Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Self Disclosure: A willingness to reveal information about oneself to others.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Social Stigma: A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.HIV Seropositivity: Development of neutralizing antibodies in individuals who have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HTLV-III/LAV).Sexual Partners: Married or single individuals who share sexual relations.Medical Errors: Errors or mistakes committed by health professionals which result in harm to the patient. They include errors in diagnosis (DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS), errors in the administration of drugs and other medications (MEDICATION ERRORS), errors in the performance of surgical procedures, in the use of other types of therapy, in the use of equipment, and in the interpretation of laboratory findings. Medical errors are differentiated from MALPRACTICE in that the former are regarded as honest mistakes or accidents while the latter is the result of negligence, reprehensible ignorance, or criminal intent.Financial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous: Human artificial insemination in which the semen used is that of a man other than the woman's husband.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Shame: An emotional attitude excited by realization of a shortcoming or impropriety.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Homosexuality, Male: Sexual attraction or relationship between males.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Bisexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of both the same and the opposite SEX.Oocyte Donation: Transfer of preovulatory oocytes from donor to a suitable host. Oocytes are collected, fertilized in vitro, and transferred to a host that can be human or animal.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Duty to Warn: A health professional's obligation to breach patient CONFIDENTIALITY to warn third parties of the danger of their being assaulted or of contracting a serious infection.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Genetic Counseling: An educational process that provides information and advice to individuals or families about a genetic condition that may affect them. The purpose is to help individuals make informed decisions about marriage, reproduction, and other health management issues based on information about the genetic disease, the available diagnostic tests, and management programs. Psychosocial support is usually offered.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Spouses: Married persons, i.e., husbands and wives, or partners. Domestic partners, or spousal equivalents, are two adults who have chosen to share their lives in an intimate and committed relationship, reside together, and share a mutual obligation of support for the basic necessities of life.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Forgiveness: Excusing or pardoning for an offense or release of anger or resentment.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.United StatesEthics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Genetic Research: Research into the cause, transmission, amelioration, elimination, or enhancement of inherited disorders and traits.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Premarital Examinations: Medical tests taken by couples planning to be married in order to determine presence of genetic and contagious diseases.Human Characteristics: The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.AIDS Serodiagnosis: Immunologic tests for identification of HIV (HTLV-III/LAV) antibodies. They include assays for HIV SEROPOSITIVITY and HIV SERONEGATIVITY that have been developed for screening persons carrying the viral antibody from patients with overt symptoms of AIDS or AIDS-RELATED COMPLEX.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Homosexuality, Female: Sexual attraction or relationship between females.Expressed Emotion: Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Off-Label Use: The practice of prescribing or using a drug outside the scope of the drug's official approved label as designated by a regulatory agency concerning the treatment of a particular disease or condition.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Unsafe Sex: Sexual behaviors which are high-risk for contracting SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES or for producing PREGNANCY.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Orthopedic Equipment: Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Controlled Substances: Drugs or chemical agents whose manufacture, possession, or use are regulated by government. This may include narcotics and prescription medications.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Sick Role: Set of expectations that exempt persons from responsibility for their illness and exempt them from usual responsibilities.Policy: A course or method of action selected to guide and determine present and future decisions.Child Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of children; frequently through a legal process.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Uganda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Conscience: The cognitive and affective processes which constitute an internalized moral governor over an individual's moral conduct.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Child Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.Surrogate Mothers: Women who allow themselves to be impregnated with the understanding that the offspring are to be given over to the parents who have commissioned the surrogate.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Condoms: A sheath that is worn over the penis during sexual behavior in order to prevent pregnancy or spread of sexually transmitted disease.Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Midwestern United States: The geographic area of the midwestern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not indicated. The states usually included in this region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Self-Help Groups: Organizations which provide an environment encouraging social interactions through group activities or individual relationships especially for the purpose of rehabilitating or supporting patients, individuals with common health problems, or the elderly. They include therapeutic social clubs.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Ethics Committees, Research: Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.Negotiating: The process of bargaining in order to arrive at an agreement or compromise on a matter of importance to the parties involved. It also applies to the hearing and determination of a case by a third party chosen by the parties in controversy, as well as the interposing of a third party to reconcile the parties in controversy.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Consent Forms: Documents describing a medical treatment or research project, including proposed procedures, risks, and alternatives, that are to be signed by an individual, or the individual's proxy, to indicate his/her understanding of the document and a willingness to undergo the treatment or to participate in the research.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Physician Incentive Plans: Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.Consumer Advocacy: The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.Los AngelesHeterosexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of the opposite SEX.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Rate Setting and Review: A method of examining and setting levels of payments.Sexuality: The sexual functions, activities, attitudes, and orientations of an individual. Sexuality, male or female, becomes evident at PUBERTY under the influence of gonadal steroids (TESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL), and social effects.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Domestic Violence: Deliberate, often repetitive physical, verbal, and/or other types of abuse by one or more members against others of a household.Safe Sex: Sexual behavior that prevents or reduces the spread of SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES or PREGNANCY.Sex Offenses: Any violation of established legal or moral codes in respect to sexual behavior.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Directed Tissue Donation: Tissue, organ, or gamete donation intended for a designated recipient.Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from one generation to another. It includes transmission in utero or intrapartum by exposure to blood and secretions, and postpartum exposure via breastfeeding.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Ethics, Institutional: The moral and ethical obligations or responsibilities of institutions.Battered Women: Women who are physically and mentally abused over an extended period, usually by a husband or other dominant male figure. Characteristics of the battered woman syndrome are helplessness, constant fear, and a perceived inability to escape. (From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3d ed)Medication Adherence: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.Genes, BRCA2: A tumor suppressor gene (GENES, TUMOR SUPPRESSOR) located on human chromosome 13 at locus 13q12.3. Mutations in this gene predispose humans to breast and ovarian cancer. It encodes a large, nuclear protein that is an essential component of DNA repair pathways, suppressing the formation of gross chromosomal rearrangements. (from Genes Dev 2000;14(11):1400-6)Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Embryonic Stem Cells: Cells derived from the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS which forms before implantation in the uterine wall. They retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
  • Consistent with an advocacy role, we find that securities lawyers' involvement in SEC comment letters is associated with resisting disclosure inquiries through redacting information from filings and issuing fewer amendments to previous disclosures. (ssrn.com)
  • 3 Introduction Executive summary Risk factor disclosures provided by companies in their Form 10-K and other Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings are supposed to serve an important role in the capital markets by offering investors an understanding of the risks faced by the individual companies. (coursehero.com)
  • Employing a novel dataset that captures auditors' access of non-client annual and quarterly SEC filings on EDGAR, we predict and find that auditors engage in disclosure benchmarking when auditing clients faced with higher levels of reporting complexity, financial reporting risk, and litigation risk. (ssrn.com)
  • Corporate risks disclosed by public companies in SEC filings often are generic and do not provide investors with clear, concise and insightful information that is company-specific. (wordpress.com)
  • The board of directors has determined that the company's practices and procedures align with National Instrument 58-101 - Disclosure of Corporate Governance Practices . (imperialoil.ca)
  • If nothing else, the regime at least puts the disclosure onus on companies for practices such as guaranteed bonuses, short term incentive plans and meaty severance packages. (reuters.com)
  • By focusing on disclosure practices, it is possible to explore the role of essential actors involved in the preparation of annual reports. (avhandlingar.se)
  • Research Question/Issue: South Africa (SA) has pursued distinctive corporate governance (CG) disclosure policy reforms in the form of the King Reports, which require firms to disclose a set of recommended good CG practices on both shareholders and stakeholders. (hud.ac.uk)
  • This paper investigates the effect of the new shareholder and stakeholder CG disclosure rules on firm value, as well as the relative value relevance of disclosing good CG practices on shareholders versus stakeholders. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Theoretical/Academic Implications: The paper generally contributes to the literature on the association between disclosure of CG practices and firm value by specifically modeling the relationship within a unique institutional and CG environment. (hud.ac.uk)
  • First, we show how stakeholder CG disclosure practices impact on firm value. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Since our evidence indicates that additional value can be created for firms that provide more transparent information on stakeholder CG practices, it provides authorities in other emerging countries currently planning or pursing CG reforms with a strong motivation to formally extend CG disclosure rules to cover both shareholder and stakeholder provisions. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Hear from the SEC staff and the rest of our expert faculty of in-house counsel and leading advisers on the preparation of disclosure documents, with an emphasis on current hot issues, best practices and practice pointers. (mayerbrown.com)
  • In short, companies must update corporate data management protocols to accommodate the explosion of data in the enterprise, implement technologies and services that support a healthy data storage process, and understand and apply data backup and recovery best practices. (itbusinessedge.com)
  • Voluntary disclosures can include strategic information such as company characteristics and strategy, nonfinancial information such socially responsible practices, and financial information such as stock price information. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Main Street versus Wall Street debate and the ensuing Occupy Wall Street movements have done much to expand public angst from mere disgruntlement with corporate America to even more emphasis on corporate governance in general. (reuters.com)
  • Although corporate America faces many objections on the above issues, the logical solution appears to lie in tying remuneration with a long term value creation outlook. (reuters.com)
  • CALGARY, ALBERTA--(Marketwired - Sept. 13, 2017) - Media Advisory - TransCanada Corporation (TSX:TRP)(NYSE:TRP) (TransCanada) today released its 2016 Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) report, providing a comprehensive update on the company's performance on environmental, social and governance topics that matter most to the communities, Indigenous groups and stakeholders involved with or affected by our business across North America. (transcanada.com)
  • These hearings, coupled with the phone calls from the White House complaining to the corporations about their disclosures, seem part of an effort to remind corporate America that their actions are not viewed positively by those who write and enforce the laws. (volokh.com)
  • Corporate America is leading the way in creating LGBTQ-friendly and inclusive work environments by adopting inclusive workplace policies protecting LGBTQ employees from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. (pflag.org)
  • Let's talk about creating a meaningful corporate partnership with North Shore Animal League America, the world's largest no-kill rescue and adoption organization to meet your business and philanthropic goals. (animalleague.org)
  • Animal League America welcomes companies and brands to inquire about creating corporate and cause-related partnerships with North Shore Animal League America as the beneficiary. (animalleague.org)
  • We require full disclosure of the donation benefitting North Shore Animal League America on all packaging, advertising, and promotional materials in clear and unambiguous language. (animalleague.org)
  • Animal League America can help Corporate Sponsors reach millions of animal lovers - plus thousands of shelter and rescue groups across the U.S. (and beyond). (animalleague.org)
  • On November 17, 2016, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC or Commission) approved new rules requiring dealers to disclose on retail customer confirmations their mark- ups and mark-downs on most municipal and corporate bond transactions, calculated from the bond's prevailing market price (PMP). (mondaq.com)
  • CALGARY, ALBERTA--(Marketwired - Sept. 13, 2017) - Media Advisory - TransCanada Corporation (TSX:TRP)(NYSE:TRP) (TransCanada) today released its 2016 Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) report, providing a comprehensive update on the company's performance on environmental, social a. (transcanada.com)
  • Therefore, this study investigates how compa-nies conduct their risk-disclosure practice after the new Italian Legislative Decree No. 254 of December 30, 2016. (francoangeli.it)
  • JPMorgan Banco de Inversión es un establecimiento de crédito vigilado por la Superintendencia de Banca, Seguros y AFP (SBS), constituido en el país desde el año 2016. (jpmorgan.com)
  • Vanguard manages about $4 trillion and is often the top shareholder in big U.S. corporations through its massive index funds - giving it a major voice in setting corporate agendas. (reuters.com)
  • Governments of 38 of the largest 50 economies in the world have, or are developing, disclosure requirements for corporations covering environmental, social and governance issues. (unpri.org)
  • However, the vast majority of countries we analysed - 38 of the top 50 economies in the world - had, or were developing, some kind of government-led disclosure guidelines for corporations covering ESG issues. (unpri.org)
  • Corporations across the country support the Society mission through sponsorship and underwritting, corporate gifts, employee matching programs and volunteerism grants, in-kind contributions, and more. (hdsa.org)
  • Factors Influencing Voluntary Annual Disclosures By U.S., U.K., and Continental European Multinational Corporations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ongoing work of the Financial Stability Board's (FSB) Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures is likely to galvanise environmental disclosure in future years. (unpri.org)
  • This enhanced level of disclosure includes new data and performance metrics relating to pipeline safety, stakeholder and Indigenous engagement, and updated information on our position, strategy and performance related to climate change and greenhouse gas emissions. (transcanada.com)
  • legislative and regulatory initiatives, climate change and accounting standards, each of which has affected and will continue to affect public company disclosure documents. (mayerbrown.com)
  • CSX also participates in CDP's annual climate reports that measure performance and disclosure. (csx.com)
  • The company also received a score of 100 - the highest score an organization can receive - for its disclosure, putting CSX on the S&P Climate Disclosure Leadership Index. (csx.com)
  • Practical implications The paper provides evidence of inconsistent company behavior in disclosing company-specific information in favor of internal and ex-ternal stakeholders, particularly by balancing company-specific disclosure be-tween risk descriptions and risk-management policies. (francoangeli.it)
  • Vanguard's stance and promise of more disclosures prompted activist fund firm Walden Asset Management of Boston to withdraw a shareholder proposal for its upcoming fund meetings, requesting a review of Vanguard's proxy voting. (reuters.com)
  • The Rule requires that such disclosure may be made either on the issuer's website, which may include hyperlinking (as long as such website or hyperlink is continuously available), or in a proxy statement or information statement for any shareholders' meeting at which directors are elected (or, if such company does not file proxy or information statements, on Form 10-K or Form 20-F). (lexology.com)
  • or (3) for purposes of the issuer's initial disclosure obligation only (as opposed to the ongoing annual disclosure requirement discussed below), have been disclosed pursuant to Item 5(b) of Schedule 14A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act) (i.e., by a party engaging in a proxy contest) or Item 5.02(d)(2) of Form 8-K in the issuer's current fiscal year. (lexology.com)
  • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC" or the "Commission") has approved a NASDAQ proposed rule change that revises disclosure requirements following a listed issuer's receipt of notification from NASDAQ that the. (jdsupra.com)
  • One reason Cede is structured as a partnership is that each general partner can order transfers of stock registered in the name of the partnership without the need of presenting a separate corporate resolution to the stock issuer's transfer agent or stock registrar to validate the authority of the transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Findings - The results indicate a statistically significant interaction between corporate disclosures and foreign share ownership among the sample firms. (repec.org)
  • Investor Relation Magazine Award, Forward-Looking Disclosure and Analyst Forecast Accuracy ) and the Modified Jones Model to test the hypotheses of the study on a matched-pair sample data of Investor Relation Magazine Award winning and non-winning firms. (springerprofessional.de)
  • Based on a sample of firms listed on Vietnamese Stock Exchange from 2009 to 2013, a sample of 600 observations was analyzed using CSR disclosure index of which is classified into four dimensions (human resource, community involvement, environment, and products/services). (ejournals.ph)
  • Significant relationships are found between board independence, CEO duality, size, and profit with the level of CSR disclosure of firms in Vietnam. (ejournals.ph)
  • This Article analyzes the potential reasons why corporate counsels keep silent in the face of potential wrongdoing in their own firms. (stanford.edu)
  • in particular, research has found that top executives have a significant influence on their firms' voluntary disclosures, and that managers have unique disclosure styles related to their personal backgrounds including their career paths and military experience. (wikipedia.org)
  • For now the essence of the unpopular disclosure regime stands: Police officers judge which evidence will be most useful for the defense. (law.com)
  • But the essence of the unpopular current disclosure regime remains intact: it is still a police officer who judges which evidence will be most useful for the defense's undermining of the prosecution's case. (law.com)
  • In practical terms, introducing a new disclosure rule is much harder without industry buy-in, and a body of voluntary market practice makes this process considerably easier. (unpri.org)
  • While there can be little doubt that the practice of mindfulness can lead to significant health benefits , its current prominence in corporate culture is nested within a social, cultural and political context where stress is now seen as a failure of the individual to adapt to the productivity demands of the corporation. (theconversation.com)
  • A key test in many markets of whether a disclosure fault was made lies in examining prior practice. (blogspot.com)
  • For example, the American Petroleum Institute and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce , which are both significant intermediaries through which undisclosed corporate political spending is currently channeled, recently argued in letters to the SEC that the "Commission could not rationally find that the benefits of such a rule" "could outweigh the huge costs. (harvard.edu)
  • If an issuer discovers an agreement or arrangement that should have been disclosed pursuant to the Rule, it must promptly make the required disclosure by filing a Form 8-K or by issuing a press release. (lexology.com)
  • The Rule states that an issuer shall not be considered deficient with respect to such disclosure under the Rule if the issuer has undertaken reasonable efforts to identify all such agreements or arrangements, including asking each director or nominee in a manner designed to allow timely disclosure, and made such disclosure upon discovery of the agreement or arrangement. (lexology.com)
  • The Group maintains disclosure controls and procedures as the term is defined in the US Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(e). (riotinto.com)
  • Management, with the participation of the chief executive and chief financial officer, evaluate the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Group's disclosure controls and procedures pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(b) as of the end of each financial reporting period. (riotinto.com)
  • Policymakers might also consider this current phenomenon to decide to what extent disclosure requirements should be detailed and, instead, what room should be left for management discre-tion with respect to users' needs. (francoangeli.it)
  • This paper examines the extent of disclosures in company annual reports of Sri Lankan listedcompanies and the user perceptions on the importance of information disclosed in company annualreports. (edu.au)
  • Though voluntary, the task force recommendations can be seen as an opportunity for governments and accounting standard setters to develop disclosure policy referring to an internationally consistent set of reporting guidelines. (unpri.org)
  • Consistent with our prediction, disclosure benchmarking is positively associated with a client's financial statement disaggregation, and client footnotes exhibit greater comparability to targeted non-clients' footnotes after disclosure benchmarking. (ssrn.com)
  • Furthermore, disclosure is necessary to ensure that directors and executives make political spending decisions that are consistent with shareholder interests. (harvard.edu)
  • The Financial Accounting Standards Board classified voluntary disclosures into the six categories below, while Meek, Roberts and Gray (1995) classified them into three major groups: strategic, nonfinancial and financial information. (wikipedia.org)
  • and (iv) the management of corporate disclosure within the annual report is heavily influenced by the knowledge, skills, and personal characteristics of the project manager. (avhandlingar.se)
  • Corporate Governance: An International Review, 20 (1). (hud.ac.uk)
  • The guidelines attempt to deal with current conflicts of interest by requiring a senior police officer to review the disclosure process rather than - as frequently happens - relying solely on a junior officer who is also part of the investigation team. (law.com)
  • The CPS has since promised to invest funds to combat disclosure abuse, using extra funds from the government's Comprehensive Spending Review to put into effect the recommendations made in March by its inspectorate. (law.com)
  • How Management Risk Affects Corporate Debt, " The Review of Financial Studies, vol 31(9), pages 3491-3531. (nber.org)
  • Board review of corporate strategy is key in light of shifting assumptions. (blackrock.com)
  • In order to perform their essential oversight duties, corporate boards need to understand the problems their executives are focused on solving as they chart a course to take their workforces from crisis to recovery. (boardmember.com)
  • P Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh ownership structure terhadap corporate disclosure quality pada perusahaan manufaktur yang terdaftar di Bursa Efek Indonesia. (trisakti.ac.id)
  • CB Scientific, Inc., a provider of innovative products and services for the ambulatory noninvasive cardiac monitoring space, announces recent disclosures regarding its acquisition of the operating business assets of Prevent Health Care International Corp. (PHCIC) and the disposition of CBSC's former business assets related to cannabis testing products and services. (ipsnews.net)
  • We examine auditors' disclosure benchmarking, which we define as auditors' acquisition of non-client financial statement information for the purpose of evaluating a client's financial statement information. (ssrn.com)
  • Findings Our result shows that there are interaction relationships among RRM, type of risk, industry, and level of specific disclosure. (francoangeli.it)
  • The next section will list the findings of various research studies on the relation between the dimensions of corporate governance and voluntarily disclosed information released by organisations. (ivoryresearch.com)
  • Our findings in the OLS and sensitivity analyses using Heckman Procedure and 2SLS regressions consistently report a significant negative association between earnings management and disclosure quality for all proxies in restraining earnings management. (springerprofessional.de)
  • In a motion filed Thursday in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York, the SEIU Pension Plans Master Trust, West Virginia Laborers' Pension Trust Fund and Plumbers and Pipefitters National Pension Fund objected to the disclosure statement. (law360.com)