A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The leaves are the source of cilantro and the seeds are the source of coriander, both of which are used in SPICES.
A plant genus of the family LYTHRACEAE that is the source of henna and has cytotoxic activity.
A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae best known for cucumber (CUCUMIS SATIVUS) and cantaloupe (CUCUMIS MELO). Watermelon is a different genus, CITRULLUS. Bitter melon may refer to MOMORDICA or this genus.
Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.

Fitness of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson in the cilantro phyllosphere. (1/23)

The epiphytic fitness of Salmonella enterica was assessed on cilantro plants by using a strain of S. enterica serovar Thompson that was linked to an outbreak resulting from cilantro. Salmonella serovar Thompson had the ability to colonize the surface of cilantro leaves, where it was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at high densities on the veins and in natural lesions. The population sizes of two common colonizers of plant surfaces, Pantoea agglomerans and Pseudomonas chlororaphis, were 10-fold higher than that of the human pathogen on cilantro incubated at 22 degrees C. However, Salmonella serovar Thompson achieved significantly higher population levels and accounted for a higher proportion of the total culturable bacterial flora on cilantro leaves when the plants were incubated at warm temperatures, such as 30 degrees C, after inoculation, indicating that the higher growth rates exhibited by Salmonella serovar Thompson at warm temperatures may increase the competitiveness of this organism in the phyllosphere. The tolerance of Salmonella serovar Thompson to dry conditions on plants at 60% relative humidity was at least equal to that of P. agglomerans and P. chlororaphis. Moreover, after exposure to low humidity on cilantro, Salmonella serovar Thompson recovered under high humidity to achieve its maximum population size in the cilantro phyllosphere. Visualization by CLSM of green fluorescent protein-tagged Salmonella serovar Thompson and dsRed-tagged P. agglomerans inoculated onto cilantro revealed that the human pathogen and the bacterial epiphyte formed large heterogeneous aggregates on the leaf surface. Our studies support the hypothesis that preharvest contamination of crops by S. enterica plays a role in outbreaks linked to fresh fruits and vegetables.  (+info)

Water-soluble constituents of coriander. (2/23)

From the water-soluble portion of the methanol extract of coriander (fruit of Coriandrum sativum L.), which has been used as a spice and medicine since antiquity, 33 compounds, including two new monoterpenoids, four new monoterpenoid glycosides, two new monoterpenoid glucoside sulfates and two new aromatic compound glycosides were obtained. Their structures, were clarified by spectral investigation.  (+info)

Production of autoinducer 2 in Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson contributes to its fitness in chickens but not on cilantro leaf surfaces. (3/23)

Food-borne illness caused by Salmonella enterica has been linked traditionally to poultry products but is associated increasingly with fresh fruits and vegetables. We have investigated the role of the production of autoinducer 2 (AI-2) in the ability of S. enterica serovar Thompson to colonize the chicken intestine and the cilantro phyllosphere. A mutant of S. enterica serovar Thompson that is defective in AI-2 production was constructed by insertional mutagenesis of luxS. The population size of the S. enterica serovar Thompson parental strain was significantly higher than that of its LuxS(-) mutant in the intestine, spleen, and droppings of chicks 12 days after their oral inoculation with the strains in a ratio of 1:1. In contrast, no significant difference in the population dynamics of the parental and LuxS(-) strain was observed after their inoculation singly or in mixtures onto cilantro plants. Digital image analysis revealed that 54% of S. enterica serovar Thompson cells were present in large aggregates on cilantro leaves but that the frequency distributions of the size of aggregates formed by the parental strain and the LuxS(-) mutant were not significantly different. Carbon utilization profiles indicated that the AI-2-producing strain utilized a variety of amino and organic acids more efficiently than its LuxS(-) mutant but that most sugars were utilized similarly in both strains. Thus, inherent differences in the nutrients available to S. enterica in the phyllosphere and in the chicken intestine may underlie the differential contribution of AI-2 synthesis to the fitness of S. enterica in these environments.  (+info)

A multifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase from Hedera helix L. (English ivy) can synthesize 16- and 18-carbon monoene and diene products. (4/23)

A desaturase with 83% sequence identity to the coriander delta(4)-16:0-ACP desaturase was isolated from developing seeds of Hedera helix (English ivy). Expression of the ivy desaturase in Arabidopsis resulted in the accumulation of 16:1delta(4) and its expected elongation product 18:1delta(6) (petroselinic acid). Expression in Escherichia coli resulted in the accumulation of soluble, active protein that was purified to apparent homogeneity. In vitro assays confirmed delta(4) desaturation with 16:0-ACP; however, with 18:0-acyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturation occurred at the delta(9) position. The ivy desaturase also converted 16:1delta(9)-ACP and 18:1delta(9)-ACP to the corresponding delta(4,9) dienes. These data suggest at least two distinct substrate binding modes, one placing C4 at the diiron active site and the other placing C9 at the active site. In the latter case, 18:0 would likely bind in an extended conformation as described for the castor desaturase with 9-carbons accommodated in the cavity beyond the dirron site. However, delta(4) desaturation would require the accommodation of 12 carbons for C16 substrates or 14 carbons for C18 substrates. The amino acids lining the substrate binding cavity of ivy and castor desaturases are conserved except for T117R and P179I (castor/ivy). Paradoxically, both substitutions, when introduced into the castor desaturase, favored the binding of shorter acyl chains. Thus, it seems likely that delta(4) desaturation would require a non-extended, perhaps U-shaped, substrate conformation. A cis double bond may facilitate the initiation of such a non-extended conformation in the monounsaturated substrates. The multifunctional properties of the ivy desaturase make it well suited for further dissection of the determinants of regiospecificity.  (+info)

Genomic structures and characterization of the 5'-flanking regions of acyl carrier protein and Delta4-palmitoyl-ACP desaturase genes from Coriandrum sativum. (5/23)

The seed-specific or seed-predominant promoters of acyl carrier protein (Cs-ACP1) and Delta4-palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (Cs-4PAD) genes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of petroselinic acid, were isolated from coriander (Coriandrum sativum) and analyzed in coriander endosperms and transgenic Arabidopsis. The expression of Cs-ACP1 and Cs-4PAD genes was coordinately regulated during seed development.  (+info)

Accumulation of calcium in the centre of leaves of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is due to an uncoupling of water and ion transport. (6/23)

 (+info)

Essential oils in the treatment of intestinal dysbiosis: A preliminary in vitro study. (7/23)

INTRODUCTION: Dysbiosis is associated with a number of gastrointestinal and systemic disorders. There is a need for selectively acting antimicrobial agents capable of inhibiting the growth of potentially pathogenic microorganisms, or those found to be out of balance, while not negatively impacting the bulk gastrointestinal tract microflora. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this in vitro study is to examine the potential of a selection of essential oils as agents to treat dysbiosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight essential oils were examined using the agar dilution method, including Carum carvi, Citrus aurantium var. amara, Foeniculum vulgare dulce, Illicium verum, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha arvensis, Mentha x piperita, and Trachyspermum copticum. Doubling dilutions of the essential oils were tested against 12 species of intestinal bacteria, which represent the major genera found in the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT). RESULTS: Carum carvi, Lavandula angustifolia, Trachyspermum copticum, and Citrus aurantium var. amara essential oils displayed the greatest degree of selectivity, inhibiting the growth of potential pathogens at concentrations that had no effect on the beneficial bacteria examined. CONCLUSION: The most promising essential oils for the treatment of intestinal dysbiosis are Carum carvi, Lavandula angustifolia, Trachyspermum copticum, and Citrus aurantium var. amara. The herbs from which these oils are derived have long been used in the treatment of gastrointestinal symptoms and the in vitro results of this study suggest that their ingestion will have little detrimental impact on beneficial members of the GIT microflora. More research is needed, however, to investigate tolerability and safety concerns, and verify the selective action of these agents.  (+info)

Potential of coriander (Coriandrum sativum) oil as a natural antimicrobial compound in controlling Campylobacter jejuni in raw meat. (8/23)

Twelve essential oils were tested in vitro for antimicrobial activities against several strains of Campylobacter jejuni, a pathogen causing food-borne diseases worldwide. Using disk diffusion and minimal inhibitory concentration determination assays, we noted that coriander oil exhibited the strongest antimicrobial activity against all tested strains. The oil had a bactericidal effect on the target bacteria. In evaluating the antimicrobial potency of coriander oil against C. jejuni on beef and chicken meat at 4 degrees C and 32 degrees C, it was found that the oil reduced the bacterial cell load in a dose-dependent manner. The type of meat and temperature did not influence the antimicrobial activity of the oil. This study indicates the potential of coriander oil to serve as a natural antimicrobial compound against C. jejuni in food.  (+info)

'Coriandrum' is the medical term for a plant species that belongs to the family Apiaceae, also known as the carrot or parsley family. The most common and well-known member of this genus is Coriandrum sativum, which is commonly referred to as coriander or cilantro.

Coriander has been used for centuries in cooking and traditional medicine. Both its leaves and seeds have a distinct aroma and flavor that are widely used in various cuisines around the world. The leaves are often called cilantro, especially in North America, while the seeds are known as coriander.

In addition to its culinary uses, coriander has been reported to possess several medicinal properties. It has been traditionally used to treat digestive disorders such as nausea, bloating, and flatulence. Some studies suggest that coriander may have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects, although more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits.

It's worth noting that while 'Coriandrum' is a medical term for the plant genus, it is not typically used in clinical or medical contexts unless discussing its medicinal properties or potential therapeutic applications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lawsonia plant" is not a recognized medical term. Lawsonia inermis, also known as the henna plant, is sometimes used in traditional medicine and body adornment, but it is not a term that would be found in a standard medical dictionary or resource.

The Lawsonia plant contains lawsone, a natural dye that has been used for centuries to stain skin, hair, nails, and wool a reddish-brown color. In some traditional medicine systems, Lawsonia inermis is used as a remedy for conditions such as headache, fever, burns, and skin diseases. However, it's important to note that the use of Lawsonia inermis as a medical treatment has not been widely studied in clinical trials, and its effectiveness and safety are not established by modern medical research.

If you have any questions about the use of Lawsonia inermis or other natural products in medicine, I would recommend consulting with a qualified healthcare provider who can provide guidance based on your individual health needs and circumstances.

'Cucumis' is a genus of plants that includes various species of fruits and vegetables, such as cucumbers, melons, and gourds. The most common species in this genus are Cucumis sativus (cucumber), Cucumis melo (melon), and Cucumis metuliferus (horned melon or kiwano). These plants are native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the world, and they are widely cultivated for their edible fruits.

Cucumis species are annual or perennial herbaceous vines that can grow quite large, with some varieties trailing up to 10 feet or more in length. They have large, lobed leaves and produce yellow or white flowers that develop into the characteristic fruit. The fruits of Cucumis plants are typically fleshy and contain numerous seeds enclosed in a thin skin.

Cucumis fruits are popular for their refreshing taste and high water content, making them a staple ingredient in many cuisines around the world. They are also rich in nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and fiber, and have been used in traditional medicine to treat various health conditions.

In summary, 'Cucumis' is a genus of plants that includes several species of fruits and vegetables, known for their refreshing taste, high water content, and nutritional benefits.

Volatile oils, also known as essential oils, are a type of organic compound that are naturally produced in plants. They are called "volatile" because they evaporate quickly at room temperature due to their high vapor pressure. These oils are composed of complex mixtures of various compounds, including terpenes, terpenoids, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and alcohols. They are responsible for the characteristic aroma and flavor of many plants and are often used in perfumes, flavors, and aromatherapy. In a medical context, volatile oils may have therapeutic properties and be used in certain medications or treatments, but it's important to note that they can also cause adverse reactions if not used properly.

... is a genus of herbs in the family Apiaceae containing the cultivated species Coriandrum sativum (coriander) and the ... The leaves and seeds of Coriandrum sativum are used in cooking. The leaves are often referred to as cilantro in North America. ...
... , the coriander aphid, is a species of aphid in the family Aphididae. "Hyadaphis coriandri Species ...
coriandrum. Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short. A Latin Dictionary on Perseus Project. κορίαννον. Liddell, Henry George; Scott ... Media related to Coriandrum sativum at Wikimedia Commons (Articles containing Ancient Greek (to 1453)-language text, Wikipedia ... "Coriander (Coriandrum sativum)". Gernot Katzer Spice Pages. 29 February 2012. Retrieved 1 July 2018. Zohary, Daniel; Hopf, ... Burdock, George A.; Carabin, Ioana G. (2009). "Safety Assessment of Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) Essential Oil as a Food ...
"Coriandrum sativum". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. "Cornucopiae cucullatum". MaltaWildPlants.com ...
Coriandrum L. Sclerotiaria Korovin Anisosciadium DC. Dicyclophora Boiss. Echinophora L. Mediasia Pimenov Nirarathamnos Balf.f. ...
Tropaeolum majus Foeniculum vulgare - Coriandrum sativum. Casearia sylvestris - Casearia gossypiosperma*. Phyllanthus ...
... , Praphulla Chandra Datta (January 2014). "Artificial Polyploidy in Coriander (Coriandrum Sativum L.)". ...
cepam, coriandrum minutatim succides, teres piper, ligusticum, cuminum, liquamen, oleum, vinum. coques, exinanies in patina, ...
Cuminum cyminum Melaleuca alternifolia Cannabis Origanum syriacum Coriandrum sativum M. Eggersdorfer (2005). "Terpenes". ... Coriandrum sativum L.) Seeds and Leaves: Volatile and Non Volatile Extracts". International Journal of Food Properties. 15 (4 ...
Marangoni, Cristiane; Moura, Neusa Fernandes de (March 2011). "Sensory profile of Italian salami with coriander (Coriandrum ...
nov., a novel bacterial species isolated from rhizospheric soil of Coriandrum sativum". Archives of Microbiology. 203 (2): 701- ... non-motile bacterium from the genus of Flavobacterium which has been isolated from rhizospheric soil of the plant Coriandrum ...
Coriandrum sativum L.)". British Food Journal. 115 (5): 743-755. doi:10.1108/00070701311331526. ISSN 0007-070X. Eigner, D; ...
Examples are parsley (Petroselinum crispum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), culantro, and dill (Anethum graveolens). The seeds ... Chaerophyllum bulbosum Anise (Pimpinella anisum) from Woodville (1793) Angelica archangelica Umbel of Coriandrum sativum ... may be used in cuisine, as with coriander (Coriandrum sativum), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), and ...
Morris, Michael, C. (2000). "Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) "companion plants" can attract hover flies, and may reduce ...
Morris, Michael C.; Li, Frank Y. (2000). "Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) "companion plants" can attract hoverflies, and may ...
Morris, Michael, C. (2000). "Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) "companion plants" can attract hover flies, and may reduce ...
Nurzyńska-Wierdak, Renata (2013). "Essential oil composition of the coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) herb depending on the ...
Similarly, it has been suggested that planting Coriandrum sativum near cabbage may attract M. fasciatum and thereby give the ... Morris, Michael C.; Li, Frank Y. (2000). "Coriander(Coriandrum sativum)"companion plants" can attract hoverflies, and may ... Morris, Michael C.; Li, Frank Y. (1 September 2000). "Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) "companion plants" can attract hoverflies ...
coriandricola, Incitant of Bacterial Umbel Blight and Seed Decay of Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) in Germany". Journal of ...
Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) is a cultivated plant native to Europe and used as a culinary herb. Coriander may also refer to ...
Despite the name "Bolivian coriander" and "summer cilantro", this plant is not botanically related to Coriandrum sativum. The ...
Coriandrum sativum (coriander), powdered seeds ground with chile and used a condiment with meat, leaves used as a salad. Note: ...
... whorled tickseed Coriandrum sativum (I) Corispermum americanum var. americanum (N) Corispermum pallasii (I) Corispermum ...
Coriandrum sativum L.) ISO 3517:2012 Essential oil of neroli (Citrus aurantium L., syn. Citrus amara Link, syn. Citrus ...
4 accepted as Conium hilliburttorum, Magee & Clark Conium sphaerocarpum Hilliard & B.L.Burtt, endemic Genus Coriandrum: ... Coriandrum sativum L. not indigenous Genus Cyclospermum: Cyclospermum leptophyllum (Pers.) Sprague, accepted as Cyclospermum ...
... especially Chenopodium album Coriandrum, species El Quelite, Sinaloa in Sinaloa This disambiguation page lists articles ...
Coriandrum sativum L.), cymbopogon (Cymbopogon martini var. martinii), and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) flowers. (R)-linalool ...
Coriandrum sativum) - Cinnamon - Cinnamon oil - used for flavoring. Citranaxanthin - color Citric acid - food acid Citric acid ...
Sativum, a Latin word meaning cultivated, may refer to: Allium sativum, the garlic Coriandrum sativum, coriander Hordeum ...
Pilocopiapoa Coprosma Coptis (goldthread) Cordia (bird lime tree) Cordyline Coreopsis (tickseed) Coriandrum (coriander cilantro ...
Coriandrum is a genus of herbs in the family Apiaceae containing the cultivated species Coriandrum sativum (coriander) and the ... The leaves and seeds of Coriandrum sativum are used in cooking. The leaves are often referred to as cilantro in North America. ...
LT: Coriandrum sativum L. LT designated by Hitchcock, Prop. Brit. Bot. 141 (1929) ...
... with a ratio of 1 part Coriandrum sativum to 3 parts liquid. Liquid comprises of 75% water and 25% sugar beet derived ethanol. ... Tincture made by a process of hydro-ethanolic percolation, with a ratio of 1 part Coriandrum sativum to 3 parts liquid. Liquid ...
The information provided on this site is intended for informational purposes only. Our products are not medications and should not be considered as substitutes for the guidance of medical and healthcare professionals. For the appropriate use of our products and addressing any health concerns, we strongly recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or pharmacist. ...
Development of the Consortium of Pacific Herbaria and several of the specimen databases have been supported by National Science Foundation Grants (BRC 1057303, ADBC 1304924 and ADBC1115116). Data Usage Policy. Continued support provided by the Symbiota Support Hub, a domain of iDigBio (NSF Award #2027654). Copyright 2015 University of Hawaii ...
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Coriander comes from Coriandrum sativum, which is an aromatic plant with small white flowers. Coriandrum sativum seeds are ... Supercritical Coriander Extract Solution , 200mg , Minimum 25% Linalool , Coriandrum sativum. Natrium Health (No reviews yet) ... Supercritical Coriander Extract Solution , 200mg , Minimum 25% Linalool , Coriandrum sativum. Rating * Select Rating. 1 star ( ...
Coriandrum sativum L. Cumin (cummin) Cuminum cyminum L. Curaçao orange peel (orange, bitter peel) Citrus aurantium L. ...
Cilantro Coriandrum sativum Item: 60209169. Size: 15 mL. Retail: PHP 2,350.00. Wholesale: PHP 1,750.00 ...
... seeds of Coriandrum sativum L.), cilantro (leaves of immature C. sativum L.) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus dives) were separated ... Essential oils from dill (Anethum graveolens L.), coriander (seeds of Coriandrum sativum L.), cilantro (leaves of immature C. ...
Coriandrum sativum , Cilantro, Chinese Parsley. £3.49. Garden Club Members Price: £3.14 JOIN TODAY ...
Coriandrum sativum) essential oil against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Antibacterial susceptibility was evaluated ... Lo Cantore P., Iacobellis N. S., De Marco A., Capasso F., Senatore F. 2004; Antibacterial activity of Coriandrum sativum L. and ... Burdock G. A., Carabin I. G. 2009; Safety assessment of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) essential oil as a food ingredient. ... Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) essential oil: its antibacterial activity and mode of action evaluated by flow cytometry * ...
Coriandrum / Medo Limite: Animais Idioma: Inglês Revista: Zebrafish Assunto da revista: Biologia Ano de publicação: 2020 Tipo ... Coriandrum / Medo Limite: Animais Idioma: Inglês Revista: Zebrafish Assunto da revista: Biologia Ano de publicação: 2020 Tipo ... Coriandrum sativum Extract Prevents Alarm Substance-Induced Fear- and Anxiety-Like Responses in Adult Zebrafish. ... Some evidences have suggested that Coriandrum sativum extract (CSE) provide sedative and anxiolytic effects. We investigate if ...
Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) is the leaf of coriander that was first found in Asia and Southern Europe. Cilantro was brought ... Coriandrum sativum. Flat, parsley-like leaves, fresh green. Sharp scent, quickly fade flavor when cooked. Full sun, light shade ... Coriandrum sativum. Short stems, small leaves (0.04-0.12 inch), dark green. Warm, milder than Indian coriander, toasty notes. ... Coriandrum sativum. Medium green, upright, 12-18 inches high and wide, ample, uniform leaves. Slight lemony like Slow-bolt ...
Coriandrum sativum 芜荽種子精油. Citrus reticulata 柑橘精油 ...
Cilantro = coriander = Chinese parsely = yan sui = Coriandrum Sativum.. posted by Mo Nickels at 5:04 PM on April 14, 2004 ...
Ingredients: Coriandrum Sativum Linnaeus. *Best before date: 3 years from production date. ...
Full Spectrum Coriandrum Sativum. 400 mg †. † Daily Value (DV) Established. Other Ingredients: Gelatin ...
Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) growing in garden * Coriander plants in plastic pots * Thyme plants growing in the field ...
Coriandrum sativum. img.stock_icon { float: right; margin-right: -15px; margin-top: 15px; max-width: 70% !important; } .inline- ...
2017 Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum). 2016 Peppers ( Capsicum ssp.). 2015 Savory (Satureja ssp.). 2014 Artemisias 2013 Elderberry ...
Lets Talk About Cilantro! Cilantro is a form of Coriandrum sativum along with coriander and Chinese parsley. Research suggests ...
coriandrum sativum (coriander) fruit oil. *coumarin. *cubeb oil. *cuminum cyminum (cumin) seed oil ...
Essential Oils: Castor, Lavandin, Rose, Bergamot, Coriandrum, Parsley, Sativum Fruit Oil Lotion: Water (Aqua), Glyceryl ... Essential Oils: Castor, Lavandin, Rose, Bergamot, Coriandrum, Parsley, Sativum Fruit Oil Lotion: Water (Aqua), Glyceryl ... Essential Oils: Castor, Lavandin, Rose, Bergamot, Coriandrum, Parsley, Sativum Fruit Oil Lotion: Water (Aqua), Glyceryl ... Coriandrum, Parsley, Sativum Fruit Oil Ingredients: Lotion: Water (Aqua), Glyceryl Stearate SE, Glycerin, Cetyl Alcohol, ...
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Coriandrum sativum. L.), ruda y perejil [38].. A recent evaluation of the collection indicates that in the city of Cajamarca 57 ...
Fructus coriandrum sativum L.), owoc kopru włoskiego (Fructus foeniculi vulgaris), ziele macierzanki piaskowej (Herba Thymus ...
  • Coriandrum is a genus of herbs in the family Apiaceae containing the cultivated species Coriandrum sativum (coriander) and the wild species Coriandrum tordylium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The leaves and seeds of Coriandrum sativum are used in cooking. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coriander, Coriandrum sativum , is native to southern Europe and the Middle East. (gardenersworld.com)
  • Coriandrum sativum L. LT designated by Hitchcock, Prop. Brit. (tropicos.org)
  • Tincture made by a process of hydro-ethanolic percolation, with a ratio of 1 part Coriandrum sativum to 3 parts liquid. (herbalapothecaryuk.com)
  • Coriandrum sativum L. (asu.edu)
  • Mucuna pruriens (MP) L. and Coriandrum sativum (CS) have been found for in vitro antithrombotic activity. (phcogj.com)
  • Coriander comes from Coriandrum sativum, which is an aromatic plant with small white flowers. (natriumhealth.com)
  • Coriandrum sativum seeds are known as coriander while the leaves are commonly referred to as cilantro! (natriumhealth.com)
  • Y-irradiation of Seeds and Productivity of Coriander, Coriandrum sativum L. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Essential oils from dill (Anethum graveolens L.), coriander (seeds of Coriandrum sativum L.), cilantro (leaves of immature C. sativum L.) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus dives) were separated into heterogeneous mixtures of components by fractional distillation and were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. (nih.gov)
  • The aim of this work was to study the antibacterial effect of coriander ( Coriandrum sativum ) essential oil against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Safety assessment of coriander ( Coriandrum sativum L. ) essential oil as a food ingredient. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Evaluation of bioactivity of linalool-rich essential oils from Ocimum basilucum and Coriandrum sativum varieties. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Coriandrum sativum Extract Prevents Alarm Substance-Induced Fear- and Anxiety-Like Responses in Adult Zebrafish. (bvsalud.org)
  • Some evidences have suggested that Coriandrum sativum extract (CSE) provide sedative and anxiolytic effects . (bvsalud.org)
  • Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) is the leaf of coriander that was first found in Asia and Southern Europe. (lacademie.com)
  • Properly authenticated eight plant materials, viz ½ palam-17.5 grams of Cuminum cyminum (cumin seeds), Coriandrum sativum (coriander seeds), Anthum graveolens (dill seeds), Syzygium aromaticum (clove),Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon), Elettaria cardamomum (cardamom) and Curcuma longa (turmeric) will be dried under sun shade until the moisture evaporates (2-3 days). (who.int)
  • Derived from the Greek word "koris" and Latin "coriandrum" meaning bug, you can imagine the spicy taste of coriander. (lacademie.com)
  • Cilantro is the Spanish word for coriander, also deriving from coriandrum . (seeds-gallery.shop)
  • Las hojas son la fuente de cilantro y las semillas son la fuente de coriandro, y ambas se utilizan como ESPECIAS. (bvsalud.org)
  • First attested in English in the late 14th century, the word "coriander" derives from the Old French coriandre, which comes from Latin coriandrum, in turn from Ancient Greek κορίαννον koriannon (or κορίανδρον koriandron), possibly derived from or related to κόρις kóris (a bed bug), and was given on account of its foetid, bed bug-like smell. (growfoodguide.com)
  • Interessant voor een plantenliefhebber is ook dat de plant in Europa goed te kweken is en zelfs redelijk winterhard is. (google.com)