Spherical RNA viruses, in the order NIDOVIRALES, infecting a wide range of animals including humans. Transmission is by fecal-oral and respiratory routes. Mechanical transmission is also common. There are two genera: CORONAVIRUS and TOROVIRUS.
An order comprising three families of eukaryotic viruses possessing linear, nonsegmented, positive sense RNA genomes. The families are CORONAVIRIDAE; ARTERIVIRIDAE; and RONIVIRIDAE.
Virus diseases caused by CORONAVIRIDAE.
A species of CORONAVIRUS causing atypical respiratory disease (SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME) in humans. The organism is believed to have first emerged in Guangdong Province, China, in 2002. The natural host is the Chinese horseshoe bat, RHINOLOPHUS sinicus.
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.
Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.
Infections with viruses of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. This includes MORBILLIVIRUS INFECTIONS; RESPIROVIRUS INFECTIONS; PNEUMOVIRUS INFECTIONS; HENIPAVIRUS INFECTIONS; AVULAVIRUS INFECTIONS; and RUBULAVIRUS INFECTIONS.
A species of RESPIROVIRUS also called hemadsorption virus 2 (HA2), which causes laryngotracheitis in humans, especially children.
An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.

Isolation of animal viruses from farm livestock waste, soil and water. (1/337)

Ten porcine enteroviruses, 2 porcine adenoviruses and 1 coronavirus were isolated directly from 32 samples of slurry collected from a pig fattening house. Concentration of the same samples by adsorption with the polyelectrolyte PE-60 yielded 24 porcine enteroviruses and 3 porcine adenoviruses. A porcine enterovirus was isolated, following PE-60 concentration, from 1 to 6 slurry samples from a sow farrowing house. No virus was isolated from 12 samples of slurry from dairy cows nor from 6 slurry samples from a calf-rearing unit. A porcine enterovirus was isolated from soil samples, after concentration with PE-60, collected 1, 2 and 8 days after pig slurry was spread on hay stubble. Two porcine enteroviruses were isolated by membrane filtration from 26 samples of surface run-off from land on which pig slurry was routinely spread, and 2 bovine enteroviruses were isolated from cattle feedlot run-off after adsorption to layers of talc and celite followed by hydroextraction. A porcine enterovirus was also isolated from 1 of 33 samples of surface water collected on farms on which pig slurry was routinely spread on the land, but no virus was isolated from 36 samples of ground water from the same farms. The surface water and ground water samples were concentrated by talc-celite adsorption and hydroextraction.  (+info)

A novel internal open reading frame product expressed from a polycistronic mRNA of porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus may not contribute to virus attenuation. (2/337)

Cell-culture-adapted (ca) porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) contains three internal open reading frames (I ORF) within the nucleocapsid protein gene and lacks the downstream counterpart of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus ORF7 or feline infectious peritonitis virus ORF6a. To confirm whether such features also exist in wild-type (wt) PEDV, the 3' 1800 nucleotides of its genome were sequenced and were found to be identical to those of ca virus. The coding potential of I-1 ORF was ascertained by transient expression in Vero cells followed by immunofluorescence using antipeptide sera. The I-1 protein was synthesized as a 12 kDa non-phosphorylated PEDV-specific protein that was not present in detectable amounts in virions. However, a low copy number of I-1 in the virion would suggest it is a structural component. Nevertheless, identical nucleotide sequences and gene expression strategies of attenuated ca virus and its virulent parent, wt PEDV, demonstrate that the 3' 1800 nucleotides or the genes and gene products encoded therein may not contribute to virus attenuation.  (+info)

In situ hybridization for the detection and localization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in the intestinal tissues from naturally infected piglets. (3/337)

Detection and localization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was studied by in situ hybridization with a nonradioactive digoxigenin-labeled probe in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 10 naturally infected piglets. A 377-base pair cDNA probe for viral RNA encoding the membrane proteins of PEDV cell-culture-adapted strain V215/78 was generated by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In the retrospective study of pigs from herds with diarrhea, the 10 piglets naturally infected with PEDV had positive signals for PEDV by in situ hybridization. When intestinal tissues were hybridized with the PEDV probe, a strong signal was seen in the villus enterocytes of jejunum and ileum but not in the cecum and colon. Positive cells typically had dark brown reaction products in the cytoplasm. Scattered epithelial cells along the ileal Peyer's patches dome areas contained viral RNA. In one piglet, hybridization signal was also found in the duodenum. PEDV was not demonstrated in tissues outside of the intestinal tract. These findings indicate that jejunal and ileal villus enterocytes are the main target of PEDV replication during epizootic outbreaks of the disease.  (+info)

Detection of Australian gill-associated virus (GAV) and lymphoid organ virus (LOV) of Penaeus monodon by RT-nested PCR. (4/337)

A highly sensitive test based on reverse transcription followed by nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR) was developed to detect the Australian yellow-head-like viruses, gill-associated virus (GAV) and lymphoid organ virus (LOV) of Penaeus monodon. The RT-nPCR detected viral RNA in as little as 10 fg lymphoid organ total RNA isolated from GAV-infected P. monodon. Amplification of serial dilutions of a GAV cDNA clone showed that the nested PCR was sufficiently sensitive to detect a single genome equivalent using a DNA template. The specificity and sensitivity of the RT-nPCR was also demonstrated using experimentally infected P. (Marsupenaeus) japonicus, where GAV sequences could be amplified from lymphoid organ and haemocyte RNA as early as 6 h post infection (p.i.), and from gills by 24 h p.i. In contrast, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) identified nucleocapsids and virions in lymphoid organ cells and haemocytes from Days 3 and 6 p.i., respectively, while there was no evidence of infection in gill cells at any time. The practical application of the RT-nPCR was demonstrated by screening healthy wild-caught P. monodon broodstock. The high prevalence (>98%) of broodstock that were positive by RT-nPCR suggests that LOV is endemic in northern Queensland. In addition, results with lymphoid organ, gill and haemocyte RNA suggest that small gill biopsies may be best suited to the non-sacrificial testing of valuable broodstock. The speed and sensitivity of the RT-nPCR make it a useful adjunct to TEM for diagnosing LOV/GAV infection of P. monodon, with the additional benefit that screening of gill biopsies may facilitate selection of LOV-free broodstock.  (+info)

Acute undifferentiated neonatal diarrhea in beef calves. I. Occurence and distribution of infectious agents. (5/337)

Beef calves in a 48-cow herd were studied during one calving season from birth to ten days of age to determine the presence or absence of potentially enteropathogenic bacteria, viruses, and/or chlamydia in both normal and diarrheic calves. Calves were born and raised outside in large pens unless the ambient temperature was below minus 10 degrees F when calving was done inside. Fecal swabs, fecal aliquots, and nasal swabs were taken from each calf at 32, 128 plus or minus 3, and 248 plus or minus 3 hours of age and as soon after the onset of diarrhea as possible. Diarrhea was defined as that condition in which the feces contained less than 10% dry matter. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in feces were identified using the ligated gut loop procedure in calves and by feeding broth cultures to colostrum fed lambs seven to 16 hours old. Potentially enteropathogenic viruses were detected using a variety of methods which included tissue culture, fluorescent antibody, hemadsorption, and electron microscope techniques. Of the 40 calves studied, 32 (80%) developed diarrhea before ten days of age. Twenty-two strains of Escherichia coli which caused dilation of calf ligated intestinal loops were isolated from 11 scouring calves and from one normal calf. Nine out of ten strains of Escherichia coli which dilated ligated loops also caused diarrhea when fed to colostrum-fed lambs seven to 16 hours old. Using antibody technique a Reo-like virus was detected in the feces of 15 calves before, during, and after the onset of diarrhea. Four calves excreted both loop dilating strains of E. coli and Reo-like virus in the feces before ten days of age; in all cases the loop dilating E. coli were isolated from the feces prior to the demonstration of Reo-like virus. A Corona-like virus was also demonstrated in three of the 15 calves infected with Reo-like virus and a noncytopathogenic strain of bovine virus diarrhea virus was isolated from two of the 15 calves infected with Reo-like virus. A loop dilating strain of Citrobacter was isolated from one diarrheic calf. There was no consistent pattern of onset or duration of diarrhea in calves which excreted different infectious agents. Salmonella species, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parvovirus, adenoviruses, parainfluenza-3 virus, and Chlamydia species could not be demonstrated in any of the calves or their dams. No potentially enteropathogenic agents could be demonstrated in 11 of the 32 calves which scoured. These findings emphasize the complexity of the infectious aspect of the neonatal diarrhea syndrome and illustrate the difficulty in making an etiological diagnosis in field outbreaks of the calf scours complex.  (+info)

Protective effect of immunoglobulins in serum and milk of sows exposed to transmissible gastroenteritis virus. (6/337)

Experimental exposure of susceptible pregnant sows by various routes to the gut-origin transmissible gastroenteritis virus stimulated production of milk and serum antibodies. These antibodies neutralized the cytopathic effect of transmissible gastroenteritis virus propagated in cell culture. This in vitro neutralizing antibody resided in the IgG and IgA immunoglobulin classes. On the other hand, protection for baby pigs resided in the IgA class of milk immunoglobulin of sows exposed orally or intramammarily but not of sows exposed intramuscularly to the virus.  (+info)

Differential detection of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus by duplex RT-PCR. (7/337)

Transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) and porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) are highly contagious enteric diseases of piglets. The clinical signs of these diseases are very similar and include watery, yellowish diarrhea. Thus, the effective differential detection of TGE virus and PED virus is required. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was established for the differential detection of TGE and PED viruses. The primers were designed for the S gene of each virus. RNA was extracted from the intestines and stool samples that were collected from the swine with diarrhea. The RT-PCR test could detect both TGE and PED viruses with 2 TCID50/200 microl. Among 90 clinical samples, 7 TGE viruses and 2 PED viruses were detected by the duplex RT-PCR. This duplex RT-PCR may be a useful diagnostic method for the rapid, specific, and sensitive differential detection of TGE and PED viruses using clinical samples.  (+info)

The sialate-4-O-acetylesterases of coronaviruses related to mouse hepatitis virus: a proposal to reorganize group 2 Coronaviridae. (8/337)

Group 2 coronaviruses are characterized within the order Nidovirales by a unique genome organization. A characteristic feature of group 2 coronaviruses is the presence of a gene encoding the haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein, which is absent in coronaviruses of groups 1 and 3. At least three coronavirus strains within group 2 expressed a structural protein with sialate-4-O-acetylesterase activity, distinguishing them from other members of group 2, which encode an enzyme specific for 5-N-acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid. The esterases of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strains S and JHM and puffinosis virus (PV) specifically hydrolysed 5-N-acetyl-4-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu4,5Ac2) as well as the synthetic substrates p-nitrophenyl acetate, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate and fluorescein diacetate. The K(m) values of the MHV-like esterases for the latter substrates were two- to tenfold lower than those of the sialate-9-O-acetylesterases of influenza C viruses. Another unspecific esterase substrate, alpha-naphthyl acetate, was used for the in situ detection of the dimeric HE proteins in SDS-polyacrylamide gels. MHV-S, MHV-JHM and PV bound to horse serum glycoproteins containing Neu4,5Ac2. De-O-acetylation of the glycoproteins by alkaline treatment or incubation with the viral esterases resulted in a complete loss of recognition, indicating a specific interaction of MHV-like coronaviruses with Neu4,5Ac2. Combined with evidence for distinct phylogenetic lineages of group 2 coronaviruses, subdivision into subgroups 2a (MHV-like viruses) and 2b (bovine coronavirus-like viruses) is suggested.  (+info)

Coronaviridae is a family of enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses. They are named for the crown-like (corona) appearance of their surface proteins. Coronaviruses infect a wide range of animals, including mammals and birds, and can cause respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological diseases. Some coronaviruses, such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), can cause severe and potentially fatal illness in humans. The most recent example is SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19.

Nidovirales is an order of viruses that includes important pathogens such as coronaviruses and arteriviruses. These viruses are characterized by their large, complex genomes and the production of nested sets of subgenomic mRNAs during replication. They have a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome and are enveloped. The name "Nidovirales" is derived from the Latin word "nidus," meaning "nest," which refers to the nested set of subgenomic mRNAs produced during replication.

Coronaviruses, which include well-known human pathogens such as SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 (which causes COVID-19), primarily infect the respiratory tract and can cause a range of symptoms from mild cold-like illness to severe pneumonia.

Arteriviruses, on the other hand, mainly infect animals and are associated with diseases such as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in pigs and simian hemorrhagic fever in non-human primates.

It's important to note that Nidovirales have a high potential for cross-species transmission, which can lead to the emergence of new viruses with the ability to infect humans and cause disease.

Coronaviridae is a family of enveloped, positive-sense RNA viruses that cause various diseases in animals and humans. Human coronavirus infections most commonly result in mild to moderate upper respiratory tract illnesses, such as the common cold. However, two highly pathogenic coronaviruses have emerged in the past two decades: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV). These viruses can cause severe and potentially fatal respiratory illnesses.

In general, coronaviruses are transmitted through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. In some cases, people may become infected by touching a surface contaminated with the virus and then touching their mouth, nose, or eyes. Preventive measures include frequent handwashing, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and practicing good respiratory etiquette (e.g., covering coughs and sneezes).

Treatment for coronavirus infections is primarily supportive, focusing on relieving symptoms and managing complications. For severe cases of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV infections, antiviral medications and supportive care in an intensive care unit may be necessary. Vaccines have been developed to protect against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and are being distributed globally.

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a viral respiratory illness caused by the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). This virus is a member of the Coronaviridae family and is thought to be transmitted most readily through close person-to-person contact via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

The SARS outbreak began in southern China in 2002 and spread to several other countries before it was contained. The illness causes symptoms such as fever, chills, and body aches, which progress to a dry cough and sometimes pneumonia. Some people also report diarrhea. In severe cases, the illness can cause respiratory failure or death.

It's important to note that SARS is not currently a global health concern, as there have been no known cases since 2004. However, it remains a significant example of how quickly and widely a new infectious disease can spread in today's interconnected world.

Viral pneumonia is a type of pneumonia caused by viral infection. It primarily affects the upper and lower respiratory tract, leading to inflammation of the alveoli (air sacs) in the lungs. This results in symptoms such as cough, difficulty breathing, fever, fatigue, and chest pain. Common viruses that can cause pneumonia include influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and adenovirus. Viral pneumonia is often milder than bacterial pneumonia but can still be serious, especially in young children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems. Treatment typically involves supportive care, such as rest, hydration, and fever reduction, while the body fights off the virus. In some cases, antiviral medications may be used to help manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Pneumonia is an infection or inflammation of the alveoli (tiny air sacs) in one or both lungs. It's often caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. Accumulated pus and fluid in these air sacs make it difficult to breathe, which can lead to coughing, chest pain, fever, and difficulty breathing. The severity of symptoms can vary from mild to life-threatening, depending on the underlying cause, the patient's overall health, and age. Pneumonia is typically diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and diagnostic tests such as chest X-rays or blood tests. Treatment usually involves antibiotics for bacterial pneumonia, antivirals for viral pneumonia, and supportive care like oxygen therapy, hydration, and rest.

Bacterial pneumonia is a type of lung infection that's caused by bacteria. It can affect people of any age, but it's more common in older adults, young children, and people with certain health conditions or weakened immune systems. The symptoms of bacterial pneumonia can vary, but they often include cough, chest pain, fever, chills, and difficulty breathing.

The most common type of bacteria that causes pneumonia is Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus). Other types of bacteria that can cause pneumonia include Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

Bacterial pneumonia is usually treated with antibiotics, which are medications that kill bacteria. The specific type of antibiotic used will depend on the type of bacteria causing the infection. It's important to take all of the prescribed medication as directed, even if you start feeling better, to ensure that the infection is completely cleared and to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance.

In severe cases of bacterial pneumonia, hospitalization may be necessary for close monitoring and treatment with intravenous antibiotics and other supportive care.

Paramyxoviridae is a family of viruses that includes several important pathogens causing respiratory infections in humans and animals. According to the medical perspective, Paramyxoviridae infections refer to the diseases caused by these viruses.

Some notable human paramyxovirus infections include:

1. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection: RSV is a common cause of respiratory tract infections, particularly in young children and older adults. It can lead to bronchiolitis and pneumonia, especially in infants and patients with compromised immune systems.
2. Measles (Rubeola): Measles is a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever, cough, coryza (runny nose), conjunctivitis, and a maculopapular rash. It can lead to severe complications such as pneumonia, encephalitis, and even death, particularly in malnourished children and individuals with weakened immune systems.
3. Parainfluenza Virus Infection: Parainfluenza viruses are responsible for upper and lower respiratory tract infections, including croup, bronchitis, and pneumonia. They mainly affect young children but can also infect adults, causing mild to severe illnesses.
4. Mumps: Mumps is a contagious viral infection that primarily affects the salivary glands, causing painful swelling. It can lead to complications such as meningitis, encephalitis, deafness, and orchitis (inflammation of the testicles) in rare cases.
5. Human Metapneumovirus (HMPV) Infection: HMPV is a respiratory virus that can cause upper and lower respiratory tract infections, similar to RSV and parainfluenza viruses. It mainly affects young children and older adults, leading to bronchitis, pneumonia, and exacerbations of chronic lung diseases.

Prevention strategies for Paramyxoviridae infections include vaccination programs, practicing good personal hygiene, and implementing infection control measures in healthcare settings.

Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human (HPIV-1) is a type of respiratory virus that belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and genus Respirovirus. It is one of the four serotypes of human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs), which are important causes of acute respiratory infections in children, immunocompromised individuals, and the elderly.

HPIV-1 primarily infects the upper respiratory tract, causing symptoms such as cough, runny nose, sore throat, and fever. However, it can also cause lower respiratory tract infections, including bronchitis, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia, particularly in young children and infants.

HPIV-1 is transmitted through respiratory droplets or direct contact with infected individuals. The incubation period for HPIV-1 infection ranges from 2 to 7 days, after which symptoms can last for up to 10 days. There is no specific antiviral treatment available for HPIV-1 infections, and management typically involves supportive care such as hydration, fever reduction, and respiratory support if necessary.

Prevention measures include good hand hygiene, avoiding close contact with infected individuals, and practicing cough etiquette. Vaccines are not currently available for HPIV-1 infections, but research is ongoing to develop effective vaccines against these viruses.

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a highly contagious viral infection that attacks the respiratory system of humans. It is caused by influenza viruses A, B, or C and is characterized by the sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, sore throat, cough, runny nose, and fatigue. Influenza can lead to complications such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and ear infections, and can be particularly dangerous for young children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems or chronic medical conditions. The virus is spread through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks, and can also survive on surfaces for a period of time. Influenza viruses are constantly changing, which makes it necessary to get vaccinated annually to protect against the most recent and prevalent strains.

'Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype' is a specific subtype of the influenza A virus that causes flu in humans and animals. It contains certain proteins called hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N) on its surface, with this subtype specifically having H1 and N1 antigens. The H1N1 strain is well-known for causing the 2009 swine flu pandemic, which was a global outbreak of flu that resulted in significant morbidity and mortality. This subtype can also cause seasonal flu, although the severity and symptoms may vary. It is important to note that influenza viruses are constantly changing, and new strains or subtypes can emerge over time, requiring regular updates to vaccines to protect against them.

Viruses portal Wikimedia Commons has media related to Coronaviridae. Wikispecies has information related to Coronaviridae. ... Coronaviridae is a family of enveloped, positive-strand RNA viruses which infect amphibians, birds, and mammals. The group ... The family Coronaviridae is organized in 2 sub-families, 5 genera, 26 sub-genera, and 46 species. Additional species are ... Coronaviridae Orthocoronavirinae Letovirinae Alphaletovirus Milecovirus Microhyla letovirus 1 Coronavirus is the common name ...
Robb, James A.; Bond, Clifford W. (1979). "Coronaviridae". Comprehensive Virology. pp. 193-247. doi:10.1007/978-1-4684-3563-4_3 ...
"Coronaviridae". Fenner's Veterinary Virology. Elsevier. 2017. pp. 435-461. doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-800946-8.00024-6. ISBN 978-0- ... "Chapter 24 - Coronaviridae". Fenner's Veterinary Virology (Fifth ed.). Academic Press. 2017. pp. 435-461. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12 ... Coronavirus Study Group) (2009). "Revision of the family Coronaviridae" (PDF). International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses ( ...
The Coronaviridae. New York: Plenum Press, pp. 403-413 Weiss M, Steck F, Horzinek MC (September 1983). "Purification and ... Coronaviridae ICTV (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Use dmy dates from April 2017, ... which led to the inclusion of the Torovirus along with the Arterivirus in the previously monogeneric Coronaviridae. At present ... among the EToVs and BToVs.Torovirus share some common characteristics with members of the related family Coronaviridae as they ...
"Chapter 24 - Coronaviridae". Fenner's Veterinary Virology (Fifth ed.). Academic Press. 2017. pp. 435-461. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12 ... 6b) Decaro N (2011). "Alphacoronavirus‡: Coronaviridae". In Tidona C, Darai G (eds.). The Springer Index of Viruses. Springer. ... Decaro N (2011). "Betacoronavirus‡: Coronaviridae". In Tidona C, Darai G (eds.). The Springer Index of Viruses. Springer. pp. ... Myint SH (1995). "Human Coronavirus Infections". In Siddell SG (ed.). The Coronaviridae. The Viruses. Springer US. pp. 389-401 ...
Family: Coronaviridae; (Subfamily): ; Genus: Coronavirus; Type Species: Infectious bronchits virus Kottier, S.A.; Cavanagh, D; ... 2008). "Revision of the family Coronaviridae" (PDF). p. 24. Retrieved 9 March 2020. Avian coronavirus (new) (comprised of ...
Myint, Steven H. (1995). "Human Coronavirus Infections". In Siddell, Stuart G. (ed.). The Coronaviridae. The Viruses. Plenum ...
Deng, X.; Baker, S.C. (2021). "Coronaviruses: Molecular Biology (Coronaviridae)". Encyclopedia of Virology: 198-207. doi: ...
Coronaviridae)". Encyclopedia of Virology: 198-207. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-814515-9.02550-9. ISBN 9780128145166. Lwoff, André; ...
Coronaviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses) (2020). "The species Severe acute respiratory ... "ICTV Taxonomy history: Coronaviridae". International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Retrieved 17 August 2020. "ICTV ... As of 2022, there are 52 species of coronaviruses in the subfamily Orthocoronavirinae under the family Coronaviridae, of which ... "ICTV 9th Report (2011): Coronaviridae (Virus Taxonomy: 2020 Release)". talk.ictvonline.org. 2021. Archived from the original on ...
"ICTV 9th Report (2011) Coronaviridae". International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Retrieved 10 January 2019. ...
"ICTV 9th Report (2011) Coronaviridae". International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Retrieved 10 January 2019. ...
TGEV belongs to the family Coronaviridae, genus Alphacoronavirus, species Alphacoronavirus 1. It is an enveloped virus with a ... "ICTV 9th Report (2011) Coronaviridae". International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Retrieved 26 January 2019. ...
Order Nidovirales Family Arteriviridae Family Coronaviridae - includes Human coronavirus (common cold viruses HCoV-229E, HCoV- ... and Coronaviridae ((+)ssRNA), e.g. SARS. Recombination in RNA viruses appears to be an adaptation for coping with genome damage ...
Picornaviridae and Coronaviridae. The viruses that contain s2m can infect a wide range of higher vertebrates, including birds, ...
Recombination occurs in the Coronaviridae (e.g. SARS). Recombination in RNA viruses appears to be an adaptation for coping with ...
Kasmi Y, Khataby K, Souiri A (2019). "Coronaviridae: 100,000 Years of Emergence and Reemergence". In Ennaji MM (ed.). Emerging ...
2009). "ICTV 9th Report (2011) New Coronaviridae". International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Archived from the ... 2009). "Revision of the family Coronaviridae" (PDF). International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). p. 18. Archived ( ...
2009). "ICTV 9th Report (2011) New Coronaviridae". International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Archived from the ...
One family of enveloped viruses causes gastroenteritis (Coronaviridae). All other viruses associated with gastroenteritis are ... Coronaviridae, Flaviviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae). All the non-enveloped families have icosahedral nucleocapsids. ...
16 September 2015). "Create 12new species in the family Coronaviridae" (PDF). International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses ( ...
Recombination also occurs in the Coronaviridae ((+)ssRNA) (e.g. SARS). Recombination in RNA viruses appears to be an adaptation ...
Recombination also occurs in the Coronaviridae ((+)ssRNA) (e.g. SARS). Recombination in RNA viruses appears to be an adaptation ...
She specifically focuses on development of novel vaccines for coronaviridae. Her early research considered the development of ...
Nanghoshaviridae Nanhypoviridae Arnidovirineae Coronaviridae Mesnidovirineae Monidovirineae Ronidovirineae Tornidovirineae Zhou ...
It is in the subfamily Orthocoronavirinae of the family Coronaviridae. They are enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA ... Coronaviruses Viralzone: Gammacoronavirus Virus Pathogen Database and Analysis Resource (ViPR): Coronaviridae Archived 2013-03- ...
It is in the subfamily Orthocoronavirinae of the family Coronaviridae. They are enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA ... Coronaviridae (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, ...
... es are in the subfamily Orthocoronavirinae of the family Coronaviridae. Both the Alpha- and Betacoronavirus ...
The order includes the families Coronaviridae, Arteriviridae, Roniviridae, and Mesoniviridae. Member viruses have a viral ... which included the Coronaviridae and Roniviridae (the large nidoviruses) and those with small genomes (the small nidoviruses)-a ... Abyssoviridae Arnidovirineae Arteriviridae Cremegaviridae Gresnaviridae Olifoviridae Cornidovirineae Coronaviridae ...
Additional members are known from Potyviridae and non-Coronaviridae Nidovirales. 3CLpro-1 Carmofur COVID Moonshot Ebselen EDP- ...
Viruses portal Wikimedia Commons has media related to Coronaviridae. Wikispecies has information related to Coronaviridae. ... Coronaviridae is a family of enveloped, positive-strand RNA viruses which infect amphibians, birds, and mammals. The group ... The family Coronaviridae is organized in 2 sub-families, 5 genera, 26 sub-genera, and 46 species. Additional species are ... Coronaviridae Orthocoronavirinae Letovirinae Alphaletovirus Milecovirus Microhyla letovirus 1 Coronavirus is the common name ...
Famîleya Coronaviridae ku,famîleyekî vîrusan e,RNAya yek helezonî ye(bi wateyekî pozîtîf) û xwediyê pêçeka vîral e. Dirêjahiya ... Ji "https://ku.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Coronaviridae&oldid=1017819" hatiye standin. ...
Coronaviridae and SARS-associated Coronavirus Strain HSR1. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(3):413-418. doi:10.3201/ ... In addition, we have observed that other biomolecular features shared by most Coronaviridae coexist in SARS-CoV HSR1 with ... Vicenzi, E., Canducci, F., Pinna, D., Mancini, N., Carletti, S., Lazzarin, A....Clementi, M. (2004). Coronaviridae and SARS- ... Coronaviridae and SARS-associated Coronavirus Strain HSR1. Volume 10, Number 3-March 2004 ...
Support is provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, U.S. National Institutes of Health, Award U24AI162625. ...
"Coronaviridae and SARS-associated Coronavirus Strain HSR1" 10, no. 3 (2004). Vicenzi, Elisa et al. "Coronaviridae and SARS- ... Title : Coronaviridae and SARS-associated Coronavirus Strain HSR1 Personal Author(s) : Vicenzi, Elisa;Canducci, Filippo;Pinna, ... 2004). Coronaviridae and SARS-associated Coronavirus Strain HSR1. 10(3). Vicenzi, Elisa et al. " ...
Coronaviridae Genus. Not listed Information From. B. Rehse-Kupper, R. Ackermann Address. Department of Virology, Neurology ...
cd22381 (PSSM ID: 411968): Conserved Protein Domain Family bat-HKU9-CoV-like_Spike_SD1-2_S1-S2_S2, This group contains the SD-1 and SD-2 subdomains of the S1 subunit C-terminal domain (C-domain), the S1/S2 cleavage region, and the S2 fusion subunit of the spike (S) glycoprotein from betacoronaviruses in the nobecovirus subgenus (D lineage), including Rousettus bat coronavirus HKU9 (Ro-BatCoV HKU9)
In The Coronaviridae; Siddell, S.G., Ed.; Plenum Press: New York, NY, USA, 1995; pp. 389-401. [Google Scholar] ...
Coronaviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. The species Severe acute respiratory syndrome- ...
Coronaviruses are from the family Coronaviridae and are single-stranded RNA viruses, the surface of which is covered by ...
COVID-19 is caused by a coronavirus from the viral family Coronaviridae. Its genetic material consists of a single strand of ...
Categories: Coronaviridae Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 179 ...
Coronavirus is a member of the Coronaviridae family. Also known as the common cold, its spread through the air. It can easily ...
Coronaviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. . The species severe acute respiratory ...
Coronaviridae. Alphacoronavirus. T40364. Human coronavirus 229E. H02442. T40365. Human coronavirus NL63. H02442. ...
Coronaviridae Infections. Nidovirales Infections. RNA Virus Infections. Lung Diseases. Respiratory Tract Diseases. Ritonavir. ...
Human coronaviruses (CoVs) are members of the subfamily Coronavirinae from the family Coronaviridae and the order Nidovirales. ...
FCoV belongs to the family Coronaviridae, a group of enveloped, positive-stranded... read more are considered most important. ...
Vírus (2019-nCoV) patrí medzi koronavírusy čeľade Coronaviridae. Tieto obalené vírusy môžu spôsobovať gastrointestinálne ...
Investigators believe that this may be due to exposure to other so-called "common cold" coronaviridae. If even 10% of the US ...
Coronaviruses (CoVs) are members of the Coronaviridae family that possess positive-sense RNA. These are enveloped viruses ...
COVID-19 is caused by SARS-CoV-2, which is a member of family Coronaviridae, genus Beta coronavirus. ...
Coronavírus - WHO Ndemic Creations and WHO are launching a public awareness campaign bringing together gamers and experts to promote actions everyone can take to stay healthy and learn to detect and act upon misinformation. WHO and GOARN experts comment on decisions made by gamers in real-time and compare it with public health management in real-life scenarios. The game also showcases WHO health and safety COVID-19 ...
Series Introduction] Coronaviruses presents compilations of reviews which present information about coronaviridae. Volumes in ...
Background: COVID-19 is a severe acute respiratory disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, a virus belonging to the Coronaviridae family ...
  • COVID-19 is a severe acute respiratory disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, a virus belonging to the Coronaviridae family. (nih.gov)
  • Coronaviruses are positive sense RNA virus belonging to the Coronaviridae family, which are further subdivided into four genera: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, and Delta Coronaviruses. (preprints.org)
  • coronavirus is part of a group of RNA viruses belonging to the Coronaviridae family, widely distributed in humans and other mammals. (bvsalud.org)
  • Coronaviridae Orthocoronavirinae Letovirinae Alphaletovirus Milecovirus Microhyla letovirus 1 Coronavirus is the common name for Coronaviridae and Orthocoronavirinae, also called Coronavirinae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coronavirus is a member of the Coronaviridae family. (bitrebels.com)
  • COVID-19 is caused by SARS-CoV-2, which is a member of family Coronaviridae, genus Beta coronavirus. (health.mil)
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a member of Coronaviridae family, emerged in 2019 and caused a public health emergency of international concern. (nature.com)
  • Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), an infectious disease, occurs after infecting a human with severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) of the Coronaviridae family in the Nidovirales order. (ssrn.com)
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a serious, potentially life-threatening viral infection caused by a previously unrecognized virus from the Coronaviridae family, the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). (medscape.com)
  • SARS-Related Coronavirus 2 is a wrapped, positive-sense singlestranded RNA infection from the Coronaviridae family and the Betacoronaviridae variety. (phrconference.org)
  • It belongs to the beta genera of the Coronaviridae family, together with SARS coronavirus in 2003 and MERS coronavirus in 2012. (creative-biolabs.com)
  • SARS-CoV-2 belongs to the family Coronaviridae and genus Betacoronavirus . (who.int)
  • Coronaviridae is a family of enveloped, positive-strand RNA viruses which infect amphibians, birds, and mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The family Coronaviridae is organized in 2 sub-families, 5 genera, 26 sub-genera, and 46 species. (wikipedia.org)
  • SARS-CoV-2 is a single-stranded, enveloped, positive-sense ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus that belongs to the family Coronaviridae. (news-medical.net)
  • Infectious bronchitis virus and SARS-CoV belong to Beta Coronaviridae family. (preprints.org)
  • This paper falls within the scope of biological sequence analysis and has as a goal to search the origin(s) and the inter-host(s) of each genome of SARS-CoV-2 by comparing it with all members of Coronaviridae family. (researchsquare.com)
  • The virus that causes COVID-19 belongs to the family Coronaviridae, which includes a group of enveloped, positive-sensed, single-stranded RNA viruses. (researchsquare.com)
  • But health agencies are using health findings of MERS and SARS, whose causative agents are from the same family of coronaviridae, to predict how long the virus survives outside the body. (co.ke)
  • SARS CoV-2 belongs to the subfamily Coronavirinae in the family of Coronaviridae. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Genomic evolution of the Coronaviridae family. (cdc.gov)
  • We've found an average of two new viruses are appearing in humans each year and that the Coronaviridae , Flaviviridae , Togaviridae , Orthomyxoviridae and Paramyxoviridae virus families are likely to be the source of the next pandemic. (www.csiro.au)
  • Two birds had mixed NDV infections (V.3/VII.2 and VII.2/XIII.1.1), and nine were coinfected with viruses of families Astroviridae, Coronaviridae, Orthomyxoviridae, Picornaviridae, Pneumoviridae, and Reoviridae. (bvsalud.org)
  • El SARS-CoV-2 puede permanecer estable en aerosoles hasta 3 horas. (univadis.es)
  • La estabilidad del SARS-CoV-2 es similar a la del SARS-CoV-1 en los diferentes materiales. (univadis.es)
  • El SARS-CoV-2 puede permanecer hasta 9 horas en la piel si no se realiza una desinfección adecuada (Hirose R, 2021). (univadis.es)
  • Este ARNm tiene instrucciones para producir una proteína de superficie que el virus SARS-CoV-2 utiliza para entrar en las células. (univadis.es)
  • El sistema inmunitario de la persona receptora, tras reconocer esta proteína como extraña, produce anticuerpos y activa los linfocitos T, lo que la protegerá cuando entre en contacto con el virus SARS-CoV-2. (univadis.es)
  • Vírus (2019-nCoV) patrí medzi koronavírusy čeľade Coronaviridae. (hartmann.info)
  • Viral matrix proteins found in species of CORONAVIRIDAE. (bvsalud.org)
  • Proteínas de la matriz viral presentes en las especies de virus de la familia CORONAVIRIDAE. (bvsalud.org)
  • Ji " https://ku.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Coronaviridae&oldid=1017819 " hatiye standin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Notably, the presence of OvRFs is correlated with network-based statistics for some virus families such as Coronaviridae, Rhab- doviridae, and Papillomaviridae. (uwo.ca)
  • Investigators believe that this may be due to exposure to other so-called "common cold" coronaviridae. (realclearmarkets.com)
  • Coronaviruses are members of the subfamily Coronavirinae in the family Coronaviridae and the order Nidovirales. (slideshare.net)
  • SARS-CoV-2 is a positive-stranded RNA (+RNA) virus and belongs to Coronaviridae family, Nidovirales order. (hindawi.com)
  • SARS-CoV is a human virus that comes under the order of Nidovirales and the family of Coronaviridae. (eurekaselect.com)
  • Strains are related to SARS-CoV-2 and other Coronaviridae viral infections via their human orthologues. (infrafrontier.eu)
  • The family Coronaviridae contains about 39 different species of coronaviruses . (medicalxpress.com)
  • Coronaviridae is a family of enveloped, positive-strand RNA viruses which infect amphibians, birds, and mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coronaviridae is a diverse family of viruses that can infect a broad range of animals and are prone to zoonotic spillovers. (nature.com)
  • Coronaviridae is a family of viruses that primarily infect animals and also have their reservoir in animals. (ihs.ac.at)
  • Members of the family Coronaviridae are large, enveloped, plus-stranded RNA viruses that cause disease in humans and domestic animals. (rtmagazine.com)
  • Coronaviridae Orthocoronavirinae Letovirinae Alphaletovirus Milecovirus Microhyla letovirus 1 Coronavirus is the common name for Coronaviridae and Orthocoronavirinae, also called Coronavirinae. (wikipedia.org)
  • SARS-CoV-2 is a Betacoronavirus, one of four genera belonging to the Coronaviridae subfamily Orthocoronavirinae. (nih.gov)
  • EMMA strains that could be used for Coronaviridae infection research. (infrafrontier.eu)
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a serious, potentially life-threatening viral infection caused by a previously unrecognized virus from the Coronaviridae family, the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). (medscape.com)
  • SARS-Related Coronavirus 2 is a wrapped, positive-sense singlestranded RNA infection from the Coronaviridae family and the Betacoronaviridae variety. (phrconference.org)
  • The family Coronaviridae is organized in 2 sub-families, 5 genera, 26 sub-genera, and 46 species. (wikipedia.org)
  • It belongs to the beta genera of the Coronaviridae family, together with SARS coronavirus in 2003 and MERS coronavirus in 2012. (creative-biolabs.com)
  • SARS-CoV-2 er et membrankledd positivkjedet RNA-virus i familien Coronaviridae . (tidsskriftet.no)
  • The causative agent is porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), which belongs to the family of Coronaviridae. (epizone-eu.net)
  • A coronavirus is an RNA virus of the family Coronaviridae and is so-named because the outer perimeter of each round virus particle resemble a spiky crown similar in shape to the sun's corona. (wordsmyth.net)
  • Among all the proteins expressed by the virus, RNA helicase is a fundamental protein for viral replication, and it is highly conserved among the coronaviridae family. (dundee.ac.uk)