Viral Core Proteins: Proteins found mainly in icosahedral DNA and RNA viruses. They consist of proteins directly associated with the nucleic acid inside the NUCLEOCAPSID.Proteoglycans: Glycoproteins which have a very high polysaccharide content.Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans: Proteoglycans consisting of proteins linked to one or more CHONDROITIN SULFATE-containing oligosaccharide chains.Hepacivirus: A genus of FLAVIVIRIDAE causing parenterally-transmitted HEPATITIS C which is associated with transfusions and drug abuse. Hepatitis C virus is the type species.Hepatitis B Core Antigens: The hepatitis B antigen within the core of the Dane particle, the infectious hepatitis virion.Decorin: A small leucine-rich proteoglycan that interacts with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and modifies the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX structure of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. Decorin has also been shown to play additional roles in the regulation of cellular responses to GROWTH FACTORS. The protein contains a single glycosaminoglycan chain and is similar in structure to BIGLYCAN.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Aggrecans: Large HYALURONAN-containing proteoglycans found in articular cartilage (CARTILAGE, ARTICULAR). They form into aggregates that provide tissues with the capacity to resist high compressive and tensile forces.Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans: Ubiquitous macromolecules associated with the cell surface and extracellular matrix of a wide range of cells of vertebrate and invertebrate tissues. They are essential cofactors in cell-matrix adhesion processes, in cell-cell recognition systems, and in receptor-growth factor interactions. (From Cancer Metastasis Rev 1996; 15(2): 177-86; Hepatology 1996; 24(3): 524-32)Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Glycosaminoglycans: Heteropolysaccharides which contain an N-acetylated hexosamine in a characteristic repeating disaccharide unit. The repeating structure of each disaccharide involves alternate 1,4- and 1,3-linkages consisting of either N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine.Extracellular Matrix Proteins: Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).Heparitin Sulfate: A heteropolysaccharide that is similar in structure to HEPARIN. It accumulates in individuals with MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDOSIS.Chondroitin Sulfates: Derivatives of chondroitin which have a sulfate moiety esterified to the galactosamine moiety of chondroitin. Chondroitin sulfate A, or chondroitin 4-sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate C, or chondroitin 6-sulfate, have the sulfate esterified in the 4- and 6-positions, respectively. Chondroitin sulfate B (beta heparin; DERMATAN SULFATE) is a misnomer and this compound is not a true chondroitin sulfate.Syndecans: A family of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain a short cytoplasmic domain, a single-span transmembrane domain, and an extracellular domain with heparin sulfate and CHONDROITIN SULFATE chains. Syndecans interact with a variety of heparin-binding INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS and may play a role in modulating cellular signaling during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis.Keratan Sulfate: A sulfated mucopolysaccharide initially isolated from bovine cornea. At least two types are known. Type I, found mostly in the cornea, contains D-galactose and D-glucosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit; type II, found in skeletal tissues, contains D-galactose and D-galactosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit.Hepatitis B virus: The type species of the genus ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS which causes human HEPATITIS B and is also apparently a causal agent in human HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA. The Dane particle is an intact hepatitis virion, named after its discoverer. Non-infectious spherical and tubular particles are also seen in the serum.Biglycan: A small leucine-rich proteoglycan found in a variety of tissues including CAPILLARY ENDOTHELIUM; SKELETAL MUSCLE; CARTILAGE; BONE; and TENDONS. The protein contains two glycosaminoglycan chains and is similar in structure to DECORIN.Chondroitin: A mucopolysaccharide constituent of chondrin. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Lectins, C-Type: A class of animal lectins that bind to carbohydrate in a calcium-dependent manner. They share a common carbohydrate-binding domain that is structurally distinct from other classes of lectins.Hepatitis C Antigens: Antigens of the virions of HEPACIVIRUS, their surface, core, or other associated antigens.Dermatan Sulfate: A naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan found mostly in the skin and in connective tissue. It differs from CHONDROITIN SULFATE A (see CHONDROITIN SULFATES) by containing IDURONIC ACID in place of glucuronic acid, its epimer, at carbon atom 5. (from Merck, 12th ed)Cartilage: A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.Virus Assembly: The assembly of VIRAL STRUCTURAL PROTEINS and nucleic acid (VIRAL DNA or VIRAL RNA) to form a VIRUS PARTICLE.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Syndecan-4: A ubiquitously expressed syndecan that is found in all stages of embryonic development and in most adult tissues. Syndecan-4 is found localized to focal adhesion sites in fibronectin-adherent cells and may play a role the process of CELL MIGRATION and CELL PROLIFERATION.Syndecan-1: A syndecan that interacts with EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS and plays a role CELL PROLIFERATION and CELL MIGRATION.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Virion: The infective system of a virus, composed of the viral genome, a protein core, and a protein coat called a capsid, which may be naked or enclosed in a lipoprotein envelope called the peplos.Chondroitinases and Chondroitin Lyases: Enzymes which catalyze the elimination of glucuronate residues from chondroitin A,B, and C or which catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate groups of the 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose 6-sulfate units of chondroitin sulfate. EC 4.2.2.-.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.Versicans: HYALURONAN-containing proteoglycans found in the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX of a variety of tissues and organs. Several versican isoforms exist due to multiple ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of the versican MESSENGER RNA.snRNP Core Proteins: The protein components that constitute the common core of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. These proteins are commonly referred as Sm nuclear antigens due to their antigenic nature.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Uridine Diphosphate Xylose: The decarboxylation product of UDPglucuronic acid, which is used for formation of the xylosides of seryl hydroxyl groups in mucoprotein synthesis. Also forms plant xylans.Chondrosarcoma: A slowly growing malignant neoplasm derived from cartilage cells, occurring most frequently in pelvic bones or near the ends of long bones, in middle-aged and old people. Most chondrosarcomas arise de novo, but some may develop in a preexisting benign cartilaginous lesion or in patients with ENCHONDROMATOSIS. (Stedman, 25th ed)Nucleocapsid: A protein-nucleic acid complex which forms part or all of a virion. It consists of a CAPSID plus enclosed nucleic acid. Depending on the virus, the nucleocapsid may correspond to a naked core or be surrounded by a membranous envelope.Gene Expression Regulation, Viral: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic factors influence the differential control of gene action in viruses.Capsid: The outer protein protective shell of a virus, which protects the viral nucleic acid.Hepatitis B Virus, Duck: A DNA virus that closely resembles human hepatitis B virus. It has been recovered from naturally infected ducks.Sulfates: Inorganic salts of sulfuric acid.Sulfur Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of sulfur that decay or disintegrate spontaneously emitting radiation. S 29-31, 35, 37, and 38 are radioactive sulfur isotopes.Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.HIV Core Protein p24: A major core protein of the human immunodeficiency virus encoded by the HIV gag gene. HIV-seropositive individuals mount a significant immune response to p24 and thus detection of antibodies to p24 is one basis for determining HIV infection by ELISA and Western blot assays. The protein is also being investigated as a potential HIV immunogen in vaccines.Hepatitis C: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by HEPATITIS C VIRUS, a single-stranded RNA virus. Its incubation period is 30-90 days. Hepatitis C is transmitted primarily by contaminated blood parenterally, and is often associated with transfusion and intravenous drug abuse. However, in a significant number of cases, the source of hepatitis C infection is unknown.Hepadnaviridae: A family of hepatotropic DNA viruses which contains double-stranded DNA genomes and causes hepatitis in humans and animals. There are two genera: AVIHEPADNAVIRUS and ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS. Hepadnaviruses include HEPATITIS B VIRUS, duck hepatitis B virus (HEPATITIS B VIRUS, DUCK), heron hepatitis B virus, ground squirrel hepatitis virus, and woodchuck hepatitis B virus (HEPATITIS B VIRUS, WOODCHUCK).Orthoreovirus: A genus of the family REOVIRIDAE infecting vertebrates only. Transmission is horizontal and infected species include humans, birds, cattle, monkeys, sheep, swine, baboons, and bats. MAMMALIAN ORTHOREOVIRUS is the type species.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.DNA, Viral: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Reoviridae: A family of unenveloped RNA viruses with cubic symmetry. The twelve genera include ORTHOREOVIRUS; ORBIVIRUS; COLTIVIRUS; ROTAVIRUS; Aquareovirus, Cypovirus, Phytoreovirus, Fijivirus, Seadornavirus, Idnoreovirus, Mycoreovirus, and Oryzavirus.Protein PrecursorsSyndecan-3: A syndecan found at high levels in the developing LIMB BUDS. It may play a role in the regulation of MUSCULOSKELETAL DEVELOPMENT by modulating the effects of INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS.Chromatography, Gel: Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Glycosylation: The chemical or biochemical addition of carbohydrate or glycosyl groups to other chemicals, especially peptides or proteins. Glycosyl transferases are used in this biochemical reaction.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Ribonucleoproteins, Small Nuclear: Highly conserved nuclear RNA-protein complexes that function in RNA processing in the nucleus, including pre-mRNA splicing and pre-mRNA 3'-end processing in the nucleoplasm, and pre-rRNA processing in the nucleolus (see RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS, SMALL NUCLEOLAR).Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins: A family of ribonucleoproteins that were originally found as proteins bound to nascent RNA transcripts in the form of ribonucleoprotein particles. Although considered ribonucleoproteins they are primarily classified by their protein component. They are involved in a variety of processes such as packaging of RNA and RNA TRANSPORT within the nucleus. A subset of heterogeneous-nuclear ribonucleoproteins are involved in additional functions such as nucleocytoplasmic transport (ACTIVE TRANSPORT, CELL NUCLEUS) of RNA and mRNA stability in the CYTOPLASM.Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Chondroitin Lyases: Enzymes which catalyze the elimination of delta-4,5-D-glucuronate residues from polysaccharides containing 1,4-beta-hexosaminyl and 1,3-beta-D-glucuronosyl or 1,3-alpha-L-iduronosyl linkages thereby bringing about depolymerization. EC 4.2.2.4 acts on chondroitin sulfate A and C as well as on dermatan sulfate and slowly on hyaluronate. EC 4.2.2.5 acts on chondroitin sulfate A and C.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Glycosides: Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)Vaccinia virus: The type species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS, related to COWPOX VIRUS, but whose true origin is unknown. It has been used as a live vaccine against SMALLPOX. It is also used as a vector for inserting foreign DNA into animals. Rabbitpox virus is a subspecies of VACCINIA VIRUS.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Glypicans: A family of GLYCOSYLPHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL-anchored, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans that may play a role in CELL GROWTH PROCESSES and CELL DIFFERENTIATION by modulating ligand-receptor interactions.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Chromatography, Ion Exchange: Separation technique in which the stationary phase consists of ion exchange resins. The resins contain loosely held small ions that easily exchange places with other small ions of like charge present in solutions washed over the resins.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Protein Processing, Post-Translational: Any of various enzymatically catalyzed post-translational modifications of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS in the cell of origin. These modifications include carboxylation; HYDROXYLATION; ACETYLATION; PHOSPHORYLATION; METHYLATION; GLYCOSYLATION; ubiquitination; oxidation; proteolysis; and crosslinking and result in changes in molecular weight and electrophoretic motility.Mucins: High molecular weight mucoproteins that protect the surface of EPITHELIAL CELLS by providing a barrier to particulate matter and microorganisms. Membrane-anchored mucins may have additional roles concerned with protein interactions at the cell surface.Ribonucleoproteins: Complexes of RNA-binding proteins with ribonucleic acids (RNA).Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Brevican: A BRAIN-specific hyalectin that may play a role in terminally differentiating NEURONS. It is found highly overexpressed in primary BRAIN TUMORS and in experimental models of GLIOMA.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Orthoreovirus, Avian: A species of ORTHOREOVIRUS infecting birds, with outcomes ranging from inapparent to lethal depending on the virus strain and age of the host bird. This species does not infect mammals.Hepatocytes: The main structural component of the LIVER. They are specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that are organized into interconnected plates called lobules.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Bluetongue virus: The type species of ORBIVIRUS causing a serious disease in sheep, especially lambs. It may also infect wild ruminants and other domestic animals.Hyaluronic Acid: A natural high-viscosity mucopolysaccharide with alternating beta (1-3) glucuronide and beta (1-4) glucosaminidic bonds. It is found in the UMBILICAL CORD, in VITREOUS BODY and in SYNOVIAL FLUID. A high urinary level is found in PROGERIA.XyloseTranscription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Ribonucleoproteins, Small Nucleolar: Nucleolar RNA-protein complexes that function in pre-ribosomal RNA processing.Amino Acids, Basic: Amino acids with side chains that are positively charged at physiological pH.GlucosamineKinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Pentosyltransferases: Enzymes of the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of a pentose group from one compound to another.Hepatitis B e Antigens: A closely related group of antigens found in the plasma only during the infective phase of hepatitis B or in virulent chronic hepatitis B, probably indicating active virus replication; there are three subtypes which may exist in a complex with immunoglobulins G.Chondroitin ABC Lyase: An enzyme that catalyzes the eliminative degradation of polysaccharides containing 1,4-beta-D-hexosaminyl and 1,3-beta-D-glucuronosyl or 1,3-alpha-L-iduronosyl linkages to disaccharides containing 4-deoxy-beta-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl groups. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Centrifugation, Density Gradient: Separation of particles according to density by employing a gradient of varying densities. At equilibrium each particle settles in the gradient at a point equal to its density. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Genes, Viral: The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Chick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Genome, Viral: The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.Carcinoma, Hepatocellular: A primary malignant neoplasm of epithelial liver cells. It ranges from a well-differentiated tumor with EPITHELIAL CELLS indistinguishable from normal HEPATOCYTES to a poorly differentiated neoplasm. The cells may be uniform or markedly pleomorphic, or form GIANT CELLS. Several classification schemes have been suggested.Viral Nonstructural Proteins: Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.Oligosaccharides: Carbohydrates consisting of between two (DISACCHARIDES) and ten MONOSACCHARIDES connected by either an alpha- or beta-glycosidic link. They are found throughout nature in both the free and bound form.RNA, Heterogeneous Nuclear: Nuclear nonribosomal RNA larger than about 1000 nucleotides, the mass of which is rapidly synthesized and degraded within the cell nucleus. Some heterogeneous nuclear RNA may be a precursor to mRNA. However, the great bulk of total hnRNA hybridizes with nuclear DNA rather than with mRNA.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Carbohydrate Sequence: The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Group A-B: A class of closely related heterogeneous-nuclear ribonucleoproteins of approximately 34-40 kDa in size. Although they are generally found in the nucleoplasm, they also shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Members of this class have been found to have a role in mRNA transport, telomere biogenesis and RNA SPLICING.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Leontopithecus: The genus of lion tamarins in the subfamily CALLITRICHINAE. The common name refers to the mane on the shoulders.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Hepatitis Antibodies: Immunoglobulins raised by any form of viral hepatitis; some of these antibodies are used to diagnose the specific kind of hepatitis.Chromatography, Affinity: A chromatographic technique that utilizes the ability of biological molecules to bind to certain ligands specifically and reversibly. It is used in protein biochemistry. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Polysaccharide-Lyases: A group of carbon-oxygen lyases. These enzymes catalyze the breakage of a carbon-oxygen bond in polysaccharides leading to an unsaturated product and the elimination of an alcohol. EC 4.2.2.Electron Transport Complex III: A multisubunit enzyme complex that contains CYTOCHROME B GROUP; CYTOCHROME C1; and iron-sulfur centers. It catalyzes the oxidation of ubiquinol to UBIQUINONE, and transfers the electrons to CYTOCHROME C. In MITOCHONDRIA the redox reaction is coupled to the transport of PROTONS across the inner mitochondrial membrane.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.GB virus B: A species of virus (tentatively placed in the genus HEPACIVIRUS) in the family FLAVIVIRIDAE, that was recovered from a tamarin monkey, but may have been of human origin. It causes HEPATITIS in several species of New World monkeys.Antigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Capsid Proteins: Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.Brachyspira hyodysenteriae: A species of anaerobic, spiral bacteria that was formerly classified as Serpulina hyodysenteriae and Treponema hyodysenteriae (and for a short while, Serpula hyodysenteriae). This organism is the agent of swine dysentery.RNA, Archaeal: Ribonucleic acid in archaea having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Hepatitis C Antibodies: Antibodies to the HEPATITIS C ANTIGENS including antibodies to envelope, core, and non-structural proteins.Lymphotoxin beta Receptor: A member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. It has specificity for LYMPHOTOXIN ALPHA1, BETA2 HETEROTRIMER and TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR LIGAND SUPERFAMILY MEMBER 14. The receptor plays a role in regulating lymphoid ORGANOGENESIS and the differentiation of certain subsets of NATURAL KILLER T-CELLS. Signaling of the receptor occurs through its association with TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS.Protein Sorting Signals: Amino acid sequences found in transported proteins that selectively guide the distribution of the proteins to specific cellular compartments.Serine: A non-essential amino acid occurring in natural form as the L-isomer. It is synthesized from GLYCINE or THREONINE. It is involved in the biosynthesis of PURINES; PYRIMIDINES; and other amino acids.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Hepatitis B: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by a member of the ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS genus, HEPATITIS B VIRUS. It is primarily transmitted by parenteral exposure, such as transfusion of contaminated blood or blood products, but can also be transmitted via sexual or intimate personal contact.Classical swine fever virus: A species of the PESTIVIRUS genus causing exceedingly contagious and fatal hemorrhagic disease of swine.Precipitin Tests: Serologic tests in which a positive reaction manifested by visible CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION occurs when a soluble ANTIGEN reacts with its precipitins, i.e., ANTIBODIES that can form a precipitate.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Lymphotoxin-beta: A membrane-bound tumor necrosis family member found primarily on LYMPHOCYTES. It can form a heterotrimer (LYMPHOTOXIN ALPHA1, BETA2 HETEROTRIMER) with the soluble ligand LYMPHOTOXIN-ALPHA and anchor it to the cell surface. The membrane-bound complex is specific for the LYMPHOTOXIN BETA receptor.Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Trypsin: A serine endopeptidase that is formed from TRYPSINOGEN in the pancreas. It is converted into its active form by ENTEROPEPTIDASE in the small intestine. It catalyzes hydrolysis of the carboxyl group of either arginine or lysine. EC 3.4.21.4.Adenoviruses, Human: Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS, causing a wide range of diseases in humans. Infections are mostly asymptomatic, but can be associated with diseases of the respiratory, ocular, and gastrointestinal systems. Serotypes (named with Arabic numbers) have been grouped into species designated Human adenovirus A-F.COS Cells: CELL LINES derived from the CV-1 cell line by transformation with a replication origin defective mutant of SV40 VIRUS, which codes for wild type large T antigen (ANTIGENS, POLYOMAVIRUS TRANSFORMING). They are used for transfection and cloning. (The CV-1 cell line was derived from the kidney of an adult male African green monkey (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS).)Blotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.DucksConserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Orbivirus: A genus of REOVIRIDAE infecting a wide range of arthropods and vertebrates including humans. It comprises at least 21 serological subgroups. Transmission is by vectors such as midges, mosquitoes, sandflies, and ticks.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Basement Membrane: A darkly stained mat-like EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM) that separates cell layers, such as EPITHELIUM from ENDOTHELIUM or a layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. The ECM layer that supports an overlying EPITHELIUM or ENDOTHELIUM is called basal lamina. Basement membrane (BM) can be formed by the fusion of either two adjacent basal laminae or a basal lamina with an adjacent reticular lamina of connective tissue. BM, composed mainly of TYPE IV COLLAGEN; glycoprotein LAMININ; and PROTEOGLYCAN, provides barriers as well as channels between interacting cell layers.Phenylmercuric Acetate: A phenyl mercury compound used mainly as a fungicide. Has also been used as a herbicide, slimicide, and bacteriocide.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Dimerization: The process by which two molecules of the same chemical composition form a condensation product or polymer.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Extracellular Matrix: A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Peptide Mapping: Analysis of PEPTIDES that are generated from the digestion or fragmentation of a protein or mixture of PROTEINS, by ELECTROPHORESIS; CHROMATOGRAPHY; or MASS SPECTROMETRY. The resulting peptide fingerprints are analyzed for a variety of purposes including the identification of the proteins in a sample, GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS, patterns of gene expression, and patterns diagnostic for diseases.Gene Products, gag: Proteins coded by the retroviral gag gene. The products are usually synthesized as protein precursors or POLYPROTEINS, which are then cleaved by viral proteases to yield the final products. Many of the final products are associated with the nucleoprotein core of the virion. gag is short for group-specific antigen.Disaccharides: Oligosaccharides containing two monosaccharide units linked by a glycosidic bond.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Group C: A group of closely related heterogeneous-nuclear ribonucleoproteins of approximately 41-43 kDa in size found in the cell nucleus. Members of this class have been implicated in a variety of processes including splicing, polyadenylation, and nuclear retention of RNA.Endopeptidases: A subclass of PEPTIDE HYDROLASES that catalyze the internal cleavage of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS.Rauscher Virus: A strain of MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS associated with mouse tumors similar to those caused by the FRIEND MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS. It is a replication-competent murine leukemia virus. It can act as a helper virus when complexing with a defective transforming component, RAUSCHER SPLEEN FOCUS-FORMING VIRUS.Hepadnaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the HEPADNAVIRIDAE.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Antigens, CD164: A sialomucin protein that functions as a cell adhesion molecule. It is a negative regulator of certain types of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.Amino Acid Substitution: The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Immunoblotting: Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.Mucin-1: Carbohydrate antigen elevated in patients with tumors of the breast, ovary, lung, and prostate as well as other disorders. The mucin is expressed normally by most glandular epithelia but shows particularly increased expression in the breast at lactation and in malignancy. It is thus an established serum marker for breast cancer.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Sequence Deletion: Deletion of sequences of nucleic acids from the genetic material of an individual.Inclusion Bodies, Viral: An area showing altered staining behavior in the nucleus or cytoplasm of a virus-infected cell. Some inclusion bodies represent "virus factories" in which viral nucleic acid or protein is being synthesized; others are merely artifacts of fixation and staining. One example, Negri bodies, are found in the cytoplasm or processes of nerve cells in animals that have died from rabies.Viral Hepatitis Vaccines: Any vaccine raised against any virus or viral derivative that causes hepatitis.Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Genetic Vectors: DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.Subcellular Fractions: Components of a cell produced by various separation techniques which, though they disrupt the delicate anatomy of a cell, preserve the structure and physiology of its functioning constituents for biochemical and ultrastructural analysis. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p163)Microscopy, Immunoelectron: Microscopy in which the samples are first stained immunocytochemically and then examined using an electron microscope. Immunoelectron microscopy is used extensively in diagnostic virology as part of very sensitive immunoassays.Photosystem II Protein Complex: A large multisubunit protein complex found in the THYLAKOID MEMBRANE. It uses light energy derived from LIGHT-HARVESTING PROTEIN COMPLEXES to catalyze the splitting of WATER into DIOXYGEN and of reducing equivalents of HYDROGEN.Heparin Lyase: An enzyme of the isomerase class that catalyzes the eliminative cleavage of polysaccharides containing 1,4-linked D-glucuronate or L-iduronate residues and 1,4-alpha-linked 2-sulfoamino-2-deoxy-6-sulfo-D-glucose residues to give oligosaccharides with terminal 4-deoxy-alpha-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl groups at their non-reducing ends. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 4.2.2.7.Protein Multimerization: The assembly of the QUATERNARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE of multimeric proteins (MULTIPROTEIN COMPLEXES) from their composite PROTEIN SUBUNITS.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Polysaccharides
Core histones are highly conserved proteins; that is, there are very few differences among the amino acid sequences of the ... The following is a list of human histone proteins: The nucleosome core is formed of two H2A-H2B dimers and a H3-H4 tetramer, ... who believed that transcription was activated by protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions on largely naked DNA templates, ... Histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 are known as the core histones, while histones H1/H5 are known as the linker histones. The core ...
Capes, Melinda D.; DasSarma, Priya; DasSarma, Shiladitya (2012-01-01). "The core and unique proteins of haloarchaea". BMC ... NRC-1. This work showed that certain proteins are highly acidic, providing an understanding of how proteins function in high ... Later in the 2000's, post-genomic research in his laboratory established signature proteins in halophilic Archaea, and the ... resulted in further refinement in understanding of protein function in high salinity and cold conditions. Such studies may ...
WIPI2, a PtdIns(3)P binding protein of the WIPI (WD-repeat protein interacting with phosphoinositides) protein family, was ... Xie, Z; Klionsky, DJ (October 2007). "Autophagosome formation: core machinery and adaptations". Nature Cell Biology. 9 (10): ... Without efficient autophagy, neurons gather ubiquitinated protein aggregates and degrade. Ubiquitinated proteins are proteins ... This allows unneeded proteins to be degraded and the amino acids recycled for the synthesis of proteins that are essential for ...
... and 3A are core viral proteins. The genome also codes for 4 capsid proteins, VP4, VP1, VP2, and VP3 that form an icosahedral ... The purpose of these U's is to modify the VPg protein which serves as a protein primer which the viral RdRP can recognize and ... The final step in maturation of the virus is when VP0, a precursor protein, is cleaved into VP2 and VP4. Viral capsid proteins ... Once viral genome and viral proteins reach high enough concentrations within the host cell, structural proteins must assemble. ...
Pu WT, Krapivinsky GB, Krapivinsky L, Clapham DE (1999). "pICln inhibits snRNP biogenesis by binding core spliceosomal proteins ... Tang CJ, Tang TK (1998). "The 30-kD domain of protein 4.1 mediates its binding to the carboxyl terminus of pICln, a protein ... "A novel WD repeat protein component of the methylosome binds Sm proteins". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (10): 8243-7. doi:10.1074/jbc. ... "A novel WD repeat protein component of the methylosome binds Sm proteins". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (10): 8243-7. doi:10.1074/jbc. ...
The core itself is helical. There are two major capsid proteins (MCP1 and MCP2). The basic MCP1 protein forms a core around ... From either end of the viron are protrusions extending from the core through the envelope. The capsid itself is elongated and ... homologous major capsid proteins. Due to these shared properties viruses from the two families are classified into an order ... a novel archaeal lipothrixvirus with unusual terminal and core structures. J Bacteriol 187(11): 3855-3858 doi:10.1128/JB.187.11 ...
This rRNA core is decorated with dozens of proteins. In the figure "Crystal Structure of the Eukaryotic 40S Ribosomal Subunit ... The table "40S ribosomal proteins" shows the individual protein folds of the 40S subunit colored by conservation. Proteins ... Proteins shared only between eukaryotes and archaea are shown as orange ribbons and proteins specific to eukaryotes are shown ... Proteins shared only between eukaryotes and archaea (EA) are shown as orange ribbons and proteins specific to eukaryotes (E) ...
"The eisosome core is composed of BAR domain proteins". Molecular Biology of the Cell. 22 (13): 2360-72. doi:10.1091/mbc.E10-12- ... These are large protein complexes composed primarily of subunits of two Bin-Amphiphysin-RVS (BAR) domain containing proteins ... It is also found that eisosome associated proteins Slm1 and Slm 2 have F-BAR domains that are used for targeting furrow like ... These two paralogue proteins self-assemble in higher order structure helices and bind preferentially to phosphoinositide- ...
The rRNA core is decorated with dozens of proteins. In the figure "Crystal Structure of the Eukaryotic 60S Ribosomal Subunit ... Proteins shared only between eukaryotes and archaea are shown as orange ribbons and proteins specific to eukaryotes are shown ... The table "60S ribosomal proteins" shows the individual protein folds of the 60S subunit colored by conservation as above. The ... The table "60S ribosomal proteins" cross-references the human ribosomal protein names with yeast, bacterial, and archaeal ...
Core-shell nanostructures with tunable magnetic properties 3. Inorganic nanophases applied to Cultural Heritage conservation ... and to nanocoating of materials (building materials, textiles, etc..) 4. Interaction potentials in protein solutions 5. ...
... multi-protein enzyme present in phagocytic cells, plays an important role in the regulation of protein-protein interactions in ... Sawicka, Anna; Seiser, Christian (2014-08-01). "Sensing core histone phosphorylation - A matter of perfect timing". Biochimica ... protein A phosphorylates protein B, and B phosphorylates C. However, in another signaling pathway, protein D phosphorylates A, ... In this way protein dynamics can induce a conformational change in the structure of the protein via long-range allostery with ...
Its core activity is adding value to proteins and fats. The products are used as ingredients in such markets as pharmaceutics, ... VION Food Group consists of two core activities: - VION Food: founded in 2003 by a merger of Dumeco, Hendrix Meat Group, Moksel ... VION N.V. is an internationally operating company with two core activities: Food and Ingredients. The Dutch group produces meat ... The product portfolio of VION's Food core activities comprises fresh pork and beef, a diverse range of convenience food ...
... contain a core protein anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane via a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol linkage. These proteins may ... This protein is involved in the misfolding of normal prion proteins in the cell membrane to the infectious prion form. In 2015 ... Schofield KP, Gallagher JT, David G (2000). "Expression of proteoglycan core proteins in human bone marrow stroma". Biochem. J ... Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans are composed of a membrane-associated protein core substituted with a variable ...
This gene encodes a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein that belongs to the SNRNP core protein family. The protein may act as a ... protein interactions between the snRNP common core proteins". Experimental Cell Research. 237 (1): 63-9. doi:10.1006/excr. ... protein interactions between the snRNP common core proteins". Experimental Cell Research. 237 (1): 63-9. doi:10.1006/excr. ... "Sm protein-Sm site RNA interactions within the inner ring of the spliceosomal snRNP core structure". The EMBO Journal. 20 (1-2 ...
Fury MG, Zhang W, Christodoulopoulos I, Zieve GW (1997). "Multiple protein: protein interactions between the snRNP common core ... "snRNP Sm proteins share two evolutionarily conserved sequence motifs which are involved in Sm protein-protein interactions". ... protein heteromer and the intact snRNP core". J. Mol. Biol. 265 (2): 87-94. doi:10.1006/jmbi.1996.0713. PMID 9020971. ... "Sm protein-Sm site RNA interactions within the inner ring of the spliceosomal snRNP core structure". EMBO J. 20 (1-2): 187-96. ...
Fury MG, Zhang W, Christodoulopoulos I, Zieve GW (1998). "Multiple protein: protein interactions between the snRNP common core ... Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated protein N is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SNRPN gene. The protein ... The protein arises from a bicistronic transcript that also encodes a protein identified as the SNRPN upstream reading frame ( ... The protein plays a role in pre-mRNA processing, possibly tissue-specific alternative splicing events. Although individual ...
... protein interactions between the snRNP common core proteins". Experimental Cell Research. 237 (1): 63-9. doi:10.1006/excr. ... protein interactions between the snRNP common core proteins". Experimental Cell Research. 237 (1): 63-9. doi:10.1006/excr. ... protein heteromer and the intact snRNP core". Journal of Molecular Biology. 265 (2): 87-94. doi:10.1006/jmbi.1996.0713. PMID ... "Sm protein-Sm site RNA interactions within the inner ring of the spliceosomal snRNP core structure". The EMBO Journal. 20 (1-2 ...
Fury MG, Zhang W, Christodoulopoulos I, Zieve GW (1998). "Multiple protein: protein interactions between the snRNP common core ... protein interactions between the snRNP common core proteins". Exp. Cell Res. UNITED STATES. 237 (1): 63-9. doi:10.1006/excr. ... "snRNP Sm proteins share two evolutionarily conserved sequence motifs which are involved in Sm protein-protein interactions". ... 2002). "A novel WD repeat protein component of the methylosome binds Sm proteins". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (10): 8243-7. doi:10.1074 ...
Fury MG, Zhang W, Christodoulopoulos I, Zieve GW (1997). "Multiple protein: protein interactions between the snRNP common core ... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SNRPB gene. The protein encoded by this gene is one of several nuclear proteins ... and its associated protein SIP1 are in a complex with spliceosomal snRNP proteins". Cell. 90 (6): 1013-21. doi:10.1016/S0092- ... "The cardiac form of the tissue-specific SmN protein is identical to the brain and embryonic forms of the protein". J. Mol. Cell ...
The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein core protein family. It is required for pre- ... Fury MG, Zhang W, Christodoulopoulos I, Zieve GW (1998). "Multiple protein: protein interactions between the snRNP common core ... protein interactions between the snRNP common core proteins". Exp. Cell Res. UNITED STATES. 237 (1): 63-9. doi:10.1006/excr. ... 2002). "Gemin5, a novel WD repeat protein component of the SMN complex that binds Sm proteins". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (7): 5631-6 ...
Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), also called mannose-binding protein or mannan-binding protein (MBP), is a lectin that is ... "Identification of the posttranslational modifications of the core-specific lectin. The core-specific lectin contains ... the MASP protein functions to cleave the blood protein C4 into C4a and C4b. The C4b fragments can then bind to the surface of ... "Mannose-binding protein C precursor [Homo sapiens]". Retrieved 2012-01-03. Jensen PH, Laursen I, Matthiesen F, Højrup P (2007 ...
Guides on Protein, Supplements & Training , BULK POWDERS®". The Core™ - Guides on Protein, Supplements & Training , BULK ... "BULK POWDERS™ and James DeGale Formalise Partnership - The Core™ - Guides on Protein, Supplements & Training - BULK POWDERS®". ... "James DeGale returns to the ring against Gevorg Khatchikian - The Core™ - ...
These developments affect core gene/protein processes. Does this altered biochemistry still continue our form of organic life? ... Biotic ethics is similar but more general, as it values not specific species but the core processes of all gene/protein life, ... All cellular biota share these gene/protein cycles, a common DNA code, and complex proteins, membranes and adenosine ... Biotic ethics states our commitment to our family of gene/protein life. If we are alone, the fate of all life is in our hands. ...
The core helix α9 stabilizes the protein as it moves through dimer configurations and mediates the interactions between α5β1 ... The FA proteins play an elaborate role with FAN1 to remove these ICLs. The pathway consists of 15 known proteins. Three of them ... This is present in proteins that bind to ubiquitinated proteins, and is highly conserved across eukaryotes. This Zinc finger is ... The FAN1 protein possesses endonuclease and exonuclease functions to remove ICLs. At a replication fork arrested at an ICL, ...
Twyman, L. J.; Ge, Y. (2006). "Porphyrin cored hyperbranched polymers as heme protein models". Chemical Communications (15): ... Machaiah JP (May 1991). "Changes in macrophage membrane proteins in relation to protein deficiency in rats". Indian J. Exp. ... "Dense star polymers having core, core branches, terminal groups" U.S. Patent 4,507,466 Tomalia, D A; Baker, H; Dewald, J; Hall ... The core of PAMAM is a diamine (commonly ethylenediamine), which is reacted with methyl acrylate, and then another ...
It has a core set of 1553 genes, plus 154 genes in its virulome, which contribute to virulence and 176 genes that maintain a ... Atromentin and leucomelone possess antibacterial activity, inhibiting the enzyme enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, ( ... and Maclyn McCarty demonstrated that the transforming factor in Griffith's experiment was not protein, as was widely believed ... pneumoniae is associated with increased resistance to oxidative stress and increased expression of the RecA protein, a key ...
... Lohmander, Stefan LU ; Shinomura, T.; ... Intracellular proteoglycan core protein precursor was purified from cell lysates by immunoprecipitation with polyclonal ... Intracellular proteoglycan core protein precursor was purified from cell lysates by immunoprecipitation with polyclonal ... Intracellular proteoglycan core protein precursor was purified from cell lysates by immunoprecipitation with polyclonal ...
... against recombinant hepatitis B virus core antigen Recombinant protein corresponding to hepatitis B virus core antigen core. ( ... Western blot analysis of HBV core antigen with Hepatitis B virus core antigen monoclonal antibody, clone 10-E-11 (Cat # MAB5402 ... Hepatitis B virus core antigen monoclonal antibody, clone 10-E-11. *Catalog # : MAB5402 ... HBcAg core antigen. Epitope localized to a.a. 1-10 (N-terminal end). ...
We combine protein signatures from a number of member databases into a single searchable resource, capitalising on their ... InterPro provides functional analysis of proteins by classifying them into families and predicting domains and important sites ... Proteins matched: Integrase, catalytic core (IPR001584) This domain is found in the following proteins: Showing 1 to 20 of ... Protein name. Species. Domain architecture. A0A0B7P3V8 Transposon Ty4-P Gag-Pol polyprotein. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain ...
An exception to this generalization is the smallest of 30S RNP core polypeptides, the Mr 34,000 protein, which has a relatively ... Immunofluorescent studies, which have confirmed the expected nucleoplasmic or euchromatic localization of the RNP core proteins ... The proteins appear to relocate in the nucleus as soon as the nuclear envelope is reformed. ... as does the pathway of assembly and disassembly of RNP substructures during re-utilization of the proteins and during their ...
Core Extreme Nutrition is focused on creating a variety of cutting edge sports nutrition supplements to enhance customers ... Protein shakers Core Extreme Nutrition is focused on creating a variety of cutting edge sports nutrition supplements to enhance ...
Tetrahymena proteins p80 and p95 are not core telomerase components. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 Oct 23;98(22):12368-12373. ... Tetrahymena proteins p80 and p95 are not core telomerase components. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 Oct 23;98(22):12368-12373. ... Tetrahymena proteins p80 and p95 are not core telomerase components. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 Oct 23;98(22):12368-12373. ... Tetrahymena proteins p80 and p95 are not core telomerase components. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 Oct 23;98(22):12368-12373. ...
core gene UL54 family protein [Human gammaherpesvirus 8] core gene UL54 family protein [Human gammaherpesvirus 8]. gi,402797656 ... Pre-computed sequence similarity results (BLAST) including alignments for the current protein against the NCBI nr protein ... Stability of structured Kaposis sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is regulated by protein phosphorylation and ... Stability of structured Kaposis sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is regulated by protein phosphorylation and ...
Your appeal for help with The Core ContestEdit. Hi, Proteins, I saw your post at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Biography#The Core ... Proteins (talk) 03:27, 18 November 2008 (UTC). Stop spamming Wikipedia about The Core Contest! It was a Veropedia stunt.Edit. I ... 1 Your appeal for help with The Core Contest. *2 improvement of the Core contest *2.1 Very long post about how to run a contest ... improvement of the Core contestEdit. We "met" at the Military History Project. I liked the idea to reward the Core contest, but ...
NMR structures of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers - Volume 47 Issue 3 - Jasmina Radoicic, George J. Lu, Stanley J. ... Protein Science 10, 2241-2250.. Wang, S., Munro, R. A., Shi, L., Kawamura, I., Okitsu, T., Wada, A., Kim, S. Y., Jung, K. H., ... Protein Science 16, 1977-1983.. Page, R. C., Moore, J. D., Nguyen, H. B., Sharma, M., Chase, R., Gao, F. P., Mobley, C. K., ... Richardson, J. S. (1981). Anatomy and taxonomy of protein structures. Advances in Protein Chemistry 34, 167-339. ...
We combine protein signatures from a number of member databases into a single searchable resource, capitalising on their ... InterPro provides functional analysis of proteins by classifying them into families and predicting domains and important sites ... HIV-1 Nef protein, core domain superfamily (IPR027481). Short name: HIV-1_Nef_core_sf ... The crystal structure of HIV-1 Nef protein bound to the Fyn kinase SH3 domain suggests a role for this complex in altered T ...
The Protein Chemistry Technology Core staff collaborates with PIs on projects involving complex experiments in peptide ... Protein Chemistry Core Collaborations. We encourage PIs to discuss collaborative projects in which Protein Chemistry Technology ... We also offer a semi-synthetic approach, called expressed protein ligation.. Mass Spectrometry Projects. Our state-of-the-art ... The PCTC has technology that allows us to synthesize small protein sequences up to about 150 residues. This approach is useful ...
If you are ready to make an appointment, select a button on the right. If you have questions about MD Andersons appointment process, our information page may be the best place to start.. Appointment Information ...
Because of mutations at critical sites in the protein tyrosine phosphatase core domain, both proteins are enzymatically ... Taken together, our experiments show that the dense core vesicle proteins IA-2 and IA-2β, alone or in combination, are involved ... Vo YP, Hutton JC, Angleson JK: Recycling of the dense-core vesicle membrane protein phogrin in Min6 beta-cells. Biochem Biophys ... Dense Core Vesicle Proteins IA-2 and IA-2β. Metabolic Alterations in Double Knockout Mice. ...
Microscale Thermophoresis is a new powerful technology which can be used to measure biomolecular interactions. The basic underlying principle Thermophoresis is the movement of biomolecules along a temporarily induced tiny temperature gradient. Binding events affect the thermophoretic movement of the involved molecules. The molecular movement can be monitored in simple glass capillaries with optical methods. The powerful technology has been developed by the Munich based company Nano Temper. An infrared-laser is used to induce a precise microscopic temperature gradient (2-5 K) within the glass capillary. At the Nano Temper website you can find a short introduction into Microscale Thermophoresis and numerous application examples. The advantages of the method are ...
Phosphorylation of synaptic vesicle proteins: modulation of the alpha SNAP interaction with the core complex. H Hirling and R H ... Phosphorylation of synaptic vesicle proteins: modulation of the alpha SNAP interaction with the core complex ... Phosphorylation of synaptic vesicle proteins: modulation of the alpha SNAP interaction with the core complex ... Phosphorylation of synaptic vesicle proteins: modulation of the alpha SNAP interaction with the core complex ...
Coupled cell-free synthesis, segregation, and core glycosylation of a secretory protein. Vishwanath R. Lingappa, Jaisri R. ... Coupled cell-free synthesis, segregation, and core glycosylation of a secretory protein ... Coupled cell-free synthesis, segregation, and core glycosylation of a secretory protein ... Coupled cell-free synthesis, segregation, and core glycosylation of a secretory protein ...
The Protein Expression Core collaborates with the Crystallization Core and X-ray Crystallography Core to offer the advanced ... PROTEIN EXPRESSION SCREENING Protein expression screening uses bacterial (E. coli) and yeast (P. pastoris) expression hosts. A ... Batch purification of protein from the soluble fraction is used to assess the ability of the target protein to bind affinity ... PROTEIN PURIFICATION Using predetermined information on protein expression and solubility from small-scale experiments ...
Versican core protein. Versican core protein (Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein 2, Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan ... to allow unambiguous identification of a protein.,p>,a href=/help/protein_names target=_top>More...,/a>,/p>Protein namesi. ... Versican core proteinImported. ,p>Information which has been imported from another database using automatic procedures.,/p> ,p ... European Bioinformatics InstituteProtein Information ResourceSIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics. UniProt is an ELIXIR core ...
Protein. Similar proteins. Organisms. Length. Cluster ID. Cluster name. Size. E7ENV9. P16112. UPI0007DBDFF5. P16112-2. P16112-3 ... to allow unambiguous identification of a protein.,p>,a href=/help/protein_names target=_top>More...,/a>,/p>Protein namesi. ... Protein. Similar proteins. Organisms. Length. Cluster ID. Cluster name. Size. E7ENV9. E7EX88. UPI0007DC4E62. UPI0007DC79B0. ... Pfam protein domain database. More...Pfami. View protein in Pfam. PF00059. Lectin_C. 1 hit. PF07686. V-set. 1 hit. PF00193. ...
RNA chaperone proteins are essential partners of RNA in living organisms and viruses. They are thought to assist in the correct ... heat resistance of core proteins, as well as far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested that a well-defined 3D protein ... RNA chaperoning and intrinsic disorder in the core proteins of Flaviviridae Nucleic Acids Res. 2008 Feb;36(3):712-25. doi: ... Previously, we have shown that the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a potent RNA chaperone that can drive profound ...
Ab91302 is an active protein fragment produced in Escherichia coli and has been validated in WB, ELISA… ... Buy our Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Core 2b protein. ... HCV core protein is among the most conserved proteins in HCV ... HCV (Hepatitis C Virus) viral core protein forms the internal viral coat that encapsidates the genomic RNA and is enveloped in ... The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein represents the first 177 amino acids of the viral precursor polyprotein and is ...
Core Grant Citation This facility is funded by NCI # CA16672. Publications should cite the Core grant in the acknowledgment ... Two copies of the publication acknowledging the Core grant should also be submitted to the facility at Unit 1058. ... section, if publications use data generated by the RPPA Core facility. ...
Ab49019 is a full length protein produced in Escherichia coli and has been validated in… ... Buy our Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen protein (Rhodamine). ... Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen protein (Rhodamine). See all Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen proteins and peptides. ... In addition, HCV core antigen is a recently developed marker of hepatitis C infection. The HCV core protein has been previously ...
... triggering factor via tyrosine protein kinases - Volume 120 Issue 3 - M. HAMADIEN, M. BAKHIET, R. A. HARRIS ... Views captured on Cambridge Core between ,date,. This data will be updated every 24 hours. ... Lapatinib-Binding Protein Kinases in the African Trypanosome: Identification of Cellular Targets for Kinase-Directed Chemical ... Interferon-γ induces secretion of trypanosome lymphocyte triggering factor via tyrosine protein kinases. * M. HAMADIEN (a1), M ...
In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e1 bands of the type I ...
  • The core precursor was eluted from the gels and treated with alkaline borohydride in order to convert serine residues substituted with xylose or N-acetylgalactosamine to alanine (or with alkaline sulfite to convert them to cysteic acid). (lu.se)
  • These data provide further support that the core precursor resides mainly in the pre-Golgi compartment and that xylosylation occurs mainly in a Golgi compartment. (lu.se)
  • Immunoprecipitations from Tetrahymena extracts also showed no evidence for an interaction between the core tTERT/telomerase RNA complex and the p80 and p95 proteins. (nih.gov)
  • Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) negative factor (Nef protein) accelerates virulent progression of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by its interaction with specific cellular proteins involved in signal transduction and host cell activation. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • The HCV core protein has been previously shown to circulate in the bloodstream of HCV-infected patients and inhibit host immunity through an interaction with gC1qR. (abcam.com)
  • The three OB-folds provide the major source of interaction between the trimerization core and these folds are packed in tandem and run half a turn around the three-helical bundle. (kenyon.edu)
  • Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the interaction between core and gC1qR indicates that HCV core binds the region spanning amino acids 188 to 259 of gC1qR, a site distinct from the binding region of C1q. (jci.org)
  • These interactions were used to infer overall protein interaction maps linking the viral proteins with components of the host cellular networks. (rsc.org)
  • Core and NS4B proteins contribute to highly compact interaction networks that may enable the virus to respond rapidly to host physiological responses to HCV infection. (rsc.org)
  • Specifically, immunogold labelling of the core NEC constituent pUL53 and NEC-associated viral kinase pUL97 suggested an intranuclear NEC-capsid interaction. (mdpi.com)
  • We propose that this interaction might be used to define the relative orientation of the shell with respect to the core. (asm.org)
  • Manipulation of HVC core protein and lncRNA HOTAIR was to evaluate the role of interaction between them on cell metabolism-related gene expression and cellular metabolism. (portlandpress.com)
  • The interaction between HCV core protein and the protein we obtained from positive colony was further confirmed by repeating yeast two - hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation in vitro . (wjgnet.com)
  • The interaction between HCV core protein and translin protein could be proved not only in yeast, but also in vitro . (wjgnet.com)
  • Thus, the interaction of the CBD with filter paper apparently accounts for the mass-transfer-limited binding rate and also for the irreversible adsorption of intact CBH I. Adsorption isotherms at 50 degrees C indicate very similar relative association constants for the intact cellulases (0.24-0.30 l/g of cellulose), but drastically reduced values for CBH I core proteins (0.03 l/g of cellulose). (biochemj.org)
  • Human Daxx is a protein that functions, in part, as a transcriptional co-repressor through its interaction with a growing number of nuclear, DNA-associated proteins. (biologists.org)
  • As well as playing a central role in virion assembly, core has been shown to modulate several cellular processes mainly due to its interaction with several host factors. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Although, the binding of these two proteins has been shown by yeast-two hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays, an authentic interaction is yet to be demonstrated in cells replicating the HCV JFH1 infectious clone. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Based on the diverse phenotypes of these mutants it is difficult to conclude as to which effects (if any) are directly related to the core-DDX3 interaction. (gla.ac.uk)
  • However, these studies failed to demonstrate if the core-DDX3 interaction had any functional relevance to this effect. (gla.ac.uk)
  • The aim of this study was to clearly define the role of the core-DDX3 interaction in HCV replication. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Detailed analysis of this mutant revealed its replication properties resembled those of the WT virus following both electroporation of the viral RNA into cells and infection of naïve cells with the virus particles, demonstrating that the core-DDX3 interaction is dispensable for virus replication in cell culture. (gla.ac.uk)
  • In addition, DDX3 knockdown experiments revealed that as for JFH1WT, the replication of JFH1Y35A was equally sensitive to the depletion of endogenous DDX3 levels from target cells, indicating that the requirement of DDX3 for HCV replication is unrelated to its interaction with the viral core protein. (gla.ac.uk)
  • The results of this study indicate that the core-DDX3 interaction is not the mechanism through which HCV utilises this host factor for its replication. (gla.ac.uk)
  • E2F1 is a remarkable example of a network hub as this protein interacts with many genes, proteins, and other transcription factors through a variety of regulatory mechanisms. (nature.com)
  • Our data suggested that suppression of HOTAIR abrogates HCV core protein-induced reduction in Sirt1 and differential expression of glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related genes. (portlandpress.com)
  • Unlike cells disrupted in any of the major GRL genes, Δ GRT1 Δ GRT2 cells show no defect in secretion, indicating that neither exocytic fusion nor core expansion depends on GRT1 . (asm.org)
  • Transactivation of wound-responsive genes containing the core sequence of the auxin-responsive. (deepdyve.com)
  • Subsequent microarray screening of NtWIF overexpressing tobacco identified 49 stress-responsive genes, and in silico analyses of available promoter regions of these genes revealed β-1,3-glucanase, ACS2, P-450, and WIPK itself to contain the ARE core motif consisted of either TGTCTC or TGTCCT. (deepdyve.com)
  • To characterize the VP6 protein of AHSV VP6, the genes were expressed using both a baculovirus and a bacterial expression system. (up.ac.za)
  • Later in the 2000's, post-genomic research in his laboratory established signature proteins in halophilic Archaea, and the function of many genes and genetic elements, including multiple replication origins, general transcription factors, and DNA repair systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • By combining logic-based network modeling, in vitro experimentation, and gene expression profiles from patient cohorts displaying tumor aggressiveness, we identify and experimentally validate distinctive, tumor type-specific signatures of receptor proteins associated to epithelial-mesenchymal transition in bladder and breast cancer. (nature.com)
  • Like C1q, HCV core can inhibit T-cell proliferative responses in vitro. (jci.org)
  • Evidence for this mechanism includes in vitro experiments showing that some proteins released via constitutive exocytosis remain soluble under TGN-like conditions that promote DCG protein aggregation ( 10 ). (asm.org)
  • Using co-fractionation and co-immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that hDaxx associates with proteins that are critical for transcriptional repression, such as histone deacetylase II, constituents of chromatin such as core histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4, and Dek, a chromatin-associated protein reported to change the topology of DNA in chromatin in vitro. (biologists.org)
  • To facilitate the solution of the crystal structure of this fusion core, we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to express the HR1 and HR2 regions linked together by a flexible linker as a single chain (named 2-helix). (eurekamag.com)
  • Recently, it has been shown that HCV core proteins (HCcAg) with C-terminal deletions assemble in vitro into virus-like particles (VLPs) in the presence of structured RNA molecules. (thescipub.com)
  • Here I review three recently characterised non-core archaeal PCNA binding proteins NusS, NreA/NreB and TIP, highlighting what is known of their interactions with PCNA and their functions in vivo and in vitro. (st-andrews.ac.uk)
  • Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) immediate early 1 (IE1) protein associates with condensed chromatin of the host cell during mitosis. (rcsb.org)
  • We have determined the structure of the chromatin-tethering domain (CTD) of IE1 bound to the nucleosome core particle, and discovered that IE1-CTD specifically interacts with the H2A-H2B acidic patch and impairs the compaction of higher-order chromatin structure. (rcsb.org)
  • A working model for the repressive action of hDaxx through its association with chromatin related proteins is presented. (biologists.org)
  • Anti-Red1 staining is confined to the cores of meiotic chromosomes and is not associated with the loops of chromatin that lie outside the SC. (rupress.org)
  • These data reveal a dynamic recruitment of proteins and post-translational modifications at damaged forks and surrounding chromatin. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • We conclude that this centromere-specific protein is a histone-like component of chromatin. (rupress.org)
  • They are the chief protein components of chromatin, acting as spools around which DNA winds, and playing a role in gene regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our resources allow rapid analysis of conditions that yield well-behaved soluble protein for downstream biochemical and biophysical studies. (ucla.edu)
  • In vivo, sorting would result if aggregated and soluble proteins exit the TGN in different carriers. (asm.org)
  • Proteins were found to be soluble and the VP6 expressed in insect cells was found to be N-glycosylated. (up.ac.za)
  • In the present study, by mating C57BL/6Nci IA-2 +/− with IA-2β +/− mice, we generated double knockout mice (IA-2 −/− /IA-2β −/− ) to study the effect of the combined deletion of these two proteins on insulin secretion and blood glucose levels. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Taken together, our experiments show that the dense core vesicle proteins IA-2 and IA-2β, alone or in combination, are involved in insulin secretion, but neither alone nor in combination are they required for the development of diabetes in NOD mice. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • MC activation by either calcium ionophore or IgE ligation caused an up-regulated expression of the SG core protein, C4ST-1, and GalNAc4S6ST, accompanied by increased secretion of chondroitin sulfate as shown by biosynthetic labeling experiments. (diva-portal.org)
  • Attempts to purify MCPs from these mutants, followed by gel electrophoresis and enzyme assays, indicated that the protein complexes isolated consisted of MCP shells depleted of core enzymes. (asm.org)
  • Abbott assays test proteins in this system, enabling diagnosis and monitoring of immune system conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis. (corelaboratory.abbott)
  • Abbott provides a broad spectrum of specific protein assays which enable diagnosis and management of many immune system related diseases. (corelaboratory.abbott)
  • Baculovirus expressed VP6 bound double and single-stranded RNA and DNA in nucleic acid overlay protein blot assays. (up.ac.za)
  • Using microfluidics affinity analysis, protein-fragment complementation assays, and co-immunoprecipitations in infected cells, we show that this motif mediates core binding to AP2M1. (pasteur.fr)
  • Sera from several humans with CREST scleroderma autoimmune disease (CREST: calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dsymotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) bind this protein in immunoblot assays of HeLa whole cell or nuclear extracts. (rupress.org)
  • The relationship of the various synthesis and degradation rates to the physiological state of mammalian cells remains to be determined, as does the pathway of assembly and disassembly of RNP substructures during re-utilization of the proteins and during their turnover. (springer.com)
  • Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase contains two essential components: Tetrahymena telomerase reverse transcriptase (tTERT), the catalytic protein component, and telomerase RNA that provides the template for telomere repeat synthesis. (nih.gov)
  • Protein-protein interactions and activity studies using different combinations of the septum synthesis core of the divisome revealed that the glycosyltransferase activity of PBP1b is repressed by FtsBLQ and that the presence of FtsN or LpoB suppresses this inhibition. (asm.org)
  • The present invention relates to the method of synthesis of core-shell nano medicine serving as a novel platform for the encapsulation of multiple therapeutic molecules enabling combinatorial therapy against diseases including cancer, inflammatory and auto-immune diseases and its associated manifestations. (amrita.edu)
  • We identified a conserved heretofore unrecognized YXXΦ motif (Φ is a bulky hydrophobic residue) within the core protein. (pasteur.fr)
  • Because the hydrophobic architecture of the catalytic core is conserved throughout the EPK superfamily, the present study suggests a universal mechanism for dynamically driven allosteric activation of kinases mediated by coordinated signal transmission through ordered motifs in their hydrophobic cores. (sciencemag.org)
  • This approach is useful for rapid mutation of short sequences within a protein molecule or introduction of site-directed modifications (isotopic labels, fluorescent probes, phosphate groups, biotin, etc.) onto specific amino acids. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • In this report, we show that the N-terminal 37 amino acids of the PduB protein have a critical role in binding the shell of the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) microcompartment to its enzymatic core. (asm.org)
  • Here, we show that the N-terminal 37 amino acids of the PduB shell protein are essential for assembly of the 1,2-propanediol utilization microcompartment. (asm.org)
  • To investigate the mechanism of HCV core-mediated immunosuppression, we searched for host proteins capable of associating with the core protein using a yeast two-hybrid system. (jci.org)
  • Using the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) membrane protein system, eleven human host proteins interacting with Core and 45 interacting with NS4B were identified, most of which are novel. (rsc.org)
  • With the components of the yeast two hybrid system 3," bait" plasmids of HCV core the gene was constructed. (wjgnet.com)
  • This motif is homologous to sorting signals within host cargo proteins known to mediate binding of AP2M1, the μ subunit of clathrin adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2), and intracellular trafficking. (pasteur.fr)
  • Negative factor (Nef) has a two-domain structure consisting of an N-terminal anchor domain and a core domain separated by a specific cleavage site of the HIV proteases. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • Aliquots of our frequently used proteins (proteases, polymerases, LIF, Cas9, Tn5, …) can be picked up at any time in the facility (room 303). (embl.de)
  • To investigate changes in corneal biomechanical responses after crosslinking with decorin core protein. (arvojournals.org)
  • A paired eye study design was utilized to investigate corneal biomechanical changes in 5 human donor pairs (10 eyes) and in 4 porcine pairs (8 eyes) after one random eye was treated (tx) with human decorin core protein (Galacorin), and the untreated fellow eye served as control (c). (arvojournals.org)
  • An eye cup was used for instillation of pretreatment (45-60 sec), followed by the penetration enhancer (45-60sec), followed immediately by decorin core protein (45-60sec) with rinsing in between the last 2 steps. (arvojournals.org)
  • Treatment with decorin core protein appeared to produce higher modulus and stiffer biomechanical behavior in both human and porcine corneas. (arvojournals.org)
  • A remarkable feature of bacterial MCPs is that the outer shells of diverse metabolic types are built primarily from the same family of proteins known as bacterial microcompartment (BMC) domain proteins ( 26 , 30 , 31 ). (asm.org)
  • T he complement system is a family of proteins that is integral in the destruction of viruses and bacteria, and is a major part of the immune system. (corelaboratory.abbott)
  • A point mutation in the core protein in which a phenylalanine at position 97 is exchanged for a smaller leucine leads to premature envelopment of the capsid before the genome maturation is fully completed. (pdbj.org)
  • Adenovirus major core protein condenses DNA in clusters and bundles, modulating genome release and capsid internal pressure. (pdbj.org)
  • Some viruses package dsDNA together with large amounts of positively charged proteins, thought to help condense the genome inside the capsid with no evidence. (pdbj.org)
  • Here, we provide electron microscopy-based data demonstrating the association of both nuclear capsids and NEC proteins at nuclear lamina budding sites. (mdpi.com)
  • Immunofluorescent studies, which have confirmed the expected nucleoplasmic or euchromatic localization of the RNP core proteins, have also indicated that these species are stable during mitosis, at which time they are dispersed through the cell away from the condensed chromosomes. (springer.com)
  • Histones are the main constituents of the protein part of chromosomes of eukaryotic cells. (diagenode.com)
  • There is little or no Hop1 protein on pachytene chromosomes or in synapsed chromosomal regions. (rupress.org)
  • They consist of sequentially acting metabolic enzymes (an enzymatic core) encapsulated within a protein shell that controls the diffusion of enzyme substrates and products while confining toxic or volatile intermediates ( 10 - 14 ). (asm.org)
  • In addition, it has recently been shown that the major adenovirus condensing protein (polypeptide VII) is dispensable for genome encapsidation. (pdbj.org)
  • These results indicate that protein VII condenses the adenovirus genome by combining direct clustering and promotion of bridging by other core proteins. (pdbj.org)
  • Phylogenetic analysis suggests that core protein specific forces constrain its diversity within the context of overall HBV genome evolution. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Moreover, gel filtration showed that Grl and Grt proteins in cell homogenates exist in nonoverlapping complexes, and affinity-isolated Grt1p complexes do not contain Grl proteins. (asm.org)
  • Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles having high affinity with polyhistidine were synthesized by decomposition of a Ni surfactant complex followed by air oxidation. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Protein expression screening uses bacterial ( E . coli ) and yeast ( P . pastoris ) expression hosts. (ucla.edu)
  • Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are extremely large proteinaceous organelles that consist of an enzymatic core encapsulated within a complex protein shell. (asm.org)
  • IMPORTANCE Bacterial microcompartments consist of metabolic enzymes encapsulated within a protein shell and are widely used to optimize metabolic process. (asm.org)
  • In order to study the humoral immune responses against different HCV proteins in patients suffering from chronic HCV infection, we produced three structural (core, E1 and E2) and six nonstructural proteins (NS2, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A and NS5B) in Sf 9 insect cells by using the baculovirus expression system. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Based on our Western blot analyses we found that the major immunogenic HCV antigens were the core, NS4B, NS3 and NS5A proteins which were recognized in 97%, 86%, 68% and 53% of patient sera, respectively. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We integrate gene expression profiles of cancer cell lines from two E2F1-driven highly aggressive bladder and breast tumors, and use network analysis methods to identify the tumor type-specific core of the network. (nature.com)
  • Using the core protein as bait, we screened a human T cell-enriched expression library and identified a gene encoding the gC1q receptor (gC1qR). (jci.org)
  • A gene from a positive colony was the gene of translin, a recombination hotspot binding protein. (wjgnet.com)
  • During maturation, all but one of the prohead proteins are proteolytically processed by a phage-coded protease which is formed by autocatalytic cleavage of the product of gene 21 (gp21). (mybiosource.com)