A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)
A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)
A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.
Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.
Disorders characterized by multiple cessations of respirations during sleep that induce partial arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. Sleep apnea syndromes are divided into central (see SLEEP APNEA, CENTRAL), obstructive (see SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE), and mixed central-obstructive types.
Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)
A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.
Techniques for effecting the transition of the respiratory-failure patient from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous ventilation, while meeting the criteria that tidal volume be above a given threshold (greater than 5 ml/kg), respiratory frequency be below a given count (less than 30 breaths/min), and oxygen partial pressure be above a given threshold (PaO2 greater than 50mm Hg). Weaning studies focus on finding methods to monitor and predict the outcome of mechanical ventilator weaning as well as finding ventilatory support techniques which will facilitate successful weaning. Present methods include intermittent mandatory ventilation, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and mandatory minute volume ventilation.
Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.
A condition associated with multiple episodes of sleep apnea which are distinguished from obstructive sleep apnea (SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE) by the complete cessation of efforts to breathe. This disorder is associated with dysfunction of central nervous system centers that regulate respiration.
Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.
RESPIRATORY MUSCLE contraction during INHALATION. The work is accomplished in three phases: LUNG COMPLIANCE work, that required to expand the LUNGS against its elastic forces; tissue resistance work, that required to overcome the viscosity of the lung and chest wall structures; and AIRWAY RESISTANCE work, that required to overcome airway resistance during the movement of air into the lungs. Work of breathing does not refer to expiration, which is entirely a passive process caused by elastic recoil of the lung and chest cage. (Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 8th ed, p406)
Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.
Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.
Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)
Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase when the patient has an artificial airway in place and is connected to a ventilator.
Moving a retruded mandible forward to a normal position. It is commonly performed for malocclusion and retrognathia. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
An abnormal pattern of breathing characterized by alternating periods of apnea and deep, rapid breathing. The cycle begins with slow, shallow breaths that gradually increase in depth and rate and is then followed by a period of apnea. The period of apnea can last 5 to 30 seconds, then the cycle repeats every 45 seconds to 3 minutes.
The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.
The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.
A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.
Removal of an endotracheal tube from the patient.
A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
Spasmodic swallowing of air.
The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.
Dental devices such as RETAINERS, ORTHODONTIC used to improve gaps in teeth and structure of the jaws. These devices can be removed and reinserted at will.
The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.
Rough, noisy breathing during sleep, due to vibration of the uvula and soft palate.
The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).
A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.
Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.
Helium. A noble gas with the atomic symbol He, atomic number 2, and atomic weight 4.003. It is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is not combustible and does not support combustion. It was first detected in the sun and is now obtained from natural gas. Medically it is used as a diluent for other gases, being especially useful with oxygen in the treatment of certain cases of respiratory obstruction, and as a vehicle for general anesthetics. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase of spontaneous respiration.
Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A chronic lung disease developed after OXYGEN INHALATION THERAPY or mechanical ventilation (VENTILATION, MECHANICAL) usually occurring in certain premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE) or newborn infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME, NEWBORN). Histologically, it is characterized by the unusual abnormalities of the bronchioles, such as METAPLASIA, decrease in alveolar number, and formation of CYSTS.
Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.
A specific category of drugs that prevent sleepiness by specifically targeting sleep-mechanisms in the brain. They are used to treat DISORDERS OF EXCESSIVE SOMNOLENCE such as NARCOLEPSY. Note that this drug category does not include broadly-acting central nervous system stimulants such as AMPHETAMINES.
The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Hospital units equipped for childbirth.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The muscles of the PHARYNX are voluntary muscles arranged in two layers. The external circular layer consists of three constrictors (superior, middle, and inferior). The internal longitudinal layer consists of the palatopharyngeus, the salpingopharyngeus, and the stylopharyngeus. During swallowing, the outer layer constricts the pharyngeal wall and the inner layer elevates pharynx and LARYNX.
Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
A complication of multiple rib fractures, rib and sternum fractures, or thoracic surgery. A portion of the chest wall becomes isolated from the thoracic cage and exhibits paradoxical respiration.
The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)
A fleshy extension at the back of the soft palate that hangs above the opening of the throat.
Abnormalities of the nose acquired after birth from injury or disease.
Hospital facilities which provide care for newborn infants.
Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.
Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.
Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.
Institutional night care of patients.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
An acute inflammatory disease of the lower RESPIRATORY TRACT, caused by paramyxoviruses, occurring primarily in infants and young children; the viruses most commonly implicated are PARAINFLUENZA VIRUS TYPE 3; RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS, HUMAN; and METAPNEUMOVIRUS.
The noninvasive measurement or determination of the partial pressure (tension) of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide locally in the capillaries of a tissue by the application to the skin of a special set of electrodes. These electrodes contain photoelectric sensors capable of picking up the specific wavelengths of radiation emitted by oxygenated versus reduced hemoglobin.
A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.
Care of patients with deficiencies and abnormalities associated with the cardiopulmonary system. It includes the therapeutic use of medical gases and their administrative apparatus, environmental control systems, humidification, aerosols, ventilatory support, bronchopulmonary drainage and exercise, respiratory rehabilitation, assistance with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and maintenance of natural, artificial, and mechanical airways.
'Infant, Premature, Diseases' refers to health conditions or abnormalities that specifically affect babies born before 37 weeks of gestation, often resulting from their immature organ systems and increased vulnerability due to preterm birth.
Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.
A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.
A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.
Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.
An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.
The application of heat to raise the temperature of the environment, ambient or local, or the systems for accomplishing this effect. It is distinguished from HEAT, the physical property and principle of physics.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.
Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)
The determination of oxygen-hemoglobin saturation of blood either by withdrawing a sample and passing it through a classical photoelectric oximeter or by electrodes attached to some translucent part of the body like finger, earlobe, or skin fold. It includes non-invasive oxygen monitoring by pulse oximetry.
Ventilatory support system using frequencies from 60-900 cycles/min or more. Three types of systems have been distinguished on the basis of rates, volumes, and the system used. They are high frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV); HIGH-FREQUENCY JET VENTILATION; (HFJV); and high-frequency oscillation (HFO).
These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.
A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Disorders of the nose, general or unspecified.
Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.
The act of BREATHING in.
The partition separating the two NASAL CAVITIES in the midplane. It is formed by the SEPTAL NASAL CARTILAGE, parts of skull bones (ETHMOID BONE; VOMER), and membranous parts.
Surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck, or the opening so created.
Non-therapeutic positive end-expiratory pressure occurring frequently in patients with severe airway obstruction. It can appear with or without the administration of external positive end-expiratory pressure (POSITIVE-PRESSURE RESPIRATION). It presents an important load on the inspiratory muscles which are operating at a mechanical disadvantage due to hyperinflation. Auto-PEEP may cause profound hypotension that should be treated by intravascular volume expansion, increasing the time for expiration, and/or changing from assist mode to intermittent mandatory ventilation mode. (From Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1127)
The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)
Method in which repeated blood pressure readings are made while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It allows quantitative analysis of the high blood pressure load over time, can help distinguish between types of HYPERTENSION, and can assess the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy.
Conveying ill or injured individuals from one place to another.
The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.
Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.
Physiological processes and properties of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.
A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.
The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.
A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.
An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.
A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1000 grams (2.2 lbs), regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.
The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.
The structural changes in the number, mass, size and/or composition of the airway tissues.
Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.
The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.
Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.
The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.
A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.
The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.
Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)
The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).
Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.
A congenital heart defect characterized by the persistent opening of fetal DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS that connects the PULMONARY ARTERY to the descending aorta (AORTA, DESCENDING) allowing unoxygenated blood to bypass the lung and flow to the PLACENTA. Normally, the ductus is closed shortly after birth.
The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.
The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.
A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.
The act of BREATHING out.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.
Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.
The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.
Techniques for administering artificial respiration without the need for INTRATRACHEAL INTUBATION.
The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.
The production of a dense fibrous network of neuroglia; includes astrocytosis, which is a proliferation of astrocytes in the area of a degenerative lesion.
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.
The position or attitude of the body.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a normal, quiet expiration. It is the sum of the RESIDUAL VOLUME and the EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME. Common abbreviation is FRC.
The pressure due to the weight of fluid.
Body ventilators that assist ventilation by applying intermittent subatmospheric pressure around the thorax, abdomen, or airway and periodically expand the chest wall and inflate the lungs. They are relatively simple to operate and do not require tracheostomy. These devices include the tank ventilators ("iron lung"), Portalung, Pneumowrap, and chest cuirass ("tortoise shell").
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
A thin leaf-shaped cartilage that is covered with LARYNGEAL MUCOSA and situated posterior to the root of the tongue and HYOID BONE. During swallowing, the epiglottis folds back over the larynx inlet thus prevents foods from entering the airway.
Decrease in existing BODY WEIGHT.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.
A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.

nCPAP improves abnormal autonomic function in at-risk-for-SIDS infants with OSA. (1/875)

We evaluated cardiovascular autonomic control and arousability during sleep in infants with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before and after 10 +/- 4 (mean +/- SD) days of treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). Six OSA infants and 12 age-matched control infants were studied with polygraphic sleep studies at the age of 13 +/- 4 wk. During the study, 45 degrees head-up tilt tests were performed in slow-wave and rapid eye movement sleep. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored. All OSA infants had decreased initial BP and HR responses, followed by hypotension in two and hypertension in two. OSA infants displayed higher arousal thresholds in response to the tilt in rapid eye movement sleep (P < 0.005) and higher baseline HR (P < 0.05) than controls. nCPAP treatment normalized BP and HR responses as well as arousal thresholds to tilting and stabilized HR levels. OSA in infants may be linked with cardiovascular autonomic control disturbances and decreased arousability during sleep. These defects are improved by control of OSA with nCPAP.  (+info)

Effects of continuous positive airway pressure/positive end-expiratory pressure and pressure-support ventilation on work of breathing, using an animal model. (2/875)

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)/positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and pressure support ventilation (PSV) on work of breathing (WOB). METHODS: With 13 anesthetized lambs we measured WOB with an esophageal balloon and flow signals. All the animals were sedated, intubated, and ventilated, using 2 pediatric ventilators (Servo 300 and VIP Bird). Ventilator settings were CPAP of 0, 5, and 10 cm H(2)O and PSV of 5 and 10 cm H(2)O with PEEP of 0, 5, and 10 cm H(2)O. Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: With the Servo 300 the total WOB (WOB(T)) increased between CPAP/PEEP of 0 and 10 cm H(2)O (p +info)

Leptin and ghrelin levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea: effect of CPAP treatment. (3/875)

Serum leptin and ghrelin levels were investigated in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome before and during continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) treatment and compared with body mass index (BMI)-matched controls without OSA. Male patients (n=30) with OSA (apnoea/hypopnoea index=58+/-16, BMI=32.6+/-5.3 kg x m(-2)) underwent CPAP treatment. Fasting leptin and ghrelin were measured at baseline and 2 days, and in the case of leptin 2 months after initiation of treatment. Baseline plasma ghrelin levels were significantly higher in OSA patients than in controls. After 2 days of CPAP treatment, plasma ghrelin decreased in almost all OSA patients (n=9) to levels that were only slightly higher than those of controls (n=9). Leptin levels did not change significantly from baseline after 2 days of CPAP treatment, but were higher than in the control group. After 8 weeks, leptin levels decreased significantly, although the BMI of the patients showed no change. The decrease in leptin levels was more pronounced in patients with a BMI <30 kg x m(-2). These data indicate that the elevated leptin and ghrelin levels are not determined by obesity alone, since they rapidly decreased during continuous positive airways pressure therapy.  (+info)

Humidified nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea. (4/875)

Heated humidification of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) reduces upper airway symptoms and improves initial use in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). The present study aimed to assess the effect of heated humidification of nCPAP on upper airway symptoms and initial use in obstructive sleep apnoea. This study was of a randomised, crossover design. Subjects with polysomnographically confirmed OSAS were randomised to 3 weeks nCPAP treatment with heated humidification (nCPAP-humid) or placebo humidification (nCPAP pl-humid). Objective and subjective nCPAP use, upper airway symptoms, and treatment satisfaction were compared. Thirty seven of 42 patients completed the protocol. nCPAP-humid reduced the frequency of adverse upper airway symptoms. nCPAP use over 3 weeks was greater with nCPAP-humid compared with nCPAP pl-humid. No difference was found between the treatment arms in terms of subjective treatment satisfaction or alertness. Heated humidification of nasal continuous positive airway pressure reduces upper airway symptoms and is associated with a small increase in initial use but not subjective sleepiness or treatment satisfaction. The results support the use of heated humidification as a strategy to reduce side-effects related to continuous positive airway pressure but not routine initial use.  (+info)

Control of upper airway muscle activity in younger versus older men during sleep onset. (5/875)

Pharyngeal dilator muscles are clearly important in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA). We have previously shown that the activity of both the genioglossus (GGEMG) and tensor palatini (TPEMG) are decreased at sleep onset, and that this decrement in muscle activity is greater in the apnoea patient than in healthy controls. We have also previously shown this decrement to be greater in older men when compared with younger ones. In order to explore the mechanisms responsible for this decrement in muscle activity nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was applied to reduce negative pressure mediated muscle activation. We then investigated the effect of sleep onset (transition from predominantly alpha to predominantly theta EEG activity) on ventilation, upper airway muscle activation and upper airway resistance (UAR) in middle-aged and younger healthy men. We found that both GGEMG and TPEMG were reduced by the application of nasal CPAP during wakefulness, but that CPAP did not alter the decrement in activity in either muscle seen in the first two breaths following an alpha to theta transition. However, CPAP prevented both the rise in UAR at sleep onset that occurred on the control night, and the recruitment in GGEMG seen in the third to fifth breaths following the alpha to theta transition. Further, GGEMG was higher in the middle-aged men than in the younger men during wakefulness and was decreased more in the middle-aged men with the application of nasal CPAP. No differences were seen in TPEMG between the two age groups. These data suggest that the initial sleep onset reduction in upper airway muscle activity is due to loss of a 'wakefulness' stimulus, rather than to loss of responsiveness to negative pressure. In addition, it suggests that in older men, higher wakeful muscle activity is due to an anatomically more collapsible upper airway with more negative pressure driven muscle activation. Sleep onset per se does not appear to have a greater effect on upper airway muscle activity as one ages.  (+info)

Effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on elderly Chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnea in the prethrombotic state. (6/875)

OBJECTIVES: To characterize the prethrombotic state (PTS) in elderly Chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and the effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) ventilation on their PTS. METHODS: Forty-one elderly patients with moderate and severe OSAHS were enrolled into the OSAHS group and underwent nCPAP treatment. Their blood samples were drawn at 6:00 am and 4:00 pm before and during nCPAP treatment, respectively, to test hemocrit, platelet aggregation (PAG), whole blood viscosity (WBV), plasma fibrinogen (fng), prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). All blood factors were also tested in a control group consisting of 32 healthy elderly Chinese with neither OSAHS nor cerebrocardiac vascular disease. RESULTS: In the OSAHS group there was a significantly higher hemocrit, WBV, fng, and a significantly shorter PT and APTT at 6:00 am compared to 4:00 pm before nCPAP treatment, while there was no significant difference among all blood test factors between 6:00 am and 4:00 pm on day 30 of the nCPAP treatment. In the OSAHS group, the hemocrit, WBV, PAG and plasma fng were significantly lower and the PT and APTT were significantly longer at 6:00 am on day 30 of the nCPAP treatment compared to 6:00 am before the nCPAP treatment. A significantly lower hemocrit, but a much longer PT and APTT were observed at 4:00 pm on day 30 of the treatment, compared with 4:00 pm before the treatment. No significant difference among the blood test factors was found between 6:00 am and 4:00 pm blood in the control group or between the control and OSAHS groups after 30 days of nCPAP treatment. CONCLUSION: In elderly Chinese OSAHS patients, PTS could be effectively eliminated by nCPAP treatment.  (+info)

Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure: a randomised comparison of continuous positive airway pressure and bi-level positive airway pressure. (7/875)

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether there is a difference in required duration of non-invasive ventilation between continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) in the treatment of a heterogeneous group of emergency department (ED) patients suffering acute respiratory failure and the subgroup of patients with acute pulmonary oedema (APO). Secondary objectives were to compare complications, failure rate, disposition, length of stay parameters, and mortality between the treatments. METHODS: This prospective randomised trial was conducted in the emergency departments of three Australian teaching hospitals. Patients in acute respiratory failure were randomly assigned to receive CPAP or BiPAP in addition to standard therapy. Duration of non-invasive ventilation, complications, failure rate, disposition, length of stay (hospital and ICU), and mortality were measured. RESULTS: 101 patients were enrolled in the study (CPAP 51, BiPAP 50). The median duration of non-invasive ventilation with CPAP was 123 minutes (range 10-338) and 132 minutes (range 20-550) for BiPAP (p = 0.206, Mann-Whitney). For the subgroup suffering APO, 36 were randomised to CPAP and 35 to BiPAP. For this group the median duration of non-invasive ventilation for CPAP was 123 minutes (range 35-338) and 133 minutes (range 30-550) for BiPAP (p = 0.320, Mann-Whitney). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that there is no significant difference in the duration of non-invasive ventilation treatment between CPAP and BiPAP when used for the treatment of acute respiratory failure in the ED. There was also no significant difference between the groups in secondary end points.  (+info)

A comparison of public and private obstructive sleep apnea clinics. (8/875)

The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical findings and polysomnography results obtained at public and private clinics in Brazil, the follow-up after diagnosis, and the therapeutic aspects related to continuous positive airway pressure. Patients who snore and who have obstructive sleep apnea were retrospectively divided into two groups, i.e., public clinic (N=307) and private clinic (N=317). Data concerning age, sex, body mass index (BMI), neck circumference, medical history, sleepiness scale, follow-up after diagnosis, and acceptance of continuous positive airway pressure therapy were collected. Mean age was 50 +/- 12 (range: 15-80) for public patients and 48 +/- 12 years (range: 19-91) for private patients. Mean BMI was 30 +/- 6 (range: 19-67) for public patients and 31 +/- 6 kg/m (range: 21-59) for private patients. The public clinic had a significantly higher frequency of women than the private clinic (M:F ratio of 2.0:1 and 6.9:1, respectively). The condition of private patients (apnea-hypopnea index=31 +/- 25) was more severe than that of public patients (apnea-hypopnea index=25 +/- 24 events/h; P=0.0004). In the public and private clinics, 19 and 15% of patients were snorers, respectively, and 81 and 85% of them had sleep apnea. After diagnosis, follow-up was longer in the private group. The continuous positive airway pressure acceptance was similar for both groups (32 vs 35%), but patients from the public clinic abandoned treatment more than private ones (65 vs 13%). Social status was significant in terms of the severity of obstructive sleep apnea age and gender distribution. Private patients look for a diagnosis earlier in the course of the disease than public patients, adhere more to follow-up, and abandon continuous positive airway pressure treatment less than public patients do.  (+info)

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is a mode of non-invasive ventilation that delivers pressurized room air or oxygen to maintain airway patency and increase functional residual capacity in patients with respiratory disorders. A CPAP device, which typically includes a flow generator, tubing, and a mask, provides a constant positive pressure throughout the entire respiratory cycle, preventing the collapse of the upper airway during inspiration and expiration.

CPAP is commonly used to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a condition characterized by repetitive narrowing or closure of the upper airway during sleep, leading to intermittent hypoxia, hypercapnia, and sleep fragmentation. By delivering positive pressure, CPAP helps to stent open the airway, ensuring unobstructed breathing and reducing the frequency and severity of apneic events.

Additionally, CPAP can be used in other clinical scenarios, such as managing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, or postoperative respiratory insufficiency, to improve oxygenation and reduce the work of breathing. The specific pressure settings and device configurations are tailored to each patient's needs based on their underlying condition, severity of symptoms, and response to therapy.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a sleep-related breathing disorder that occurs when the upper airway becomes partially or completely blocked during sleep, leading to pauses in breathing or shallow breaths. These episodes, known as apneas or hypopneas, can last for 10 seconds or longer and may occur multiple times throughout the night, disrupting normal sleep patterns and causing oxygen levels in the blood to drop.

The obstruction in OSA is typically caused by the relaxation of the muscles in the back of the throat during sleep, which allows the soft tissues to collapse and block the airway. This can result in snoring, choking, gasping for air, or awakening from sleep with a start.

Contributing factors to OSA may include obesity, large neck circumference, enlarged tonsils or adenoids, alcohol consumption, smoking, and use of sedatives or muscle relaxants. Untreated OSA can lead to serious health consequences such as high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cognitive impairment. Treatment options for OSA include lifestyle changes, oral appliances, positive airway pressure therapy, and surgery.

Positive-pressure respiration is a type of mechanical ventilation where positive pressure is applied to the airway and lungs, causing them to expand and inflate. This can be used to support or replace spontaneous breathing in patients who are unable to breathe effectively on their own due to conditions such as respiratory failure, neuromuscular disorders, or sedation for surgery.

During positive-pressure ventilation, a mechanical ventilator delivers breaths to the patient through an endotracheal tube or a tracheostomy tube. The ventilator is set to deliver a specific volume or pressure of air with each breath, and the patient's breathing is synchronized with the ventilator to ensure proper delivery of the breaths.

Positive-pressure ventilation can help improve oxygenation and remove carbon dioxide from the lungs, but it can also have potential complications such as barotrauma (injury to lung tissue due to excessive pressure), volutrauma (injury due to overdistention of the lungs), hemodynamic compromise (decreased blood pressure and cardiac output), and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Therefore, careful monitoring and adjustment of ventilator settings are essential to minimize these risks and provide safe and effective respiratory support.

Polysomnography (PSG) is a comprehensive sleep study that monitors various body functions during sleep, including brain activity, eye movement, muscle tone, heart rate, respirations, and oxygen levels. It is typically conducted in a sleep laboratory under the supervision of a trained technologist. The data collected during PSG is used to diagnose and manage various sleep disorders such as sleep-related breathing disorders (e.g., sleep apnea), movement disorders (e.g., periodic limb movement disorder), parasomnias, and narcolepsy.

The study usually involves the attachment of electrodes to different parts of the body, such as the scalp, face, chest, and legs, to record electrical signals from the brain, eye movements, muscle activity, and heartbeats. Additionally, sensors may be placed on or near the nose and mouth to measure airflow, and a belt may be worn around the chest and abdomen to monitor breathing efforts. Oxygen levels are also monitored through a sensor attached to the finger or ear.

Polysomnography is often recommended when a sleep disorder is suspected based on symptoms or medical history, and other diagnostic tests have been inconclusive. The results of the study can help guide treatment decisions and improve overall sleep health.

Sleep apnea syndromes refer to a group of disorders characterized by abnormal breathing patterns during sleep. These patterns can result in repeated pauses in breathing (apneas) or shallow breaths (hypopneas), causing interruptions in sleep and decreased oxygen supply to the body. There are three main types of sleep apnea syndromes:

1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA): This is the most common form, caused by the collapse or obstruction of the upper airway during sleep, often due to relaxation of the muscles in the throat and tongue.

2. Central Sleep Apnea (CSA): This type is less common and results from the brain's failure to send proper signals to the breathing muscles. It can be associated with conditions such as heart failure, stroke, or certain medications.

3. Complex/Mixed Sleep Apnea: In some cases, a person may experience both obstructive and central sleep apnea symptoms, known as complex or mixed sleep apnea.

Symptoms of sleep apnea syndromes can include loud snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, morning headaches, difficulty concentrating, and mood changes. Diagnosis typically involves a sleep study (polysomnography) to monitor breathing patterns, heart rate, brain activity, and other physiological factors during sleep. Treatment options may include lifestyle modifications, oral appliances, positive airway pressure therapy, or even surgery in severe cases.

In a medical context, masks are typically used as personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect the wearer from inhaling airborne particles and contaminants. They can also help prevent the spread of respiratory droplets from the wearer to others, which is particularly important in clinical settings where patients may have infectious diseases.

There are several types of masks used in medical settings, including:

1. Medical Masks: These are loose-fitting, disposable masks that create a physical barrier between the mouth and nose of the wearer and potential contaminants in the immediate environment. They are commonly used by healthcare professionals during medical procedures to protect themselves and patients from respiratory droplets and aerosols.
2. N95 Respirators: These are tight-fitting masks that can filter out both large droplets and small aerosol particles, including those containing viruses. They offer a higher level of protection than medical masks and are recommended for use in healthcare settings where there is a risk of exposure to airborne contaminants, such as during certain medical procedures or when caring for patients with infectious diseases like tuberculosis or COVID-19.
3. Surgical N95 Respirators: These are a specialized type of N95 respirator designed for use in surgical settings. They have a clear plastic window that allows the wearer's mouth and nose to be visible, which is useful during surgery where clear communication and identification of the wearer's facial features are important.
4. Powered Air-Purifying Respirators (PAPRs): These are motorized masks that use a fan to draw air through a filter, providing a continuous supply of clean air to the wearer. They offer a high level of protection and are often used in healthcare settings where there is a risk of exposure to highly infectious diseases or hazardous substances.

It's important to note that masks should be used in conjunction with other infection prevention measures, such as hand hygiene and social distancing, to provide the best possible protection against respiratory illnesses.

Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS), Newborn is a common lung disorder in premature infants. It occurs when the lungs lack a substance called surfactant, which helps keep the tiny air sacs in the lungs open. This results in difficulty breathing and oxygenation, causing symptoms such as rapid, shallow breathing, grunting noises, flaring of the nostrils, and retractions (the skin between the ribs pulls in with each breath). RDS is more common in infants born before 34 weeks of gestation and is treated with surfactant replacement therapy, oxygen support, and mechanical ventilation if necessary. In severe cases, it can lead to complications such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia or even death.

Ventilator weaning is the process of gradually reducing the amount of support provided by a mechanical ventilator to a patient, with the ultimate goal of completely withdrawing the mechanical assistance and allowing the patient to breathe independently. This process is typically initiated when the patient's underlying medical condition has improved to the point where they are able to sustain their own respiratory efforts.

The weaning process may involve reducing the frequency and duration of ventilator breaths, decreasing the amount of oxygen supplied by the ventilator, or adjusting the settings of the ventilator to encourage the patient to take more frequent and deeper breaths on their own. The rate at which weaning is attempted will depend on the individual patient's condition and overall progress.

Close monitoring of the patient's respiratory status, oxygenation, and work of breathing is essential during the weaning process to ensure that the patient is able to tolerate the decreased level of support and to identify any potential complications that may arise. Effective communication between the healthcare team and the patient is also important to provide education, set expectations, and address any concerns or questions that may arise during the weaning process.

Patient compliance, also known as medication adherence or patient adherence, refers to the degree to which a patient's behavior matches the agreed-upon recommendations from their healthcare provider. This includes taking medications as prescribed (including the correct dosage, frequency, and duration), following dietary restrictions, making lifestyle changes, and attending follow-up appointments. Poor patient compliance can negatively impact treatment outcomes and lead to worsening of symptoms, increased healthcare costs, and development of drug-resistant strains in the case of antibiotics. It is a significant challenge in healthcare and efforts are being made to improve patient education, communication, and support to enhance compliance.

Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a type of sleep-disordered breathing characterized by repeated cessations in breathing during sleep due to the brain's failure to transmit signals to the respiratory muscles that control breathing. Unlike obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which results from airway obstruction, CSA occurs when the brain fails to send the necessary signals to the diaphragm and intercostal muscles to initiate or maintain respiratory efforts during sleep.

Central sleep apneas are usually associated with decreased oxygen saturation levels and can lead to frequent arousals from sleep, causing excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and impaired cognitive function. CSA is often related to underlying medical conditions such as heart failure, stroke, or brainstem injury, and it may also be caused by the use of certain medications, including opioids.

There are several types of central sleep apnea, including:

1. Primary Central Sleep Apnea: This type occurs without any underlying medical condition or medication use.
2. Cheyne-Stokes Breathing: A pattern of central sleep apnea commonly seen in individuals with heart failure or stroke. It is characterized by a crescendo-decrescendo pattern of breathing, with periods of hyperventilation followed by hypoventilation and apnea.
3. High-Altitude Periodic Breathing: This type occurs at high altitudes due to the reduced oxygen levels and is usually reversible upon returning to lower altitudes.
4. Complex or Mixed Sleep Apnea: A combination of both central and obstructive sleep apneas, often observed in patients with OSA who are treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. In some cases, the central component may resolve over time with continued CPAP use.

Diagnosis of CSA typically involves a sleep study (polysomnography), which monitors various physiological parameters during sleep, such as brain waves, eye movements, muscle activity, heart rate, and breathing patterns. Treatment options for central sleep apnea depend on the underlying cause and may include medications, adjustments in medication dosages, or the use of devices that assist with breathing, such as adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) or bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) therapy.

Respiratory insufficiency is a condition characterized by the inability of the respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange, resulting in an inadequate supply of oxygen and/or removal of carbon dioxide from the body. This can occur due to various causes, such as lung diseases (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia), neuromuscular disorders (e.g., muscular dystrophy, spinal cord injury), or other medical conditions that affect breathing mechanics and/or gas exchange.

Respiratory insufficiency can manifest as hypoxemia (low oxygen levels in the blood) and/or hypercapnia (high carbon dioxide levels in the blood). Symptoms of respiratory insufficiency may include shortness of breath, rapid breathing, fatigue, confusion, and in severe cases, loss of consciousness or even death. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition and may include oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, medications, and/or other supportive measures.

A nose, in a medical context, refers to the external part of the human body that is located on the face and serves as the primary organ for the sense of smell. It is composed of bone and cartilage, with a thin layer of skin covering it. The nose also contains nasal passages that are lined with mucous membranes and tiny hairs known as cilia. These structures help to filter, warm, and moisturize the air we breathe in before it reaches our lungs. Additionally, the nose plays an essential role in the process of verbal communication by shaping the sounds we make when we speak.

In medical terms, pressure is defined as the force applied per unit area on an object or body surface. It is often measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) in clinical settings. For example, blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the arteries and is recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (when the heart beats and pushes blood out) and diastolic pressure (when the heart rests between beats).

Pressure can also refer to the pressure exerted on a wound or incision to help control bleeding, or the pressure inside the skull or spinal canal. High or low pressure in different body systems can indicate various medical conditions and require appropriate treatment.

Humidity, in a medical context, is not typically defined on its own but is related to environmental conditions that can affect health. Humidity refers to the amount of water vapor present in the air. It is often discussed in terms of absolute humidity (the mass of water per unit volume of air) or relative humidity (the ratio of the current absolute humidity to the maximum possible absolute humidity, expressed as a percentage). High humidity can contribute to feelings of discomfort, difficulty sleeping, and exacerbation of respiratory conditions such as asthma.

Work of breathing (WOB) is a term used in respiratory physiology to describe the amount of energy expended by the respiratory muscles to overcome the elastic and resistive forces in the lungs and chest wall during breathing. It is usually measured in joules per liter (J/L) or in breaths per minute (BPM).

WOB can be increased in various lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and interstitial lung disease, due to increased airway resistance or decreased lung compliance. Increased WOB can lead to respiratory muscle fatigue, decreased exercise tolerance, and reduced quality of life.

WOB can be measured noninvasively using techniques such as esophageal pressure monitoring or transdiaphragmatic pressure measurement, or invasively through the use of indwelling catheters in the pleural space or within the airways. These measurements are often used in research settings to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments for respiratory disorders.

Sleep stages are distinct patterns of brain activity that occur during sleep, as measured by an electroencephalogram (EEG). They are part of the sleep cycle and are used to describe the different types of sleep that humans go through during a normal night's rest. The sleep cycle includes several repeating stages:

1. Stage 1 (N1): This is the lightest stage of sleep, where you transition from wakefulness to sleep. During this stage, muscle activity and brain waves begin to slow down.
2. Stage 2 (N2): In this stage, your heart rate slows, body temperature decreases, and eye movements stop. Brain wave activity becomes slower, with occasional bursts of electrical activity called sleep spindles.
3. Stage 3 (N3): Also known as deep non-REM sleep, this stage is characterized by slow delta waves. It is during this stage that the body undergoes restorative processes such as tissue repair, growth, and immune function enhancement.
4. REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep: This is the stage where dreaming typically occurs. Your eyes move rapidly beneath closed eyelids, heart rate and respiration become irregular, and brain wave activity increases to levels similar to wakefulness. REM sleep is important for memory consolidation and learning.

The sleep cycle progresses through these stages multiple times during the night, with REM sleep periods becoming longer towards morning. Understanding sleep stages is crucial in diagnosing and treating various sleep disorders.

Airway resistance is a measure of the opposition to airflow during breathing, which is caused by the friction between the air and the walls of the respiratory tract. It is an important parameter in respiratory physiology because it can affect the work of breathing and gas exchange.

Airway resistance is usually expressed in units of cm H2O/L/s or Pa·s/m, and it can be measured during spontaneous breathing or during forced expiratory maneuvers, such as those used in pulmonary function testing. Increased airway resistance can result from a variety of conditions, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bronchitis, and bronchiectasis. Decreased airway resistance can be seen in conditions such as emphysema or after a successful bronchodilator treatment.

Oxygen inhalation therapy is a medical treatment that involves the administration of oxygen to a patient through a nasal tube or mask, with the purpose of increasing oxygen concentration in the body. This therapy is used to treat various medical conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, heart failure, and other conditions that cause low levels of oxygen in the blood. The additional oxygen helps to improve tissue oxygenation, reduce work of breathing, and promote overall patient comfort and well-being. Oxygen therapy may be delivered continuously or intermittently, depending on the patient's needs and medical condition.

Artificial respiration is an emergency procedure that can be used to provide oxygen to a person who is not breathing or is breathing inadequately. It involves manually forcing air into the lungs, either by compressing the chest or using a device to deliver breaths. The goal of artificial respiration is to maintain adequate oxygenation of the body's tissues and organs until the person can breathe on their own or until advanced medical care arrives. Artificial respiration may be used in conjunction with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in cases of cardiac arrest.

Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation (IPPV) is a type of mechanical ventilation in which positive pressure is intermittently applied to the airway and lungs, allowing for inflation and deflation of the lungs. This mode of ventilation is often used in critical care settings such as intensive care units (ICUs) to support patients who are unable to breathe effectively on their own due to respiratory failure or other conditions that affect breathing.

During IPPV, a mechanical ventilator delivers breaths to the patient at set intervals, with each breath consisting of a set volume or pressure. The patient may also be allowed to take spontaneous breaths between the mechanically delivered breaths. The settings for IPPV can be adjusted based on the patient's needs and condition, including factors such as their respiratory rate, tidal volume (the amount of air moved with each breath), and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), which helps to keep the alveoli open and prevent atelectasis.

IPPV can be used to provide short-term or long-term ventilatory support, depending on the patient's needs. It is an effective way to ensure that patients receive adequate oxygenation and ventilation while minimizing the risk of lung injury associated with high pressures or volumes. However, it is important to closely monitor patients receiving IPPV and adjust the settings as needed to avoid complications such as ventilator-associated pneumonia or barotrauma.

Mandibular advancement is a treatment approach used in dentistry and sleep medicine, which involves the surgical or non-surgical forward movement of the mandible (lower jaw) to address certain medical conditions. The most common use of mandibular advancement is in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), where the tongue and soft tissues at the back of the throat can collapse into the airway during sleep, causing obstruction and breathing difficulties.

Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) are often used in non-surgical treatments. These custom-made oral appliances look similar to mouthguards or sports guards and are worn during sleep. They work by holding the lower jaw in a slightly forward position, which helps to keep the airway open and prevents the tongue and soft tissues from collapsing into it.

Surgical mandibular advancement is another option for patients with severe OSA who cannot tolerate or do not respond well to MADs or other treatments like continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In this procedure, the jaw is surgically moved forward and stabilized in that position using plates, screws, or wires. This creates more space in the airway and reduces the risk of obstruction during sleep.

In summary, mandibular advancement refers to the movement of the lower jaw forward, either through non-surgical means like MADs or surgical interventions, with the primary goal of treating obstructive sleep apnea by maintaining a patent airway during sleep.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Cheyne-Stokes respiration is a pattern of breathing characterized by cyclical changes in the depth and rate of respirations. It is often associated with various medical conditions that affect the brainstem, such as stroke, brain injury, or certain neurological disorders.

In Cheyne-Stokes respiration, the individual's breathing starts with a series of deeper and faster breaths (hyperventilation), which gradually become shallower and slower (hypoventilation). This cycle repeats every few minutes, resulting in a pattern of waxing and waning of the depth and rate of respirations.

The underlying mechanism for Cheyne-Stokes respiration is related to the regulation of breathing by the brainstem. When there are abnormalities in this area, it can lead to instability in the control of breathing, resulting in the cyclical pattern of hyperventilation and hypoventilation.

Cheyne-Stokes respiration can be a sign of serious underlying medical conditions, and it is important to seek medical attention if you or someone else experiences this type of breathing pattern. Treatment may involve addressing the underlying cause, such as managing heart failure or reducing intracranial pressure in patients with brain injury or stroke.

Air pressure, also known as atmospheric pressure, is the force exerted by the weight of air in the atmosphere on a surface. It is measured in units such as pounds per square inch (psi), hectopascals (hPa), or inches of mercury (inHg). The standard atmospheric pressure at sea level is defined as 101,325 Pa (14.7 psi/1013 hPa/29.92 inHg). Changes in air pressure can be used to predict weather patterns and are an important factor in the study of aerodynamics and respiratory physiology.

Airway obstruction is a medical condition that occurs when the normal flow of air into and out of the lungs is partially or completely blocked. This blockage can be caused by a variety of factors, including swelling of the tissues in the airway, the presence of foreign objects or substances, or abnormal growths such as tumors.

When the airway becomes obstructed, it can make it difficult for a person to breathe normally. They may experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and chest tightness. In severe cases, airway obstruction can lead to respiratory failure and other life-threatening complications.

There are several types of airway obstruction, including:

1. Upper airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the upper part of the airway, such as the nose, throat, or voice box.
2. Lower airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the lower part of the airway, such as the trachea or bronchi.
3. Partial airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is partially blocked, allowing some air to flow in and out of the lungs.
4. Complete airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is completely blocked, preventing any air from flowing into or out of the lungs.

Treatment for airway obstruction depends on the underlying cause of the condition. In some cases, removing the obstruction may be as simple as clearing the airway of foreign objects or mucus. In other cases, more invasive treatments such as surgery may be necessary.

The nasal cavity is the air-filled space located behind the nose, which is divided into two halves by the nasal septum. It is lined with mucous membrane and is responsible for several functions including respiration, filtration, humidification, and olfaction (smell). The nasal cavity serves as an important part of the upper respiratory tract, extending from the nares (nostrils) to the choanae (posterior openings of the nasal cavity that lead into the pharynx). It contains specialized structures such as turbinate bones, which help to warm, humidify and filter incoming air.

A premature infant is a baby born before 37 weeks of gestation. They may face various health challenges because their organs are not fully developed. The earlier a baby is born, the higher the risk of complications. Prematurity can lead to short-term and long-term health issues, such as respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, anemia, infections, hearing problems, vision problems, developmental delays, and cerebral palsy. Intensive medical care and support are often necessary for premature infants to ensure their survival and optimal growth and development.

Airway extubation is a medical procedure in which an endotracheal tube is removed from a patient's airway. The endotracheal tube is typically inserted during intubation, which is performed to maintain a secure airway and ensure proper ventilation and oxygenation of the lungs during surgery or other medical procedures.

Extubation is usually done when the patient is able to breathe on their own and no longer requires mechanical ventilation. The procedure involves carefully removing the tube while ensuring that the patient's airway remains open and protected. This may involve suctioning secretions from the airway, providing oxygen supplementation, and monitoring the patient's vital signs closely.

Extubation can be a routine procedure in some cases, but it can also carry risks such as respiratory distress, laryngospasm, or aspiration of stomach contents into the lungs. As such, it is typically performed by trained medical professionals in a controlled setting, with appropriate monitoring and equipment available to manage any potential complications.

Intubation, intratracheal is a medical procedure in which a flexible plastic or rubber tube called an endotracheal tube (ETT) is inserted through the mouth or nose, passing through the vocal cords and into the trachea (windpipe). This procedure is performed to establish and maintain a patent airway, allowing for the delivery of oxygen and the removal of carbon dioxide during mechanical ventilation in various clinical scenarios, such as:

1. Respiratory failure or arrest
2. Procedural sedation
3. Surgery under general anesthesia
4. Neuromuscular disorders
5. Ingestion of toxic substances
6. Head and neck trauma
7. Critical illness or injury affecting the airway

The process of intubation is typically performed by trained medical professionals, such as anesthesiologists, emergency medicine physicians, or critical care specialists, using direct laryngoscopy or video laryngoscopy to visualize the vocal cords and guide the ETT into the correct position. Once placed, the ETT is secured to prevent dislodgement, and the patient's respiratory status is continuously monitored to ensure proper ventilation and oxygenation.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Mechanical Ventilators are medical devices that assist with breathing by providing mechanical ventilation to patients who are unable to breathe sufficiently on their own. These machines deliver breaths to the patient through an endotracheal tube or a tracheostomy tube, which is placed in the windpipe (trachea). Mechanical Ventilators can be set to deliver breaths at specific rates and volumes, and they can also be adjusted to provide varying levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to help keep the alveoli open and improve oxygenation.

Mechanical ventilation is typically used in critical care settings such as intensive care units (ICUs), and it may be employed for a variety of reasons, including respiratory failure, sedation, neuromuscular disorders, or surgery. Prolonged use of mechanical ventilation can lead to complications such as ventilator-associated pneumonia, muscle weakness, and decreased cardiac function, so the goal is usually to wean patients off the ventilator as soon as possible.

Oxygen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that constitutes about 21% of the earth's atmosphere. It is a crucial element for human and most living organisms as it is vital for respiration. Inhaled oxygen enters the lungs and binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which carries it to tissues throughout the body where it is used to convert nutrients into energy and carbon dioxide, a waste product that is exhaled.

Medically, supplemental oxygen therapy may be provided to patients with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, heart failure, or other medical conditions that impair the body's ability to extract sufficient oxygen from the air. Oxygen can be administered through various devices, including nasal cannulas, face masks, and ventilators.

Aerophagy is the excessive swallowing of air, which can occur during activities such as eating, drinking, smoking, or chewing gum. This can lead to symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, and excessive burping or passing of gas. In some cases, aerophagy may be a sign of an underlying digestive disorder. It is generally not considered a serious medical condition, but if it becomes chronic or is accompanied by other symptoms, it is recommended to seek medical advice.

Pulmonary ventilation, also known as pulmonary respiration or simply ventilation, is the process of moving air into and out of the lungs to facilitate gas exchange. It involves two main phases: inhalation (or inspiration) and exhalation (or expiration). During inhalation, the diaphragm and external intercostal muscles contract, causing the chest volume to increase and the pressure inside the chest to decrease, which then draws air into the lungs. Conversely, during exhalation, these muscles relax, causing the chest volume to decrease and the pressure inside the chest to increase, which pushes air out of the lungs. This process ensures that oxygen-rich air from the atmosphere enters the alveoli (air sacs in the lungs), where it can diffuse into the bloodstream, while carbon dioxide-rich air from the bloodstream in the capillaries surrounding the alveoli is expelled out of the body.

Orthodontic appliances, removable, are dental devices that can be removed and inserted by the patient as needed or directed. These appliances are designed to align and straighten teeth, correct bite issues, and improve the function and appearance of the teeth and jaws. They are typically made from materials such as plastic, metal, or acrylic and may include components like wires, springs, or screws. Examples of removable orthodontic appliances include aligners, retainers, and space maintainers. The specific type and design of the appliance will depend on the individual patient's orthodontic needs and treatment goals.

Respiratory mechanics refers to the biomechanical properties and processes that involve the movement of air through the respiratory system during breathing. It encompasses the mechanical behavior of the lungs, chest wall, and the muscles of respiration, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles.

Respiratory mechanics includes several key components:

1. **Compliance**: The ability of the lungs and chest wall to expand and recoil during breathing. High compliance means that the structures can easily expand and recoil, while low compliance indicates greater resistance to expansion and recoil.
2. **Resistance**: The opposition to airflow within the respiratory system, primarily due to the friction between the air and the airway walls. Airway resistance is influenced by factors such as airway diameter, length, and the viscosity of the air.
3. **Lung volumes and capacities**: These are the amounts of air present in the lungs during different phases of the breathing cycle. They include tidal volume (the amount of air inspired or expired during normal breathing), inspiratory reserve volume (additional air that can be inspired beyond the tidal volume), expiratory reserve volume (additional air that can be exhaled beyond the tidal volume), and residual volume (the air remaining in the lungs after a forced maximum exhalation).
4. **Work of breathing**: The energy required to overcome the resistance and elastic forces during breathing. This work is primarily performed by the respiratory muscles, which contract to generate negative intrathoracic pressure and expand the chest wall, allowing air to flow into the lungs.
5. **Pressure-volume relationships**: These describe how changes in lung volume are associated with changes in pressure within the respiratory system. Important pressure components include alveolar pressure (the pressure inside the alveoli), pleural pressure (the pressure between the lungs and the chest wall), and transpulmonary pressure (the difference between alveolar and pleural pressures).

Understanding respiratory mechanics is crucial for diagnosing and managing various respiratory disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and restrictive lung diseases.

Snoring is defined as the vibration of respiratory structures and the resulting sound, due to obstructed air movement during breathing while sleeping. It occurs when the tissues at the back of the throat relax and narrow during sleep, partially blocking the airway. The airflow causes these tissues to vibrate, leading to the snoring sound. Snoring can be a sign of various conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea or other respiratory disorders. It can also be influenced by factors such as alcohol consumption, obesity, and sleeping position.

Tidal volume (Vt) is the amount of air that moves into or out of the lungs during normal, resting breathing. It is the difference between the volume of air in the lungs at the end of a normal expiration and the volume at the end of a normal inspiration. In other words, it's the volume of each breath you take when you are not making any effort to breathe more deeply.

The average tidal volume for an adult human is around 500 milliliters (ml) per breath, but this can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, size, and fitness level. During exercise or other activities that require increased oxygen intake, tidal volume may increase to meet the body's demands for more oxygen.

Tidal volume is an important concept in respiratory physiology and clinical medicine, as it can be used to assess lung function and diagnose respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma.

Nasal obstruction is a medical condition that refers to any blockage or restriction in the normal flow of air through the nasal passages. This can be caused by various factors such as inflammation, swelling, or physical abnormalities in the nasal cavity. Common causes of nasal obstruction include allergies, sinusitis, deviated septum, enlarged turbinates, and nasal polyps. Symptoms may include difficulty breathing through the nose, nasal congestion, and nasal discharge. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

The pharynx is a part of the digestive and respiratory systems that serves as a conduit for food and air. It is a musculo-membranous tube extending from the base of the skull to the level of the sixth cervical vertebra where it becomes continuous with the esophagus.

The pharynx has three regions: the nasopharynx, oropharynx, and laryngopharynx. The nasopharynx is the uppermost region, which lies above the soft palate and is connected to the nasal cavity. The oropharynx is the middle region, which includes the area between the soft palate and the hyoid bone, including the tonsils and base of the tongue. The laryngopharynx is the lowest region, which lies below the hyoid bone and connects to the larynx.

The primary function of the pharynx is to convey food from the oral cavity to the esophagus during swallowing and to allow air to pass from the nasal cavity to the larynx during breathing. It also plays a role in speech, taste, and immune defense.

Sleep is a complex physiological process characterized by altered consciousness, relatively inhibited sensory activity, reduced voluntary muscle activity, and decreased interaction with the environment. It's typically associated with specific stages that can be identified through electroencephalography (EEG) patterns. These stages include rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, associated with dreaming, and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, which is further divided into three stages.

Sleep serves a variety of functions, including restoration and strengthening of the immune system, support for growth and development in children and adolescents, consolidation of memory, learning, and emotional regulation. The lack of sufficient sleep or poor quality sleep can lead to significant health problems, such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even cognitive decline.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) defines sleep as "a period of daily recurring natural rest during which consciousness is suspended and metabolic processes are reduced." However, it's important to note that the exact mechanisms and purposes of sleep are still being researched and debated among scientists.

Pulmonary edema is a medical condition characterized by the accumulation of fluid in the alveoli (air sacs) and interstitial spaces (the area surrounding the alveoli) within the lungs. This buildup of fluid can lead to impaired gas exchange, resulting in shortness of breath, coughing, and difficulty breathing, especially when lying down. Pulmonary edema is often a complication of heart failure, but it can also be caused by other conditions such as pneumonia, trauma, or exposure to certain toxins.

In the early stages of pulmonary edema, patients may experience mild symptoms such as shortness of breath during physical activity. However, as the condition progresses, symptoms can become more severe and include:

* Severe shortness of breath, even at rest
* Wheezing or coughing up pink, frothy sputum
* Rapid breathing and heart rate
* Anxiety or restlessness
* Bluish discoloration of the skin (cyanosis) due to lack of oxygen

Pulmonary edema can be diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, chest X-ray, and other diagnostic tests such as echocardiography or CT scan. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the condition, as well as providing supportive care such as supplemental oxygen, diuretics to help remove excess fluid from the body, and medications to help reduce anxiety and improve breathing. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation may be necessary to support respiratory function.

Medical Definition of Respiration:

Respiration, in physiology, is the process by which an organism takes in oxygen and gives out carbon dioxide. It's also known as breathing. This process is essential for most forms of life because it provides the necessary oxygen for cellular respiration, where the cells convert biochemical energy from nutrients into adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and releases waste products, primarily carbon dioxide.

In humans and other mammals, respiration is a two-stage process:

1. Breathing (or external respiration): This involves the exchange of gases with the environment. Air enters the lungs through the mouth or nose, then passes through the pharynx, larynx, trachea, and bronchi, finally reaching the alveoli where the actual gas exchange occurs. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses into the blood, while carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism, diffuses from the blood into the alveoli to be exhaled.

2. Cellular respiration (or internal respiration): This is the process by which cells convert glucose and other nutrients into ATP, water, and carbon dioxide in the presence of oxygen. The carbon dioxide produced during this process then diffuses out of the cells and into the bloodstream to be exhaled during breathing.

In summary, respiration is a vital physiological function that enables organisms to obtain the necessary oxygen for cellular metabolism while eliminating waste products like carbon dioxide.

Pulmonary gas exchange is the process by which oxygen (O2) from inhaled air is transferred to the blood, and carbon dioxide (CO2), a waste product of metabolism, is removed from the blood and exhaled. This process occurs in the lungs, primarily in the alveoli, where the thin walls of the alveoli and capillaries allow for the rapid diffusion of gases between them. The partial pressure gradient between the alveolar air and the blood in the pulmonary capillaries drives this diffusion process. Oxygen-rich blood is then transported to the body's tissues, while CO2-rich blood returns to the lungs to be exhaled.

Helium is not a medical term, but it's a chemical element with symbol He and atomic number 2. It's a colorless, odorless, tasteless, non-toxic, inert, monatomic gas that heads the noble gases section of the periodic table. In medicine, helium is sometimes used in medical settings for its unique properties, such as being less dense than air, which can help improve the delivery of oxygen to patients with respiratory conditions. For example, heliox, a mixture of helium and oxygen, may be used to reduce the work of breathing in patients with conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma. Additionally, helium is also used in cryogenic medical equipment and in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines to cool the superconducting magnets.

Intermittent Positive-Pressure Breathing (IPPB) is a type of ventilatory support that involves the intermittent delivery of positive pressure to the airways and alveoli during inspiration, while allowing for expiration to occur passively. This technique is often used in medical settings to assist patients with respiratory insufficiency or failure, such as those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), neuromuscular disorders, or following surgery.

During IPPB, the patient breathes in through a mouthpiece or mask that is connected to a ventilator or breathing machine. The machine delivers positive pressure to the airways, which helps to inflate the lungs and improve oxygenation. The pressure can be adjusted to meet the needs of each individual patient, and the frequency and duration of breaths can also be controlled by the healthcare provider.

IPPB is typically used on a short-term basis, as a means of providing respiratory support while a patient's underlying condition improves. It may be used in conjunction with other therapies, such as bronchodilators or corticosteroids, to help improve lung function and reduce symptoms. While IPPB can be an effective tool for managing respiratory insufficiency, it is not without risks, and careful monitoring is required to ensure that it is used safely and effectively.

A cross-over study is a type of experimental design in which participants receive two or more interventions in a specific order. After a washout period, each participant receives the opposite intervention(s). The primary advantage of this design is that it controls for individual variability by allowing each participant to act as their own control.

In medical research, cross-over studies are often used to compare the efficacy or safety of two treatments. For example, a researcher might conduct a cross-over study to compare the effectiveness of two different medications for treating high blood pressure. Half of the participants would be randomly assigned to receive one medication first and then switch to the other medication after a washout period. The other half of the participants would receive the opposite order of treatments.

Cross-over studies can provide valuable insights into the relative merits of different interventions, but they also have some limitations. For example, they may not be suitable for studying conditions that are chronic or irreversible, as it may not be possible to completely reverse the effects of the first intervention before administering the second one. Additionally, carryover effects from the first intervention can confound the results if they persist into the second treatment period.

Overall, cross-over studies are a useful tool in medical research when used appropriately and with careful consideration of their limitations.

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease that primarily affects premature infants. It is defined as the need for supplemental oxygen at 28 days of life or beyond, due to abnormal development and injury to the lungs.

The condition was first described in the 1960s, following the introduction of mechanical ventilation and high concentrations of oxygen therapy for premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). These treatments, while lifesaving, can also cause damage to the delicate lung tissue, leading to BPD.

The pathogenesis of BPD is complex and involves an interplay between genetic factors, prenatal exposures, and postnatal injury from mechanical ventilation and oxygen toxicity. Inflammation, oxidative stress, and impaired lung development contribute to the development of BPD.

Infants with BPD typically have abnormalities in their airways, alveoli (air sacs), and blood vessels in the lungs. These changes can lead to symptoms such as difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, and poor growth. Treatment may include oxygen therapy, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, diuretics, and other medications to support lung function and minimize complications.

The prognosis for infants with BPD varies depending on the severity of the disease and associated medical conditions. While some infants recover completely, others may have long-term respiratory problems that require ongoing management.

Disorders of excessive somnolence (DES) are a group of medical conditions characterized by an increased tendency to fall asleep or experience excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), despite having adequate opportunity and circumstances for sleep. These disorders are typically classified as central disorders of hypersomnolence according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-3).

The most common DES is narcolepsy, a chronic neurological disorder caused by the brain's inability to regulate sleep-wake cycles normally. Other DES include idiopathic hypersomnia, Kleine-Levin syndrome, and recurrent hypersomnia. These disorders can significantly impact an individual's daily functioning, quality of life, and overall health.

Narcolepsy is further divided into two types: narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) and narcolepsy type 2 (NT2). NT1 is characterized by the presence of cataplexy, a sudden loss of muscle tone triggered by strong emotions, while NT2 does not include cataplexy. Both types of narcolepsy involve excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, and fragmented nighttime sleep.

Idiopathic hypersomnia is a DES without the presence of REM-related symptoms like cataplexy or sleep paralysis. Individuals with idiopathic hypersomnia experience excessive daytime sleepiness and prolonged nighttime sleep, often lasting 10 to 14 hours, but do not feel refreshed upon waking.

Kleine-Levin syndrome is a rare DES characterized by recurrent episodes of excessive sleepiness, often accompanied by cognitive impairment, altered perception, hyperphagia (excessive eating), and hypersexuality during the episodes. These episodes can last days to weeks and typically occur multiple times per year.

Recurrent hypersomnia is another rare DES with recurring episodes of excessive sleepiness lasting for several days, followed by a period of normal or reduced sleepiness. The episodes are not as predictable or consistent as those seen in Kleine-Levin syndrome.

Treatment for DES typically involves pharmacological interventions to manage symptoms and improve daytime alertness. Modafinil, armodafinil, and traditional stimulants like amphetamine salts are commonly used to treat excessive daytime sleepiness. Additionally, antidepressants may be prescribed to manage REM-related symptoms like cataplexy or sleep paralysis. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as scheduled napping and good sleep hygiene practices, can also help improve symptoms.

Equipment design, in the medical context, refers to the process of creating and developing medical equipment and devices, such as surgical instruments, diagnostic machines, or assistive technologies. This process involves several stages, including:

1. Identifying user needs and requirements
2. Concept development and brainstorming
3. Prototyping and testing
4. Design for manufacturing and assembly
5. Safety and regulatory compliance
6. Verification and validation
7. Training and support

The goal of equipment design is to create safe, effective, and efficient medical devices that meet the needs of healthcare providers and patients while complying with relevant regulations and standards. The design process typically involves a multidisciplinary team of engineers, clinicians, designers, and researchers who work together to develop innovative solutions that improve patient care and outcomes.

Blood gas analysis is a medical test that measures the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, as well as the pH level, which indicates the acidity or alkalinity of the blood. This test is often used to evaluate lung function, respiratory disorders, and acid-base balance in the body. It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatments for conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and other respiratory illnesses. The analysis is typically performed on a sample of arterial blood, although venous blood may also be used in some cases.

Respiratory Function Tests (RFTs) are a group of medical tests that measure how well your lungs take in and exhale air, and how well they transfer oxygen and carbon dioxide into and out of your blood. They can help diagnose certain lung disorders, measure the severity of lung disease, and monitor response to treatment.

RFTs include several types of tests, such as:

1. Spirometry: This test measures how much air you can exhale and how quickly you can do it. It's often used to diagnose and monitor conditions like asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other lung diseases.
2. Lung volume testing: This test measures the total amount of air in your lungs. It can help diagnose restrictive lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis or sarcoidosis.
3. Diffusion capacity testing: This test measures how well oxygen moves from your lungs into your bloodstream. It's often used to diagnose and monitor conditions like pulmonary fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, and other lung diseases that affect the ability of the lungs to transfer oxygen to the blood.
4. Bronchoprovocation testing: This test involves inhaling a substance that can cause your airways to narrow, such as methacholine or histamine. It's often used to diagnose and monitor asthma.
5. Exercise stress testing: This test measures how well your lungs and heart work together during exercise. It's often used to diagnose lung or heart disease.

Overall, Respiratory Function Tests are an important tool for diagnosing and managing a wide range of lung conditions.

Wakefulness-promoting agents are a class of medications that are used to promote and maintain alertness and wakefulness. They work by stimulating the brain's arousal centers, increasing the release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and histamine, which help to counteract the effects of sleep-promoting substances in the brain.

Wakefulness-promoting agents are typically used to treat excessive daytime sleepiness associated with conditions such as narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea, shift work sleep disorder, and other disorders that cause disrupted sleep patterns. Some examples of wakefulness-promoting agents include modafinil, armodafinil, pitolisant, and solriamfetol.

It is important to note that while these medications can help to promote alertness and reduce excessive daytime sleepiness, they are not a substitute for getting adequate amounts of quality sleep. It is also important to use them under the guidance of a healthcare provider, as they may have potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

In the context of medicine, and specifically in physiology and respiratory therapy, partial pressure (P or p) is a measure of the pressure exerted by an individual gas in a mixture of gases. It's commonly used to describe the concentrations of gases in the body, such as oxygen (PO2), carbon dioxide (PCO2), and nitrogen (PN2).

The partial pressure of a specific gas is calculated as the fraction of that gas in the total mixture multiplied by the total pressure of the mixture. This concept is based on Dalton's law, which states that the total pressure exerted by a mixture of gases is equal to the sum of the pressures exerted by each individual gas.

For example, in room air at sea level, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) is approximately 160 mmHg (mm of mercury), which represents about 21% of the total barometric pressure (760 mmHg). This concept is crucial for understanding gas exchange in the lungs and how gases move across membranes, such as from alveoli to blood and vice versa.

A delivery room is a specialized unit in a hospital where childbirth takes place. It is staffed with healthcare professionals, such as obstetricians, nurses, and midwives, who are trained to assist women during labor, delivery, and the immediate postpartum period. Delivery rooms are equipped with medical equipment and supplies to monitor the mother's and baby's vital signs, administer medications, and perform emergency procedures if necessary.

Delivery rooms may also be referred to as labor and delivery units or wards. In some hospitals, there may be different types of delivery rooms, such as birthing suites that provide a more home-like atmosphere for women who prefer a natural childbirth experience. Overall, the goal of a delivery room is to ensure a safe and healthy outcome for both the mother and the baby during childbirth.

A Severity of Illness Index is a measurement tool used in healthcare to assess the severity of a patient's condition and the risk of mortality or other adverse outcomes. These indices typically take into account various physiological and clinical variables, such as vital signs, laboratory values, and co-morbidities, to generate a score that reflects the patient's overall illness severity.

Examples of Severity of Illness Indices include the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) system, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), and the Mortality Probability Model (MPM). These indices are often used in critical care settings to guide clinical decision-making, inform prognosis, and compare outcomes across different patient populations.

It is important to note that while these indices can provide valuable information about a patient's condition, they should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decision-making. Rather, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as the patient's overall clinical presentation, treatment preferences, and goals of care.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

The pharyngeal muscles, also known as the musculature of the pharynx, are a group of skeletal muscles that make up the walls of the pharynx, which is the part of the throat located just above the esophagus and behind the nasal and oral cavities. These muscles play a crucial role in several vital functions, including:

1. Swallowing (deglutition): The pharyngeal muscles contract in a coordinated sequence to propel food or liquids from the mouth through the pharynx and into the esophagus during swallowing.
2. Speech: The contraction and relaxation of these muscles help shape the sounds produced by the vocal cords, contributing to the production of speech.
3. Respiration: The pharyngeal muscles assist in maintaining an open airway during breathing, especially during sleep and when the upper airways are obstructed.

The pharyngeal muscles consist of three layers: the outer circular muscle layer, the middle longitudinal muscle layer, and the inner inferior constrictor muscle layer. The specific muscles that make up these layers include:

1. Superior constrictor muscle (outer circular layer)
2. Middle constrictor muscle (middle longitudinal layer)
3. Inferior constrictor muscle (inner inferior constrictor layer)
4. Stylopharyngeus muscle
5. Salpingopharyngeus muscle
6. Palatopharyngeus muscle
7. Buccinator muscle (partially contributes to the middle longitudinal layer)

These muscles work together to perform their various functions, and any dysfunction in these muscles can lead to problems like swallowing difficulties (dysphagia), speech impairments, or respiratory issues.

Pulmonary atelectasis is a medical condition characterized by the collapse or closure of the alveoli (tiny air sacs) in the lungs, leading to reduced or absent gas exchange in the affected area. This results in decreased lung volume and can cause hypoxemia (low oxygen levels in the blood). Atelectasis can be caused by various factors such as obstruction of the airways, surfactant deficiency, pneumothorax, or compression from outside the lung. It can also occur after surgical procedures, particularly when the patient is lying in one position for a long time. Symptoms may include shortness of breath, cough, and chest discomfort, but sometimes it may not cause any symptoms, especially if only a small area of the lung is affected. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and may include bronchodilators, chest physiotherapy, or even surgery in severe cases.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas that is naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere. It is a normal byproduct of cellular respiration in humans, animals, and plants, and is also produced through the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas.

In medical terms, carbon dioxide is often used as a respiratory stimulant and to maintain the pH balance of blood. It is also used during certain medical procedures, such as laparoscopic surgery, to insufflate (inflate) the abdominal cavity and create a working space for the surgeon.

Elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the body can lead to respiratory acidosis, a condition characterized by an increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and a decrease in pH. This can occur in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other lung diseases that impair breathing and gas exchange. Symptoms of respiratory acidosis may include shortness of breath, confusion, headache, and in severe cases, coma or death.

Flail chest is a serious injury to the thorax characterized by a segment of the chest wall that moves paradoxically in relation to the rest of the chest wall during respiration. This occurs due to multiple rib fractures at two or more places, resulting in a free-floating section of the chest wall that is not connected to the sternum or spine.

During inspiration, when the chest normally expands, the flail segment moves inward, and during expiration, it moves outward, which can lead to significant impairment of ventilation and oxygenation. Flail chest can result from high-impact trauma such as motor vehicle accidents or falls, and it is often associated with underlying lung contusions or other injuries. It requires immediate medical attention and may necessitate mechanical ventilation and surgical stabilization of the rib cage to prevent complications such as pneumonia and respiratory failure.

Lung compliance is a measure of the ease with which the lungs expand and is defined as the change in lung volume for a given change in transpulmonary pressure. It is often expressed in units of liters per centimeter of water (L/cm H2O). A higher compliance indicates that the lungs are more easily distensible, while a lower compliance suggests that the lungs are stiffer and require more force to expand. Lung compliance can be affected by various conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis, pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The uvula is a small, conical piece of soft tissue that hangs down from the middle part of the back of the soft palate (the rear-most portion of the roof of the mouth). It contains muscle fibers and mucous glands, and its function is associated with swallowing, speaking, and protecting the airway. During swallowing, the uvula helps to prevent food and liquids from entering the nasal cavity by blocking the opening between the oral and nasal cavities (the nasopharynx). In speech, it plays a role in shaping certain sounds like "a" and "u."

Acquired nose deformities refer to structural changes or abnormalities in the shape of the nose that occur after birth, as opposed to congenital deformities which are present at birth. These deformities can result from various factors such as trauma, injury, infection, tumors, or surgical procedures. Depending on the severity and cause of the deformity, it may affect both the aesthetic appearance and functionality of the nose, potentially causing difficulty in breathing, sinus problems, or sleep apnea. Treatment options for acquired nose deformities may include minimally invasive procedures, such as fillers or laser surgery, or more extensive surgical interventions, such as rhinoplasty or septoplasty, to restore both form and function to the nose.

A "Nursery, Hospital" is a specialized unit within a hospital that provides care for newborn infants, particularly those who are born prematurely or sick. Also known as a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), it is equipped with advanced medical technology and staffed by healthcare professionals trained in the care of newborns, including neonatologists, neonatal nurses, and respiratory therapists.

The nursery provides a range of services, such as monitoring vital signs, providing nutrition and hydration, administering medications, and performing medical procedures as needed. It may also offer developmental care to promote the growth and development of premature infants. The level of care provided in a hospital nursery can vary, with some units offering more intensive care for critically ill newborns and others providing less intensive care for those who are stable but require monitoring and support.

Intubation is a medical procedure in which a flexible plastic tube called an endotracheal tube (ETT) is inserted into the patient's windpipe (trachea) through the mouth or nose. This procedure is performed to maintain an open airway and ensure adequate ventilation and oxygenation of the lungs during surgery, critical illness, or trauma.

The ETT is connected to a breathing circuit and a ventilator, which delivers breaths and removes carbon dioxide from the lungs. Intubation allows healthcare professionals to manage the patient's airway, control their breathing, and administer anesthesia during surgical procedures. It is typically performed by trained medical personnel such as anesthesiologists, emergency medicine physicians, or critical care specialists.

There are two main types of intubation: oral and nasal. Oral intubation involves inserting the ETT through the patient's mouth, while nasal intubation involves passing the tube through the nostril and into the trachea. The choice of technique depends on various factors, including the patient's medical condition, anatomy, and the reason for intubation.

Neonatal Intensive Care (NIC) is a specialized medical care for newborn babies who are born prematurely, have low birth weight, or have medical conditions that require advanced medical intervention. This can include monitoring and support for breathing, heart function, temperature regulation, and nutrition. NICUs are staffed with healthcare professionals trained in neonatology, nursing, respiratory therapy, and other specialized areas to provide the highest level of care for these vulnerable infants.

The goal of NICU is to stabilize the newborn's condition, treat medical problems, promote growth and development, and support the family throughout the hospitalization and transition to home. The level of care provided in a NICU can vary depending on the severity of the infant's condition, ranging from basic monitoring and support to complex treatments such as mechanical ventilation, surgery, and medication therapy.

In general, NICUs are classified into different levels based on the complexity of care they can provide. Level I NICUs provide basic care for infants born at or near term who require minimal medical intervention. Level II NICUs provide more advanced care for premature or sick newborns who require specialized monitoring and treatment but do not need surgery or complex therapies. Level III NICUs provide the highest level of care, including advanced respiratory support, surgical services, and critical care for critically ill infants with complex medical conditions.

A Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a specialized hospital unit that provides advanced, intensive care for newborn babies who are born prematurely, critically ill, or have complex medical conditions. The NICU staff includes neonatologists, neonatal nurses, respiratory therapists, and other healthcare professionals trained to provide specialized care for these vulnerable infants.

The NICU is equipped with advanced technology and monitoring systems to support the babies' breathing, heart function, temperature regulation, and nutrition. The unit may include incubators or radiant warmers to maintain the baby's body temperature, ventilators to assist with breathing, and intravenous lines to provide fluids and medications.

NICUs are typically classified into levels based on the complexity of care provided, ranging from Level I (basic care for healthy newborns) to Level IV (the highest level of care for critically ill newborns). The specific services and level of care provided in a NICU may vary depending on the hospital and geographic location.

'Night care' in a medical context typically refers to healthcare or support services provided to individuals during nighttime hours, usually between evening and early morning. This can include a range of services such as:

1. Monitoring vital signs and overall health status.
2. Administering medications.
3. Assisting with personal care needs like bathing, dressing, and using the bathroom.
4. Providing safety supervision to prevent falls or other accidents.
5. Offering comfort and companionship.

These services can be provided in various settings including hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and private homes. They are often essential for individuals who require around-the-clock care but do not need hospital-level services during the night.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Pulmonary surfactants are a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that are produced by the alveolar type II cells in the lungs. They play a crucial role in reducing the surface tension at the air-liquid interface within the alveoli, which helps to prevent collapse of the lungs during expiration. Surfactants also have important immunological functions, such as inhibiting the growth of certain bacteria and modulating the immune response. Deficiency or dysfunction of pulmonary surfactants can lead to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature infants and other lung diseases.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Viral bronchiolitis is a common respiratory infection in infants and young children, typically caused by a viral pathogen such as the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The infection leads to inflammation and congestion of the small airways (bronchioles) in the lungs, resulting in symptoms like wheezing, cough, difficulty breathing, and rapid breathing.

The infection usually spreads through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The virus can also survive on surfaces for several hours, making it easy to contract the infection by touching contaminated objects and then touching the face.

Most cases of viral bronchiolitis are mild and resolve within 1-2 weeks with supportive care, including increased fluid intake, humidified air, and fever reduction. However, in severe cases or in high-risk infants (such as those born prematurely or with underlying heart or lung conditions), hospitalization may be necessary to manage complications like dehydration, respiratory distress, or oxygen deprivation.

Preventive measures include good hand hygiene, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and ensuring that infants and young children receive appropriate vaccinations and immunizations as recommended by their healthcare provider.

Transcutaneous blood gas monitoring (TcBGM) is a non-invasive method to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) and carbon dioxide (pCO2) in the blood. This technique uses heated sensors placed on the skin, typically on the ear lobe or the soles of the feet, to estimate the gas tensions in the capillary blood.

The sensors contain a electrochemical or optical sensor that measures the pO2 and pCO2 levels in the tiny amount of gas that diffuses through the skin from the underlying capillaries. The measurements are then adjusted to reflect the actual blood gas values based on calibration curves and other factors, such as the patient's age, temperature, and skin perfusion.

TcBGM is commonly used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) to monitor oxygenation and ventilation in premature infants, who may have immature lungs or other respiratory problems that make invasive blood gas sampling difficult or risky. It can also be used in adults with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sleep apnea, or neuromuscular disorders, where frequent blood gas measurements are needed to guide therapy and monitor response to treatment.

Overall, TcBGM provides a safe, painless, and convenient way to monitor blood gases in real-time, without the need for repeated arterial punctures or other invasive procedures. However, it is important to note that TcBGM may not always provide accurate measurements in certain situations, such as when the skin perfusion is poor or when there are significant differences between the capillary and arterial blood gases. Therefore, clinical judgment and other diagnostic tests should be used in conjunction with TcBGM to ensure appropriate patient management.

Wakefulness is a state of consciousness in which an individual is alert and aware of their surroundings. It is characterized by the ability to perceive, process, and respond to stimuli in a purposeful manner. In a medical context, wakefulness is often assessed using measures such as the electroencephalogram (EEG) to evaluate brain activity patterns associated with consciousness.

Wakefulness is regulated by several interconnected neural networks that promote arousal and attention. These networks include the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), which consists of a group of neurons located in the brainstem that project to the thalamus and cerebral cortex, as well as other regions involved in regulating arousal and attention, such as the basal forebrain and hypothalamus.

Disorders of wakefulness can result from various underlying conditions, including neurological disorders, sleep disorders, medication side effects, or other medical conditions that affect brain function. Examples of such disorders include narcolepsy, insomnia, hypersomnia, and various forms of encephalopathy or brain injury.

Respiratory therapy is a healthcare profession that specializes in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of respiratory disorders and diseases. Respiratory therapists (RTs) work under the direction of physicians to provide care for patients with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, cystic fibrosis, sleep apnea, and neuromuscular diseases that affect breathing.

RTs use a variety of techniques and treatments to help patients breathe more easily, including oxygen therapy, aerosol medication delivery, chest physiotherapy, mechanical ventilation, and patient education. They also perform diagnostic tests such as pulmonary function studies to assess lung function and help diagnose respiratory conditions.

RTs work in a variety of healthcare settings, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and home health agencies. They may provide care for patients of all ages, from premature infants to the elderly. The overall goal of respiratory therapy is to help patients achieve and maintain optimal lung function and quality of life.

A "premature infant" is a newborn delivered before 37 weeks of gestation. They are at greater risk for various health complications and medical conditions compared to full-term infants, due to their immature organ systems and lower birth weight. Some common diseases and health issues that premature infants may face include:

1. Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS): A lung disorder caused by the lack of surfactant, a substance that helps keep the lungs inflated. Premature infants, especially those born before 34 weeks, are at higher risk for RDS.
2. Intraventricular Hemorrhage (IVH): Bleeding in the brain's ventricles, which can lead to developmental delays or neurological issues. The risk of IVH is inversely proportional to gestational age, meaning that the earlier the infant is born, the higher the risk.
3. Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC): A gastrointestinal disease where the intestinal tissue becomes inflamed and can die. Premature infants are at greater risk for NEC due to their immature digestive systems.
4. Jaundice: A yellowing of the skin and eyes caused by an accumulation of bilirubin, a waste product from broken-down red blood cells. Premature infants may have higher rates of jaundice due to their liver's immaturity.
5. Infections: Premature infants are more susceptible to infections because of their underdeveloped immune systems. Common sources of infection include the mother's genital tract, bloodstream, or hospital environment.
6. Anemia: A condition characterized by a low red blood cell count or insufficient hemoglobin. Premature infants may develop anemia due to frequent blood sampling, rapid growth, or inadequate erythropoietin production.
7. Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP): An eye disorder affecting premature infants, where abnormal blood vessel growth occurs in the retina. Severe ROP can lead to vision loss or blindness if not treated promptly.
8. Developmental Delays: Premature infants are at risk for developmental delays due to their immature nervous systems and environmental factors such as sensory deprivation or separation from parents.
9. Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA): A congenital heart defect where the ductus arteriosus, a blood vessel that connects two major arteries in the fetal heart, fails to close after birth. Premature infants are at higher risk for PDA due to their immature cardiovascular systems.
10. Hypothermia: Premature infants have difficulty maintaining body temperature and are at risk for hypothermia, which can lead to increased metabolic demands, poor feeding, and infection.

Lung volume measurements are clinical tests that determine the amount of air inhaled, exhaled, and present in the lungs at different times during the breathing cycle. These measurements include:

1. Tidal Volume (TV): The amount of air inhaled or exhaled during normal breathing, usually around 500 mL in resting adults.
2. Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV): The additional air that can be inhaled after a normal inspiration, approximately 3,000 mL in adults.
3. Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV): The extra air that can be exhaled after a normal expiration, about 1,000-1,200 mL in adults.
4. Residual Volume (RV): The air remaining in the lungs after a maximal exhalation, approximately 1,100-1,500 mL in adults.
5. Total Lung Capacity (TLC): The total amount of air the lungs can hold at full inflation, calculated as TV + IRV + ERV + RV, around 6,000 mL in adults.
6. Functional Residual Capacity (FRC): The volume of air remaining in the lungs after a normal expiration, equal to ERV + RV, about 2,100-2,700 mL in adults.
7. Inspiratory Capacity (IC): The maximum amount of air that can be inhaled after a normal expiration, equal to TV + IRV, around 3,500 mL in adults.
8. Vital Capacity (VC): The total volume of air that can be exhaled after a maximal inspiration, calculated as IC + ERV, approximately 4,200-5,600 mL in adults.

These measurements help assess lung function and identify various respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and restrictive lung diseases.

REM sleep, or Rapid Eye Movement sleep, is a stage of sleep characterized by rapid eye movements, low muscle tone, and active brain activity. It is one of the two main types of sleep along with non-REM sleep and is marked by vivid dreaming, increased brain metabolism, and altered brain wave patterns. REM sleep is often referred to as "paradoxical sleep" because of the seemingly contradictory nature of its characteristics - an active brain in a state of relaxation. It is thought to play a role in memory consolidation, learning, and mood regulation. A typical night's sleep cycle includes several episodes of REM sleep, with each episode becoming longer as the night progresses.

Hypercapnia is a state of increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the blood, typically defined as an arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) above 45 mmHg. It is often associated with conditions that impair gas exchange or eliminate CO2 from the body, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), severe asthma, respiratory failure, or certain neuromuscular disorders. Hypercapnia can cause symptoms such as headache, confusion, shortness of breath, and in severe cases, it can lead to life-threatening complications such as respiratory acidosis, coma, and even death if not promptly treated.

Long-term care (LTC) is a term used to describe various medical and support services that are required by individuals who need assistance with activities of daily living (such as bathing, dressing, using the toilet) or who have chronic health conditions that require ongoing supervision and care. LTC can be provided in a variety of settings, including nursing homes, assisted living facilities, adult day care centers, and private homes.

The goal of LTC is to help individuals maintain their independence and quality of life for as long as possible, while also ensuring that they receive the necessary medical and support services to meet their needs. LTC can be provided on a short-term or long-term basis, depending on the individual's needs and circumstances.

LTC is often required by older adults who have physical or cognitive limitations, but it can also be needed by people of any age who have disabilities or chronic illnesses that require ongoing care. LTC services may include nursing care, therapy (such as occupational, physical, or speech therapy), personal care (such as help with bathing and dressing), and social activities.

LTC is typically not covered by traditional health insurance plans, but it may be covered by long-term care insurance policies, Medicaid, or other government programs. It's important to plan for LTC needs well in advance, as the cost of care can be significant and can have a major impact on an individual's financial resources.

A very low birth weight (VLBW) infant is a baby born weighing less than 1500 grams (3 pounds, 5 ounces). This category includes babies who are extremely preterm (born at or before 28 weeks of gestation) and/or have intrauterine growth restriction. VLBW infants often face significant health challenges, including respiratory distress syndrome, brain bleeds, infections, and feeding difficulties. They may require extended hospital stays in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and have a higher risk of long-term neurodevelopmental impairments compared to infants with normal birth weights.

In the context of medical terminology, "heating" generally refers to the application of heat to an area of the body for therapeutic purposes. This can be done using various methods such as hot packs, heating pads, warm compresses, or even heated wax. The goal of applying heat is to increase blood flow, reduce pain and muscle spasms, and promote healing in the affected area. It's important to note that excessive heating or application of heat to sensitive areas should be avoided, as it can lead to burns or other injuries.

Heart rate is the number of heartbeats per unit of time, often expressed as beats per minute (bpm). It can vary significantly depending on factors such as age, physical fitness, emotions, and overall health status. A resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm is generally considered normal for adults, but athletes and individuals with high levels of physical fitness may have a resting heart rate below 60 bpm due to their enhanced cardiovascular efficiency. Monitoring heart rate can provide valuable insights into an individual's health status, exercise intensity, and response to various treatments or interventions.

In a medical or physiological context, "arousal" refers to the state of being awake and responsive to stimuli. It involves the activation of the nervous system, particularly the autonomic nervous system, which prepares the body for action. Arousal levels can vary from low (such as during sleep) to high (such as during states of excitement or stress). In clinical settings, changes in arousal may be assessed to help diagnose conditions such as coma, brain injury, or sleep disorders. It is also used in the context of sexual response, where it refers to the level of physical and mental awareness and readiness for sexual activity.

Orthodontic appliances are devices used in orthodontics, a branch of dentistry focused on the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. These appliances can be fixed or removable and are used to align teeth, correct jaw relationships, or modify dental forces. They can include braces, aligners, palatal expanders, space maintainers, and headgear, among others. The specific type of appliance used depends on the individual patient's needs and the treatment plan developed by the orthodontist.

Pulse oximetry is a noninvasive method for monitoring a person's oxygen saturation (SO2) and pulse rate. It uses a device called a pulse oximeter, which measures the amount of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin in the blood compared to the amount of hemoglobin that is not carrying oxygen. This measurement is expressed as a percentage, known as oxygen saturation (SpO2). Normal oxygen saturation levels are generally 95% or above at sea level. Lower levels may indicate hypoxemia, a condition where there is not enough oxygen in the blood to meet the body's needs. Pulse oximetry is commonly used in hospitals and other healthcare settings to monitor patients during surgery, in intensive care units, and in sleep studies to detect conditions such as sleep apnea. It can also be used by individuals with certain medical conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), to monitor their oxygen levels at home.

High-frequency ventilation (HFV) is a specialized mode of mechanical ventilation that delivers breaths at higher rates (usually 120-900 breaths per minute) and smaller tidal volumes (1-3 mL/kg) compared to conventional ventilation. This technique aims to reduce lung injury caused by overdistension and atelectasis, which can occur with traditional ventilator settings. It is often used in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units for the management of severe respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, and other conditions where conventional ventilation may be harmful.

There are two main types of high-frequency ventilation: high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) and high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV). Both techniques use different methods to generate the high-frequency breaths but share similar principles in delivering small tidal volumes at rapid rates.

In summary, high-frequency ventilation is a medical intervention that utilizes specialized ventilators to deliver faster and smaller breaths, minimizing lung injury and improving oxygenation for critically ill patients with severe respiratory distress.

Respiratory muscles are a group of muscles involved in the process of breathing. They include the diaphragm, intercostal muscles (located between the ribs), scalene muscles (located in the neck), and abdominal muscles. These muscles work together to allow the chest cavity to expand or contract, which draws air into or pushes it out of the lungs. The diaphragm is the primary muscle responsible for breathing, contracting to increase the volume of the chest cavity and draw air into the lungs during inhalation. The intercostal muscles help to further expand the ribcage, while the abdominal muscles assist in exhaling by compressing the abdomen and pushing up on the diaphragm.

Heart failure is a pathophysiological state in which the heart is unable to pump sufficient blood to meet the metabolic demands of the body or do so only at the expense of elevated filling pressures. It can be caused by various cardiac disorders, including coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular heart disease, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. Symptoms may include shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid retention. Heart failure is often classified based on the ejection fraction (EF), which is the percentage of blood that is pumped out of the left ventricle during each contraction. A reduced EF (less than 40%) is indicative of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), while a preserved EF (greater than or equal to 50%) is indicative of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). There is also a category of heart failure with mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) for those with an EF between 40-49%.

Nose diseases, also known as rhinologic disorders, refer to a wide range of conditions that affect the nose and its surrounding structures. These may include:

1. Nasal Allergies (Allergic Rhinitis): An inflammation of the inner lining of the nose caused by an allergic reaction to substances such as pollen, dust mites, or mold.

2. Sinusitis: Inflammation or infection of the sinuses, which are air-filled cavities in the skull that surround the nasal cavity.

3. Nasal Polyps: Soft, fleshy growths that develop on the lining of the nasal passages or sinuses.

4. Deviated Septum: A condition where the thin wall (septum) between the two nostrils is displaced to one side, causing difficulty breathing through the nose.

5. Rhinitis Medicamentosa: Nasal congestion caused by overuse of decongestant nasal sprays.

6. Nosebleeds (Epistaxis): Bleeding from the nostrils, which can be caused by a variety of factors including dryness, trauma, or underlying medical conditions.

7. Nasal Fractures: Breaks in the bone structure of the nose, often caused by trauma.

8. Tumors: Abnormal growths that can occur in the nasal passages or sinuses. These can be benign or malignant.

9. Choanal Atresia: A congenital condition where the back of the nasal passage is blocked, often by a thin membrane or bony partition.

10. Nasal Valve Collapse: A condition where the side walls of the nose collapse inward during breathing, causing difficulty breathing through the nose.

These are just a few examples of the many diseases that can affect the nose.

Equipment failure is a term used in the medical field to describe the malfunction or breakdown of medical equipment, devices, or systems that are essential for patient care. This can include simple devices like syringes and thermometers, as well as complex machines such as ventilators, infusion pumps, and imaging equipment.

Equipment failure can have serious consequences for patients, including delayed or inappropriate treatment, injury, or even death. It is therefore essential that medical equipment is properly maintained, tested, and repaired to ensure its safe and effective operation.

There are many potential causes of equipment failure, including:

* Wear and tear from frequent use
* Inadequate cleaning or disinfection
* Improper handling or storage
* Power supply issues
* Software glitches or bugs
* Mechanical failures or defects
* Human error or misuse

To prevent equipment failure, healthcare facilities should have established policies and procedures for the acquisition, maintenance, and disposal of medical equipment. Staff should be trained in the proper use and handling of equipment, and regular inspections and testing should be performed to identify and address any potential issues before they lead to failure.

Inhalation is the act or process of breathing in where air or other gases are drawn into the lungs. It's also known as inspiration. This process involves several muscles, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles between the ribs, working together to expand the chest cavity and decrease the pressure within the thorax, which then causes air to flow into the lungs.

In a medical context, inhalation can also refer to the administration of medications or therapeutic gases through the respiratory tract, typically using an inhaler or nebulizer. This route of administration allows for direct delivery of the medication to the lungs, where it can be quickly absorbed into the bloodstream and exert its effects.

The nasal septum is the thin, flat wall of bone and cartilage that separates the two sides (nostrils) of the nose. Its primary function is to support the structures of the nose, divide the nostrils, and regulate airflow into the nasal passages. The nasal septum should be relatively centered, but it's not uncommon for a deviated septum to occur, where the septum is displaced to one side, which can sometimes cause blockage or breathing difficulties in the more affected nostril.

A tracheostomy is a surgically created opening through the neck into the trachea (windpipe). It is performed to provide an airway in cases where the upper airway is obstructed or access to the lower airway is required, such as in prolonged intubation, severe trauma, or chronic lung diseases. The procedure involves making an incision in the front of the neck and creating a direct opening into the trachea, through which a tracheostomy tube is inserted to maintain the patency of the airway. This allows for direct ventilation of the lungs, suctioning of secretions, and prevention of complications associated with upper airway obstruction.

Intrinsic Positive-Pressure Respiration (IPPR) is a type of positive-pressure breathing that occurs naturally within the body, without the use of mechanical ventilation or other external devices. It is also known as "auto-PEEP" or "occult PEEP," where PEEP stands for Positive End-Expiratory Pressure.

In normal, spontaneous breathing, the pressure inside the alveoli (air sacs) in the lungs becomes slightly negative during inhalation and returns to atmospheric pressure during exhalation. However, certain lung conditions or patient efforts can lead to an increase in resistance to airflow during exhalation, causing positive pressure to persist within the alveoli at the end of expiration. This results in intrinsic PEEP or auto-PEEP.

IPPR can be caused by several factors, including:

1. Air trapping due to obstructive lung diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma
2. High respiratory rates leading to incomplete exhalation before the next inspiration begins
3. Inadequate expiratory time, often seen in mechanically ventilated patients with high tidal volumes and/or low respiratory rates
4. Dynamic hyperinflation due to increased minute ventilation or high inspiratory flow rates
5. Bronchoconstriction or airway narrowing, which can occur during an asthma attack or in certain other lung conditions

IPPR has several clinical implications, such as reduced venous return and cardiac output, increased work of breathing, and potential for lung injury due to overdistension (volutrauma). Healthcare providers must consider IPPR when managing patients with respiratory distress, especially those on mechanical ventilation, to optimize their care and prevent complications.

Dental equipment refers to the various instruments and devices used by dental professionals to perform oral health examinations, diagnose dental conditions, and provide treatment to patients. Here are some examples:

1. Dental chair: A specially designed chair that allows patients to recline while receiving dental care.
2. Examination light: A bright light used to illuminate the oral cavity during examinations and procedures.
3. Dental mirror: A small, angled mirror used to help dentists see hard-to-reach areas of the mouth.
4. Explorer: A sharp instrument used to probe teeth for signs of decay or other dental problems.
5. Dental probe: A blunt instrument used to measure the depth of periodontal pockets and assess gum health.
6. Scaler: A handheld instrument or ultrasonic device used to remove tartar and calculus from teeth.
7. Suction device: A vacuum-like tool that removes saliva, water, and debris from the mouth during procedures.
8. Dental drill: A high-speed instrument used to remove decayed or damaged tooth structure and prepare teeth for fillings, crowns, or other restorations.
9. Rubber dam: A thin sheet of rubber used to isolate individual teeth during procedures, keeping them dry and free from saliva.
10. Dental X-ray machine: A device that uses radiation to capture images of the teeth and surrounding structures, helping dentists diagnose conditions such as decay, infection, and bone loss.
11. Curing light: A special light used to harden dental materials, such as composite fillings and crowns, after they have been placed in the mouth.
12. Air/water syringe: A handheld device that delivers a stream of air and water to clean teeth and rinse away debris during procedures.

Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) is a non-invasive method of measuring blood pressure at regular intervals over a 24-hour period or more. This is typically done using a portable device that is worn on a belt around the waist and connected to a cuff wrapped around the upper arm. The device automatically inflates the cuff and records blood pressure readings at preset intervals, usually every 15 to 30 minutes during the day and every 30 to 60 minutes during the night.

ABPM provides valuable information about blood pressure patterns over an extended period, including how it varies throughout the day and in response to daily activities, posture changes, and sleep. This can help healthcare providers diagnose and manage hypertension more effectively, as well as assess the effectiveness of antihypertensive medications. ABPM is also useful for identifying white coat hypertension, a condition where blood pressure readings are higher in a medical setting than in daily life.

Overall, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is an important tool in the diagnosis and management of hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases.

Transportation of patients, in a medical context, refers to the process of moving patients safely and comfortably from one location to another. This can include the movement of patients within a healthcare facility (such as from their hospital room to the radiology department for testing) or between facilities (such as from a hospital to a rehabilitation center). Patient transportation may be required for various reasons, including receiving medical treatment, undergoing diagnostic tests, attending appointments, or being discharged from the hospital.

The process of patient transportation involves careful planning and coordination to ensure the safety, comfort, and well-being of the patient during transit. It may involve the use of specialized equipment, such as stretchers, wheelchairs, or ambulances, depending on the patient's medical needs and mobility status. Trained personnel, such as paramedics, nurses, or patient care technicians, are often involved in the transportation process to monitor the patient's condition, provide medical assistance if needed, and ensure a smooth and uneventful transfer.

It is essential to follow established protocols and guidelines for patient transportation to minimize risks and ensure the best possible outcomes for patients. This includes assessing the patient's medical status, determining the appropriate mode of transportation, providing necessary care and support during transit, and communicating effectively with all parties involved in the process.

Physiological monitoring is the continuous or intermittent observation and measurement of various body functions or parameters in a patient, with the aim of evaluating their health status, identifying any abnormalities or changes, and guiding clinical decision-making and treatment. This may involve the use of specialized medical equipment, such as cardiac monitors, pulse oximeters, blood pressure monitors, and capnographs, among others. The data collected through physiological monitoring can help healthcare professionals assess the effectiveness of treatments, detect complications early, and make timely adjustments to patient care plans.

Obstructive lung disease is a category of respiratory diseases characterized by airflow limitation that causes difficulty in completely emptying the alveoli (tiny air sacs) of the lungs during exhaling. This results in the trapping of stale air and prevents fresh air from entering the alveoli, leading to various symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and decreased exercise tolerance.

The most common obstructive lung diseases include:

1. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A progressive disease that includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema, often caused by smoking or exposure to harmful pollutants.
2. Asthma: A chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by variable airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and an underlying inflammation. Symptoms can be triggered by various factors such as allergens, irritants, or physical activity.
3. Bronchiectasis: A condition in which the airways become abnormally widened, scarred, and thickened due to chronic inflammation or infection, leading to mucus buildup and impaired clearance.
4. Cystic Fibrosis: An inherited genetic disorder that affects the exocrine glands, resulting in thick and sticky mucus production in various organs, including the lungs. This can lead to chronic lung infections, inflammation, and airway obstruction.
5. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: A genetic condition characterized by low levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin protein, which leads to uncontrolled protease enzyme activity that damages the lung tissue, causing emphysema-like symptoms.

Treatment for obstructive lung diseases typically involves bronchodilators (to relax and widen the airways), corticosteroids (to reduce inflammation), and lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation and pulmonary rehabilitation programs. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or even lung transplantation may be considered.

Respiratory physiological phenomena refer to the various mechanical, chemical, and biological processes and functions that occur in the respiratory system during breathing and gas exchange. These phenomena include:

1. Ventilation: The movement of air into and out of the lungs, which is achieved through the contraction and relaxation of the diaphragm and intercostal muscles.
2. Gas Exchange: The diffusion of oxygen (O2) from the alveoli into the bloodstream and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the bloodstream into the alveoli.
3. Respiratory Mechanics: The physical properties and forces that affect the movement of air in and out of the lungs, such as lung compliance, airway resistance, and chest wall elasticity.
4. Control of Breathing: The regulation of ventilation by the central nervous system through the integration of sensory information from chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors in the respiratory system.
5. Acid-Base Balance: The maintenance of a stable pH level in the blood through the regulation of CO2 elimination and bicarbonate balance by the respiratory and renal systems.
6. Oxygen Transport: The binding of O2 to hemoglobin in the red blood cells and its delivery to the tissues for metabolic processes.
7. Defense Mechanisms: The various protective mechanisms that prevent the entry and colonization of pathogens and foreign particles into the respiratory system, such as mucociliary clearance, cough reflex, and immune responses.

The larynx, also known as the voice box, is a complex structure in the neck that plays a crucial role in protection of the lower respiratory tract and in phonation. It is composed of cartilaginous, muscular, and soft tissue structures. The primary functions of the larynx include:

1. Airway protection: During swallowing, the larynx moves upward and forward to close the opening of the trachea (the glottis) and prevent food or liquids from entering the lungs. This action is known as the swallowing reflex.
2. Phonation: The vocal cords within the larynx vibrate when air passes through them, producing sound that forms the basis of human speech and voice production.
3. Respiration: The larynx serves as a conduit for airflow between the upper and lower respiratory tracts during breathing.

The larynx is located at the level of the C3-C6 vertebrae in the neck, just above the trachea. It consists of several important structures:

1. Cartilages: The laryngeal cartilages include the thyroid, cricoid, and arytenoid cartilages, as well as the corniculate and cuneiform cartilages. These form a framework for the larynx and provide attachment points for various muscles.
2. Vocal cords: The vocal cords are thin bands of mucous membrane that stretch across the glottis (the opening between the arytenoid cartilages). They vibrate when air passes through them, producing sound.
3. Muscles: There are several intrinsic and extrinsic muscles associated with the larynx. The intrinsic muscles control the tension and position of the vocal cords, while the extrinsic muscles adjust the position and movement of the larynx within the neck.
4. Nerves: The larynx is innervated by both sensory and motor nerves. The recurrent laryngeal nerve provides motor innervation to all intrinsic laryngeal muscles, except for one muscle called the cricothyroid, which is innervated by the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. Sensory innervation is provided by the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve and the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

The larynx plays a crucial role in several essential functions, including breathing, speaking, and protecting the airway during swallowing. Dysfunction or damage to the larynx can result in various symptoms, such as hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, shortness of breath, or stridor (a high-pitched sound heard during inspiration).

A circadian rhythm is a roughly 24-hour biological cycle that regulates various physiological and behavioral processes in living organisms. It is driven by the body's internal clock, which is primarily located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus in the brain.

The circadian rhythm controls many aspects of human physiology, including sleep-wake cycles, hormone secretion, body temperature, and metabolism. It helps to synchronize these processes with the external environment, particularly the day-night cycle caused by the rotation of the Earth.

Disruptions to the circadian rhythm can have negative effects on health, leading to conditions such as insomnia, sleep disorders, depression, bipolar disorder, and even increased risk of chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Factors that can disrupt the circadian rhythm include shift work, jet lag, irregular sleep schedules, and exposure to artificial light at night.

"Papio" is a term used in the field of primatology, specifically for a genus of Old World monkeys known as baboons. It's not typically used in human or medical contexts. Baboons are large monkeys with robust bodies and distinctive dog-like faces. They are native to various parts of Africa and are known for their complex social structures and behaviors.

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

Anoxia is a medical condition that refers to the absence or complete lack of oxygen supply in the body or a specific organ, tissue, or cell. This can lead to serious health consequences, including damage or death of cells and tissues, due to the vital role that oxygen plays in supporting cellular metabolism and energy production.

Anoxia can occur due to various reasons, such as respiratory failure, cardiac arrest, severe blood loss, carbon monoxide poisoning, or high altitude exposure. Prolonged anoxia can result in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, a serious condition that can cause brain damage and long-term neurological impairments.

Medical professionals use various diagnostic tests, such as blood gas analysis, pulse oximetry, and electroencephalography (EEG), to assess oxygen levels in the body and diagnose anoxia. Treatment for anoxia typically involves addressing the underlying cause, providing supplemental oxygen, and supporting vital functions, such as breathing and circulation, to prevent further damage.

Pneumothorax is a medical condition that refers to the presence of air in the pleural space, which is the potential space between the lungs and the chest wall. This collection of air can result in a partial or complete collapse of the lung. The symptoms of pneumothorax may include sudden chest pain, shortness of breath, cough, and rapid heartbeat.

The two main types of pneumothorax are spontaneous pneumothorax, which occurs without any apparent cause or underlying lung disease, and secondary pneumothorax, which is caused by an underlying lung condition such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or lung cancer.

Treatment for pneumothorax may include observation, oxygen therapy, needle aspiration, or chest tube insertion to remove the excess air from the pleural space and allow the lung to re-expand. In severe cases, surgery may be required to prevent recurrence.

Nonparametric statistics is a branch of statistics that does not rely on assumptions about the distribution of variables in the population from which the sample is drawn. In contrast to parametric methods, nonparametric techniques make fewer assumptions about the data and are therefore more flexible in their application. Nonparametric tests are often used when the data do not meet the assumptions required for parametric tests, such as normality or equal variances.

Nonparametric statistical methods include tests such as the Wilcoxon rank-sum test (also known as the Mann-Whitney U test) for comparing two independent groups, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for comparing two related groups, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for comparing more than two independent groups. These tests use the ranks of the data rather than the actual values to make comparisons, which allows them to be used with ordinal or continuous data that do not meet the assumptions of parametric tests.

Overall, nonparametric statistics provide a useful set of tools for analyzing data in situations where the assumptions of parametric methods are not met, and can help researchers draw valid conclusions from their data even when the data are not normally distributed or have other characteristics that violate the assumptions of parametric tests.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

Hypertension is a medical term used to describe abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries, often defined as consistently having systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) over 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) over 80 mmHg. It is also commonly referred to as high blood pressure.

Hypertension can be classified into two types: primary or essential hypertension, which has no identifiable cause and accounts for about 95% of cases, and secondary hypertension, which is caused by underlying medical conditions such as kidney disease, hormonal disorders, or use of certain medications.

If left untreated, hypertension can lead to serious health complications such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, it is important for individuals with hypertension to manage their condition through lifestyle modifications (such as healthy diet, regular exercise, stress management) and medication if necessary, under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Quality of Life (QOL) is a broad, multidimensional concept that usually includes an individual's physical health, psychological state, level of independence, social relationships, personal beliefs, and their relationship to salient features of their environment. It reflects the impact of disease and treatment on a patient's overall well-being and ability to function in daily life.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines QOL as "an individual's perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." It is a subjective concept, meaning it can vary greatly from person to person.

In healthcare, QOL is often used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and other research studies to assess the impact of interventions or treatments on overall patient well-being.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult (RDSa or ARDS), also known as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, is a severe form of acute lung injury characterized by rapid onset of widespread inflammation in the lungs. This results in increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary membrane, pulmonary edema, and hypoxemia (low oxygen levels in the blood). The inflammation can be triggered by various direct or indirect insults to the lung, such as sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, or aspiration.

The hallmark of ARDS is the development of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray, which can resemble pulmonary edema, but without evidence of increased left atrial pressure. The condition can progress rapidly and may require mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to maintain adequate oxygenation and prevent further lung injury.

The management of ARDS is primarily supportive, focusing on protecting the lungs from further injury, optimizing oxygenation, and providing adequate nutrition and treatment for any underlying conditions. The use of low tidal volumes and limiting plateau pressures during mechanical ventilation have been shown to improve outcomes in patients with ARDS.

Apnea is a medical condition defined as the cessation of breathing for 10 seconds or more. It can occur during sleep (sleep apnea) or while awake (wakeful apnea). There are different types of sleep apnea, including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and complex sleep apnea syndrome. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the airway becomes blocked during sleep, while central sleep apnea occurs when the brain fails to signal the muscles to breathe. Complex sleep apnea syndrome, also known as treatment-emergent central sleep apnea, is a combination of obstructive and central sleep apneas. Sleep apnea can lead to various complications, such as fatigue, difficulty concentrating, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

Hemodynamics is the study of how blood flows through the cardiovascular system, including the heart and the vascular network. It examines various factors that affect blood flow, such as blood volume, viscosity, vessel length and diameter, and pressure differences between different parts of the circulatory system. Hemodynamics also considers the impact of various physiological and pathological conditions on these variables, and how they in turn influence the function of vital organs and systems in the body. It is a critical area of study in fields such as cardiology, anesthesiology, and critical care medicine.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure used to assess whether a person has a healthy weight for their height. It's calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters. Here is the medical definition:

Body Mass Index (BMI) = weight(kg) / [height(m)]^2

According to the World Health Organization, BMI categories are defined as follows:

* Less than 18.5: Underweight
* 18.5-24.9: Normal or healthy weight
* 25.0-29.9: Overweight
* 30.0 and above: Obese

It is important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying weight issues in populations, it does have limitations when applied to individuals. For example, it may not accurately reflect body fat distribution or muscle mass, which can affect health risks associated with excess weight. Therefore, BMI should be used as one of several factors when evaluating an individual's health status and risk for chronic diseases.

An "Extremely Low Birth Weight" (ELBW) infant is a newborn with a birth weight below 1000 grams (2 pounds, 3 ounces), according to the World Health Organization (WHO). This classification is part of the broader category of low birth weight infants, which includes those born weighing less than 2500 grams (about 5.5 pounds). ELBW infants often face significant health challenges due to their prematurity and small size, which can include issues with breathing, feeding, temperature regulation, and potential long-term neurodevelopmental impairments. It is crucial for these infants to receive specialized care in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to optimize their chances of survival and promote healthy development.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Patient satisfaction is a concept in healthcare quality measurement that reflects the patient's perspective and evaluates their experience with the healthcare services they have received. It is a multidimensional construct that includes various aspects such as interpersonal mannerisms of healthcare providers, technical competence, accessibility, timeliness, comfort, and communication.

Patient satisfaction is typically measured through standardized surveys or questionnaires that ask patients to rate their experiences on various aspects of care. The results are often used to assess the quality of care provided by healthcare organizations, identify areas for improvement, and inform policy decisions. However, it's important to note that patient satisfaction is just one aspect of healthcare quality and should be considered alongside other measures such as clinical outcomes and patient safety.

Home care services, also known as home health care, refer to a wide range of health and social services delivered at an individual's residence. These services are designed to help people who have special needs or disabilities, those recovering from illness or surgery, and the elderly or frail who require assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) or skilled nursing care.

Home care services can include:

1. Skilled Nursing Care: Provided by registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), or licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to administer medications, wound care, injections, and other medical treatments. They also monitor the patient's health status, provide education on disease management, and coordinate with other healthcare professionals.
2. Therapy Services: Occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists help patients regain strength, mobility, coordination, balance, and communication skills after an illness or injury. They develop personalized treatment plans to improve the patient's ability to perform daily activities independently.
3. Personal Care/Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs): Home health aides and personal care assistants provide assistance with bathing, dressing, grooming, toileting, and other personal care tasks. They may also help with light housekeeping, meal preparation, and shopping.
4. Social Work Services: Provided by licensed social workers who assess the patient's psychosocial needs, connect them to community resources, and provide counseling and support for patients and their families.
5. Nutritional Support: Registered dietitians evaluate the patient's nutritional status, develop meal plans, and provide education on special diets or feeding techniques as needed.
6. Telehealth Monitoring: Remote monitoring of a patient's health status using technology such as video conferencing, wearable devices, or mobile apps to track vital signs, medication adherence, and symptoms. This allows healthcare providers to monitor patients closely and adjust treatment plans as necessary without requiring in-person visits.
7. Hospice Care: End-of-life care provided in the patient's home to manage pain, provide emotional support, and address spiritual needs. The goal is to help the patient maintain dignity and quality of life during their final days.
8. Respite Care: Temporary relief for family caregivers who need a break from caring for their loved ones. This can include short-term stays in assisted living facilities or hiring professional caregivers to provide in-home support.

Gestational age is the length of time that has passed since the first day of the last menstrual period (LMP) in pregnant women. It is the standard unit used to estimate the age of a pregnancy and is typically expressed in weeks. This measure is used because the exact date of conception is often not known, but the start of the last menstrual period is usually easier to recall.

It's important to note that since ovulation typically occurs around two weeks after the start of the LMP, gestational age is approximately two weeks longer than fetal age, which is the actual time elapsed since conception. Medical professionals use both gestational and fetal age to track the development and growth of the fetus during pregnancy.

Airway remodeling is a term used to describe the structural changes that occur in the airways as a result of chronic inflammation in respiratory diseases such as asthma. These changes include thickening of the airway wall, increased smooth muscle mass, and abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix components. These alterations can lead to narrowing of the airways, decreased lung function, and increased severity of symptoms. Airway remodeling is thought to be a major contributor to the persistent airflow obstruction that is characteristic of severe asthma.

Spirometry is a common type of pulmonary function test (PFT) that measures how well your lungs work. This is done by measuring how much air you can exhale from your lungs after taking a deep breath, and how quickly you can exhale it. The results are compared to normal values for your age, height, sex, and ethnicity.

Spirometry is used to diagnose and monitor certain lung conditions, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory diseases that cause narrowing of the airways. It can also be used to assess the effectiveness of treatment for these conditions. The test is non-invasive, safe, and easy to perform.

The medical definition of 'Automobile Driving' is the act of operating a motor vehicle, typically a car, on public roads or highways. This requires a set of cognitive, physical, and sensory skills to safely control the vehicle, navigate through traffic, and respond to various situations that may arise while driving.

Cognitive skills include attention, memory, decision-making, problem-solving, and judgment. Physical abilities encompass fine motor coordination, reaction time, strength, and flexibility. Sensory functions such as vision, hearing, and touch are also essential for safe driving.

Various medical conditions or medications can impair these skills and affect a person's ability to drive safely. Therefore, it is crucial for individuals to consult with their healthcare providers about any potential risks associated with driving and follow any recommended restrictions or guidelines.

Lung diseases refer to a broad category of disorders that affect the lungs and other structures within the respiratory system. These diseases can impair lung function, leading to symptoms such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, and wheezing. They can be categorized into several types based on the underlying cause and nature of the disease process. Some common examples include:

1. Obstructive lung diseases: These are characterized by narrowing or blockage of the airways, making it difficult to breathe out. Examples include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis.
2. Restrictive lung diseases: These involve stiffening or scarring of the lungs, which reduces their ability to expand and take in air. Examples include idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, and asbestosis.
3. Infectious lung diseases: These are caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites that infect the lungs. Examples include pneumonia, tuberculosis, and influenza.
4. Vascular lung diseases: These affect the blood vessels in the lungs, impairing oxygen exchange. Examples include pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).
5. Neoplastic lung diseases: These involve abnormal growth of cells within the lungs, leading to cancer. Examples include small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and mesothelioma.
6. Other lung diseases: These include interstitial lung diseases, pleural effusions, and rare disorders such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).

It is important to note that this list is not exhaustive, and there are many other conditions that can affect the lungs. Proper diagnosis and treatment of lung diseases require consultation with a healthcare professional, such as a pulmonologist or respiratory therapist.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, 'probability' does not have a specific medical definition. However, in general terms, probability is a branch of mathematics that deals with the study of numerical quantities called probabilities, which are assigned to events or sets of events. Probability is a measure of the likelihood that an event will occur. It is usually expressed as a number between 0 and 1, where 0 indicates that the event is impossible and 1 indicates that the event is certain to occur.

In medical research and statistics, probability is often used to quantify the uncertainty associated with statistical estimates or hypotheses. For example, a p-value is a probability that measures the strength of evidence against a hypothesis. A small p-value (typically less than 0.05) suggests that the observed data are unlikely under the assumption of the null hypothesis, and therefore provides evidence in favor of an alternative hypothesis.

Probability theory is also used to model complex systems and processes in medicine, such as disease transmission dynamics or the effectiveness of medical interventions. By quantifying the uncertainty associated with these models, researchers can make more informed decisions about healthcare policies and practices.

In medical terms, the tongue is a muscular organ in the oral cavity that plays a crucial role in various functions such as taste, swallowing, and speech. It's covered with a mucous membrane and contains papillae, which are tiny projections that contain taste buds to help us perceive different tastes - sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. The tongue also assists in the initial process of digestion by moving food around in the mouth for chewing and mixing with saliva. Additionally, it helps in forming words and speaking clearly by shaping the sounds produced in the mouth.

Fatigue is a state of feeling very tired, weary, or exhausted, which can be physical, mental, or both. It is a common symptom that can be caused by various factors, including lack of sleep, poor nutrition, stress, medical conditions (such as anemia, diabetes, heart disease, or cancer), medications, and substance abuse. Fatigue can also be a symptom of depression or other mental health disorders. In medical terms, fatigue is often described as a subjective feeling of tiredness that is not proportional to recent activity levels and interferes with usual functioning. It is important to consult a healthcare professional if experiencing persistent or severe fatigue to determine the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Sleep disorders are a group of conditions that affect the ability to sleep well on a regular basis. They can include problems with falling asleep, staying asleep, or waking up too early in the morning. These disorders can be caused by various factors such as stress, anxiety, depression, medical conditions, or substance abuse.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) recognizes over 80 distinct sleep disorders, which are categorized into the following major groups:

1. Insomnia - difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep.
2. Sleep-related breathing disorders - abnormal breathing during sleep such as obstructive sleep apnea.
3. Central disorders of hypersomnolence - excessive daytime sleepiness, including narcolepsy.
4. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders - disruption of the internal body clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle.
5. Parasomnias - abnormal behaviors during sleep such as sleepwalking or night terrors.
6. Sleep-related movement disorders - repetitive movements during sleep such as restless legs syndrome.
7. Isolated symptoms and normal variants - brief and occasional symptoms that do not warrant a specific diagnosis.

Sleep disorders can have significant impacts on an individual's quality of life, productivity, and overall health. If you suspect that you may have a sleep disorder, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional or a sleep specialist for proper evaluation and treatment.

Cardiac output is a measure of the amount of blood that is pumped by the heart in one minute. It is defined as the product of stroke volume (the amount of blood pumped by the left ventricle during each contraction) and heart rate (the number of contractions per minute). Normal cardiac output at rest for an average-sized adult is about 5 to 6 liters per minute. Cardiac output can be increased during exercise or other conditions that require more blood flow, such as during illness or injury. It can be measured noninvasively using techniques such as echocardiography or invasively through a catheter placed in the heart.

Traffic accidents are incidents that occur when a vehicle collides with another vehicle, a pedestrian, an animal, or a stationary object, resulting in damage or injury. These accidents can be caused by various factors such as driver error, distracted driving, drunk driving, speeding, reckless driving, poor road conditions, and adverse weather conditions. Traffic accidents can range from minor fender benders to severe crashes that result in serious injuries or fatalities. They are a significant public health concern and cause a substantial burden on healthcare systems, emergency services, and society as a whole.

Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) is a congenital heart defect in which the ductus arteriosus, a normal fetal blood vessel that connects the pulmonary artery and the aorta, fails to close after birth. The ductus arteriosus allows blood to bypass the lungs while the fetus is still in the womb, but it should close shortly after birth as the newborn begins to breathe and oxygenate their own blood.

If the ductus arteriosus remains open or "patent," it can result in abnormal blood flow between the pulmonary artery and aorta. This can lead to various cardiovascular complications, such as:

1. Pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs)
2. Congestive heart failure
3. Increased risk of respiratory infections

The severity of the symptoms and the need for treatment depend on the size of the PDA and the amount of blood flow that is shunted from the aorta to the pulmonary artery. Small PDAs may close on their own over time, while larger PDAs typically require medical intervention, such as medication or surgical closure.

In medical and psychological terms, "affect" refers to a person's emotional or expressive state, mood, or dispositions that are outwardly manifested in their behavior, facial expressions, demeanor, or speech. Affect can be described as being congruent or incongruent with an individual's thoughts and experiences.

There are different types of affect, including:

1. Neutral affect: When a person shows no apparent emotion or displays minimal emotional expressiveness.
2. Positive affect: When a person exhibits positive emotions such as happiness, excitement, or enthusiasm.
3. Negative affect: When a person experiences and displays negative emotions like sadness, anger, or fear.
4. Blunted affect: When a person's emotional response is noticeably reduced or diminished, often observed in individuals with certain mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia.
5. Flat affect: When a person has an almost complete absence of emotional expressiveness, which can be indicative of severe depression or other mental health disorders.
6. Labile affect: When a person's emotional state fluctuates rapidly and frequently between positive and negative emotions, often observed in individuals with certain neurological conditions or mood disorders.

Clinicians may assess a patient's affect during an interview or examination to help diagnose mental health conditions, evaluate treatment progress, or monitor overall well-being.

The Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) is a part of the peripheral nervous system that operates largely below the level of consciousness and controls visceral functions. It is divided into two main subdivisions: the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which generally have opposing effects and maintain homeostasis in the body.

The Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) prepares the body for stressful or emergency situations, often referred to as the "fight or flight" response. It increases heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and metabolic rate, while also decreasing digestive activity. This response helps the body respond quickly to perceived threats.

The Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS), on the other hand, promotes the "rest and digest" state, allowing the body to conserve energy and restore itself after the stress response has subsided. It decreases heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate, while increasing digestive activity and promoting relaxation.

These two systems work together to maintain balance in the body by adjusting various functions based on internal and external demands. Disorders of the Autonomic Nervous System can lead to a variety of symptoms, such as orthostatic hypotension, gastroparesis, and cardiac arrhythmias, among others.

A single-blind method in medical research is a study design where the participants are unaware of the group or intervention they have been assigned to, but the researchers conducting the study know which participant belongs to which group. This is done to prevent bias from the participants' expectations or knowledge of their assignment, while still allowing the researchers to control the study conditions and collect data.

In a single-blind trial, the participants do not know whether they are receiving the active treatment or a placebo (a sham treatment that looks like the real thing but has no therapeutic effect), whereas the researcher knows which participant is receiving which intervention. This design helps to ensure that the participants' responses and outcomes are not influenced by their knowledge of the treatment assignment, while still allowing the researchers to assess the effectiveness or safety of the intervention being studied.

Single-blind methods are commonly used in clinical trials and other medical research studies where it is important to minimize bias and control for confounding variables that could affect the study results.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

Obesity is a complex disease characterized by an excess accumulation of body fat to the extent that it negatively impacts health. It's typically defined using Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure calculated from a person's weight and height. A BMI of 30 or higher is indicative of obesity. However, it's important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying obesity in populations, it does not directly measure body fat and may not accurately reflect health status in individuals. Other factors such as waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and blood sugar levels should also be considered when assessing health risks associated with weight.

Clinical protocols, also known as clinical practice guidelines or care paths, are systematically developed statements that assist healthcare professionals and patients in making decisions about the appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence and consist of a set of recommendations that are designed to optimize patient outcomes, improve the quality of care, and reduce unnecessary variations in practice. Clinical protocols may cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and disease prevention, and are developed by professional organizations, government agencies, and other groups with expertise in the relevant field.

Exhalation is the act of breathing out or exhaling, which is the reverse process of inhalation. During exhalation, the diaphragm relaxes and moves upwards, while the chest muscles also relax, causing the chest cavity to decrease in size. This decrease in size puts pressure on the lungs, causing them to deflate and expel air.

Exhalation is a passive process that occurs naturally after inhalation, but it can also be actively controlled during activities such as speaking, singing, or playing a wind instrument. In medical terms, exhalation may also be referred to as expiration.

Left ventricular function refers to the ability of the left ventricle (the heart's lower-left chamber) to contract and relax, thereby filling with and ejecting blood. The left ventricle is responsible for pumping oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. Its function is evaluated by measuring several parameters, including:

1. Ejection fraction (EF): This is the percentage of blood that is pumped out of the left ventricle with each heartbeat. A normal ejection fraction ranges from 55% to 70%.
2. Stroke volume (SV): The amount of blood pumped by the left ventricle in one contraction. A typical SV is about 70 mL/beat.
3. Cardiac output (CO): The total volume of blood that the left ventricle pumps per minute, calculated as the product of stroke volume and heart rate. Normal CO ranges from 4 to 8 L/minute.

Assessment of left ventricular function is crucial in diagnosing and monitoring various cardiovascular conditions such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, valvular heart diseases, and cardiomyopathies.

Systole is the phase of the cardiac cycle during which the heart muscle contracts to pump blood out of the heart. Specifically, it refers to the contraction of the ventricles, the lower chambers of the heart. This is driven by the action of the electrical conduction system of the heart, starting with the sinoatrial node and passing through the atrioventricular node and bundle branches to the Purkinje fibers.

During systole, the pressure within the ventricles increases as they contract, causing the aortic and pulmonary valves to open and allowing blood to be ejected into the systemic and pulmonary circulations, respectively. The duration of systole is typically shorter than that of diastole, the phase during which the heart muscle relaxes and the chambers fill with blood.

In clinical settings, the terms "systolic" and "diastolic" are often used to describe blood pressure measurements, with the former referring to the pressure exerted on the artery walls when the ventricles contract and eject blood, and the latter referring to the pressure when the ventricles are relaxed and filling with blood.

The superior vena cava is a large vein that carries deoxygenated blood from the upper half of the body to the right atrium of the heart. It is formed by the union of the left and right brachiocephalic veins (also known as the internal jugular and subclavian veins) near the base of the neck. The superior vena cava runs posteriorly to the sternum and enters the upper right portion of the right atrium, just posterior to the opening of the inferior vena cava. It plays a crucial role in the circulatory system by allowing blood returning from the head, neck, upper limbs, and thorax to bypass the liver before entering the heart.

Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) refers to the delivery of mechanical ventilation without using an invasive airway, such as an endotracheal tube or tracheostomy. It is a technique used to support patients with respiratory insufficiency or failure, while avoiding the potential complications associated with intubation and invasive ventilation.

NIV can be provided through various interfaces, including nasal masks, full-face masks, or mouthpieces. The most common modes of NIV are continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP), which provide a constant flow of pressurized air to maintain airway patency and support breathing efforts.

NIV is commonly used in the management of chronic respiratory conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea, COPD, and neuromuscular disorders, as well as acute respiratory failure due to causes such as pneumonia or exacerbation of chronic lung disease. However, it is not appropriate for all patients and should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is a part of the autonomic nervous system that operates largely below the level of consciousness, and it functions to produce appropriate physiological responses to perceived danger. It's often associated with the "fight or flight" response. The SNS uses nerve impulses to stimulate target organs, causing them to speed up (e.g., increased heart rate), prepare for action, or otherwise respond to stressful situations.

The sympathetic nervous system is activated due to stressful emotional or physical situations and it prepares the body for immediate actions. It dilates the pupils, increases heart rate and blood pressure, accelerates breathing, and slows down digestion. The primary neurotransmitter involved in this system is norepinephrine (also known as noradrenaline).

Gliosis is a term used in histopathology and neuroscience to describe the reaction of support cells in the brain, called glial cells, to injury or disease. This response includes an increase in the number and size of glial cells, as well as changes in their shape and function. The most common types of glial cells involved in gliosis are astrocytes and microglia.

Gliosis can be triggered by a variety of factors, including trauma, infection, inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke. In response to injury or disease, astrocytes become hypertrophied (enlarged) and undergo changes in their gene expression profile that can lead to the production of various proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These changes can result in the formation of a dense network of astrocytic processes, which can contribute to the formation of a glial scar.

Microglia, another type of glial cell, become activated during gliosis and play a role in the immune response in the central nervous system (CNS). They can release pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species that contribute to the inflammatory response.

While gliosis is a protective response aimed at containing damage and promoting tissue repair, it can also have negative consequences. For example, the formation of glial scars can impede axonal regeneration and contribute to neurological deficits. Additionally, chronic activation of microglia has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

Oxygen consumption, also known as oxygen uptake, is the amount of oxygen that is consumed or utilized by the body during a specific period of time, usually measured in liters per minute (L/min). It is a common measurement used in exercise physiology and critical care medicine to assess an individual's aerobic metabolism and overall health status.

In clinical settings, oxygen consumption is often measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to evaluate cardiovascular function, pulmonary function, and exercise capacity in patients with various medical conditions such as heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory or cardiac disorders.

During exercise, oxygen is consumed by the muscles to generate energy through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. The amount of oxygen consumed during exercise can provide important information about an individual's fitness level, exercise capacity, and overall health status. Additionally, measuring oxygen consumption can help healthcare providers assess the effectiveness of treatments and rehabilitation programs in patients with various medical conditions.

Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional health conditions or diseases alongside a primary illness or condition. These co-occurring health issues can have an impact on the treatment plan, prognosis, and overall healthcare management of an individual. Comorbidities often interact with each other and the primary condition, leading to more complex clinical situations and increased healthcare needs. It is essential for healthcare professionals to consider and address comorbidities to provide comprehensive care and improve patient outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pilot projects" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine, to describe a small-scale initiative that is implemented on a temporary basis to evaluate its feasibility, effectiveness, or impact before deciding whether to expand or continue it.

In the context of healthcare, pilot projects might involve testing new treatment protocols, implementing innovative care models, or introducing technology solutions in a limited setting to assess their potential benefits and drawbacks. The results of these projects can help inform decisions about broader implementation and provide valuable insights for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare services.

Stroke volume is a term used in cardiovascular physiology and medicine. It refers to the amount of blood that is pumped out of the left ventricle of the heart during each contraction (systole). Specifically, it is the difference between the volume of blood in the left ventricle at the end of diastole (when the ventricle is filled with blood) and the volume at the end of systole (when the ventricle has contracted and ejected its contents into the aorta).

Stroke volume is an important measure of heart function, as it reflects the ability of the heart to pump blood effectively to the rest of the body. A low stroke volume may indicate that the heart is not pumping efficiently, while a high stroke volume may suggest that the heart is working too hard. Stroke volume can be affected by various factors, including heart disease, high blood pressure, and physical fitness level.

The formula for calculating stroke volume is:

Stroke Volume = End-Diastolic Volume - End-Systolic Volume

Where end-diastolic volume (EDV) is the volume of blood in the left ventricle at the end of diastole, and end-systolic volume (ESV) is the volume of blood in the left ventricle at the end of systole.

Posture is the position or alignment of body parts supported by the muscles, especially the spine and head in relation to the vertebral column. It can be described as static (related to a stationary position) or dynamic (related to movement). Good posture involves training your body to stand, walk, sit, and lie in positions where the least strain is placed on supporting muscles and ligaments during movement or weight-bearing activities. Poor posture can lead to various health issues such as back pain, neck pain, headaches, and respiratory problems.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Functional Residual Capacity (FRC) is the volume of air that remains in the lungs after normal expiration during quiet breathing. It represents the sum of the residual volume (RV) and the expiratory reserve volume (ERV). The FRC is approximately 2.5-3.5 liters in a healthy adult. This volume of air serves to keep the alveoli open and maintain oxygenation during periods of quiet breathing, as well as providing a reservoir for additional ventilation during increased activity or exercise.

Hydrostatic pressure is the pressure exerted by a fluid at equilibrium at a given point within the fluid, due to the force of gravity. In medical terms, hydrostatic pressure is often discussed in relation to body fluids and tissues. For example, the hydrostatic pressure in the capillaries (tiny blood vessels) is the force that drives the fluid out of the blood vessels and into the surrounding tissues. This helps to maintain the balance of fluids in the body. Additionally, abnormal increases in hydrostatic pressure can contribute to the development of edema (swelling) in the tissues.

A negative pressure ventilator, also known as an iron lung, is a type of mechanical ventilator that creates a negative pressure environment around the patient's chest and abdomen to assist with breathing. This technology was widely used during the polio epidemic in the mid-20th century to help patients with respiratory paralysis caused by the disease.

In a negative pressure ventilator, the patient is placed inside an airtight chamber that is connected to a pump. The pump changes the air pressure within the chamber, creating a vacuum effect that causes the chest and abdomen to expand and contract, which in turn facilitates breathing. As the pressure around the chest decreases, the chest wall expands, allowing the lungs to fill with air. When the pressure increases, the chest wall contracts, pushing air out of the lungs.

Negative pressure ventilators have largely been replaced by positive pressure ventilators, which are more commonly used today. Positive pressure ventilators work by actively pushing air into the lungs, rather than relying on negative pressure to create a vacuum effect. However, negative pressure ventilators may still be used in certain situations where positive pressure ventilation is not appropriate or feasible.

A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a type of clinical study in which participants are randomly assigned to receive either the experimental intervention or the control condition, which may be a standard of care, placebo, or no treatment. The goal of an RCT is to minimize bias and ensure that the results are due to the intervention being tested rather than other factors. This design allows for a comparison between the two groups to determine if there is a significant difference in outcomes. RCTs are often considered the gold standard for evaluating the safety and efficacy of medical interventions, as they provide a high level of evidence for causal relationships between the intervention and health outcomes.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

The epiglottis is a flap-like structure located at the base of the tongue, near the back of the throat (pharynx). It is made of elastic cartilage and covered with mucous membrane. The primary function of the epiglottis is to protect the trachea (windpipe) from food or liquids entering it during swallowing.

During normal swallowing, the epiglottis closes over the opening of the larynx (voice box), redirecting the food or liquid bolus into the esophagus. In this way, the epiglottis prevents aspiration, which is the entry of foreign materials into the trachea and lungs.

Inflammation or infection of the epiglottis can lead to a serious medical condition called epiglottitis, characterized by swelling, redness, and pain in the epiglottis and surrounding tissues. Epiglottitis can cause difficulty breathing, speaking, and swallowing, and requires immediate medical attention.

Weight loss is a reduction in body weight attributed to loss of fluid, fat, muscle, or bone mass. It can be intentional through dieting and exercise or unintentional due to illness or disease. Unintentional weight loss is often a cause for concern and should be evaluated by a healthcare professional to determine the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan. Rapid or significant weight loss can also have serious health consequences, so it's important to approach any weight loss plan in a healthy and sustainable way.

Right Ventricular Function refers to the ability of the right ventricle (RV) of the heart to receive and eject blood during the cardiac cycle. The right ventricle is one of the four chambers of the heart and is responsible for pumping deoxygenated blood from the body to the lungs for re-oxygenation.

Right ventricular function can be assessed by measuring various parameters such as:

1. Right Ventricular Ejection Fraction (RVEF): It is the percentage of blood that is ejected from the right ventricle during each heartbeat. A normal RVEF ranges from 45-75%.
2. Right Ventricular Systolic Function: It refers to the ability of the right ventricle to contract and eject blood during systole (contraction phase). This can be assessed by measuring the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) or tissue Doppler imaging.
3. Right Ventricular Diastolic Function: It refers to the ability of the right ventricle to relax and fill with blood during diastole (relaxation phase). This can be assessed by measuring the right ventricular inflow pattern, tricuspid valve E/A ratio, or deceleration time.
4. Right Ventricular Afterload: It refers to the pressure that the right ventricle must overcome to eject blood into the pulmonary artery. Increased afterload can impair right ventricular function.

Abnormalities in right ventricular function can lead to various cardiovascular conditions such as pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmias.

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

A feasibility study is a preliminary investigation or analysis conducted to determine the viability of a proposed project, program, or product. In the medical field, feasibility studies are often conducted before implementing new treatments, procedures, equipment, or facilities. These studies help to assess the practicality and effectiveness of the proposed intervention, as well as its potential benefits and risks.

Feasibility studies in healthcare typically involve several steps:

1. Problem identification: Clearly define the problem that the proposed project, program, or product aims to address.
2. Objectives setting: Establish specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) objectives for the study.
3. Literature review: Conduct a thorough review of existing research and best practices related to the proposed intervention.
4. Methodology development: Design a methodology for data collection and analysis that will help answer the research questions and achieve the study's objectives.
5. Resource assessment: Evaluate the availability and adequacy of resources, including personnel, time, and finances, required to carry out the proposed intervention.
6. Risk assessment: Identify potential risks and challenges associated with the implementation of the proposed intervention and develop strategies to mitigate them.
7. Cost-benefit analysis: Estimate the costs and benefits of the proposed intervention, including direct and indirect costs, as well as short-term and long-term benefits.
8. Stakeholder engagement: Engage relevant stakeholders, such as patients, healthcare providers, administrators, and policymakers, to gather their input and support for the proposed intervention.
9. Decision-making: Based on the findings of the feasibility study, make an informed decision about whether or not to proceed with the proposed project, program, or product.

Feasibility studies are essential in healthcare as they help ensure that resources are allocated efficiently and effectively, and that interventions are evidence-based, safe, and beneficial for patients.

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"Effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in obstructive sleep apnoea in adults" (PDF). National ... variable/bilevel positive airway pressure) provides two levels of pressure: inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) and a ... Breathing out against the positive pressure resistance (the expiratory positive airway pressure component, or EPAP) may also ... July 2010). "Helmet continuous positive airway pressure vs oxygen therapy to improve oxygenation in community-acquired ...
Jat KR, Dsouza JM, Mathew JL (April 2022). "Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for acute bronchiolitis in children". ... Jat KR, Mathew JL (January 2019). "Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for acute bronchiolitis in children". The ... continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and cool mist or steam inhalation. Maintaining hydration is an important part of ... lacking regarding the use of high-flow nasal cannula compared to standard oxygen therapy or continuous positive airway pressure ...
Response to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment: The response to CPAP treatment partly depends on respiratory ... Ortega-Albas, J. J., Diaz, J. R., Serrano, A. L., & de Entrambasaguas, M. (2006). Continuous positive airway pressure as ... Iriarte, J., Alegre, M., Urrestarazu, E., Viteri, C., Arcocha, J., & Artieda, J. (2006). Continuous positive airway pressure as ... Some evidence indicates that continuous positive airway pressure can be an effective treatment for catathrenia: in a study, the ...
Morley CJ, Lau R, De Paoli A, Davis PG (July 2005). "Nasal continuous positive airway pressure: does bubbling improve gas ... It is one of the methods by which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is delivered to a spontaneously breathing newborn ... "Experiences with implementation of continuous positive airway pressure for neonates and infants in low-resource settings: A ... "Treatment of the idiopathic respiratory-distress syndrome with continuous positive airway pressure". The New England Journal of ...
More serious cases are treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Hypoxia exists when there is a reduced amount ... The ambient pressure at 190 msw is sufficient to provide a partial pressure of about 0.4 bar, which is suitable for saturation ... This generally involves a positive pressure ventilator connected to an endotracheal tube, and allows precise delivery of ... By increasing the concentration of oxygen in the at ambient pressure, the effects of lower barometric pressure are countered ...
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Continuous Positive Airway Pressure as a Treatment for Hypernasality" (PDF). Kuehn, D. P. (May 2002), "Efficacy of continuous ... Kuehn, D.P. (1996). "Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the treatment of hypernasality" (PDF). Proceeding of Fourth ... Kuehn, D. P. (Dec 1991), "New therapy for treating hypernasal speech using continuous positive airway pressure.", Plastic and ... The positive pressure provided by a CPAP machine provides resistance to strengthen velopharyngeal muscles. With nasal mask in ...
Continuous positive airway pressure may be applied using a face mask; this has been shown to improve symptoms more quickly than ... Peter JV, Moran JL, Phillips-Hughes J, Graham P, Bersten AD (April 2006). "Effect of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation ... and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). Even if symptoms of heart failure are not present, medications can be ... The person may, in fact, have too little fluid in their blood vessels, but if the low blood pressure is due to cardiogenic ...
Oxygen is given with a small amount of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and intravenous fluids are administered to ... Ho, Jacqueline J; Subramaniam, Prema; Davis, Peter G (2020-10-15). "Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for respiratory ... "Nasal continuous positive airway pressure and early surfactant therapy for respiratory distress syndrome in newborns of less ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure), very effective approaches to managing preterm neonates with respiratory distress. In 1989 ...
One treatment for obstructive hypopnea is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). CPAP is a treatment in which the patient ... The most common treatment for this form is the use of non-invasive ventilation such as a bilevel positive airway pressure (BPAP ... An air blower forces air through the upper airway. The air pressure is adjusted so that it is just enough to maintain the ... Surgery is generally a last resort in hypopnea treatment, but is a site-specific option for the upper airway. Depending on the ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is introduced by Gregory. 1971: (US) The journal Inhalation Therapy is renamed to ... 1928: Phillip Drinker develops the "iron lung" negative pressure ventilator. 1935: Carl Matthes invented the first noninvasive ...
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure). In 1989 he used this pioneering method to successfully treat the first premature infant ... "Nasal continuous positive airway pressure and early surfactant therapy for respiratory distress syndrome in newborns of less ... "Treatment of the idiopathic respiratory-distress syndrome with continuous positive airway pressure". The New England Journal of ... "Surfactant therapy and nasal continuous positive airway pressure for newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. Danish- ...
Stuck, BA; Leitzbach, S; Maurer, JT (Jun 2012). "Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on apnea-hypopnea index in ... Weaver, EM; Maynard, C; Yueh, B (2004). "Survival of veterans with sleep apnea: continuous positive airway pressure versus ... Sullivan and colleagues introduced continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which replaced tracheostomy as the gold standard ... CPAP is the most effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, in which the pressure from CPAP prevents the airway from ...
Continuous positive airway pressure is commonly used as a treatment for sleep apnea. In cases where the individual has both ... the implementation of a continuous positive airway pressure resulted in complete discontinuation of unwanted behaviors.[ ... and blood pressure being measured at their lowest. Representing approximately 15-20% of an individual's total sleep, brain ... citation needed] Positive lifestyle changes are encouraged for individuals with sexsomnia. Reducing stress and anxiety triggers ...
CPAP is continuous positive airway pressure, a form of positive airway pressure ventilator. CPAP may also refer to: Centrosomal ...
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The additional pressure holds open the relaxed muscles. There are several variants: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ... "Practice parameters for the use of auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure devices for titrating pressures and ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and mandibular advancement devices are often used and found to be equally effective ... For patients who cannot use a continuous positive airway pressure device, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014 granted ...
... was described initially by Stock and Downs in 1987 as a continuous positive airway pressure ... APRV is an applied continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) that at a set timed interval releases the applied pressure. ... Airway Pressure Release Ventilation - Part 3". PulmCCM. Daoud EG, Farag HL, Chatburn RL (2012). "Airway pressure release ... Fundamentally APRV is a time-cycled alternant between two levels of positive airway pressure, with the main time on the high ...
"Use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure as treatment of childhood obstructive sleep apnea". The Journal of Pediatrics ... Normally, the muscles at the level of the throat relax and dilate while asleep in order to open up airway however, patients ... In some cases, it occurs when patients are born with a small airway opening. Patients with obstructive apnea often have ... Obstructive apnea occurs when the airway passages are obstructed and little to no air exchange occurs, resulting in impaired ...
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... the most common treatment is the use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or automatic positive airway pressure ( ... "Randomized controlled trial of variable-pressure versus fixed-pressure continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for ... "The impact of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: evidence ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective treatment for severe obstructive sleep apnea, but oral ...
... concluded that the best response to pressure loss would be a rapid descent. Continuous positive airway pressure would have ... Air France British Airways Braniff International Airways operated Concordes between Dulles International Airport and Dallas ... Until 2003, Air France and British Airways continued to operate the New York services daily. From 1987 to 2003 British Airways ... the charter business was viewed as lucrative by British Airways and Air France. In 1997, British Airways held a promotional ...
"Home Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Infants with Sleep-Disordered Breathing." Journal of Pediatrics: 905-12. ... "Congnitive function in patients with sleep apnea after acute nocturnal nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ... ventricular arrhythmias and nasal bilevel positive pressure ventilation." Sleep 16: S139- S140 Guilleminault, C.; Stoohs R.; ... 106 (9): 1089-1093 Guilleminault, C; Stoohs, R; Kim, Y; Chervin, R; Black, J; Clerk, A. (1995) "Upper Airway sleep-disordered ...
continuous positive airway pressure, and possibly mechanical ventilation, may be necessary for adequate oxygen saturation. As ... and continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation. Pulmonary oedema may develop over several hours. Bronchospasm can be treated ...
... and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NPPV). For extremely ... Subramaniam P, Ho JJ, Davis PG (June 2016). "Prophylactic nasal continuous positive airway pressure for preventing morbidity ... Continuous feeding may have little to no effect on length of body growth or head circumference and the effects of continuous ... A positive test indicates an increased risk of preterm birth, and a negative test has a high predictive value. It has been ...
"Graded exposure therapy for addressing claustrophobic reactions to continuous positive airway pressure: a case series report". ... such as difficulty using continuous positive airway pressure), and hypersomnia-associated difficulties (for example daytime ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask may be used to treat sleep apnea. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) may ... Nausea and vomiting Initially raised blood pressure followed by lowered blood pressure as the condition progresses. Severe ... Above 3000 metres (10,000 feet) - ambient pressure 69.7kPa, about 14.6kPa partial pressure of oxygen - enough hypoxic ... where atmospheric pressure is about 14.7kPa. This is a function of the partial pressure of oxygen in the breathing gas, and is ...
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"Continuous positive airway pressure reduces daytime sleepiness in mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea: a meta-analysis". ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a form of positive airway pressure (PAP) ventilation in which a constant level of ... "Continuous negative extrathoracic pressure or continuous positive airway pressure compared to conventional ventilation for ... Yang, Zhihao; Du, Guodong; Ma, Lei; Lv, Yunhui; Zhao, Yang; Yau, Tung On (February 2021). "Continuous positive airway pressure ... Werman, Howard A.; Karren, K; Mistovich, Joseph (2014). "Continuous Positive Airway Pressure(CPAP)". In Werman A. Howard; ...
Cite this: Long-Term Effects of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Sleep Apnea ... Long-Term Effects of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Sleep Apnea Syndrome. ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective therapy and is the most widely used modality in patients with ... but the impact of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is unclear.. Methods: We performed a long-term ...
Use this page to view details for the Proposed Decision Memo for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy for ... continuous positive pressure airway pressure in patients with positional obstructive airway apnea syndrome. Chest 1999;115:771- ... Efficacy of automatic continuous positive pressure airway pressure therapy that uses an estimated required pressure in the ... Arbitrary pressure continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Am. Jrnl. Respir Crit. Care Med ...
... maintaining a continuous pressure that functions as a stent to keep the airway open throughout the night. ... A CPAP machine works by administering a steady stream of airflow into the clients airway, ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a type of non-invasive ventilation commonly used to treat moderate to severe ... maintaining a continuous pressure that functions as a stent to keep the airway open throughout the night. ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea. ... What is continuous positive airway pressure?. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a treatment for obstructive sleep ... Key points about continuous positive airway pressure. *continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a treatment for ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea. ...
... extubation of very low birth weight infants was facilitated by the use of nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure ( ... Randomized, controlled trial of nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure in the extubation of very low birth weight ... extubation of very low birth weight infants was facilitated by the use of nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure ( ...
Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep ... Objective: To systematically analyze the studies that have examined the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on ... blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). ...
Decreased continuous positive airway pressure cpap requirement after prolonged therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy and other positive-pressure devices La Medicina del Lavoro 108(4): 283-287. ... Chin, K. 2006: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is also the first choice therapy for obstructive sleep apnea patients ... Ren, L.; Wang, K.; Shen, H.; Xu, Y.; Wang, J.; Chen, R. 2019: Effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on ...
Growth of Airways and Lung Tissues in Premature and Healthy Infants Duration of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Via Binasal Prong vs Nasal Mask: a Randomised Controlled Trial. May 27, 2020. checkorphan ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Via Binasal Prong vs Nasal Mask: a Randomised Controlled Trial Randomized Trial of ... Randomized Trial of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or Synchronized Nasal Ventilation in Premature Infants. The ...
Continuous positive airway pressure. The goal of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is to prevent alveolar collapse at ... Winking TC, Wüllenweber J, Kipp F, Rieger-Fackeldey E. Microbiological monitoring of continuous positive airway pressure and ... The positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can initially be set at 4 cm H2O; however, this can vary according to the infant ... Peak pressures or volumes, depending on whether a pressure or hybrid mode is chosen, are adjusted to achieve good chest ...
Description It provides low income countries with a simple, low cost method of reducing the 20-38% of neonatal deaths due to respiratory failure.. ...
... treatment uses a machine to pump air under pressure into the airway of the lungs. This helps keep the windpipe open during ... treatment uses a machine to pump air under pressure into the airway of the lungs. This helps keep the windpipe open during ... Continuous positive airway pressure; CPAP; Bilevel positive airway pressure; BiPAP; Autotitrating positive airway pressure; ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) provides a gentle and steady pressure of air in your airway to keep it open. ...
This study aims to learn about the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on people with autonomic failure and ... is to evaluate whether biomarkers of lung injury and remodeling are responsive to effective continuous positive airway pressure ... with positive airway pressure (PAP) in children with Downs Syndrome (DS). ... to apply a low air pressure in the airways. ... Assessment of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in ...
... : Global Industry Insights, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Market 2030 By Type, Distribution Channel, End-user and Region - Partner & Customer ... Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Market Research Report 2023 renders deep perception of the key regional ... The report cloaks the market analysis and projection of "Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Market" on a regional as ...
Continuous Positive Airways Pressure (CPAP) Web Admin2023-07-20T00:41:47+00:00. CONTINUOUS POSITIVE AIRWAYS PRESSURE (CPAP). ... What is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure?. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is a common and very effective ... CPAP treats sleep apnoea by providing a gentle flow of positive air pressure through a mask which splints the airways open ... When CPAP is applied, air is pumped through a mask into your upper airway acting as a splint to hold your airway open so that ...
The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (BP-NCPAP) ... Table 1 Guidelines for use of biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (BP-NCPAP) and nasal continuous positive ... Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for preterm ... trial comparing synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure ...
The Efficacy of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Is Proven Share ... The Efficacy of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Is Proven ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the current treatment for patients with symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA ... Continuous positive airway pressure does not reduce blood pressure in nonsleepy hypertensive OSA patients. Eur Respir J 2006;27 ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) acts as a pneumatic splint to the upper airway during sleep and corrects the ... Effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment on blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. ...
As adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is crucial in the successful management of obstructive sleep ... N2 - As adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is crucial in the successful management of obstructive ... AB - As adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is crucial in the successful management of obstructive ... Dive into the research topics of Factors that predict adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment in ...
PAP therapy may be provided using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP or BPAP ... or auto-titrating positive airway pressure (APAP).. *CPAP: A CPAP machine pumps air at a consistent and predetermined pressure ... The primary treatment for OSA is positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy.. PAP therapy involves the use of pressurized air, ... For most people, this narrowing of the airway Trusted Source UpToDate More than 2 million healthcare providers around the world ...
Abbreviations: BiPAP = bilevel positive airway pressure; CPAP = continuous positive airway pressure; ICU = intensive care unit ... and bilevel positive airway pressure or continuous positive airway pressure (BiPAP/CPAP) (6% versus 16%; p = 0.05). Among seven ... One child with only influenza also received a positive adenovirus test result.. †† Children who have chronic pulmonary ( ... Medians and IQRs are presented for continuous variables, with between-group comparisons analyzed using a Wilcoxon rank sum test ...
Simple point of care continuous positive airway pressure delivery device (Jain-CPAP) ... Simple point of care continuous positive airway pressure delivery device (Jain-CPAP) ... inexpensive neonatal non-invasive bubble continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. ... This assembly was attached to the anatomic airway with nasal prongs. Pressure and FiO2 were measured from within the lung model ...
Pressure modification for improving usage of continuous positive airway pressure machines in adults with obstructive sleep ... How to treat patients that do not tolerate continuous positive airway pressure. O.M. Vanderveken, A. Hoekema ... Continuous positive airways pressure for obstructive sleep apnoea in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2006; 1: CD001106- ... Determinants of continuous positive airway pressure compliance in a group of Greek patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Eur J ...
The mask is attached to a small unit that provides continuous air pressure to the nasal passage. The forced air delivered by ... Obstructive sleep apnea among other breathing disorders are caused by episodes of airway collapse that block the breathing. In ... CPAP prevents the episodes of airway collapse by keeping the windpipe open, eliminating snoring and providing a better, more ...
... and after 14 days of treatment with either continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, ▪) or bilevel positive airway pressure ... Continuous positive airway pressure and bilevel ventilation with low pressures were equally effective in improving sleep ... Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on intrathoracic and left ventricular transmural pressure in patients with ... Circulation time before treatment and during continuous positive pressure ventilation (CPAP) or bilevel positive airway ...
Prophylactic or very early initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for preterm infants answers are found in ... "Prophylactic or Very Early Initiation of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) for Preterm Infants." Cochrane Abstracts, ... Prophylactic or very early initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for preterm infants. In Cochrane Abstracts ... Prophylactic or very early initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for preterm infants. Cochrane Abstracts. ...
CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure). The delivery of pressure and air flow to your lungs. CPAP can be used with a small ... BiPAP® (Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure) A breathing machine that provides assistance in breathing through a tight-fitting ... A medicine that helps open the airways, making breathing easier. Trachea. The largest airway in the respiratory system, ... Smaller airways of the lungs that lead to the alveoli. Bronchodilators. This is a type of medication that works to relax the ...
Long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use in obstructive sleep apnea]. / Uso de CPAP nasal en el largo plazo en ...
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) and Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure (BiPAP) are two commonly used sleep apnea ... CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) and BiPAP (Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure) machines are the two main types of ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) and Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure (BiPAP) are two commonly used sleep apnea ... Deep Dive into Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP). CPAP is one of the most widely used sleep apnea machines. It ...
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a form of positive airway pressure (PAP) ventilation in which a constant level of pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is continuously applied to the upper respiratory tract of a person. (wikipedia.org)
  • CPAP is the most effective treatment for moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, in which the mild pressure from the CPAP prevents the airway from collapsing or becoming blocked. (wikipedia.org)
  • CPAP cannot be used in the following situations or conditions: A person is not breathing on their own A person is uncooperative or anxious A person cannot protect their own airway (i.e., has altered consciousness for reasons other than sleep, such as extreme illness, intoxication, coma, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • CPAP therapy uses machines specifically designed to deliver a flow of air at a constant pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, while PEEP refers to devices that impose positive pressure only at the end of the exhalation, CPAP devices apply continuous positive airway pressure throughout the breathing cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, the ventilator does not cycle during CPAP, no additional pressure greater than the level of CPAP is provided, and patients must initiate all of their breaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, principally from cardiovascular disease, but the impact of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is unclear. (medscape.com)
  • [ 3 ] Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective therapy and is the most widely used modality in patients with moderate-to-severe disease. (medscape.com)
  • A CPAP machine works by administering a steady stream of airflow into the client's airway, maintaining a continuous pressure that functions as a stent to keep the airway open throughout the night. (ausmed.com.au)
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a type of non-invasive ventilation commonly used to treat moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). (ausmed.com.au)
  • We conducted a prospective, randomized controlled trial to determine whether extubation of very low birth weight infants was facilitated by the use of nasopharyngeal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). (nih.gov)
  • To systematically analyze the studies that have examined the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). (nih.gov)
  • The forced air delivered by CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) prevents episodes of airway collapse that block the breathing in people with obstructive sleep apnea and other breathing problems. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) provides a gentle and steady pressure of air in your airway to keep it open. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This study aims to learn about the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on people with autonomic failure and high blood pressure when lying down (supine hypertension) to determine if it can be used to treat their high blood pressure during the night. (nih.gov)
  • CPAP (a widely used treatment for sleep apnea) involves using a machine that blows air into a tube connected to a mask covering the nose, or nose and mouth, to apply a low air pressure in the airways. (nih.gov)
  • The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether biomarkers of lung injury and remodeling are responsive to effective continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in adults with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). (nih.gov)
  • Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Market Research Report 2023 renders deep perception of the key regional market status of the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Market Industry on a global level that primarily aims the core regions which comprises of continents like Europe, North America, and Asia and the key countries such as United States, Germany, China and Japan. (marketdigits.com)
  • The report on "Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Market" is a professional report which provides thorough knowledge along with complete information pertaining to the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Market industry propos classifications, definitions, applications, industry chain summary, industry policies in addition to plans, product specifications, manufacturing processes, cost structures, etc. (marketdigits.com)
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  • The report also enlightens the productions, sales, supply, market condition, demand, growth, and forecast of the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Market industry in the global markets. (marketdigits.com)
  • So as to fabricate this report, complete key details, strategies and variables are examined so that entire useful information is amalgamated together for the understanding and studying the key facts pertaining the global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Market Industry. (marketdigits.com)
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  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is a common and very effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea. (sleepservices.com.au)
  • CPAP treats sleep apnoea by providing a gentle flow of positive air pressure through a mask which splints the airways open during sleep. (sleepservices.com.au)
  • When CPAP is applied, air is pumped through a mask into your upper airway acting as a splint to hold your airway open so that you can breathe normally. (sleepservices.com.au)
  • If there is any snoring while on nasal CPAP, there is a problem with the pressure. (sleepservices.com.au)
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the current treatment for patients with symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). (atsjournals.org)
  • This multicenter controlled trial assesses the effects of 1 year of CPAP treatment on blood pressure (BP) in nonsymptomatic, hypertensive patients with OSA. (atsjournals.org)
  • As adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is crucial in the successful management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), identification of the many factors that affect adherence is important. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Objective To describe the effective pressure and FiO 2 delivery to a realistic spontaneously breathing lung model using a novel, simple, inexpensive neonatal non-invasive bubble continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. (bmj.com)
  • To outline recommendations concerning the proper management of obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) patients that cannot be treated adequately with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) due to intolerance, poor compliance or CPAP refusal. (ersjournals.com)
  • Summary The effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is potentially high for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS), but accounting for the relatively low acceptance and compliance, and correcting for sleep time, its actual effect and use, the adjusted CPAP effectiveness remains relatively low. (ersjournals.com)
  • The standard treatment for moderate-to-severe OSAHS is application of nasal continous positive airway pressure (CPAP) [ 9 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • The forced air delivered by CPAP prevents the episodes of airway collapse by keeping the windpipe open, eliminating snoring and providing a better, more restful night's sleep. (sleepservicesmd.com)
  • Long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use in obstructive sleep apnea]. (bvsalud.org)
  • Uso de CPAP nasal en el largo plazo en síndrome de apnea-hipopnea del sueño. (bvsalud.org)
  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) and Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure (BiPAP) are two commonly used sleep apnea machines. (carlawillsbrandon.com)
  • UK guidelines recommend the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), including in patients for whom IMV is not appropriate. (sath.nhs.uk)
  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) remains the reference treatment for moderate to severe forms of the Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS). (biomedcentral.com)
  • For example in a patient with AHT the most significant reduction in blood pressure was observed in patients who used CPAP for more than 5.6 h per night [ 10 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the standard treatment for moderate to severe OSAS.8 Continuous positive pressure acts as a pneumatic splint that prevents the upper airway to collapse. (docksci.com)
  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is the standard therapy for OSA but despite its efficacy has poor adherence. (cdc.gov)
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the simplest form of noninvasive ventilation and it can be applied through flow generator, mechanical ventilators for noninvasive ventilation or specific ventilators. (usp.br)
  • This system provides continuous positive pressure by injecting high gas flows (air/oxygen) through a cylinder connected to angulated lateral channels This study aims at assessing the laboratorial performance efficiency of the Boussignac CPAP System fed by an oxygen flow meter, using a mechanical lung model. (usp.br)
  • Patients with UARS can be treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-specifically, nasal CPAP (n-CPAP). (medscape.com)
  • Long-term treatment with n-CPAP reduces both mortality and the acute blood pressure elevation that occurs with SDB. (medscape.com)
  • Once OSA is diagnosed, a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) study is often performed to determine the optimal positive airway pressure required to reduce the AHI and improve oxygenation. (cdc.gov)
  • continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), oral appliance therapy (OAT), surgery, weight loss, behavioral management, and adjunctive therapies such as orofacial myofunctional therapy (OMT). (aadsm.org)
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) throughout the ventilation cycle improves alveolar oxygen exchange. (aao.org)
  • Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent disorder with significant morbidity and impact on quality of life that can be improved by treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). (cdc.gov)
  • The present study contributes to understanding the relationship of nasal /upper airway mechanisms to the development of sleep apnea in this population and explores the possibility of improving comfort and adherence to CPAP treatment by modifying how CPAP is delivered. (cdc.gov)
  • Will CPAP adherence be affected by high nasal resistance in those with OSA and will reducing expiratory pressure using CPAP flex improve adherence? (cdc.gov)
  • It has long been known that men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have daytime sleepiness, impaired quality of life, and impaired health status and that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatments can improve these symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • The present trial is the first to study the effect of continuous nocturnal CPAP in females with moderate to severe OSA. (medscape.com)
  • There was a significant positive correlation between hours of CPAP and improvement in each of the QSQ domains except the hypersomnolence domain, which nevertheless showed a trend in the direction of improvement. (medscape.com)
  • The application of positive pressure may be intended to prevent upper airway collapse, as occurs in obstructive sleep apnea, or to reduce the work of breathing in conditions such as acute decompensated heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Upper airway resistance syndrome is another form of sleep-disordered breathing with symptoms that are similar to obstructive sleep apnea, but not severe enough to be considered OSA. (wikipedia.org)
  • A second purpose is to learn whether collapse at several levels of the upper airway is associated with obstructive sleep apnea that persists after adenotonsillectomy, the surgery that removes the tonsils and adenoids. (nih.gov)
  • This study is investigating if the Self-Supporting Nasopharyngeal Airway (ssNPA) device can be used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in children with Hypotonic Upper Airway Obstruction (HUAO). (nih.gov)
  • The goal of this study is to identify the perceptions, beliefs, and family-relevant outcomes regarding the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) with positive airway pressure (PAP) in children with Down's Syndrome (DS). (nih.gov)
  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) occurs when the upper airway becomes blocked, leading to brief pauses in breathing during sleep. (sleepfoundation.org)
  • Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep disorder characterized by repeated obstruction to the airway during sleep. (sleepfoundation.org)
  • Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) is the most common type of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and is characterised by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction that occur during sleep, usually associated with a reduction in blood oxygen saturation and sleep fragmentation [ 1 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • Obstructive sleep apnea among other breathing disorders are caused by episodes of airway collapse that block the breathing. (sleepservicesmd.com)
  • Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the muscles in the back of the throat fail to keep the airway open, causing it to collapse. (carlawillsbrandon.com)
  • Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on quality of life in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea: data from a randomized controlled trial. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Nasal symptoms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and their impact on therapeutic compliance with continuous positive airway pressure. (docksci.com)
  • Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction accompanied by arousal and/or oxygen desaturation.1 The main features of OSAS include loud snoring, excessive sleepiness and non-restorative sleep. (docksci.com)
  • Go to Obstructive Sleep Apnea , Childhood Sleep Apnea , Central Sleep Apnea Syndromes , Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Home Sleep Monitoring , Surgical Approach to Snoring and Sleep Apnea , Oral Appliances in Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea , and Upper Airway Evaluation in Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea for more information on these topics. (medscape.com)
  • Current treatment options for patients with obstructive sleep apnea include continuous positive airway pressure, oral appliance therapy, behavioral management, and adjunctive therapies that include orofacial myofunctional therapy (OMT). (aadsm.org)
  • Although there are many different types of SBDs, upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be of particular interest to dentists. (aadsm.org)
  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) consists of multiple episodes of partial or complete closure of the upper airway that occur during sleep and lead to breathing cessation (defined as a period of. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Each has similar upper airway obstructive pathophysiology but differs in degree and clinical consequences of the airway obstruction. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Identification of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in this population that is at high risk for OSA due to traditional risk factors and in addition due to upper airway inflammation. (cdc.gov)
  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Improves Quality of Life in Women With Obstructive Sleep Apnea. (medscape.com)
  • Obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome is the complete obstruction of the airways by the collapse of the oropharynx, soft palate and dorsal tongue for approximately 10 seconds, with a frequency of at least five to ten times per hour during sleep. (bvsalud.org)
  • OSA causes partial or complete obstruction of the airway during sleep, causing the client to stop breathing, wake up and then go back to sleep. (ausmed.com.au)
  • Secondly, routine application of drug-induced sleep endoscopy to assess the site(s) of flutter and upper airway obstruction during drug-induced sleep can increase the success rate of both upper airway surgery and oral appliance therapy. (ersjournals.com)
  • Upper-airway obstruction occurring during sleep-that is, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB)-was first demonstrated in the 1960s. (medscape.com)
  • [ 4 ] disruptive snoring, repeated episodes of upper-airway obstruction during sleep, and nocturnal hypoxemia. (medscape.com)
  • Any factors that decrease upper-airway size or patency during sleep can lead to intermittent obstruction during inspiration, despite inspiratory effort. (medscape.com)
  • Factors affecting upper-airway size or patency include numerous anatomic variants and abnormalities (eg, nasal obstruction, retrognathia, macroglossia ), obesity, alcohol or sedative intake, and body position during sleep. (medscape.com)
  • This usually is caused by a blockage (obstruction) or narrowing in the nose, mouth, or throat (airway). (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Similarly, avoiding precipitants of airway obstruction is important in ameliorating asthmatic conditions. (aao.org)
  • They deliver pressurized air through a mask to keep the airway open during sleep. (carlawillsbrandon.com)
  • Furthermore, if pharyngeal dilators cannot keep the airway open in response to the negative intraluminal pressure induced by inspiration, the upper airway narrows, increasing local airflow velocity (for a given inspiratory volume). (msdmanuals.com)
  • This research study is designed to learn, first, whether two anesthetics have different effects on collapse seen within the upper airway during sleep endoscopy. (nih.gov)
  • To discuss the different surgical options for the treatment of OSAHS and to provide information on the important issue of a proper patient selection for upper airway surgery, as most OSAHS surgical outcomes are associated with the pre-operative assessment of the level(s) of upper airway collapse. (ersjournals.com)
  • Excess weight can put pressure on the airway, making it more likely to collapse during sleep. (carlawillsbrandon.com)
  • As the alveoli collapse, damaged cells collect in the airways. (uhhospitals.org)
  • This is especially true because the components aiding in appropriate tongue positioning may help manage one of the important anatomic points of collapse in the upper airway: the tongue. (aadsm.org)
  • The therapy is an alternative to positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cite this: Long-Term Effects of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Sleep Apnea Syndrome - Medscape - Jun 01, 2005. (medscape.com)
  • Reduction of excess expiratory positive pressure by the modality known as Cflex(TM) during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure therapy (CPAPFlex) has been suggested to improve comfort without compromising efficacy. (cdc.gov)
  • Noninvasive pressure support ventilation is recommended for patients with respiratory failure who are expected to quickly respond to medical therapy. (aao.org)
  • Noninvasive pressure support ventilation can be used to deliver increased airway pressure. (aao.org)
  • In select circumstances, it may be wise to consider noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (PPV), when this is permissible, or a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC). (medscape.com)
  • This prevents the upper airway from collapsing and thus prevents apnoeic events and snoring. (sleepservices.com.au)
  • If it goes untreated, it can cause loud snoring , daytime tiredness, or more serious problems like heart trouble or high blood pressure . (webmd.com)
  • Upper-airway resistance syndrome (UARS) is characterized by snoring with increased resistance in the upper airway, resulting in arousals during sleep. (medscape.com)
  • The narrower the airway is, the more the tissue vibrates, and the louder the snoring is. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • The increased flow velocity promotes flutter directly and decreases intraluminal pressure, further enhancing airway closure and thus promoting flutter and snoring. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Inclusion criteria consisted of an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) greater than 19 hour −1 , an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score less than 11, and one of the following: under antihypertensive treatment or systolic blood pressure greater than 140 or diastolic blood pressure greater than 90 mm Hg. (atsjournals.org)
  • Sleep apnea machines, also known as positive airway pressure (PAP) machines, are commonly used to treat sleep apnea. (carlawillsbrandon.com)
  • They'll review your family's history for sleep apnea or other sleep disorders, whether you have a risk factor for the condition, and if you have any complications of undiagnosed sleep apnea (like atrial fibrillation, hard-to-control high blood pressure , or type 2 diabetes ). (webmd.com)
  • Your doctor will perform a physical exam on you to look for signs of other conditions that can heighten your risk for sleep apnea (like obesity , narrowing of the upper airways, large tonsils , or large neck circumference). (webmd.com)
  • Yu J, Zhou Z, McEvoy RD, Anderson CS, Rodgers A, Perkovic V, Neal B. Association of positive airway pressure with cardiovascular events and deaths in adults with sleep apnea: a systematic review and meta-analysis. (aao.org)
  • A key point in managing the unanticipated difficult airway is the importance of maximizing the safe apnea oxygenation time by providing optimal preoxygenation. (medscape.com)
  • A difficult airway is one for which a preintubation examination identifies attributes that are likely to make laryngoscopy, intubation, bag-mask ventilation (BMV), the use of a supraglottic device, or surgical airway management more difficult than would be the case for a normal airway. (medscape.com)
  • the positive pressure acts as a pneumatic splint to maintain airway patency. (aao.org)
  • This assembly was attached to the anatomic airway with nasal prongs. (bmj.com)
  • MARTINEZ, F. E. Influence of body position on the displacement of nasal prongs in preterm newborns receiving continuous positive airway pressure. (bvsalud.org)
  • The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (BP-NCPAP) vs. NCPAP in facilitating sustained extubation in infants ≤ 1,250 grams. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It has been hypothesized that earlier extubation and use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) may decrease lung inflammation and reduce the incidence of BPD [ 7 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • During these episodes, your diaphragm and chest muscles work harder than normal to open your airways. (webmd.com)
  • Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP or BIPAP) has a higher pressure when you breathe in and lower pressure when you breathe out. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Results There was a linear increase in the mean pressure in the 10 recorded breaths as oxygen flows were increased. (bmj.com)
  • With a recessed flow meter, metal cannula connector, strong plastic casing, proven sieve bed and Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) technology, and fewer moving parts than other concentrators, EverFlo oxygen concentrator is designed to deliver consistent, trouble-free operation. (cpapmalaysia.com)
  • This is a breathing machine that pushes a continuous flow of air or oxygen to the airways. (uhhospitals.org)
  • OSA is characterized by repetitive partial or complete obstructions in the upper airway, usually along the pharyngeal segment, while maintaining the thoracic effort of breathing and with associated oxygen desaturations and/or neurologic arousals. (aadsm.org)
  • Cigarette smoke lowers the oxygen in the blood, which raises blood pressure and heart rate. (mayoclinic.org)
  • In patients with severe pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale, use of supplemental oxygen to maintain an arterial oxygen pressure above 60 mm Hg confers a modest reduction in pulmonary hypertension and improved survival rates. (aao.org)
  • A realistic 3D anatomic airway model of a 28-week preterm neonate was affixed to the ASL5000 Test Lung to simulate spontaneous breathing with lung mechanics that are specific to a preterm neonate. (bmj.com)
  • It occurs when the upper airway becomes partially or fully blocked during sleep, leading to pauses in breathing. (carlawillsbrandon.com)
  • A failed airway occurs when a provider has embarked on a certain course of airway management (eg, rapid sequence intubation/induction [RSI]) and has determined that intubation by that method will not succeed and that immediate initiation of a rescue sequence must be implemented. (medscape.com)
  • Contrary to previous beliefs, standard doses of common hypnotics (temazepam, trazodone, zopiclone and zolpidem) do not systematically reduce pharyngeal muscle contractility or increase upper airway collapsibility [ 11 , 18 , 19 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • Only 59% of treated patients reported good adherence to treatment with positive airway pressure, and response to treatment correlated with OSA severity. (cdc.gov)
  • Positive airway pressure treatment was initiated in 81% of veterans with OSA, but only 59% reported good adherence to this treatment method. (cdc.gov)
  • This positive pressure can be applied by a Correspondence to: J. Verbraecken, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Multidisciplinary Sleep Disorders Centre, University Hospital Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium. (docksci.com)
  • It happens when your airways repeatedly become completely or partially blocked during sleep , usually because the soft tissue in the back of your throat collapses. (webmd.com)
  • It results from the temporary relaxation of soft tissues in the throat, closing a person's airway while they snore. (straight.com)
  • Waking up too easily during airway narrowing (low respiratory arousal threshold) may be a key contributor to OSA pathogenesis in up to 50% or more of OSA patients [ 12 - 17 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • Airway difficulties may be encountered in numerous scenarios, including head and neck trauma, traumatic airway injury, morbid obesity with or without respiratory distress, thermal injury, upper-airway pathology (eg, Ludwig angina), and term pregnancy (to name only a few examples). (medscape.com)
  • Lower Airway Protection in the Preterm Infant on Nasal Respiratory Support. (usherbrooke.ca)
  • After a person with OSA falls asleep, their airway intermittently narrows or collapses Trusted Source UpToDate More than 2 million healthcare providers around the world choose UpToDate to help make appropriate care decisions and drive better health outcomes. (sleepfoundation.org)
  • The most common treatment for OSA, positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment, is frequently initiated to reduce sleep-related symptoms. (cdc.gov)
  • CRS was defined by =3 nasal/upper airway symptoms over the prior 8 weeks. (cdc.gov)
  • Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment uses a machine to pump air under pressure into the airway of the lungs. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Two methods of pre-treatment airway evaluation will be discussed. (ersjournals.com)
  • The indications for sleep apnoea surgery are controversial, and the role of upper airway surgery in obese OSAHS patients is not well established [ 15 - 17 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • If this area collapses, the airway becomes narrow or blocked. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Millions of tiny sacs at the very ends of the smallest airways/tubes in the lungs. (copdfoundation.org)
  • The larger airways of the lungs. (copdfoundation.org)
  • Smaller airways of the lungs that lead to the alveoli. (copdfoundation.org)
  • A condition in which the bronchial tubes (airways) of the lungs become damaged, inflamed, and swollen. (copdfoundation.org)
  • The delivery of pressure and air flow to your lungs. (copdfoundation.org)
  • You snore when the flow of air from your mouth or nose to your lungs makes the tissues of the airway vibrate. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • The machine pumps air under pressure through the hose and mask and into your airway while you sleep. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The mask is attached to a small unit that provides continuous air pressure to the nasal passage. (sleepservicesmd.com)
  • [ 8 ] Over time, a trend develops toward baseline blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with SDB. (medscape.com)
  • Pressure and FiO 2 were measured from within the lung model at different flow settings and recorded for 10 breaths. (bmj.com)
  • The risk of worsening airway injuries (eg, turning a partial tear of the larynx into a total one) through injudicious airway instrumentation must be avoided. (medscape.com)
  • The baby has to work harder and harder to breathe trying to reinflate the collapsed airways. (uhhospitals.org)
  • These include high blood pressure, high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes. (mayoclinic.org)
  • A healthy diet can help protect the heart, improve blood pressure and cholesterol, and lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. (mayoclinic.org)
  • First, newer technologies using imaging techniques coupled with computational fluid dynamics methods allow investigation of the flow characteristics and aerodynamic forces within the upper airway of the OSAHS patient. (ersjournals.com)