Densitometry: The measurement of the density of a material by measuring the amount of light or radiation passing through (or absorbed by) the material.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal: Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency.Electrophoresis, Cellulose Acetate: Electrophoresis in which cellulose acetate is the diffusion medium.Retinal Pigments: Photosensitive protein complexes of varied light absorption properties which are expressed in the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are OPSINS conjugated with VITAMIN A-based chromophores. Chromophores capture photons of light, leading to the activation of opsins and a biochemical cascade that ultimately excites the photoreceptor cells.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Calcaneus: The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.Chromatography, Thin Layer: Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Osteoporotic Fractures: Breaks in bones resulting from low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration characteristic of OSTEOPOROSIS.alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency: Deficiency of the protease inhibitor ALPHA 1-ANTITRYPSIN that manifests primarily as PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA and LIVER CIRRHOSIS.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Bone Diseases, MetabolicPulmonary Emphysema: Enlargement of air spaces distal to the TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES where gas-exchange normally takes place. This is usually due to destruction of the alveolar wall. Pulmonary emphysema can be classified by the location and distribution of the lesions.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Maximal Midexpiratory Flow Rate: Measurement of rate of airflow over the middle half of a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination (from the 25 percent level to the 75 percent level). Common abbreviations are MMFR and FEF 25%-75%.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Residual Volume: The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a maximal expiration. Common abbreviation is RV.Fovea Centralis: An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Diphosphonates: Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.Ophthalmoscopes: Devices for examining the interior of the eye, permitting the clear visualization of the structures of the eye at any depth. (UMDNS, 1999)Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Emphysema: A pathological accumulation of air in tissues or organs.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Color Vision Defects: Defects of color vision are mainly hereditary traits but can be secondary to acquired or developmental abnormalities in the CONES (RETINA). Severity of hereditary defects of color vision depends on the degree of mutation of the ROD OPSINS genes (on X CHROMOSOME and CHROMOSOME 3) that code the photopigments for red, green and blue.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Electrophoresis, Agar Gel: Electrophoresis in which agar or agarose gel is used as the diffusion medium.Flicker Fusion: The point or frequency at which all flicker of an intermittent light stimulus disappears.Photography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Skinfold Thickness: The measurement of subcutaneous fat located directly beneath the skin by grasping a fold of skin and subcutaneous fat between the thumb and forefinger and pulling it away from the underlying muscle tissue. The thickness of the double layer of skin and subcutaneous tissue is then read with a caliper. The five most frequently measured sites are the upper arm, below the scapula, above the hip bone, the abdomen, and the thigh. Its application is the determination of relative fatness, of changes in physical conditioning programs, and of the percentage of body fat in desirable body weight. (From McArdle, et al., Exercise Physiology, 2d ed, p496-8)Pupil: The aperture in the iris through which light passes.Fractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Photoreceptor Cells: Specialized cells that detect and transduce light. They are classified into two types based on their light reception structure, the ciliary photoreceptors and the rhabdomeric photoreceptors with MICROVILLI. Ciliary photoreceptor cells use OPSINS that activate a PHOSPHODIESTERASE phosphodiesterase cascade. Rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells use opsins that activate a PHOSPHOLIPASE C cascade.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Indocyanine Green: A tricarbocyanine dye that is used diagnostically in liver function tests and to determine blood volume and cardiac output.Autoradiography: The making of a radiograph of an object or tissue by recording on a photographic plate the radiation emitted by radioactive material within the object. (Dorland, 27th ed)Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins: Proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid, normally albumin and globulin present in the ratio of 8 to 1. Increases in protein levels are of diagnostic value in neurological diseases. (Brain and Bannister's Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p221)Lasers: An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.Macula Lutea: An oval area in the retina, 3 to 5 mm in diameter, usually located temporal to the posterior pole of the eye and slightly below the level of the optic disk. It is characterized by the presence of a yellow pigment diffusely permeating the inner layers, contains the fovea centralis in its center, and provides the best phototropic visual acuity. It is devoid of retinal blood vessels, except in its periphery, and receives nourishment from the choriocapillaris of the choroid. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Body Water: Fluids composed mainly of water found within the body.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Fundus Oculi: The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Isoelectric Focusing: Electrophoresis in which a pH gradient is established in a gel medium and proteins migrate until they reach the site (or focus) at which the pH is equal to their isoelectric point.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells: Photosensitive afferent neurons located primarily within the FOVEA CENTRALIS of the MACULA LUTEA. There are three major types of cone cells (red, blue, and green) whose photopigments have different spectral sensitivity curves. Retinal cone cells operate in daylight vision (at photopic intensities) providing color recognition and central visual acuity.Electrophoresis: An electrochemical process in which macromolecules or colloidal particles with a net electric charge migrate in a solution under the influence of an electric current.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Bone Density Conservation Agents: Agents that inhibit BONE RESORPTION and/or favor BONE MINERALIZATION and BONE REGENERATION. They are used to heal BONE FRACTURES and to treat METABOLIC BONE DISEASES such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Dark Adaptation: Adjustment of the eyes under conditions of low light. The sensitivity of the eye to light is increased during dark adaptation.Immunoblotting: Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.
... densitometry, x-ray MeSH E01.370.350.700.200 --- electrokymography MeSH E01.370.350.700.225 --- fluoroscopy MeSH E01.370. ... corneal topography MeSH E01.370.380.225 --- electroretinography MeSH E01.370.380.235 --- eye movements MeSH E01.370.380.235.280 ...
"PEMF For Treatment Of Corneal Disorders". S. Dhanasekaran, T. Mark Doherty, John Kenneth and TB Trials Study Group. (Mar 2010 ... Northern blot densitometry or semi-quantitative PCR (PCR mimics). Now, in the genome era, it is possible to carry out a more ...
In physical fitness, body composition is used to describe the percentages of fat, bone, water and muscle in human bodies. Because muscular tissue takes up less space in our body than fat tissue, our body composition, as well as our weight, determines leanness. Two people of the same sex and body weight may look completely different because they have a different body composition. The most accurate estimation of body composition is derived from body density by means of the equation of fractional densities which states that the overall density of a mixture containing more than one substance (each with a different density) can be calculated if the proportion and density of each component substance is known. For determination of body composition the body is often assumed to be composed of four basic substances ("four compartment model") with the general form of the equation as follows: 1 / D b = w / D w + f / D f + p / D p + m / D m {\displaystyle 1/Db=w/Dw+f/Df+p/Dp+m/Dm} Where: D b {\displaystyle ...
Nástup digitálnej skiagrafie hrudníka viedol k rozvoju nových spôsobov zberu a spracovania údajov a následnej výstavby obrazu. Cieľom bola čo najvyššia možná kvalita snímky a zvýšenie citlivosti na čo najmenšie patologické zmeny. Zobrazovanie duálnou energiou (DEI, dual-energy imaging) spojené so následnou subtrakciou obrazov využíva vlastnosť kostí a mäkkých tkanív, ktoré majú odlišné absorpčné koeficienty rtg žiarenia v závislosti od použitej energie. Kombinácia dvoch snímok s odlišnou energiou (napr 40 a 120 kV) umožňuje napr. lepšie zobrazenie drobných pľúcnych nodulov a tiež určiť, či sú skalcifikované.[3] Techniky temporálnej subtrakcie sú založené na možnosti subtrakcie dvoch snímok hrudníka konkrétneho pacienta, urobené v rôznom čase. Takáto subtrakcia odfiltruje štruktúry, ktoré sa v čase nezmenili a naopak zvýrazní zmeny, ktoré sa mohli objaviť na aktuálnej snímke. Zvyšuje tak šancu na diagnostiku včasných ...
A sonometer is a diagnostic instrument used to measure the tension, frequency or density of vibrations. They are used in medical settings to test both hearing and bone density. A sonometer, or audiometer, is used to determine hearing sensitivity, while a clinical bone sonometer measures bone density to help determine such conditions as the risk of osteoporosis. In audiology, the device is used to test for hearing loss and other disorders of the ear. The audiometer measures the ability to hear sounds at frequencies normally detectable by the human ear. Several test are usually conducted using the audiometer which will then be used to assess hearing ability. Results typically are recorded on a chart known as an audiogram. A clinical bone sonometer is a device which tests for the risk of bone fractures associated with osteoporosis. This test, called an ultrasound bone densitometry screening, is not typically used for diagnostic purposes; it is generally used as a risk ...
There are two types of bone marrow. Red marrow is made mostly of myeloid tissue (which makes new blood cells). Red blood cells, platelets, and most white blood cells are created by red marrow. Yellow marrow is made mainly of fat cells. Both types of bone marrow contain many blood vessels and capillaries. When a person is born, all of their bone marrow is red. As the person ages, more and more of the bone marrow changes to the yellow type. By adulthood, about half of a person's bone marrow is red. Red marrow is found mainly in the flat bones - like the hip bone, breast bone, skull, ribs, vertebra (the bones that make up the spinal column), and shoulder blades - and in the cancellous ("spongy") material at the ends of the long bones like the femur (thigh bone) and humerus (upper forearm bone). Yellow marrow is found inside the hollow middle section, or medullary cavity of the long bones. In cases of severe blood loss, the body can change yellow marrow back to red marrow so that more blood cells ...
... is constantly being created and replaced in a process known as remodeling. This ongoing turnover of bone is a process of resorption followed by replacement of bone with little change in shape. This is accomplished through osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cells are stimulated by a variety of signals, and together referred to as a remodeling unit. Approximately 10% of the skeletal mass of an adult is remodelled each year.[42] The purpose of remodeling is to regulate calcium homeostasis, repair microdamaged bones from everyday stress, and to shape the skeleton during growth.[citation needed] Repeated stress, such as weight-bearing exercise or bone healing, results in the bone thickening at the points of maximum stress (Wolff's law). It has been hypothesized that this is a result of bone's piezoelectric properties, which cause bone to generate small electrical potentials under stress.[43] The action of osteoblasts and osteoclasts are controlled by a number of chemical enzymes that either promote or ...
The areal density (also known as area density, surface density, superficial density, or density thickness) of a two-dimensional object is calculated as the mass per unit area. The SI derived unit is: kilogram per square metre (kg·m−2). In the paper and fabric industries, it is called grammage and is expressed in grams per square meter (gsm); for paper in particular, it may be expressed as pounds per ream of standard sizes ("basis ream"). It can be calculated as: ρ A = m A {\displaystyle \rho _{A}={\frac {m}{A}}} or ρ A = ρ ⋅ l {\displaystyle \rho _{A}=\rho \cdot l} where, A special type of area density is called column (mass) density (also columnar mass density), denoted ρA or σ. It is the mass of substance per unit area integrated along a path; It is obtained integrating volumetric density ρ {\displaystyle \rho } over a column: σ = ∫ ρ d ⁡ s . {\displaystyle \sigma =\int \rho \;\operatorname {d} s.} In general the integration path can be slant or oblique incidence (as in, for ...
... is constantly being created and replaced in a process known as remodeling. This ongoing turnover of bone is a process of resorption followed by replacement of bone with little change in shape. This is accomplished through osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cells are stimulated by a variety of signals, and together referred to as a remodeling unit. Approximately 10% of the skeletal mass of an adult is remodelled each year.[42] The purpose of remodeling is to regulate calcium homeostasis, repair microdamaged bones from everyday stress, and to shape the skeleton during growth.[citation needed] Repeated stress, such as weight-bearing exercise or bone healing, results in the bone thickening at the points of maximum stress (Wolff's law). It has been hypothesized that this is a result of bone's piezoelectric properties, which cause bone to generate small electrical potentials under stress.[43] The action of osteoblasts and osteoclasts are controlled by a number of chemical enzymes that either promote or ...
... (also known medically by several other names) is pain coming from a bone. It occurs as a result of a wide range of diseases and/or physical conditions and may severely impair the quality of life for patients who suffer from it. Bone pain belongs to the class of deep somatic pain, often experienced as a dull pain that cannot be localized accurately by the patient. This is in contrast with the pain which is mediated by superficial receptors in, e.g., the skin. Bone pain can have several possible causes ranging from extensive physical stress to serious diseases such as cancer. For many years it has been known that bones are innervated with sensory neurons. Yet their exact anatomy remained obscure due to the contrasting physical properties of bone and neural tissue. More recently, it is becoming clear what types of nerves innervated which sections of bone. The periosteal layer of bone tissue is highly pain-sensitive and an important cause of pain in several disease conditions causing bone ...
Mouse and other animal models are being heavily used to determine the neuron tissue densities in bone[5] and mechanisms for maintenance of bone pain.[1] This information is pertinent to determining the biological and physiological components of pain in the bone. By creating a detailed map relating the types of nerves going through the different sections of bone, it is possible to pin-point locations in the bone that are at a higher risk of being susceptible to bone pain.[citation needed]. Treatments focusing on biological components such as cannabinoid receptors are being tested for effectiveness. Through testing in mouse models, it has been shown that activation of the CB-1 receptor helps reduce reactions associated with acute pain, indicating that it alleviates bone pain. Thus, a new target for potential treatments is activation of the CB-1 receptor.[17]. Modern research and techniques are attempting to provide longer-lasting and more effective methods of treating bone pain by developing and ...
According to Jeff Smith, the earliest forerunner drawings of what later became the Bone cousins occurred when he was about five, and sitting in his living room drawing, and he drew what looked like an old C-shaped telephone handset receiver, which emerged as a frowning character with its mouth wide open. Elements of that character and its demeanor found their way into the character Phoney Bone, the grouchy cousin to Fone Bone. His name is derived from "Fonebone", the generic surname that Don Martin gave to many of the characters that appeared in his Mad magazine strips.[17] Smith began to create comics with the Bone characters as early as 1970, when he was about 10 years old.[18]. A major influence on Smith was Scrooge McDuck creator Carl Barks. Alluding to Barks' influence on Bone, Smith commented, "I always wanted Uncle Scrooge to go on a longer adventure. I thought, 'Man, if you could just get a comic book of that quality, the length of say, War and Peace, or The Odyssey or something, that ...
Off-label prescription of HGH is controversial and may be illegal.[46] Claims for GH as an anti-aging treatment date back to 1990 when the New England Journal of Medicine published a study wherein GH was used to treat 12 men over 60.[47] At the conclusion of the study, all the men showed statistically significant increases in lean body mass and bone mineral density, while the control group did not. The authors of the study noted that these improvements were the opposite of the changes that would normally occur over a 10- to 20-year aging period. Despite the fact the authors at no time claimed that GH had reversed the aging process itself, their results were misinterpreted as indicating that GH is an effective anti-aging agent.[48][49][50] This has led to organizations such as the controversial American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine promoting the use of this hormone as an "anti-aging agent".[51] A Stanford University School of Medicine meta-analysis of clinical studies on the subject published ...
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Linear Low Density Poly Ethylene എന്നാണ് മുഴുവൻ പേര്. എഥിലീനിനോടൊപ്പം 1-ബ്യൂട്ടീൻ, 1-ഹെക്സീൻ, 1-ഒക്റ്റേൻ, എന്നീ സഹഏകകങ്ങളും ചേർത്ത് പോളിമറീകരിക്കുന്നു. ഋജുവായ അധികം ദൈർഘ്യമില്ലാത്ത ശൃംഖലകൾക്ക് വളരെ കുറിയ, ഏതാനും ശാഖകളും കാണുന്നു. 0.915 സാന്ദ്രത ഏതാണ്ട് 0.915-0.925 g/cm3. കനം കുറഞ്ഞ സഞ്ചികൾ, ഷീറ്റുകൾ, ഫിലിം എന്നിവ നിർമ്മിക്കാനുതകുന്നു. മുഖ്യമായും പാക്കിംഗിനാണ് എൽ.എൽ.ഡിപിഇ ഉപയോഗപ്പെടുന്നത്.. ...
Data of corneal densitometry and corneal thickness were collected using the Oculus Pentacam at the pretreatment visit and ... and posttreatment corneal densitometry and corneal thickness value of keratoconus (KCN) patients managed via contact lenses ( ... The corneal clarity diversity found was not statistically significant at 12 months post treatment (P,0.05). Corneal thickness ... On the other hand, corneal clarity reduces with disease progression in cases managed with CLs only. Analysis of Oculus Pentacam ...
Corneal densitometry was expressed in standardized grayscale units (GSU).. Results: the mean corneal densitometry over the ... Corneal densitometry increases with age, but corneal keratometry and refractive parameters do not affect light scattering in ... Corneal densitometry; Corneal transparency; Cornea. Subjects:. Medical sciences , Medicine , Ophtalmology. Medical sciences , ... Corneal densitometry and its correlation with age, pachymetry, corneal curvature, and refraction ...
The corneal densitometry values over the annulus of 2 to 6 mm followed a skewed distribution. The mean corneal densitometry ... Corneal densitometry, which also is known as corneal backscatter, relates to corneal transparency and is influenced by changes ... Purpose: To investigate the correlation between corneal densitometry, corneal topographic parameters, and corneal biomechanical ... decrease in corneal thickness, and steeping of corneal curvature might underlie the correlations between corneal densitometry, ...
... called a corneal densitometry map. In practice, corneal densitometry has been described in infectious keratitis, 12,13 corneal ... Corneal densitometry measurements subdivided by (A) surface area and (B) corneal layer; *** refers to a statistical ... Corneal densitometry measurements subdivided by (A) surface area and (B) corneal layer; *** refers to a statistical ... Otri A Fares U Al-Aqaba MA Dua H. Corneal densitometry as an indicator of corneal health. Ophthalmology . 2012; 119: 501-508. [ ...
Corneal Densitometry: Repeatability in Eyes With Keratoconus and Postcollagen Cross-Linking. In: Cornea. 2016 ; Vol. 35, No. 6 ... Corneal Densitometry: Repeatability in Eyes With Keratoconus and Postcollagen Cross-Linking. / Pahuja, Natasha; Shetty, Rohit; ... Pahuja N, Shetty R, Subbiah P, Nagaraja H, Nuijts RMMA, Jayadev C. Corneal Densitometry: Repeatability in Eyes With Keratoconus ... Corneal Densitometry: Repeatability in Eyes With Keratoconus and Postcollagen Cross-Linking. Natasha Pahuja, Rohit Shetty, ...
One-Year Follow-Up of Changes in Corneal Densitometry After Accelerated (45 mW/cm2) Transepithelial Corneal Collagen Cross- ... Corneal Densitometry in Healthy Corneas and Its Correlation With Endothelial Morphometry. Tekin, Kemal; Sekeroglu, Mehmet Ali; ... In Vivo Confocal Microscopy Reveals Corneal Reinnervation After Treatment of Neurotrophic Keratopathy With Corneal ... IC3D Classification of Corneal Dystrophies-Edition 2. Weiss, Jayne S.; Møller, Hans Ulrik; Aldave, Anthony J.; More ...
Corneal densitometry and its correlation with age, corneal curvature and refraction. Poster Details. First Author: F. Poyales ... The mean corneal densitometry over the total area was 16.46 ± 1.85 GSU. For total densitometry the Pearsons correlation ... The corneal densitometry increases with age, but the corneal keratometry and the refractive parameters do not affect light ... Corneal densitometry was obtained with Oculus Pentacam®. Densitometry measurements were expressed in standardized grayscale ...
Densitometry Analysis of Corneal Backscatter After Pre-Descemet Endothelial Keratoplasty for Pseudophakic Bullous Keratopathy. ... Comparison of Corneal Power and Corneal Astigmatism of Different Diameter Zones Centered on the Pupil and Corneal Apex Using ... Corneal Topographic, Anatomic, and Biomechanical Properties in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome. Arriola- ... Topography and Pachymetry Guided, Rapid Epi-on Corneal Cross-Linking for Keratoconus: 7-year Study Results. Caruso, Ciro; ...
To establish a normal-value range for corneal densitometry in healthy subjects and to assess corneal densitometry changes ... Corneal densitometry changes following corneal refractive surgery measured with a Pentacam-Scheimpflug system. Poster Details. ... Corneal densitometry does change as a result of the refractive surgery procedure for all laser-based techniques under analysis ... The devices own software was used to assess corneal optical densitometry in various ring-shaped zones (0-2 mm, 2-6 mm and 0-12 ...
Assessment of corneal densitometry in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Scleral manifestations of the disease include an anterior ...
Corneal densitometry scores in participants on treatment. *Corneal clouding score over time in patients on treatment. ...
Corneal densitometry after photorefractive keratectomy, laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, and small-incision lenticule ... on corneal biomechanical properties.We used the ocular response analyzer to measure corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal ... Corneal densitometry after photorefractive keratectomy, laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, and small-incision lenticule ... Central corneal haze increased by radial keratotomy following photorefractive keratectomy. To report a case of central corneal ...
Assessment of Corneal Haze After PRK and the Effect of Sutureless Amniotic Membrane Graft by Corneal Densitometry Anthony R. ... Metabolomic Analysis in Corneal Lenticules From Contact Lens Wearers Min Li, MD; Lin Liu, MM; Chen Qu, BM; Yuehui Shi, BM; Lina ... Iontophoresis Corneal Cross-linking With Enhanced Fluence and Pulsed UV-A Light: 3-Year Clinical Results Cosimo Mazzotta, MD, ... Can the Corvis ST Estimate Corneal Viscoelasticity? Ahmed Abass, PhD; Cynthia J. Roberts, PhD; Bernardo Lopes, MD; Ashkan ...
Increased corneal densitometry as a subclinical corneal change associated with multiple myeloma. ... Noninvasive assessment of corneal alterations associated with monoclonal gammopathy.. Ichii M, Koh S, Maeno S, Busch C, Oie Y, ... Prominent regression of corneal crystalline deposits in multiple myeloma after treatment with proteasome inhibitor. ...
Survival Analysis of Corneal Densitometry After Collagen Cross-Linking for Progressive Keratoconus. ... Comparison of Different Corneal Power Readings From Pentacam in Post-laser In Situ Keratomileusis Eyes. ...
Protein bands were measured by densitometry. Each experiment was performed in triplicate. ... Although corneal epithelial cells have been reported to originate from the surface ectoderm, 1 corneal stromal cells and ... cultured HCEC transplantation could be a treatment for corneal endothelial diseases or for the repair of corneal damages. For ... 13 Human corneal endothelial cells obtained from the remnant donor tissue after corneal transplantation were harvested on or ...
Everything relating to Densitometry: compilations of facts, news, background knowledge, product information and market trends ... Increased corneal densitometry as a subclinical corneal change associated with multiple myeloma Increased corneal densitometry ... Publications Densitometry. * Energies, Vol. 10, Pages 1205: Physical and Compression Properties of Pellets Manufactured with ... as a subclinical corneal change associated with multiple myeloma Eye advance online publication, July 14 2017. doi:10.1038/eye. ...
The densitometry of the immunoreactive bands was quantified with ImageJ software. According to our comparison of the expression ... Corneal epithelial wound healing. The mouse central corneal epithelium (2 mm diameter) was removed by using the Algerbrush II ... Measurement of corneal mechanical sensitivity. Corneal esthesiometry was performed according to our previous descriptions [40, ... Corneal reactive oxygen species and glutathione staining. For ROS staining, fresh corneal cryostat sections were incubated with ...
Sorcha Ni Dhubhghaill, Jos J. Rozema, Marie-Jose Tassignon; Corneal Scheimpflug Densitometry Values measured by Pentacam in ... Holladay et al; Corneal Power Measurements Using Scheimpflug Imaging in Eyes With Prior Corneal Refractive Surgery, J Refract ... Ambrosio et al; Corneal-thickness spatial profile and corneal-volume distribution: Tomographic indices to detect keratoconus, J ... The maximum and average corneal opacity is displayed in a colour map. Opacities can also be viewed in selected layers. Corneal ...
Objective: To assess the spatial distribution and the time course of the increased corneal densitometry (corneal light ... 0.0 to 3.0 mm from the corneal centre, in patients treated with CXL. In Paper IV the corneal densitometry (light scattering) ... Interventions: Corneal cross-linking according to the Dresden protocol or CRXL.. Main Outcomes and Measures: Change in corneal ... Conclusions: Analysis of corneal light scattering/densitometry shows tissue changes at the expected treatment location, and may ...
Objective: To assess the spatial distribution and the time course of the increased corneal densitometry (corneal light ... central corneal thickness (CCT), corneal curvature (CC), anterior chamber volume (ACV), corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal ... Interventions: Corneal cross-linking according to the Dresden protocol or CRXL.. Main Outcomes and Measures: Change in corneal ... Treatment Effect and Corneal Light Scattering With 2 Corneal Cross-linking Protocols: A Randomized Clinical Trial2015Inngår i: ...
Objective: To assess the spatial distribution and the time course of the increased corneal densitometry (corneal light ... Interventions: Corneal cross-linking according to the Dresden protocol or CRXL.. Main Outcomes and Measures: Change in corneal ... Treatment Effect and Corneal Light Scattering With 2 Corneal Cross-linking Protocols: A Randomized Clinical Trial2015In: JAMA ... Conclusions and Relevance: The degree of corneal light backscatter relates to the reduction in corneal steepness after cross- ...
Corneal Haze After Transepithelial Collagen Cross-linking for Keratoconus: A Scheimpflug Densitometry Analysis ... Purpose: To quantitate corneal haze and analyze the postoperative time course of corneal haze after transepithelial corneal ... Corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), and corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc) were evaluated ... Comparative Evaluation of Central Corneal Thickness in Cross-Linked Keratoconic Eyes. Purpose: To compare the central corneal ...
Corneal Haze After Transepithelial Collagen Cross-linking for Keratoconus: A Scheimpflug Densitometry Analysis ... Purpose: To quantitate corneal haze and analyze the postoperative time course of corneal haze after transepithelial corneal ... Corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), and corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc) were evaluated ... Comparative Evaluation of Central Corneal Thickness in Cross-Linked Keratoconic Eyes. Purpose: To compare the central corneal ...
To investigate the corneal biomechanical responses of subclinical keratoconus with normal topographic, topometric, and ... An early finding of keratoconus: increase in corneal densitometry. Cornea. 2018;37:580-586. doi:10.1097/ICO.0000000000001537 [ ... An early finding of keratoconus: increase in corneal densitometry. Cornea. 2018;37:580-586. doi:10.1097/ICO.0000000000001537 [ ... speed of the corneal apex at the first applanation), A2 velocity (A2V = speed of the corneal apex at the second applanation), ...

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