also cause zoonotic infections. In 2003, A 47-year-old woman in Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France was admitted to the ...
"Urinary tract infection with Corynebacterium aurimucosum after urethroplasty stricture of the urethra: a case report". Journal ... These well inhibited bacteria cause Staph infections, urinary tract infections, and cavities. This suggests that lactocillin ... Lactocillin could function as a new antibiotic that could help people fight off infections that are resistant to many other ... Lactocillin was found to be most effective at preventing growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Corynebacterium aurimucosum, and ...
"Classification of Coryneform Bacteria Associated with Human Urinary Tract Infection (Group D2) as Corynebacterium urealyticum ... Corynebacterium urealyticum is a bacterial species of the genus Corynebacterium. It is not commonly found in healthy people. It ... There are other urease-producing corynebacteria that are associated with urinary tract infections, but C. urealyticum is the ... ISBN 978-0-323-08692-9. Type strain of Corynebacterium urealyticum at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e ( ...
The infection is caused by Corynebacterium amycolatum, an aerobic Gram-positive bacterium and mainly affects very young chicks ... However, it seems likely that a triggering agent (e.g. a virus) might be involved in which renders the corynebacterium a ... Summarized from Minutes of "Yellow-eyed Penguin Corynebacterium Workshop" held in Dunedin, Tuesday 5 April 2005 (All articles ... in serious cases tongue exposed Isolation of Corynebacterium amycolatum from a clinical specimen, or Histopathologic diagnosis ...
The disease has been linked to an infection of Corynebacterium, a genus of bacteria that also causes diphtheria in humans. It ... "Phylogenomic Characterization of a Novel Corynebacterium Species Associated with Fatal Diphtheritic Stomatitis in Endangered ...
The term "intertrigo" commonly refers to a secondary infection with bacteria (such as Corynebacterium minutissimum), fungi ( ... These areas are more susceptible to irritation and subsequent infection due to factors that promote skin breakdown such as ... Intertrigo is treated by addressing associated infections, by removing moisture from the site, and by using substances at the ... Diaper rash List of skin diseases Kalra, MG; Higgins, KE; Kinney, BS (April 2014). "Intertrigo and secondary skin infections". ...
Bacterial infections Corynebacterium minutissimum is coral red Pseudomonas is yellow-green Cutibacterium acnes, a bacterium ... It is also helpful in diagnosing: Fungal infections. Some forms of tinea, such as Trichophyton tonsurans, do not fluoresce. ... Wood's lamp is useful in diagnosing conditions such as tuberous sclerosis and erythrasma (caused by Corynebacterium ... it was in 1925 that the technique was used in dermatology by Margarot and Deveze for the detection of fungal infection of hair ...
Illnesses that can affect dromedary productivity are pyogenic diseases and wound infections caused by Corynebacterium and ...
Graevenitz, A.; Funke, G. (2013). "Turicella otitidis and Corynebacterium auris: 20 years on" (PDF). Infection. 42 (1): 1-4. ... differentiation from Corynebacterium afermentans and Corynebacterium auris". Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 34 (10): 2625- ... Corynebacterium otitidis is a coryneform Gram-positive bacterium first isolated from patients with otitis media. Parte, A.C. " ... "Corynebacterium otitidis" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN Type strain of Turicella otitidis at BacDive - the Bacterial ...
August 2022). "Toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae Infection in Cat, Texas, USA". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 28 (8): 1686- ... In adults, the infection is limited mostly to the tonsillar region. Some unusual sites of infection include the heart, larynx, ... "UK Standards for Microbiology Investigations - Identification of Corynebacterium species" (PDF). "Diphtheria Infection , Home ... "Corynebacterium". LPSN. Hoskisson PA (June 2018). "Microbe Profile: Corynebacterium diphtheriae - an old foe always ready to ...
For instance, infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the temperate phage PaP3 changed the expression of 38% (2160/5633) of its ... Examples are the conversion of harmless strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae or Vibrio cholerae by bacteriophages to highly ... Therapeutic efficacy of a phage cocktail was evaluated in a mice model with nasal infection of multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. ... Maintaining an appropriate balance in the amounts of each of these proteins produced during viral infection appears to be ...
Examples: Corynebacterium diphtheriae produces the toxin of diphtheria only when it is infected by the phage β. In this case, ... In 80-90% of single-cell infections, phages enter the lysogenic cycle. In the other 10-20%, phages enter the lytic cycle.[ ... Strategies to combat certain bacterial infections by blocking prophage induction (the transition from the lytic cycle to the ... Mokrousov I (January 2009). "Corynebacterium diphtheriae: genome diversity, population structure and genotyping perspectives". ...
... in that in humans it is usually caused by lung tumors or infections such as Mycobacterium fortuitum or Corynebacterium. The ... Foster W, Armstrong J (2006). "Hypertrophic osteopathy associated with pulmonary Eikenella corrodens infection in a dog". J Am ... "Hypertrophic osteopathy associated with pulmonary Eikenella corrodens infection in a dog". Journal of the American Veterinary ...
However, it is usually a mild infection resulting in an elevated somatic cell count. The bacterium is sensitive to the majority ... Corynebacterium bovis is a pathogenic bacterium that causes mastitis and pyelonephritis in cattle. C. bovis is a facultatively ... Type strain of Corynebacterium bovis at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase Portal: Biology v t e (Articles with ... In mastitic infections, C. bovis is spread from cow to cow most commonly through improper milking technique. ...
However, induction of cell lysis may not be the primary function of the toxins during infection. At low concentrations of toxin ... Well-known exotoxins include: botulinum toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum; Corynebacterium diphtheriae toxin, produced ... These "toxins" allow the further spread of bacteria and, as a consequence, deeper tissue infections. Examples are hyaluronidase ... Tweten RK (October 2005). "Cholesterol-dependent cytolysins, a family of versatile pore-forming toxins". Infection and Immunity ...
C. jeikeium is pathogenic, typically causing an opportunistic infection seen most frequently in bone marrow transplant patients ... Corynebacterium jeikeium is a rod-shaped, catalase-positive, aerobic species of Actinomycetota in the genus Corynebacterium. ... Parte, A.C. "Corynebacterium". LPSN. Funke, Guido; Bernard, KA (May 16, 2011). "Chapter 26: Coryneform Gram-Positive Rods". In ... Type strain of Corynebacterium jeikeium at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase Portal: Biology (Articles with short ...
ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. v t e (Bacterium-related cutaneous conditions, All stub articles, Infection-related cutaneous condition ... Group JK corynebacterium sepsis is a form of sepsis which occurs when the bacterium Corynebacterium jeikeium colonizes the skin ...
Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Bordetella pertussis, and Bacillus anthracis[citation needed]. Sexually transmitted infections ... An upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) is an illness caused by an acute infection, which involves the upper respiratory ... Baron, S.; Dasaraju, P. V.; Liu, C. (1996). "Infections of the Respiratory System". Chapter 93: Infections of the Respiratory ... Guibas GV, Papadopoulos NG (2017). "Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infections". In Green RJ (ed.). Viral Infections in Children ...
Diphtheria is a potentially life-threatening upper respiratory infection caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae, which has been ... Most cases are caused by a viral infection. Strep throat, a bacterial infection, is the cause in about 25% of children and 10% ... Antibiotics are useful if a bacterial infection is the cause of the sore throat. For viral infections, antibiotics have no ... submandibular space infection (Ludwig's angina), and epiglottitis. Some cases of pharyngitis are caused by fungal infection, ...
Corynebacterium, Dermobacterium, and Pitosporum spp., while transient organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella ... In the US, the most frequent type of hospital infection is urinary tract infection (36%), followed by surgical site infection ( ... infections of surgery site (14.2%). Infections of the skin and mucous membrane (10.2%), other respiratory infections (6.8%) and ... Nosocomial infections can cause severe pneumonia and infections of the urinary tract, bloodstream and other parts of the body. ...
Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy. 18 (4): 552-554. doi:10.1007/s10156-011-0335-x. PMID 22080192. S2CID 44306319. Vela, Ana ... "Urosepsis caused by Globicatella sanguinis and Corynebacterium riegelii in an adult: case report and literature review". ... "Meningoencephalitis Associated with Globicatella sanguinis Infection in Lambs". Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 38 (11): 4254 ...
The genus contains the species Corynebacterium diphtheriae and the nondiphtherial corynebacteria, collectively referred to as ... in cattle due to infection with Corynebacterium renale, Corynebacterium cystidis, Corynebacterium pilosum, and Corynebacterium ... encoded search term (Corynebacterium Infections) and Corynebacterium Infections What to Read Next on Medscape ... Screening for Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans in patients with upper respiratory tract infections 2007 ...
The genus contains the species Corynebacterium diphtheriae and the nondiphtherial corynebacteria, collectively referred to as ... in cattle due to infection with Corynebacterium renale, Corynebacterium cystidis, Corynebacterium pilosum, and Corynebacterium ... encoded search term (Corynebacterium Infections) and Corynebacterium Infections What to Read Next on Medscape ... Screening for Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans in patients with upper respiratory tract infections 2007 ...
Corynebacterium infections are related to excessive sweating; for this reason, deodorants containing an aluminum chloride ... "Corynebacterium-associated skin infections". International Journal of Dermatology. 47 (9): 884-90. doi:10.1111/j.1365-4632.2008 ... but because it is a bacterial infection and not a fungal infection, it should be called trichobacteriosis. It is characterized ... The infection is diagnosed by close examination of the hair shafts where brown to yellow material called concretions are seen. ...
Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii breast infections: Report of four cases]. / Infecciones mamarias por Corynebacterium ... Corynebacterium Infecções por Corynebacterium/diagnóstico Infecções por Corynebacterium/tratamento farmacológico Feminino ... Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii is an immobile, non-sporulated, glucose-fermenting and lipophilic gram-positive rod of the skin ... In recent years, numerous isolates of this species have been reported mainly in breast infections, such as abscesses and ...
Diphtheria is an acute infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae. ... Diphtheria is an acute infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae. ... Diphtheria is an acute infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae.. Causes. ... The throat infection causes a gray to black, tough, fiber-like covering, which can block your airways. In some cases, ...
Vaccines are available that help prevent diphtheria, an infection caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae bacteria. Four kinds of ...
Categories: Corynebacterium Infections Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Corynebacterium jeikeium and Corynebacterium striatum were significantly overrepresented in the group with true infection, ... Corynebacterium jeikeium and Corynebacterium striatum were significantly overrepresented in the group with true infection, ... The species of Corynebacterium in blood cultures can help to determine if a finding represent true infection or contamination. ... The species of Corynebacterium in blood cultures can help to determine if a finding represent true infection or contamination. ...
C. ulcerans infection in humans frequently has been associated with antecedent contact with farm animals or with consumption of ... A strain of Corynebacterium ulcerans was subsequently isolated from the culture specimen at CDC, and toxin production by this ... Kisely SR, Price S, Ward T. `Corynebacterium ulcerans: a potential cause of diphtheria. Commun Dis Rep Rev 1994;4:R63-R64. * ... A rapid screening test for B-hemolytic streptococcal infection was negative. The patient was administered 1 g of cefotaxime ...
Erythrasma is infection of the top layers of the skin caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium minutissimum. ... See also Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections The skin provides a remarkably good ... This infection is also common in the groin, where it causes irregularly shaped pink or brown patches and fine scaling ... Although many bacteria come in contact with or reside on the skin, they are normally unable to establish an infection... read ...
Corynebacterium spp.]. Bacillus spp. [not B. anthracis], Propionibacterium spp., coagulase-negative staphylococci [including S ... The rate of infection was calculated as follows: (number of CLABSIs/number of central-line days) × 1000 for each month and ... Infection control strategies that were previously used for the prevention of CLABSI were put in the bundle protocol. All health ... RÉSUMÉ Les infections sur cathéter central sont lun des problèmes les plus importants dans les unités de soins intensifs ...
Corynebacterium striatum Bacteremia during SARS-CoV2 Infection: Case Report, Literature Review, and Clinical Considerations. ... Effects of COVID-19-Associated Infection Control on the Pattern of Infections Imported by German Soldiers and Police Officers ... Latent Tuberculosis Infection and COVID-19: Analysis of a Cohort of Patients from Careggi University Hospital (Florence, Italy) ... The COVID-19 Impact on the Trends in Yellow Fever and Lassa Fever Infections in Nigeria. Nnennaya U. Opara, Ugochinyere I. ...
Diphtheria Diphtheria is caused by infection with Corynebacterium diphtheriae and may strike the nose, larynx, tonsils, or ... Is the wheelchair to be weighed oversize order flagyl 200 mg on line infection game tips. Thither is a double of embody thick ... Gordon G, Throop D, Berberian L, et al discount acivir pills 200 mg hiv infection by touching blood. Polymorphisms within the P ... But this is caused by a Catch-22 billet order liv 52 200 ml mastercard symptoms yeast infection. Peak and Coffer Circumference ...
It is caused by infection with toxigenic strains of gram-positive Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Important sites of infection are ...
Toxigenic corynebacterium diphtheriae infection in cat, Texas, USA Tyler RJr , Rincon L , Weigand MR , Xiaoli L , Acosta AM , ... Between July 2018 and May 2019, Corynebacterium diphtheriae was isolated from eight patients with non-respiratory infections, ... Respiratory diphtheria is a serious infection caused by toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and disease transmission mainly ... Corynebacterium ulcerans, one of three species of Corynebacterium (in addition to C. diphtheriae and C. psuedotuberculosis) ...
Erythrasma is infection of the top layers of the skin caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium minutissimum. ... See also Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections The skin provides a remarkably good ... This infection is also common in the groin, where it causes irregularly shaped pink or brown patches and fine scaling ... Although many bacteria come in contact with or reside on the skin, they are normally unable to establish an infection... read ...
... if Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection is suspected). Incubation on BA is better for streptococcal hemolysis. If CA is used, ... A viral infection is usually self-limiting but may be complicated by a bacterial superinfection due to poor immunity or a ... More severe viral infections may occur in epidemic or pandemic forms and are caused by extremely virulent virus strains. ... Microscopy is of no value for throat swabs unless Ludwig angina (a mixed infection caused by a spirochaeta and a gram-negative ...
Miscellaneous Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Rhodococcus Equi (Synonym Rhodococcus Hoagii) Infection. Corynebacterium ... Heterobilharzia Americana Infection (Heterobilharziasis/Canine Schistosomiasis). Paragonimus Kellicotti Infection ( ... Miscellaneous Infections and Inflammatory Disorders of the Central Nervous System. Prion Diseases and Feline Spongiform ... Cardiovascular Infections (Bacteremia, Endocarditis, Myocarditis, Infectious Pericarditis). EtiologIC Agents, Epidemiology and ...
The vaccine provides specific active immunization against infections caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Clostridium tetani ...
Unspecified Atypical mycobacterium infection NOS 032 Diphtheria Includes: infection by Corynebacterium diphtheriae 032.0 ... infection Rat tapeworm (infection) 123.8 Other Diplogonoporus (grandis) infection Dipylidium (caninum) infection Dog tapeworm ( ... infection) Threadworm infection 127.5 Capillariasis Infection by Capillaria philippinensis Excludes: infection by Capillaria ... infection) Human T-cell lymphotropic virus-III (disease) (illness) (infection) HTLV-III (disease) (illness) (infection) HTLV- ...
Most infections cause no symptoms, but in a small number of people can result in a potentially life-threatening infection that ... Corynebacterium ulcerans (C. ulcerans), and less commonly Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (C. pseudotuberculosis). ... Most infections cause no symptoms, but in a small number of people can result in a potentially life-threatening infection that ... The most common presentations of invasive H. influenzae infection are meningitis, sepicaemia and acute respiratory infections. ...
... infection) and it has already been clearly shown that infectious diarrhea could lead to malnutrition (infection =, malnutrition ... However, a dysbiotic profile with an enrichment of Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii, a pathogen usually associated with ... Microbiota and neonatal infections. The work of the team on nutritional diseases has led to a precise interest in the milk ... IHU Méditerranée Infection 19-21 Boulevard Jean Moulin 13005 Marseille Tél : +33 (0)4 13 73 24 01 ...
Corynebacterium Infections * Preventive Oncology Recommendations. * 2001. ACIP Issues 2018 Child and Adolescent Vaccine ...
Antimicrobial fabrics are used as an engineering control to prevent infection. Efficacy testing standards have limitations, ... Corynebacterium striatum, Micrococcus luteus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. When tested singly, all microorganisms were ... Health care workers; Microorganisms; Nosocomial infections; Antimicrobial resistance; Antimicrobials; Fabrics; Textiles; ...
A few ... botulinum), and wound botulism (infection of a wound with C. botulinum). C. botulinum produces heat-resistant ... An antitoxin produced against the toxin of CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE that is used for the treatment of DIPHTHERIA.. ... In a medical context, antitoxins are often used as a treatment for certain types of bacterial infections, such as diphtheria ... This antitoxin is used to provide immediate protection against tetanus infection in cases of wound management or as a post- ...
Infection-specific dosing for Vancocin (vancomycin), frequency-based adverse effects, comprehensive interactions, ... Bone Infections. Indicated for treatment of bone infections due to: susceptible isolates of MRSA and coagulase negative ... and Corynebacterium species ... Bone Infections. Indicated for treatment of bone infections due ... It will not work for bacterial infections in any other part of the body or for viral infections (such as common cold, flu). ...
  • Diphtheria is an acute infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Erythrasma is infection of the top layers of the skin caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium minutissimum . (msdmanuals.com)
  • In contrast, toxigenic recommendations exist for toxigenic diphtheria in Corynebacterium ulcerans is a zoonotic organism that animals because of its rarity, but health departments causes diphtheria-like illness in humans clinically may pursue interventions similar to those to prevent transmission in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • This report describes a recent case of respiratory diphtheria caused by a toxin-producing strain of Corynebacterium ulcerans. (cdc.gov)
  • A strain of Corynebacterium ulcerans was subsequently isolated from the culture specimen at CDC, and toxin production by this strain was confirmed by a toxin-antitoxin precipitation assay (Elek test) and by PCR assay on the isolate. (cdc.gov)
  • by Corynebacterium diphtheriae , Corynebacterium ulcerans and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis . (who.int)
  • Diphtheria is an acute bacterial infection affecting the upper respiratory tract or the skin, caused by the diphtheria toxin produced by toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae (C. diphtheriae), Corynebacterium ulcerans (C. ulcerans), and less commonly Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (C. pseudotuberculosis). (publichealthscotland.scot)
  • The genus contains the species Corynebacterium diphtheriae and the nondiphtherial corynebacteria, collectively referred to as diphtheroids. (medscape.com)
  • It is caused by several species of Corynebacterium. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent years, numerous isolates of this species have been reported mainly in breast infections , such as abscesses and granulomatous mastitis . (bvsalud.org)
  • Due to the association of C. kroppenstedtii with mammary infections , the identification at the species level of those corynebacteria isolated from this location is highly advisable in order to reach the final diagnosis and to test the antimicrobial susceptibility in order to apply the appropriate antibiotic treatment . (bvsalud.org)
  • Corynebacterium isolates were species determined using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Patient were, from the medical records, classified as having true infection or contamination caused by Corynebacterium through a scheme considering both bacteriological and clinical features and the groups were compared. (lu.se)
  • The species of Corynebacterium in blood cultures can help to determine if a finding represent true infection or contamination. (lu.se)
  • Here we utilized whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to characterize recovered isolates of C. diphtheriae and two co-circulating non-diphtheritic Corynebacterium (NDC) species - C. pseudodiphtheriticum and C. propinquum. (cdc.gov)
  • Patients who shave the affected area only once will generally experience a recurrence of the infection, since, the bacteria begin to develop the concretions once again as the hair grows back. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vaccines are available that help prevent diphtheria , an infection caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae bacteria. (cdc.gov)
  • Although many bacteria come in contact with or reside on the skin, they are normally unable to establish an infection. (msdmanuals.com)
  • iphtheria, caused by toxigenic strains of the bac- Although these 3 strains contained the tox gene, they terium Corynebacterium diphtheriae , can result were not toxin producing. (cdc.gov)
  • Of note, the strains identi- in life-threatening respiratory disease or cutaneous fied in the United States have recently been reclassified infections. (cdc.gov)
  • C diphtheriae infection typically is characterized by a local inflammation, usually in the upper respiratory tract, associated with toxin-mediated cardiac and neural disease. (medscape.com)
  • Culture media include blood agar (BA), chocolate agar (CA), and Mueller-Hinton tellurite blood agar or Tinsdale agar (if Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection is suspected). (medscape.com)
  • Based on this reclassification, for example, Corynebacterium haemolyticum became Arcanobacterium haemolyticum and the JK group became Corynebacterium jeikeium . (medscape.com)
  • Corynebacterium jeikeium and Corynebacterium striatum were significantly overrepresented in the group with true infection, whereas Corynebacterium afermentans was significantly more common in the contamination group. (lu.se)
  • Each was tested singly and in the presence of a representative normal skin flora mixture, including: Acinetobacter lwoffii, Corynebacterium striatum, Micrococcus luteus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. (cdc.gov)
  • Nigéria, en décembre 2022 et publie depuis lors des rapports mensuels. (who.int)
  • In some endemic locations, such as India, 44% of throat and nasal swabs tested positive for C diphtheriae and Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum . (medscape.com)
  • Those microorganisms that are potential indicators of contamination in a dental environment include Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus salivarius, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Bacteroides fragilis and Peptoestreptococus. (bvsalud.org)
  • Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections The skin provides a remarkably good barrier against bacterial infections. (msdmanuals.com)
  • This category will also be used in primary coding to classify bacterial infections of unspecified nature or site. (cdc.gov)
  • ABSTRACT Central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) is one of the most important problems in intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. (who.int)
  • Efficacy for this organism was studied in fewer than 10 infections. (fda.gov)
  • CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES AND INJURIES I. INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (001-139) Includes: diseases generally recognized as communicable or transmissible as well as a few diseases of unknown but possibly infectious origin Excludes: acute respiratory infections (460-466) influenza (487. (cdc.gov)
  • Corynebacterium is a genus that can contaminate blood cultures and also cause severe infections like infective endocarditis (IE). (lu.se)
  • Respiratory diphtheria is a serious infection caused by toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and disease transmission mainly occurs through respiratory droplets. (cdc.gov)
  • The condition has been called extensively trichomycosis axillaris in the literature, but because it is a bacterial infection and not a fungal infection, it should be called trichobacteriosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although erythrasma may be confused with a fungal infection, doctors can easily diagnose erythrasma because skin infected with Corynebacterium glows coral-red under an ultraviolet light. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The armpits, skinfolds under the breasts or on the abdomen, and the area just in front of the anus (perineum) are prone to this infection, particularly among people with diabetes and among middle-aged women with obesity. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Vaccinating your goats cannot prevent exposure to infectious organisms, but they do increase an animals' ability to fend off an infection or lessen the severity of the disease if it occurs. (angoras.co.za)
  • and urinary tract infections and mastitis (affecting milk production) in cattle due to infection with Corynebacterium renale , Corynebacterium cystidis , Corynebacterium pilosum , and Corynebacterium bovis . (medscape.com)
  • The shot also has vaccine medicine for an infection called tetanus . (medlineplus.gov)
  • The vaccine provides specific active immunization against infections caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Clostridium tetani, Bordetella pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae type B and the Hepatitis B virus in children from six weeks of age. (bvsalud.org)
  • We report a toxigenic strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolated from an oozing dermal wound in a pet cat in Texas, USA. (cdc.gov)
  • [ 5 ] Today, the more common scenario is nondiphtherial corynebacterial bacteremia associated with device infections (venous access catheters, heart valves, neurosurgical shunts, peritoneal catheters), as well as meningitis , septic arthritis , and urinary tract infections. (medscape.com)
  • A retrospective population-based study of Corynebacterium bacteremia 2012-2017 in southern Sweden was performed. (lu.se)
  • Three hundred thirty-nine episodes of bacteremia with Corynebacterium were identified in 335 patients of which 30 (8.8%) episodes were classified as true infection. (lu.se)
  • By neglecting controls over cross-infection, the risk of infections in patients and professionals grows larger. (bvsalud.org)
  • Microscopy is of no value for throat swabs unless Ludwig angina (a mixed infection caused by a spirochaeta and a gram-negative anaerobic fusiform) is suspected. (medscape.com)
  • Infections were typically community acquired and affected mostly older males with comorbidities. (lu.se)
  • Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii is an immobile, non-sporulated, glucose -fermenting and lipophilic gram-positive rod of the skin microbiota . (bvsalud.org)
  • The throat infection causes a gray to black, tough, fiber-like covering, which can block your airways. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Corynebacterium diphtheriae is responsible for both endemic and epidemic diphtheria. (who.int)
  • This infection is also common in the groin, where it causes irregularly shaped pink or brown patches and fine scaling especially where the thighs touch the scrotum (in men). (msdmanuals.com)
  • certain localized infections Note: Categories for "late effects" of infectious and parasitic diseases are to be found at 137. (cdc.gov)
  • On the other hand, microorganisms hosted by humans, animals and plants (their microbiota) play a critical role in health ( symbiosis ) but also in diseases and infections ( dysbiosis ). (mephi.eu)
  • A rapid screening test for B-hemolytic streptococcal infection was negative. (cdc.gov)
  • infections were cutaneous and associated with inter- After treatment is completed, the index case-patient national travel ( 1 - 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • An antitoxin produced against the toxin of CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE that is used for the treatment of DIPHTHERIA. (lookformedical.com)
  • Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii breast infections: Report of four cases]. (bvsalud.org)
  • Antimicrobial fabrics are used as an engineering control to prevent infection. (cdc.gov)
  • The finding of a single blood culture with Corynebacterium does not exclude true infection such as IE. (lu.se)
  • The focus of infection was most often unknown, and in-hospital mortality was around 10% in both the groups with true infection and contamination. (lu.se)
  • Recommended public health response to toxi- ered nearly exclusively a human pathogen, and hu- genic diphtheria infections in humans in the United mans are believed to be the reservoir. (cdc.gov)
  • We also describe the epidemiologic public health efforts conducted to identify potential sources of infection and mitigate its spread and the molecular and genetic studies performed to identify the bacterium. (cdc.gov)
  • Le retour d'information fourni au personnel a permis de renforcer la culture de la sécurité du patient en unité de soins intensifs. (who.int)
  • The infection is diagnosed by close examination of the hair shafts where brown to yellow material called concretions are seen. (wikipedia.org)
  • We present here four cases of C. kroppenstedtii infections isolated from breast aspiration samples in women . (bvsalud.org)