Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)Sleep Apnea, Obstructive: A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.HLA-B37 Antigen: A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*37 allele family.Masks: Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn: A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.Ventilator Weaning: Techniques for effecting the transition of the respiratory-failure patient from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous ventilation, while meeting the criteria that tidal volume be above a given threshold (greater than 5 ml/kg), respiratory frequency be below a given count (less than 30 breaths/min), and oxygen partial pressure be above a given threshold (PaO2 greater than 50mm Hg). Weaning studies focus on finding methods to monitor and predict the outcome of mechanical ventilator weaning as well as finding ventilatory support techniques which will facilitate successful weaning. Present methods include intermittent mandatory ventilation, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and mandatory minute volume ventilation.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Sleep Apnea, Central: A condition associated with multiple episodes of sleep apnea which are distinguished from obstructive sleep apnea (SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE) by the complete cessation of efforts to breathe. This disorder is associated with dysfunction of central nervous system centers that regulate respiration.DNA, C-Form: An isoform of DNA that occurs under experimental conditions. It is a right-handed helix that is less compact than the B-form of DNA.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Work of Breathing: RESPIRATORY MUSCLE contraction during INHALATION. The work is accomplished in three phases: LUNG COMPLIANCE work, that required to expand the LUNGS against its elastic forces; tissue resistance work, that required to overcome the viscosity of the lung and chest wall structures; and AIRWAY RESISTANCE work, that required to overcome airway resistance during the movement of air into the lungs. Work of breathing does not refer to expiration, which is entirely a passive process caused by elastic recoil of the lung and chest cage. (Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 8th ed, p406)Sleep Stages: Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Oxygen Inhalation Therapy: Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation: Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase when the patient has an artificial airway in place and is connected to a ventilator.Mandibular Advancement: Moving a retruded mandible forward to a normal position. It is commonly performed for malocclusion and retrognathia. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cheyne-Stokes Respiration: An abnormal pattern of breathing characterized by alternating periods of apnea and deep, rapid breathing. The cycle begins with slow, shallow breaths that gradually increase in depth and rate and is then followed by a period of apnea. The period of apnea can last 5 to 30 seconds, then the cycle repeats every 45 seconds to 3 minutes.Air Pressure: The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Nasal Cavity: The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Airway Extubation: Removal of an endotracheal tube from the patient.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Ventilators, Mechanical: Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Aerophagy: Spasmodic swallowing of air.Pulmonary Ventilation: The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.Orthodontic Appliances, Removable: Dental devices such as RETAINERS, ORTHODONTIC used to improve gaps in teeth and structure of the jaws. These devices can be removed and reinserted at will.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Snoring: Rough, noisy breathing during sleep, due to vibration of the uvula and soft palate.Oceania: The islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia. (Random House Dictionary, 2d ed)Nasal Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Pharynx: A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Helium: Helium. A noble gas with the atomic symbol He, atomic number 2, and atomic weight 4.003. It is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is not combustible and does not support combustion. It was first detected in the sun and is now obtained from natural gas. Medically it is used as a diluent for other gases, being especially useful with oxygen in the treatment of certain cases of respiratory obstruction, and as a vehicle for general anesthetics. (Dorland, 27th ed)Intermittent Positive-Pressure Breathing: Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase of spontaneous respiration.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A chronic lung disease developed after OXYGEN INHALATION THERAPY or mechanical ventilation (VENTILATION, MECHANICAL) usually occurring in certain premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE) or newborn infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME, NEWBORN). Histologically, it is characterized by the unusual abnormalities of the bronchioles, such as METAPLASIA, decrease in alveolar number, and formation of CYSTS.Disorders of Excessive Somnolence: Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Wakefulness-Promoting Agents: A specific category of drugs that prevent sleepiness by specifically targeting sleep-mechanisms in the brain. They are used to treat DISORDERS OF EXCESSIVE SOMNOLENCE such as NARCOLEPSY. Note that this drug category does not include broadly-acting central nervous system stimulants such as AMPHETAMINES.Partial Pressure: The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Delivery Rooms: Hospital units equipped for childbirth.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Pharyngeal Muscles: The muscles of the PHARYNX are voluntary muscles arranged in two layers. The external circular layer consists of three constrictors (superior, middle, and inferior). The internal longitudinal layer consists of the palatopharyngeus, the salpingopharyngeus, and the stylopharyngeus. During swallowing, the outer layer constricts the pharyngeal wall and the inner layer elevates pharynx and LARYNX.Pulmonary Atelectasis: Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Flail Chest: A complication of multiple rib fractures, rib and sternum fractures, or thoracic surgery. A portion of the chest wall becomes isolated from the thoracic cage and exhibits paradoxical respiration.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Uvula: A fleshy extension at the back of the soft palate that hangs above the opening of the throat.Nose Deformities, Acquired: Abnormalities of the nose acquired after birth from injury or disease.Nurseries, Hospital: Hospital facilities which provide care for newborn infants.Intubation: Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.Intensive Care, Neonatal: Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.Intensive Care Units, Neonatal: Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.Night Care: Institutional night care of patients.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Pulmonary Surfactants: Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bronchiolitis, Viral: An acute inflammatory disease of the lower RESPIRATORY TRACT, caused by paramyxoviruses, occurring primarily in infants and young children; the viruses most commonly implicated are PARAINFLUENZA VIRUS TYPE 3; RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS, HUMAN; and METAPNEUMOVIRUS.Blood Gas Monitoring, Transcutaneous: The noninvasive measurement or determination of the partial pressure (tension) of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide locally in the capillaries of a tissue by the application to the skin of a special set of electrodes. These electrodes contain photoelectric sensors capable of picking up the specific wavelengths of radiation emitted by oxygenated versus reduced hemoglobin.Wakefulness: A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.Respiratory Therapy: Care of patients with deficiencies and abnormalities associated with the cardiopulmonary system. It includes the therapeutic use of medical gases and their administrative apparatus, environmental control systems, humidification, aerosols, ventilatory support, bronchopulmonary drainage and exercise, respiratory rehabilitation, assistance with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and maintenance of natural, artificial, and mechanical airways.Infant, Premature, DiseasesLung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Hypercapnia: A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Infant, Very Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.Heating: The application of heat to raise the temperature of the environment, ambient or local, or the systems for accomplishing this effect. It is distinguished from HEAT, the physical property and principle of physics.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Oximetry: The determination of oxygen-hemoglobin saturation of blood either by withdrawing a sample and passing it through a classical photoelectric oximeter or by electrodes attached to some translucent part of the body like finger, earlobe, or skin fold. It includes non-invasive oxygen monitoring by pulse oximetry.High-Frequency Ventilation: Ventilatory support system using frequencies from 60-900 cycles/min or more. Three types of systems have been distinguished on the basis of rates, volumes, and the system used. They are high frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV); HIGH-FREQUENCY JET VENTILATION; (HFJV); and high-frequency oscillation (HFO).Respiratory Muscles: These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Nose Diseases: Disorders of the nose, general or unspecified.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Inhalation: The act of BREATHING in.Nasal Septum: The partition separating the two NASAL CAVITIES in the midplane. It is formed by the SEPTAL NASAL CARTILAGE, parts of skull bones (ETHMOID BONE; VOMER), and membranous parts.Tracheostomy: Surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck, or the opening so created.Positive-Pressure Respiration, Intrinsic: Non-therapeutic positive end-expiratory pressure occurring frequently in patients with severe airway obstruction. It can appear with or without the administration of external positive end-expiratory pressure (POSITIVE-PRESSURE RESPIRATION). It presents an important load on the inspiratory muscles which are operating at a mechanical disadvantage due to hyperinflation. Auto-PEEP may cause profound hypotension that should be treated by intravascular volume expansion, increasing the time for expiration, and/or changing from assist mode to intermittent mandatory ventilation mode. (From Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1127)Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory: Method in which repeated blood pressure readings are made while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It allows quantitative analysis of the high blood pressure load over time, can help distinguish between types of HYPERTENSION, and can assess the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy.Transportation of Patients: Conveying ill or injured individuals from one place to another.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Lung Diseases, Obstructive: Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.Respiratory Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Larynx: A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Papio: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Armoracia: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE known for the root used in hot SPICES. It is also the source of HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE which is widely used in laboratories.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Apnea: A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1000 grams (2.2 lbs), regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Airway Remodeling: The structural changes in the number, mass, size and/or composition of the airway tissues.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Automobile Driving: The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.BCG Vaccine: An active immunizing agent and a viable avirulent attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, var. bovis, which confers immunity to mycobacterial infections. It is used also in immunotherapy of neoplasms due to its stimulation of antibodies and non-specific immunity.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Ductus Arteriosus, Patent: A congenital heart defect characterized by the persistent opening of fetal DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS that connects the PULMONARY ARTERY to the descending aorta (AORTA, DESCENDING) allowing unoxygenated blood to bypass the lung and flow to the PLACENTA. Normally, the ductus is closed shortly after birth.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Exhalation: The act of BREATHING out.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Methylobacterium extorquens: A species of METHYLOBACTERIUM which can utilize acetate, ethanol, or methylamine as a sole carbon source. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Vena Cava, Superior: The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.Noninvasive Ventilation: Techniques for administering artificial respiration without the need for INTRATRACHEAL INTUBATION.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Gliosis: The production of a dense fibrous network of neuroglia; includes astrocytosis, which is a proliferation of astrocytes in the area of a degenerative lesion.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Functional Residual Capacity: The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a normal, quiet expiration. It is the sum of the RESIDUAL VOLUME and the EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME. Common abbreviation is FRC.Hydrostatic Pressure: The pressure due to the weight of fluid.Receptors, Leukotriene: Cell-surface receptors that bind LEUKOTRIENES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. The leukotriene receptor subtypes have been tentatively named according to their affinities for the endogenous leukotrienes LTB4; LTC4; LTD4; and LTE4.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Epiglottis: A thin leaf-shaped cartilage that is covered with LARYNGEAL MUCOSA and situated posterior to the root of the tongue and HYOID BONE. During swallowing, the epiglottis folds back over the larynx inlet thus prevents foods from entering the airway.Weight Loss: Decrease in existing BODY WEIGHT.Ventricular Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.

nCPAP improves abnormal autonomic function in at-risk-for-SIDS infants with OSA. (1/875)

We evaluated cardiovascular autonomic control and arousability during sleep in infants with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before and after 10 +/- 4 (mean +/- SD) days of treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). Six OSA infants and 12 age-matched control infants were studied with polygraphic sleep studies at the age of 13 +/- 4 wk. During the study, 45 degrees head-up tilt tests were performed in slow-wave and rapid eye movement sleep. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored. All OSA infants had decreased initial BP and HR responses, followed by hypotension in two and hypertension in two. OSA infants displayed higher arousal thresholds in response to the tilt in rapid eye movement sleep (P < 0.005) and higher baseline HR (P < 0.05) than controls. nCPAP treatment normalized BP and HR responses as well as arousal thresholds to tilting and stabilized HR levels. OSA in infants may be linked with cardiovascular autonomic control disturbances and decreased arousability during sleep. These defects are improved by control of OSA with nCPAP.  (+info)

Effects of continuous positive airway pressure/positive end-expiratory pressure and pressure-support ventilation on work of breathing, using an animal model. (2/875)

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)/positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and pressure support ventilation (PSV) on work of breathing (WOB). METHODS: With 13 anesthetized lambs we measured WOB with an esophageal balloon and flow signals. All the animals were sedated, intubated, and ventilated, using 2 pediatric ventilators (Servo 300 and VIP Bird). Ventilator settings were CPAP of 0, 5, and 10 cm H(2)O and PSV of 5 and 10 cm H(2)O with PEEP of 0, 5, and 10 cm H(2)O. Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: With the Servo 300 the total WOB (WOB(T)) increased between CPAP/PEEP of 0 and 10 cm H(2)O (p +info)

Leptin and ghrelin levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea: effect of CPAP treatment. (3/875)

Serum leptin and ghrelin levels were investigated in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome before and during continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) treatment and compared with body mass index (BMI)-matched controls without OSA. Male patients (n=30) with OSA (apnoea/hypopnoea index=58+/-16, BMI=32.6+/-5.3 kg x m(-2)) underwent CPAP treatment. Fasting leptin and ghrelin were measured at baseline and 2 days, and in the case of leptin 2 months after initiation of treatment. Baseline plasma ghrelin levels were significantly higher in OSA patients than in controls. After 2 days of CPAP treatment, plasma ghrelin decreased in almost all OSA patients (n=9) to levels that were only slightly higher than those of controls (n=9). Leptin levels did not change significantly from baseline after 2 days of CPAP treatment, but were higher than in the control group. After 8 weeks, leptin levels decreased significantly, although the BMI of the patients showed no change. The decrease in leptin levels was more pronounced in patients with a BMI <30 kg x m(-2). These data indicate that the elevated leptin and ghrelin levels are not determined by obesity alone, since they rapidly decreased during continuous positive airways pressure therapy.  (+info)

Humidified nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea. (4/875)

Heated humidification of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) reduces upper airway symptoms and improves initial use in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). The present study aimed to assess the effect of heated humidification of nCPAP on upper airway symptoms and initial use in obstructive sleep apnoea. This study was of a randomised, crossover design. Subjects with polysomnographically confirmed OSAS were randomised to 3 weeks nCPAP treatment with heated humidification (nCPAP-humid) or placebo humidification (nCPAP pl-humid). Objective and subjective nCPAP use, upper airway symptoms, and treatment satisfaction were compared. Thirty seven of 42 patients completed the protocol. nCPAP-humid reduced the frequency of adverse upper airway symptoms. nCPAP use over 3 weeks was greater with nCPAP-humid compared with nCPAP pl-humid. No difference was found between the treatment arms in terms of subjective treatment satisfaction or alertness. Heated humidification of nasal continuous positive airway pressure reduces upper airway symptoms and is associated with a small increase in initial use but not subjective sleepiness or treatment satisfaction. The results support the use of heated humidification as a strategy to reduce side-effects related to continuous positive airway pressure but not routine initial use.  (+info)

Control of upper airway muscle activity in younger versus older men during sleep onset. (5/875)

Pharyngeal dilator muscles are clearly important in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA). We have previously shown that the activity of both the genioglossus (GGEMG) and tensor palatini (TPEMG) are decreased at sleep onset, and that this decrement in muscle activity is greater in the apnoea patient than in healthy controls. We have also previously shown this decrement to be greater in older men when compared with younger ones. In order to explore the mechanisms responsible for this decrement in muscle activity nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was applied to reduce negative pressure mediated muscle activation. We then investigated the effect of sleep onset (transition from predominantly alpha to predominantly theta EEG activity) on ventilation, upper airway muscle activation and upper airway resistance (UAR) in middle-aged and younger healthy men. We found that both GGEMG and TPEMG were reduced by the application of nasal CPAP during wakefulness, but that CPAP did not alter the decrement in activity in either muscle seen in the first two breaths following an alpha to theta transition. However, CPAP prevented both the rise in UAR at sleep onset that occurred on the control night, and the recruitment in GGEMG seen in the third to fifth breaths following the alpha to theta transition. Further, GGEMG was higher in the middle-aged men than in the younger men during wakefulness and was decreased more in the middle-aged men with the application of nasal CPAP. No differences were seen in TPEMG between the two age groups. These data suggest that the initial sleep onset reduction in upper airway muscle activity is due to loss of a 'wakefulness' stimulus, rather than to loss of responsiveness to negative pressure. In addition, it suggests that in older men, higher wakeful muscle activity is due to an anatomically more collapsible upper airway with more negative pressure driven muscle activation. Sleep onset per se does not appear to have a greater effect on upper airway muscle activity as one ages.  (+info)

Effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on elderly Chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnea in the prethrombotic state. (6/875)

OBJECTIVES: To characterize the prethrombotic state (PTS) in elderly Chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and the effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) ventilation on their PTS. METHODS: Forty-one elderly patients with moderate and severe OSAHS were enrolled into the OSAHS group and underwent nCPAP treatment. Their blood samples were drawn at 6:00 am and 4:00 pm before and during nCPAP treatment, respectively, to test hemocrit, platelet aggregation (PAG), whole blood viscosity (WBV), plasma fibrinogen (fng), prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). All blood factors were also tested in a control group consisting of 32 healthy elderly Chinese with neither OSAHS nor cerebrocardiac vascular disease. RESULTS: In the OSAHS group there was a significantly higher hemocrit, WBV, fng, and a significantly shorter PT and APTT at 6:00 am compared to 4:00 pm before nCPAP treatment, while there was no significant difference among all blood test factors between 6:00 am and 4:00 pm on day 30 of the nCPAP treatment. In the OSAHS group, the hemocrit, WBV, PAG and plasma fng were significantly lower and the PT and APTT were significantly longer at 6:00 am on day 30 of the nCPAP treatment compared to 6:00 am before the nCPAP treatment. A significantly lower hemocrit, but a much longer PT and APTT were observed at 4:00 pm on day 30 of the treatment, compared with 4:00 pm before the treatment. No significant difference among the blood test factors was found between 6:00 am and 4:00 pm blood in the control group or between the control and OSAHS groups after 30 days of nCPAP treatment. CONCLUSION: In elderly Chinese OSAHS patients, PTS could be effectively eliminated by nCPAP treatment.  (+info)

Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure: a randomised comparison of continuous positive airway pressure and bi-level positive airway pressure. (7/875)

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether there is a difference in required duration of non-invasive ventilation between continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) in the treatment of a heterogeneous group of emergency department (ED) patients suffering acute respiratory failure and the subgroup of patients with acute pulmonary oedema (APO). Secondary objectives were to compare complications, failure rate, disposition, length of stay parameters, and mortality between the treatments. METHODS: This prospective randomised trial was conducted in the emergency departments of three Australian teaching hospitals. Patients in acute respiratory failure were randomly assigned to receive CPAP or BiPAP in addition to standard therapy. Duration of non-invasive ventilation, complications, failure rate, disposition, length of stay (hospital and ICU), and mortality were measured. RESULTS: 101 patients were enrolled in the study (CPAP 51, BiPAP 50). The median duration of non-invasive ventilation with CPAP was 123 minutes (range 10-338) and 132 minutes (range 20-550) for BiPAP (p = 0.206, Mann-Whitney). For the subgroup suffering APO, 36 were randomised to CPAP and 35 to BiPAP. For this group the median duration of non-invasive ventilation for CPAP was 123 minutes (range 35-338) and 133 minutes (range 30-550) for BiPAP (p = 0.320, Mann-Whitney). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that there is no significant difference in the duration of non-invasive ventilation treatment between CPAP and BiPAP when used for the treatment of acute respiratory failure in the ED. There was also no significant difference between the groups in secondary end points.  (+info)

A comparison of public and private obstructive sleep apnea clinics. (8/875)

The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical findings and polysomnography results obtained at public and private clinics in Brazil, the follow-up after diagnosis, and the therapeutic aspects related to continuous positive airway pressure. Patients who snore and who have obstructive sleep apnea were retrospectively divided into two groups, i.e., public clinic (N=307) and private clinic (N=317). Data concerning age, sex, body mass index (BMI), neck circumference, medical history, sleepiness scale, follow-up after diagnosis, and acceptance of continuous positive airway pressure therapy were collected. Mean age was 50 +/- 12 (range: 15-80) for public patients and 48 +/- 12 years (range: 19-91) for private patients. Mean BMI was 30 +/- 6 (range: 19-67) for public patients and 31 +/- 6 kg/m (range: 21-59) for private patients. The public clinic had a significantly higher frequency of women than the private clinic (M:F ratio of 2.0:1 and 6.9:1, respectively). The condition of private patients (apnea-hypopnea index=31 +/- 25) was more severe than that of public patients (apnea-hypopnea index=25 +/- 24 events/h; P=0.0004). In the public and private clinics, 19 and 15% of patients were snorers, respectively, and 81 and 85% of them had sleep apnea. After diagnosis, follow-up was longer in the private group. The continuous positive airway pressure acceptance was similar for both groups (32 vs 35%), but patients from the public clinic abandoned treatment more than private ones (65 vs 13%). Social status was significant in terms of the severity of obstructive sleep apnea age and gender distribution. Private patients look for a diagnosis earlier in the course of the disease than public patients, adhere more to follow-up, and abandon continuous positive airway pressure treatment less than public patients do.  (+info)

*Continuous positive airway pressure

... (CPAP) is a form of positive airway pressure ventilator, which applies mild air pressure on ... PEEP Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is the pressure in the lungs (alveolar pressure) above atmospheric pressure (the ... Werman, Howard A.; Karren, K; Mistovich, Joseph (2014). "Continuous Positive Airway Pressure(CPAP)". In Werman A. Howard; ... CPAP devices apply continuous positive airway pressure throughout the breathing cycle. Thus, the ventilator itself does not ...

*Sleep apnea

... the most common treatment is the use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or automatic positive airway pressure ( ... "Randomized controlled trial of variable-pressure versus fixed-pressure continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for ... "The impact of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: evidence ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective treatment for severe obstructive sleep apnea but oral ...

*Bubble CPAP

Morley, CJ; Lau, R; De Paoli, A; Davis, PG (July 2005). "Nasal continuous positive airway pressure: does bubbling improve gas ... It is one of the methods by which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is delivered to a spontaneously breathing newborn ... "Treatment of the idiopathic respiratory-distress syndrome with continuous positive airway pressure". The New England Journal of ... The depth to which the tubing is immersed underwater determines the pressure generated in the airways of the infant. As the gas ...

*Acute decompensated heart failure

Continuous positive airway pressure may be applied using a face mask; this has been shown to improve symptoms more quickly than ... Peter JV, Moran JL, Phillips-Hughes J, Graham P, Bersten AD (April 2006). "Effect of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation ... and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). Even if symptoms of heart failure are not present, medications can be ... The person may, in fact, have too little fluid in their blood vessels, but if the low blood pressure is due to cardiogenic ...

*Hypopnea

One treatment for obstructive hypopnea is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). CPAP is a treatment in which the patient ... An air blower forces air through the upper airway. The air pressure is adjusted so that it is just enough to maintain the ... Surgery is generally a last resort in hypopnea treatment, but is a site-specific option for the upper airway. Depending on the ... It commonly is due to partial obstruction of the upper airway. Hypopnea during sleep is classed as a sleep disorder. With ...

*Timeline of respiratory therapy

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is introduced by Gregory. 1971: (US) The journal Inhalation Therapy is renamed to ... 1928: Phillip Drinker develops the "iron lung" negative pressure ventilator. 1935: Carl Matthes invented the first noninvasive ...

*Obstructive sleep apnea

The additional pressure holds open the relaxed muscles. There are several variants: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ... Automatic positive airway pressure, or automatic positive airway pressure, also known as "Auto CPAP", incorporates pressure ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and mandibular advancement devices are often used and found to be equally effective ... Giles, TL; Lasserson, TJ; Smith, BH; White, J; Wright, J; Cates, CJ (Jul 19, 2006). "Continuous positive airways pressure for ...

*Henrik Verder

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure). In 1989 he used this pioneering method to successfully treat the first premature infant ... "Nasal continuous positive airway pressure and early surfactant therapy for respiratory distress syndrome in newborns of less ... "Treatment of the idiopathic respiratory-distress syndrome with continuous positive airway pressure". The New England Journal of ... "Surfactant therapy and nasal continuous positive airway pressure for newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. Danish- ...

*Hypernasal speech

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure as a Treatment for Hypernasality" (PDF). Kuehn, D. P. (May 2002), "Efficacy of continuous ... Kuehn D. P. "Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in the Treatment of Hypernasality" (PDF). Hartman L. D. "Critical Review: ... Kuehn, D. P. (Dec 1991), "New therapy for treating hypernasal speech using continuous positive airway pressure.", Plastic and ... The positive pressure provided by a CPAP machine provides resistance to stregthen velopharyngeal muscles. With nasal mask in ...

*Infantile apnea

"Use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure as treatment of childhood obstructive sleep apnea". The Journal of Pediatrics ... Normally, the muscles at the level of the throat relax and dilate while asleep in order to open up airway however, patients ... In some cases, it occurs when patients are born with a small airway opening. Patients with obstructive apnea often have ... Obstructive apnea occurs when the airway passages are obstructed and little to no air exchange occurs, resulting in impaired ...

*Infant respiratory distress syndrome

"Nasal continuous positive airway pressure and early surfactant therapy for respiratory distress syndrome in newborns of less ... Oxygen is given with a small amount of continuous positive airway pressure ("CPAP"), and intravenous fluids are administered to ... "Surfactant therapy and nasal continuous positive airway pressure for newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. Danish- ... Therapeutic oxygen and positive-pressure ventilation, while potentially life-saving, can damage the lung. The diagnosis is made ...

*Positive airway pressure

"Effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in obstructive sleep apnoea in adults" (PDF). National ... variable/bilevel positive airway pressure) provides two levels of pressure: inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) and a ... Breathing out against the positive pressure resistance (the expiratory positive airway pressure component, or EPAP) may also ... July 2010). "Helmet continuous positive airway pressure vs oxygen therapy to improve oxygenation in community-acquired ...

*Health Builders

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is used on newborns in respiratory distress and helps to improve child survival . HB ...

*Apnea of prematurity

CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) is sometimes used for apnea when medications and supplemental oxygen are not ... In addition, premature infants have an exaggerated response to laryngeal stimulation (a normal reflex that closes the airway as ...

*Hans Rudolph

John and Hans began design work on masks for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines in the early 1980s. CPAPs aid ... Hans, John, Kevin and Kelly built upon the research of Hans to design CPAP and BIPAP (bilevel positive airway pressure) masks ...

*Mandibular advancement splint

CPAP and oral devices on blood pressure found that oral devices were equally effective as continuous positive airway pressure ( ... "Health outcomes of continuous positive airway pressure versus oral appliance treatment for obstructive sleep apnea: a ... September 2004). "Efficacy of positive airway pressure and oral appliance in mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea". ... which tightens the soft tissue and muscles of the upper airway to prevent obstruction of the airway during sleep. The ...

*Respironics

The company introduced the first continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine for the treatment of sleep apnea in 1985. ...

*Airway pressure release ventilation

... was described initially by Stock and Downs in 1987 as a continuous positive airway pressure ... APRV is an applied continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) that at a set timed interval releases the applied pressure. ... Fundamentally APRV is a time-cycled alternant between two levels of positive airway pressure, with the main time on the high ... M. Baum, H. Benzer, C. Putensen, W. Koller & G. Putz (September 1989). "[Biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP)--a new form ...

*Down syndrome

Surgery, however, does not always address the sleep apnea and a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine may be ... If the screening test has a 2% false-positive rate, this means one of eleven who test positive on screening have a fetus with ... These airway changes lead to obstructive sleep apnea in around half of those with Down syndrome. Other common features include ... If Down syndrome occurs in one in 500 pregnancies and the test used has a 5% false-positive rate, this means, of 26 women who ...

*Sleep surgery

Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on apnea-hypopnea index in obstructive sleep apnea based on long-term compliance ... PMID 21590521 Weaver EM, Maynard C, Yueh B. Survival of veterans with sleep apnea: continuous positive airway pressure versus ... Sullivan and colleagues introduced continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which replaced tracheostomy as the gold standard ... CPAP is the most effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, in which the pressure from CPAP prevents the airway from ...

*Snoring

A continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine is often used to control sleep apnea and the snoring associated with it. ... 1998 "Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)". American Academy of Otolaryngology−Head and Neck Surgery. Retrieved 2007-07- ... The machine utilizes the air pressure as an "air splint" to keep the airway open. In obstructive sleep apnea, the airway at the ... The air pressure required to keep the airway open is delivered through this and it is attached to a CPAP machine which is like ...

*Leptin

... but decreased after the administration of continuous positive airway pressure. In non-obese individuals, however, restful sleep ... Ovulatory cycles in females are linked to energy balance (positive or negative depending on whether a female is losing or ... Knight WD, Seth R, Boron J, Overton JM (2009). "Short-term physiological hyperleptinemia decreases arterial blood pressure". ... Hyperleptinemia produced by infusion or adenoviral gene transfer decreases blood pressure in rats. Leptin microinjections into ...

*C-reactive protein

Treatment of OSA with CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) significantly alleviated the effect of OSA on CRP and IL-6 ...

*Mucopolysaccharidosis

Some persons with MPS I H-S need continuous positive airway pressure during sleep to ease breathing. Life expectancy is ... Other problems may include narrowing of the airway passage in the throat and enlargement of the tonsils and adenoids, making it ... Many individuals have hearing loss, either conductive (in which pressure behind the eardrum causes fluid from the lining of the ... Sleep studies can assess airway status and the possible need for nighttime oxygen. Some patients may require surgical insertion ...

*Polysomnography

CPAP is continuous positive airway pressure and is delivered via a mask to the patient's nose or the patient's nose and mouth ... so the technician can increase the airway pressure inside the mask as needed, until all, or most, of the patient's airway ... This forces air in and out of the mouth while no air enters the airway and lungs. Thus, the pressure transducer and ... Nasal and oral airflow can be measured using pressure transducers, and/or a thermocouple, fitted in or near the nostrils; the ...

*Childbirth

As pressure on the cervix increases, women may have the sensation of pelvic pressure and an urge to begin pushing. At the ... The continuous support may be provided either by hospital staff such as nurses or midwives, doulas, or by companions of the ... Childbirth can be an intense event and strong emotions, both positive and negative, can be brought to the surface. Abnormal and ... For uncomplicated births, care can include suctioning of newborns airway, cord cutting, collection of afterbirth, obtaining an ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - The impact of continuous positive airway pressure on the lower esophageal sphincter. AU - Shepherd, K.. AU - Holloway, R.. AU - Hillman, D.R.. AU - Eastwood, Peter. PY - 2007. Y1 - 2007. N2 - The lower esophageal sphincter ( LES) is the primary barrier to gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux is associated with periods of LES relaxation, as occurs during swallowing. Continuous positive airway pressure ( CPAP) has been shown to reduce reflux in individuals with and without sleep apnea, by an unknown mechanism. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of CPAP on swallow- induced LES relaxation. Measurements were made in 10 healthy, awake, supine individuals. Esophageal ( Pes), LES ( Ples), gastric ( Pg), and barrier pressure to reflux ( Pb = Ples - Pg) were recorded using a sleeve catheter during five swallows of 5 ml of water. This was repeated at four levels of CPAP ( 0, 5, 10, and 15 cmH(2)O). Pressures were measured during quiet breathing and during the LES relaxation ...
BACKGROUND--Patients with the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome often receive continuous positive airway pressure to improve their symptoms and daytime performance, yet objective evidence of the effect of this treatment on cognitive performance is lacking. METHODS--A prospective parallel group study was performed comparing the change in objective daytime sleepiness as assessed by multiple sleep latency, cognitive function, and mood in 21 patients (mean (SE) number of apnoeas and hypopnoeas/hour 57 (6)) who received continuous positive airway pressure for three months and 16 patients (49(6) apnoeas and hypopnoeas/hour) who received conservative treatment for a similar period. RESULTS--Both groups showed significant within group changes in cognitive function between baseline and three months, but when comparisons were made between groups the only significant difference was a greater improvement in multiple sleep latency with continuous positive airway pressure. However, the improvement in sleep ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a form of positive airway pressure ventilator, which applies mild air pressure on a continuous basis to keep the airways continuously open in people who are able to breathe spontaneously on their own. It is an alternative to positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Both modalities stent the lungs alveoli open and thus recruit more of the lungs surface area for ventilation. But while PEEP refers to devices that impose positive pressure only at the end of the exhalation, CPAP devices apply continuous positive airway pressure throughout the breathing cycle. Thus, the ventilator itself does not cycle during CPAP, no additional pressure above the level of CPAP is provided, and patients must initiate all of their breaths. CPAP typically is used for people who have breathing problems, such as sleep apnea. CPAP also may be used to treat preterm infants whose lungs have not yet fully developed. For example, physicians may use CPAP in infants with ...
The hypothesis for this study is that children with sleep disordered breathing will benefit from treatment with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) or Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure (BiPAP) in terms of reduction in cardiovascular risk markers and insulin resistance.. The CPAP machine delivers a predetermined level of pressure. It releases a stream of compressed air through a hose to the nose mask and keeps the upper airway open under continuous air pressure. This air pressure prevents obstructive sleep apnea, which occurs as a result of narrowing of the airway due to the relaxation of upper respiratory tract muscles during sleep. This machine helps to increase the oxygen flow by keeping the airway open.. The BiPAP machine delivers two levels of pressure. Inspiratory Positive Airway Pressure (IPAP) is a high amount of pressure, applied when the patient inhales and a low Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure (EPAP) during exhalation. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Safety and efficacy of postoperative continuous positive airway pressure to prevent pulmonary complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. AU - Huerta, Sergio. AU - DeShields, Scott. AU - Shpiner, Robert. AU - Li, Zhaoping. AU - Liu, Carson. AU - Sawicki, Mark. AU - Arteaga, James. AU - Livingston, Edward H.. PY - 2002. Y1 - 2002. N2 - Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is used to prevent apneic arrest and/or hypoxia in patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea. This modality has not been universally accepted for patients following upper gastrointestinal surgery because of concerns that pressurized air will inflate the stomach and proximal intestine, resulting in anastomotic disruption. This study was performed to assess the safety and efficacy of postoperative CPAP for patients undergoing a gastrojejunostomy as part of a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure. A total of 1067 patients (837 women [78%] and 230 men [22%]) were prospectively evaluated for the risk ...
Background and Objective: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a standard therapy for patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Increased demands for polysomnography (PSG) and CPAP titration have led to long waiting lists and high cost. CPAP prediction formulas derived from sleep and anthropometric parameters are used to set the initial CPAP level during CPAP titration. In the current study, we aimed to compare the pressure derived from prediction formulas with the pressure resulted from CPAP titration in a sample of Iranian patients.. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 90 subjects with confirmed OSA in a full PSG who underwent CPAP titration in Baharloo Sleep Clinic, Tehran, Iran, during 2017, were enrolled. All of the participants had Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) ≥ 15 in their PSG test. Then, the optimal pressure obtained from manual CPAP titration was compared with the one calculated by different prediction formulas for each ...
Continuous positive airway pressure therapy ( CPAP ) uses a machine to help a person who has obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) breathe more easily during sleep. A CPAP machine increases air pressure in your throat so that your airway doesnt collapse when you breathe in. When you use CPAP, your bed partner may sleep better...
Background: Previous studies showed that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in patients with heart failure (HF) and associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. However, therapeutic impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on mortality and morbidity remains unclear among patients with HF.. Methods: In a prospective cohort study, we examined 111 HF patients who underwent sleep study, and compared all-cause death and HF hospitalization rates among patients without OSA, those with untreated OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 10 per hr of sleep), and those with OSA treated by CPAP.. Results: Patients were divided into without OSA (N=32), untreated OSA (N=53) and treated OSA (N=26). During a median follow-up of 21±9 months, there was no death in those with treated OSA, while there was no significant difference in total death rate between those without OSA and with untreated OSA (log-rank test P=0.558). However, there were 52 (28%) all-cause deaths plus HF hospitalizations during ...
Tuberculosis (TB) remains as an important public health problem worldwide. Pleural tuberculosis is the most prevalent form of extrapulmonary presentation in immunocompetent patients.. The volume of effusion in the pleural space of patients with pleural TB may cause complications like restrictive ventilator lung functional disturb and/or pleural thickening. The respiratory physiotherapy can be adjuvant on treatment of pleural effusion tuberculosis throughout of various treatment technique.. The Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is utilized in various pathologic, this improves lung mechanics by recruiting atelectatic alveoli, improving pulmonary compliance, and reducing the work of breathing.. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of CPAP on fluid absorption among patients with pleural effusion due tuberculosis. ...
Our study demonstrated that zaleplon administered just before CPAP titration during split-night PSG improved initial sleep latency without affecting minimum oxygen saturation or resultant CPAP pressure. Contrary to our hypothesis, use of zaleplon did not result improvement in sleep efficiency or arousal indices, and thus perception of sleep quality during the PSG did not differ between the two groups. Although CPAP adherence was relatively high in both groups, use of zaleplon did not result in increased compliance. Improvements in OSA-related symptoms as measured by FOSQ and ESS were also similar in the zaleplon and placebo groups.. Our data conflict with Lettieris work involving the use of a hypnotic during CPAP titration. A retrospective assessment of 400 consecutive patients prescribed CPAP for OSA showed that of multiple parameters assessed, only age and use of a hypnotic (typically zolpidem) during the CPAP titration were associated with better short-term CPAP compliance.14 This ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy uses a machine to help a person who has obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) breathe more easily during sleep. A CPAP machine increases air pressure in the throat so your airway does not collapse when you breathe in. You use CPAP at home every night while you sleep.. ...
A system including methods and apparatus for treatment of a medical disorder such as obstructive sleep apnea or congestive heart failure. The system involves applying a gain to flow rate of pressurized gas delivered to a patient during inspiratory and/or expiratory phases of a respiratory cycle to deliver the pressurized gas in proportion to the respective gains during inspiration and/or expiration. A base pressure may be applied in addition to the gain-modified pressures and an elevated pressure profile may be employed to assist or control inspiration. The system may be fully automated responsive to feedback provided by a flow sensor that determines the estimated patient flow rate. A leak computer can be included to instantaneously calculate gas leakage from the system. The system may be utilized in connection with conventional continuous positive airway pressure treatments, such as CPAP or bi-level positive airway pressure equipment to effect various beneficial treatment applications.
A system including methods and apparatus for treatment of a medical disorder such as obstructive sleep apnea or congestive heart failure. The system involves applying a gain to flow rate of pressurized gas delivered to a patient during inspiratory and/or expiratory phases of a respiratory cycle to deliver the pressurized gas in proportion to the respective gains during inspiration and/or expiration. A base pressure may be applied in addition to the gain-modified pressures and an elevated pressure profile may be employed to assist or control inspiration. The system may be fully automated responsive to feedback provided by a flow sensor that determines the estimated patient flow rate. A leak computer can be included to instantaneously calculate gas leakage from the system. The system may be utilized in connection with conventional continuous positive airway pressure treatments, such as CPAP or bi-level positive airway pressure equipment to effect various beneficial treatment applications.
Aim: Infants with viral bronchiolitis are often hospitalised with a proportion requiring respiratory support. The aim of this review was to examine the use of nasal prong continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as a management strategy for infants with a diagnosis of bronchiolitis, who required stabilisation and transport to a tertiary centre.. Method: A retrospective audit of infants with bronchiolitis requiring CPAP during transport between January 2003 and June 2007.. Results: Nasal CPAP was initiated in 54 infants with 51 of these (34 ex-preterm, 17 term) subsequently continuing on CPAP during retrieval. Mean CPAP pressure was 7 cmH2O. Oxygenation improved between stabilisation and the end of retrieval (P , 0.01). During retrieval, there was no significant increase in transcutaneous CO2, no infant required endotracheal ventilation and no adverse events were noted. Five infants were intubated within the first 24 h of admission at the receiving hospital.. Conclusion: This review ...
What Is CPAP?The most common and effective nonsurgical treatment for sleep apnea is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or CPAP which is applied through a nasal or facial mask while you sleep. The CPAP device does n
Background: Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) are two forms of resistance breathing used in spontaneously breathing patients. With a threshold resistor or a flow resistor, both PEP and CPAP provide a positive (elevated) pressure level during the expiratory phase. With PEP, inspiratory pressure is negative, i.e. lower than ambient air pressure, as during a normal inspiration, but with CPAP, the inspiratory pressure is positive, i.e. higher than ambient air pressure.. Methods: This thesis is based on four separate studies in which four different breathing devices, a PEP-bottle (threshold resistor device), a PEP-mask (flow resistor device), a threshold resistor CPAP and a flow resistor device were investigated. Paper I, II and III are based on studies in healthy volunteers. Paper IV is a bench study performed in a hypobaric chamber. Paper I examined differences between two PEP devices, the PEP-bottle and the PEP-mask. Paper II evaluated the ...
What is CPAP? Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) A non-invasive alternative to intubation Does not require any sedation It provides comfort to the patient with acute respiratory distress by reducing work of breathing Revised for B/F Counties 2014
Purpose: Recent guidelines for acute heart failure (AHF) support the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) although its early use upstream intensive care unit (ICU) requires more evidence. The aim of this multicenter randomized study was to compare the effects of standard treatment of cardiogenic acute pulmonary oedema to CPAP when started in out-hospital setting and continued in ICU.. Methods: AHF presenters with respiratory distress were enrolled by 10 emergency medical mobile services. Inclusion criteria were respiratory rate ,25, pulse oxygen saturation ,90% in air and Killip score ≥3. Each eligible patient was randomly assigned at home to receive standard treatment (ST) including oxygen, nitroglycerin, diuretic and inotropic drug as appropriate, or a combination of ST and CPAP (7.5-10 cmH2O). The primary end point, a composite of death, presence of intubation criteria or persistence at the second hour after inclusion, reappearance of the inclusion criteria or circulatory ...
CPAP treatment was associated with a reduction in the number of patients with unsustained AT (from 8 to 1, P=.024) and in the total number of AT beats (P=.026). In contrast, the number of VEs did not fall significantly (P=.44).. Two patients developed episodes of second-degree atrioventricular block. The use of CPAP in both patients resolved conduction changes and neither required pacemaker implantation. Two more patients had non-severe sinus dysfunction, which resolved in 1 of them after introduction of CPAP; neither required a pacemaker.. Subgroup Analysis. Patients over 50 years of age (n=17) had more disturbed baseline HRV figures than younger patients (P,.05) and their frequency domain parameters (VLF, LF and HF) during waking hours improved more significantly than the under-50 age group (P,.05). Age did not affect the incidence of arrhythmias, nor the influence of CPAP on this parameter. Arterial hypertension was more common in patients aged,50 years (14/17 vs. 3/9 patients, P=.03), and ...
Purpose: To investigate the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) applied by a full-face fitted mask at 15 cmH2O on total cerebral blood flow (tCBF), jugular venous flow (tJVF) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow.. Materials and methods: Axial 2D phase-contrast MRI measurements were acquired at the C2-C3 vertebral level for 23 healthy male awake subjects at baseline (without) and with CPAP applied. CSF flow was quantified within the spinal subarachnoid space and tCBF was quantified based on the summation of blood flow within the left and right internal carotid and vertebral arteries. tJVF was quantified based on the summation of blood flow within the left and right jugular veins. Heart rate, transcutaneous carbon dioxide (PtcCO2) and oxygen saturation were continuously monitored during the MR protocol.. Results: CPAP decreased the pulse amplitude (PtPPA) of tJVF by 21% (p = 0.004). CSF stroke volume (SV) and PtPPA also decreased by 20% (p = 0.003) and 15% (p = 0.005), respectively. ...
OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of bubble continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and Infant Flow Driver (IFD) CPAP for the post-extubation management of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). STUDY DESIGN: A total
Introduction Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) is characterised by an increase in end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and contributes to exercise limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients. Neural respiratory drive (NRD) directly reflects the load-capacity relationship of the respiratory system and is therefore expected to increase with DH. However, there are limited data investigating the effects of isolated increases in EELV on NRD. We hypothesised that 1) increases in EELV induced by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would increase NRD in healthy subjects and 2) with the change in lung volume, NRD to the parasternal intercostal muscles would increase to a greater extent than that to the diaphragm at higher levels of CPAP. ...
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure information provided by Mt. Scott ENT and Sleep Medicine in Seattle and Clackamas, OR - (503) 233-5548
Continuous positive airway pressure side effects: evolution over time and association to treatment dropout in JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH, vol 21, issue SI, pp 340-340 ...
Simelaro J, Greenberg R, Cannavo J. Intermittent mandatory ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure: two inexpensive methods of delivery. J Am Osteopath Assoc 1980;79(6):383. doi: 10.7556/jaoa.1980.79.6.383.. Download citation file:. ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (C PA P) is a treatment modality for pulmonary oxygenation difficulties. C PA P impairs venous return to the heart and, in turn, affects cerebral blood flow (CBF) a
Learn more about Continuous Positive Airway Pressure at Medical City Dallas DefinitionReasons for the Use of CPAPPossible ComplicationsWhat to ExpectCall Your Doctorrevision ...
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Few comparative studies of nasal CPAP devices have been published. In particular, we are unaware of any studies that compare lung recruitment with different nasal CPAP devices as they are currently being used in infants. The main objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of 3 distinct devices-2 continuous flow devices and 1 variable flow device-in recruiting lung volume at various nasal CPAP levels.. Factors determining the effectiveness of any nasal CPAP device include its associated work of breathing, flow characteristics, ease of application, and the comfort level of the infant once the device is in place. Continuous flow nasal CPAP is increased or decreased by varying the resistance to exhalation at the exhalation valve on an infant ventilator. Nasal prongs are commonly used to provide continuous flow nasal CPAP. Concerns exist, however, about increased work of breathing with nasal prongs, compared with face mask CPAP.11Additionally, nasal prongs often become dislodged making care ...
BackgroundSeveral beneficial effects of non-nutritive sucking in infants, including the physiological stability, relaxation, better transition from tube feeding to oral feeding have been reported. But its effect on oxygen saturation in neonates under the Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (NCPAPو (is not so clear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of non-nutritive sucking on transcutaneous oxygen saturation levels of neonates treated with NCPAP.Materials and MethodsThis quasi-experimental study was done on 25 preterm neonates, hospitalized with a diagnosis of respiratory distress, required NCPAP, in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at the Ayatollah Rouhani Hospital and Babol Clinic, North of Iran. Non-nutritive sucking was elicited by a standard pacifier appropriate to their age one hour a day, and the mean oxygen saturation was measured before and after intervention by cardiopulmonary monitoring (Saadat Co., Iran). Data analyzed using SPSS-18.0 software.ResultsIn the 25 cases
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
The BiPAP is bi-level continuous positive airway pressure device that mainly used for home care and clinical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) or respiratory insufficiency. CPAP is short for Continuos Positive Airway...
In this study we found that treatment of OSA with CPAP did not result in a reduction in weight, and actually was associated with weight gain. This observation was independent of age, gender, race, OSA severity, and sleepiness. Furthermore, those with the greatest adherence to CPAP appeared to have gained the most weight.. The primary finding in this study is that CPAP treatment of OSA does not result in weight loss over a 6-month time frame. Our findings are therefore consistent with those of Redenius et al., who failed to observe in a retrospective study any reduction in weight in 183 CPAP treated patients followed in a sleep center over 10 to 14 months.12 Similarly, several smaller studies also have failed to find a change in weight with CPAP treatment. In a randomized controlled trial of sibutramine in comparison to CPAP for weight loss, CPAP treatment for one year in 18 patients was not associated with a change in weight.11 Similarly, addition of CPAP did not result in greater weight loss ...
Intermittent positive pressure ventilation has been a major advance in the care of preterm infants. It permits temporary support of pulmonary function and hence preservation of life.13However, it is generally accepted that this form of ventilation places the infant at increased risk of pulmonary injury, leading to chronic lung disease.14 The presence of a foreign body in the trachea also provides a portal of entry for infection and may cause local damage to the upper airway. The optimal method of managing infants when they are judged no longer to need an endotracheal tube has been controversial. Theoretical reasons supporting the use of NCPAP in this role include prevention of atelectasis, recruitment of small airways, and decreased work of breathing. However, if extubation to headbox oxygen was shown to be equally effective, then this method of care would be favoured because it is less invasive.. We have found that extubation to a single nasal prong using a CPAP level of 7 cm water results in ...
Although a simpler and less invasive form of assisted ventilation of the newborn, the introduction of nasal CPAP followed that of intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Gregoryet al 5 first described two methods of delivery of CPAP in 1971 for the treatment of RDS: through an endotracheal tube and through a pressure chamber around the infants head. Subsequently, delivery through a face mask6 and nasal tubes ending above the vocal cords have more commonly been used to deliver CPAP.7 Several forms of these tubes exist, some long enough to end just above the epiglottis (nasopharyngeal) and some only 1-2 cm inside the nose. Short prongs may be single or binasal. The Infant Flow Driver (IFD; Electro Medical Equipment, Brighton, Sussex, UK) is a binasal system commonly used in the United Kingdom. In contrast with other binasal systems, it uses a "fluidic flip" mechanism, which is claimed to lead to a more stable level of CPAP being delivered throughout the respiratory cycle. A two hour crossover ...
Results There were no differences in death, duration of hospitalization, failure to treatment, duration of improvement of RD, necrotizing enterocolitis(NEC), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), chronic lung disease (CLD), pnumothorax, pulmonary hemorrhage, apnea, sepsis, duration of hospitalization, duration to reach to full entral feeding between two groups (NCPAP, HFNC). During the study, those on HFNC had more normal examination of nasal mucosa (P,0.0001). According to neonatal nurses opinions, application of HFNC was easier than NCPAP for neonates (P,0.0001).. ...
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology is Annals of Pediatric Cardiology is the official publication of the Pediatric Cardiology Society of India .
DI-fusion, le Dépôt institutionnel numérique de lULB, est loutil de référencementde la production scientifique de lULB.Linterface de recherche DI-fusion permet de consulter les publications des chercheurs de lULB et les thèses qui y ont été défendues.
Positive airway pressure devices keep pressured air flowing through the airways of the throat and is one of the common treatments for sleep apnea. The patient wears a face mask which is attached with a tube and a machine that blows pressurized air through the mask into the airway to keep it open.
Mild hypopnea can often be treated by losing weight or by avoiding sleeping on your back. CPAP, or continuous positive airway pressure is the most common treatment for hypopnea.. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a treatment in which the patient wears a mask over the nose and/or mouth. An air blower forces air through the upper airway.. The air pressure is adjusted so that it is just enough to avoid the upper airway tissues from collapsing during sleep but apnea episodes return when CPAP is stopped or it is used improperly.. CPAP can also help reduce the excessive sleepiness people experience during the day. This device must be worn every night to be efficient. PROVIGIL can be used in addition to CPAP to treat excessive sleepiness when CPAP does not work properly.. ...
Limitations of CBA study: Controlled before after study. Mahajan, Anjali // Lung India;Nov/Dec2015, Vol. 32 Issue 6, p670 A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Evaluation of short-term use of nocturnal nasal continuous positive airway pressure for a clinical profile and exercise capacity in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome." ...
The sleep apnea mask is called a continuous positive airway pressure device and it uses air pressure to push ones tongue forward and opens the throat during sleep.
Results: Altogether 138 patients in algorithm I and 110 patients in algorithm II completed the CPAP trial. There were no significant differences between these algorithms with respect to the primary end‐point. The sensitivity and specificity of algorithm I versus II as a diagnostic test for OSA were 0.3, 0.8 versus 0.31, 1.00 respectively. In predicting CPAP adherence at 6 months, the likelihood ratio positive for algorithms I and II was 2.7 and 5.27 respectively. The mean (SE) time taken from the first consultation to the end of CPAP trial in algorithm I and algorithm II was 60 (2) and 98 (5) days, respectively, P < 0.01 ...
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Humidified high flow nasal airway respiratory support is a method of delivering a high per-minute volume of respiratory gas via nasal cannula. The respiratory gas is heated to near body temperature and humidified, usually to saturation vapor pressure. This form of respiratory support is generally referred to as high flow therapy (HFT). HFT is also referred to as transnasal insufflation (TNI),[5] especially when used for treatment of sleep apnea.. Nasal cannulae usually used for oxygen delivery typically deliver 1-6 liters of oxygen per minute. The FiO2 - the percentage of oxygen inhaled by the patient-usually ranges roughly from 24% to 35%, as 100% O2 delivered from the cannula is diluted with air at about 21% oxygen. Flow rates for delivery of oxygen using typical nasal cannulae are limited because medical oxygen is anhydrous, and when delivered from a pressurized source the gas cools as it expands with the drop to atmospheric pressure. Delivery of cold, dry gas is irritating to the respiratory ...
A new study suggests that continuous positive airway pressure therapy reduces the mortality rate in people who have both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea, which the authors refer to as
CPAP is a treatment which uses mild air pressure to keep the airways open. The machine is used by people who have breathing problems, such as sleep apnea.
Wissenschaftlich bewiesen: Gegenüber CPAP haben die Patienten unter Velumount weniger Nebenwirkungen, bessere systolische Blutdruckwerte, eine bessere Therapietreue und insbesondere eine bessere Therapiezufriedenheit
Described is a method and system for automated titration of CPAP. The system may include an air pressure supply providing air pressure to a patients airways and a sensor detecting input data corresponding to a patients breathing patterns of a plurality of breaths. The system also includes a titration device which receives and analyzes the input data to determine existence of breathing disorder and corresponding characteristics. The titration device generating output data for adjusting the air pressure supplied to the patient as a function of the characteristics of the breathing disorder.
To date, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective intervention in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea, but adherence to this treatment is often less than optimal. A variety of factors and interventions that influence and improve CPAP use have been examined. There is increasing recognition of the multifaceted nature of CPAP adherence: the patients psychological profile and social environment have been recognised, in addition to the more extensively researched patients treatment and physiological profile. Understanding how these multiple factors impact on CPAP use in an integrative fashion might provide us with a useful holistic model of CPAP adherence. This concept of integration--a biopsychosocial (BPS) approach to health and illness--has previously been described to understand care provision for various chronic health disorders. This paper proposes an adherence framework, whereby variables integrally affect CPAP use. The BPS model has been considered for nearly 35 years;
If you have moderate to severe sleep apnea, you may benefit from a machine that delivers positive air pressure (PAP) through a mask placed over your nose while you sleep.. The most common type is called continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP (SEE-pap). With this treatment, the pressure of the air breathed is continuous and somewhat greater than that of the surrounding air, which is just enough to keep your upper airway passages open. This prevents apnea and snoring. Alternatively, your doctor might prescribe Auto-adjusting Positive Airway Pressure (APAP). APAP works much the same as CPAP, except with APAP the pressure delivered throughout the night adjusts according to your needs rather than delivering a consistent pressure throughout. This can result in a more comfortable therapy experience.. Although PAP is the most consistently successful and most commonly used method of treating sleep apnea, some people find it cumbersome and uncomfortable at first. With some practice and help from our ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), but treatment compliance is often unsatisfactory. This study investigated the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of telemonitoring for improving CPAP compliance.. 100 newly diagnosed OSA patients requiring CPAP (apnoea-hypopnoea index ,15 events·h−1) were randomised to standard management or a telemonitoring programme that collected daily information about compliance, air leaks and residual respiratory events, and initiated patient contact to resolve issues. Clinical/anthropometric variables, daytime sleepiness and quality of life were recorded at baseline and after 3 months. Patient satisfaction, additional visits/calls, side-effects and total costs were assessed.. There were no significant differences between the standard and telemedicine groups in terms of CPAP compliance (4.9±2.2 versus 5.1±2.1 h·night−1), symptoms, clinical variables, quality of life and unwanted effects. ...
AMONG people with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) who do not have daytime sleepiness, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy does not significantly reduce the incidence of hypertension or cardiovascular events, according to research published in JAMA. However, the researchers, who followed patients with OSA for a median of 2.7 years, said a post-hoc analysis of their results suggested CPAP treatment might reduce the incidence of hypertension or cardiovascular events in patients with CPAP adherence of 4 or more hours a night. Another JAMA study found that, after a median of 12.2 years follow-up, patients with OSA were at increased risk of developing hypertension - but that adherence to CPAP therapy ameliorated this risk.. Calcium linked to heart attacks ...
Serum glucose is not a reliable biomarker for predicting obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or whether treatment is effective with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a pilot study of biomarkers presented at SLEEP 2015 concluded.
ObjectiveTo identify risk factors that may predispose patients with a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to fail treatment with positive airway pressure
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen is a non-invasive alternative to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for infants and children requiring respiratory support. There is a paucity of data to support its use in children, with no published data from sub-Saharan Africa. OBJECTIVES: To describe the outcomes of and adverse events related to HFNC in the first year of its use in a level 2 (L2) general paediatric ward, and to compare these outcomes with those of a historical cohort when this intervention was unavailable. METHODS: This retrospective descriptive study included children aged ,13 years who received HFNC in the first 12 months after its introduction (HFNC-availability group, n=66). Demographic data, clinical characteristics and outcomes (death, treatment failure, length of HFNC and HFNC-related adverse events) were assessed. A comparative description of children who required transfer to level 3 (L3) for any form of respiratory support (other than the ...
The difference between CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) and APAP (Automatically-adjusting Positive Airway Pressure) relates to how the press
Patients diagnosed with sleep-disordered breathing are often equipped with a specialized mask to wear while they sleep. We ensure that patients are fitted with a comfortable mask that provides an appropriate seal for the positive air pressures during a special training session. One of the main treatments for sleep disordered breathing is CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure), in which the mask is connected to an air pressurizer, a small machine that generates air pressure slightly above the atmospheric pressure. The mask is fitted so that it covers either the nose or nose and mouth. When the system is sealed, it increases the pressure in the throat so that it remains open, allowing the patient to breathe normally throughout the night. Patients with sleep apnea related to obesity, heart failure, or a neuromuscular disease may be equipped with a more complex system called BiPAP (Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure), which supplements the breath with each inhalation. We also offer a treatment ...
HERAKLION, Greece - The best therapy for obstructive sleep apnea remains nasal continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP), reported investigators here who compared it with atrial overdrive pacing.
Nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Over the 5-year study period, a total of 59 infants with BWs between 750 g and 900 g were given NCPAP. Twenty-nine of these infants were also given surfactant. The use of NCPAP in this group of patients increased signiicantly from less than 10% in 2007 to 37.5% in 2010. Of the 59 infants who received NCPAP, 16 (27.1%) survived until discharge. Overall, NCPAP had no influence on survival (x2 0.602; p=0.74). However, NCPAP was only used in the latter part of our study period and only in neonates with BWs ≥ 750 g. When only babies weighing ,700 g in 2008 - 2010 are considered, babies weighing ,800 g who received NCPAP were signiicantly less likely to survive (19% in the NCPAP group v. 27% in the non-NCPAP group; x2 9.247; p=0.002).. Discussion. This was the first study in our unit to look solely at ELBW infants, specifically those with BWs ≤900 g who did not receive conventional mechanical ventilation. Similar previous studies in the same unit included ...
a) For the purposes of this chapter, the following definitions shall apply:. (1) "Board" means the Medical Board of California.. (2) "Polysomnography" means the treatment, management, diagnostic testing, control, education, and care of patients with sleep and wake disorders. Polysomnography shall include, but not be limited to, the process of analysis, monitoring, and recording of physiologic data during sleep and wakefulness to assist in the treatment of disorders, syndromes, and dysfunctions that are sleep-related, manifest during sleep, or disrupt normal sleep activities. Polysomnography shall also include, but not be limited to, the therapeutic and diagnostic use of oxygen, the use of positive airway pressure including continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bilevel modalities, adaptive servo-ventilation, and maintenance of nasal and oral airways that do not extend into the trachea.. (3) "Supervision" means that the supervising physician and surgeon shall remain available, either in ...
ABSTRACTObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is increasingly common but largely underrecognized. Untreated, it is associated with heart disease, stroke, and sudden nocturnal death. Simple clinical assessments can determine if a patient is likely to have OSA and is a candidate for diagnostic polysomnography. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the mainstay of treatment and ameliorates symptoms as well as long-term sequelae. Patient education and effective troubleshooting and evaluation of CPAP adherence issues increase successful adjustment to therapy. Alternative treatments can be considered in those whose OSA does not respond to standard CPAP therapy.
Breathe better: Morton Plant North Bay Hospital, 6600 Madison St., New Port Richey, offers continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) clinics at 1 p.m. Mon
SAN FRANCISCO - Braden Partners, L.P., doing business as Pacific Pulmonary Services, has agreed to pay $11.4 million to resolve allegations against it and its general partner, Teijin Pharma USA LLC, for violating the False Claims Act. The government has accused the entities of submitting claims for reimbursement to Medicare and other federal healthcare programs in violation of program rules and as part of a cross-referral kickback scheme with sleep clinics. The announcement was made by U.S. Attorney Brian J. Stretch, Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Departments Civil Division Chad A. Readler, and Special Agent in Charge of the Office of Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Steven J. Ryan.. California-based Pacific Pulmonary Services furnishes stationary and portable oxygen tanks and related supplies, and sleep therapy equipment, such as Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure masks and related supplies, to ...
CPAP stands for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure. CPAP is used by people with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) during the night to help keep...
Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with cancer incidence and mortality. The contribution of the immune system appears to be crucial; however, the potential role of monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells remains unclear.. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, flow cytometry and in vitro assays were used to analyse the phenotype and immune response activity in 92 patients with OSA (60 recently diagnosed untreated patients and 32 patients after 6 months of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)) and 29 healthy volunteers (HV).. We determined that monocytes in patients with OSA exhibit an immunosuppressive phenotype, including surface expression of glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant protein (GARP) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), in contrast to those from the HV and CPAP groups. High levels of TGF-β were detected in OSA sera. TGF-β release by GARP+ monocytes impaired NK cytotoxicity and maturation. This altered phenotype correlated with the hypoxic ...
A prospective study11 reported a significantly greater death rate in 37 untreated heart failure patients with OSA than in the 113 patients without (or with mild) OSA. The death rate was significant after controlling for confounding factors. Furthermore, the authors reported no deaths among the 14 heart failure patients with OSA who were treated with CPAP devices, the treatment of choice for OSA. However, n was small and this difference was significant at .07 p value.. In a French study, comparing 50 patients with AHI , 5/hour to 236 patients with AHI ≥ 5 hour Damy and colleagues15 reported excess mortality associated with OSA. Furthermore, the authors reported that treatment of OSA with positive airway pressure device was associated with improved survival in 62 patients compare to the 48 untreated patients with AHI ≥ 20/hour. In a study AHI from Japan,12 in patients with HFrEF and moderate to severe OSA (n=65), use of a CPAP device was associated with significant reduction in the rate of ...
Sleep apnea nasal congestion - Is sleep apnea caused by not getting enough oxygen through my nose or is the problem sourced in my neck? I have chronic nasal congestion. Not your nose. People with complete nasal blockade will simply begin to breathe through their mouth while asleep. This is not sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is closure of the airway due to obstruction of tissue in the back of the throat (posterior pharynx) and it requires surgery or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to open it.
A new study suggests that treatment of mild sleep-disordered breathing with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in pregnant women with preeclampsia improves fetal activity levels, a marker of fetal well-being.
To tackle the cardiovascular risks from obstructive sleep apnea, continuous positive airway pressure was better than giving oxygen at night, and adding a weight-loss strategy may be even better in som
Being able to go to sleep quickly was something I took pride in. I didnt know that it was a symptom of sleep apnea. It wasnt so great that I would also fall asleep in the evenings while reading or watching television in my easy chair. Especially disconcerting was my tendency to nod off in the afternoons when I was driving an hour or more. My doctor, a specialist in both endocrinology and internal medicine, told me that my ability to fall asleep quickly in these circumstances was quite normal. I was tired all the time, even though it was usually 10 hours or so from the time I went to bed until I got up. So I asked my doctor to set me up with a sleep specialist. He discouraged me. The only treatment that works for most people, he said, is a CPAP machine. CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure. A CPAP system delivers pressurized air, typically through a nasal mask, to prevent collapse of the upper airway during sleep. It is a sort of miniaturized vacuum cleaner blowing air into the ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) not only improves patients lives, it can improve the li
ResMed, one of the bigger names in CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) therapy, is unveiling today the worlds smallest CPAP device. The ResMed AirM
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment seems to improve cognitive functioning in patients with Alzheimers disease who also suffer from obstructive sleep apnea, according to the results of a randomized clinical trial conducted at the University of California, San Diego.
January 11, 2017 -- Medical device company ResMed has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for its AirMini portable continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device.. The AirMini is a small, fully featured CPAP device designed to be a users secondary device, used such as when traveling. The product is not yet commercially available but will launched later in 2017, according to the company. ...
The study is to evaluate the product reliability, therapy effectiveness and user feedback of a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) device in-home for up to 6 months.
For individuals with co-existing obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease, continuous positive airway pressure does not alter renal function, according to a study published online July 25 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Bioengineering of functional lung tissue by using whole lung scaffolds has been proposed as a potential alternative for patients awaiting lung transplant. Previous studies have demonstrated that vascular resistance (Rv) could be altered to optimize the process of obtaining suitable lung scaffolds. Therefore, this work was aimed at determining how lung inflation (tracheal pressure) and perfusion (pulmonary arterial pressure) affect vascular resistance. This study was carried out using the lungs excised from 5 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats. The trachea was cannulated and connected to a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device to provide a tracheal pressure ranging from 0 to 15 cmH(2)O. The pulmonary artery was cannulated and connected to a controlled perfusion system with continuous pressure (gravimetric level) ranging from 5 to 30 cmH(2)O. Effective Rv was calculated by ratio of pulmonary artery pressure (P-PA) by pulmonary artery flow (V(PA)). Rv in the decellularized lungs ...
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most common treatment for sleep apnea. For this treatment, you wear a mask over your nose during sleep. The mask blows air into your throat at a pressure level that is right for you. The increased airway pressure keeps the throat open while you sleep. The air pressure is adjusted so that it is ...
Why CPAP might not be the sleep apnea treatment youre looking for CPAP stands for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and has generally been considered "the solution" by health care professionals. When people suffer from sleep apnea, CPAP is almost always the therapy initially prescribed. If CPAP is your sleep apnea treatment, youll wear a specially designed ...
Why CPAP might not be the sleep apnea treatment youre looking for CPAP stands for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and has generally been considered "the solution" by health care professionals. When people suffer from sleep apnea, CPAP is almost always the therapy initially prescribed. If CPAP is your sleep apnea treatment, youll wear a specially designed ...
Sleep apnea is treated using lifestyle changes and breathing devices such as the continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, device; these treatments are not considered cures. A CPAP machine works...
By James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.. I forgot to mention some more hookups. There was a small microphone taped to the front of my neck to monitor snoring and a wire attached to both lower legs to watch for leg movements.. I took a sleeping pill (Ambien) that I had brought with me. They said it was ok to do. They wanted me to get some sleep or the testing was useless. I had very little trouble getting to sleep. The attached wires were not uncomfortable but it did take a little effort to make sure the wires to the portable device did not get tangled when I turned over.. During the night the nurse came in to hook me up to a CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) machine. She said her tests were showing that I was having some sleep apnea. Apparently my breathing would slow or stop. This lowered my blood oxygen content. The reason for this was my airway would relax to the point of obstruction. After a few seconds my body would realize this and I would wake up a bit to correct it. Since this happens ...
Clinical trial for Preterm Infants | Diaphragm Electrical Activity | RAM Cannula | respiratory distress syndrome of newborn | Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Diaphragm Electrical Activity of Preterm Infants on nCPAP With Binasal Prongs Versus RAM Cannula
Jon-Emile S. Kenny MD [@heart_lung] with illustrations by Carla M. Canepa MD Pilots of high-performance, tactical fighter jets each have continuous positive airway pressure [i.e. CPAP] masks as a part of their flight suit. Strikingly, beyond the clinically-commonplace airway pressure of 5-15 cm of H2O, a fighter pilot may endure a mask-applied pressure of 90 [… read more]. ...
If you have recently been diagnosed as having sleep apnea, your choice for help may seem limited to the CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) therapy mask.
BACKGROUND Sleep apnea occurs in 60-96% of stroke survivors and is associated with poor functional recovery and higher post-stroke mortality. Among patients without stroke, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a safe and effective treatment for sleep apnea. This feasibility pilot study is a step in planning a future efficacy trial of CPAP for patients with acute ischemic stroke ...
DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Asia Pacific Sleep Apnea Devices Market to 2025 - Regional Analysis and Forecasts by Diagnostic Devices, Therapeutic Devices, Positive Airway Pressure Devices, End User, and Country report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.coms offering. The Asia Pacific sleep apnea devices market is expected to reach US$ 963.4 Mn in 2025 from US$ 502.9 Mn…
CPAP machine supplier in Paramus, NJ. CPAP machine treatment of sleep apnea delivers a continuous positive airway pressure through a CPAP mask.
BACKGROUND: Variations exist among the administered pressure and duration of sustained lung inflation (SLI) in the delivery room (DR). We aimed to evaluate the appropriate pressure and duration needed for SLI in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. METHODS: We prospectively randomized 100 preterm (,32 weeks) infants to receive either conventional therapy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) at 5 cm H2O, or four groups of CPAP plus a single maneuver of SLI at four regimens based on administered pressures and durations; P20D20 (Pressure of 20 cm H2O for a duration of 20 seconds), P20D10 (20 cm H2O for 10 seconds), P15D20 (15 cm H2O for 20 seconds), and P15D10 (15 cm H2O for 10 seconds) using a T-piece ventilator ...
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Its important to know the basic about the different types of PAP (positive airway pressure) devices that are used to treat sleep apnea. Whether youre newly diagnosed with sleep apnea or a more seasoned user or healthcare provider, this post outlines the basics of each of the devices. Our goal is to help you understand
Zkratka CPAP [sípap] znamená Continuous Positive Airway Pressure. Jedná se o speciální přístroje s maskou, která se upevní na dýchací cesty. Přístroje vytváří neustálý přetlak v dýchacích cestách a využívá se k léčbě syndromu spánkové apnoe ...
15 events per hour) who were treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).. Thirty men were assigned to a very-low-energy liquid diet (550 kcal/day) for 7 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of gradual reintroduction of normal food; the others maintained their usual diets for 9 weeks. At baseline, mean AHIs were 37 in both groups. After 9 weeks, the mean weight in the intervention group was 20 kg lower than that in the control group, and AHI was 23 events per hour lower with dieting than without. In addition, 5 men in the intervention group were disease free (AHI ,5), and 15 had mild OSA, whereas all but 1 control patient continued to exhibit moderate-to-severe OSA.. Comment: The results of this study are consistent with those of two prior studies (JW Gen Med Mar 10 2009 and Oct 22 2009): Weight loss can be effective for diminishing OSA and might allow some patients to discontinue CPAP, which often is not tolerated well.. - Paul S. Mueller, MD, MPH, FACP. Published in Journal Watch General ...
55 indicates mature surfactant production(correlates with an L/S ratio of 2.2 or greater). Oxygen is given with a small amount of continuous positive airway pressure ("CPAP"), and intravenous fluids are administered to stabilize the blood sugar, blood salts, and blood pressure. If the babys condition worsens, an endotracheal tube (breathing tube) is inserted into the trachea and intermittent breaths are given by a mechanical device. An exogenous preparation of surfactant, either synthetic or extracted from animal lungs, is given through the breathing tube into the lungs. Some of the most commonly used surfactants are Survanta or its generic form Beraksurf, derived from cow lungs, which can decrease the risk of death in hospitalized very-low-birth-weight infants by 30%. Such small premature infants may remain ventilated for months. A study shows that an aerosol of a perfluorocarbon such as perfluoromethyldecalin can reduce inflammation in swine model of IRDS. Chronic lung disease including ...
A double-ended variable speed blower for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) ventilation of patients includes two impellers in the gas flow path that cooperatively pressurize gas to desired pressure and flow characteristics. Thus, the double-ended blower can provide faster pressure response and desired flow characteristics over a narrower range of motor speeds, resulting in greater reliability and less acoustic noise.
Medicant delivery system | Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy using measurements of speed and pressure | Portable sedation apparatus and related method | Textured/polished respiratory mask seal and mask | Mask for use with a patient undergoing a sedated endoscopic procedure |
Subjects will be exposed to short term hypoxia aiming for a target saturation of 80% while haemodynamic and ventilatory parameters are measured. They will breathe through a mouthpiece connected to special equipment which delivers different gas mixtures and enables the delivery of the hypoxic exposure. Heart rate, blood pressure, arterial stiffness ( via pulse wave analysis), and peripheral vasoconstriction (via peripheral arterial tonometry PAT) will be measured. Initially there will be a 10 minute baseline period followed by the 20 minute period of hypoxia and then a 10 minute recovery period. A proportion of subjects will then be studied after being commenced on treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). ...
Adult Obstructive Sleep Apnea Task Force of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Epstein LJ, Kristo D, Strollo PJ Jr, Friedman N, Malhotra A, et al. Clinical guideline for the evaluation, management and long-term care of obstructive sleep apnea in adults. J Clin Sleep Med. 2009 Jun 15;5(3):263-76.. Aurora RN, Casey KR, Kristo D, Auerbach S, Bista SR, Chowdhuri S, et al. Practice parameters for the surgical modifications of the upper airway for obstructive sleep apnea in adults. Sleep. 2010 Oct;33(10):1408-13.. Ballard RD. Management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Fam Pract. 2008 Aug;57(8 Suppl):S24-30.. Barbé F, Durán-Cantolla J, Sánchez-de-la-Torre M, Martínez-Alonso M, Carmona C, Barceló A, et al. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on the incidence of hypertension and cardiovascular events in nonsleepy patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2012 May 23;307(20):2161-8.. Basner RC. Continuous positive airway pressure for ...
The No-apnea score vs . the other five questionnaires in screening for obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in patients with cerebral infarction
Respiration 1997; 64(2):159-61. ABSTRACT. We studied the effects of modafinil, a vigilance-enhancing drug, on excessive daytime sleepiness, memory, night sleep and respiration in 6 patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) using a double-blind random cross-over design with 24-hour polysomnography, verbal memory test and a 5-week sleep-wake diary kept by the patients. There were two 2-week treatment periods in which either modafinil or placebo was used; they were separated by a 1-week wash-out period. Our results show that modafinil reduces daytime sleep duration, lengthens the duration of subjective daytime vigilance and improves long-term memory in patients with OSAHS without modifying night sleep and respiration events.. ...
Looking for online definition of bilevel positive airway pressure in the Medical Dictionary? bilevel positive airway pressure explanation free. What is bilevel positive airway pressure? Meaning of bilevel positive airway pressure medical term. What does bilevel positive airway pressure mean?
Multivariate analysis. We found that age had a significant between subjects effect in Total sleep time (F = 4.08, p = 0.04). On the other hand we found that BMI had significant between subjects effects in Total sleep time (F = 3.27, p = 0.04), Sleep latency (F = 5.47, p = 0.006), Electroencephalographic activations (F = 8.38, p , 0.001), AHI (F = 22.00, p , 0.001), mean oxygen saturation (F = 4.89, p = 0.009), and minimum oxygen saturation (F = 3.91, p = 0.02).. DISCUSSION. Our main finding of this study was that SA is worst disrupted in police officers on NSW and OSAHS than in patients with OSAHS only and control subjects. Our three groups design allowed us to measure how the additive effect of NSW and OSAHS results in more SA and SQ alterations. Alterations were influenced mainly by BMI.. Night shift workers experienced several troubles such as a circadian disruption, increased frequency of sleep disorders, and social and family issues [3]. Searching for better work conditions, the Work ...
... is a chapter in the book, Pulmonology, containing the following 35 pages: Needle Cricothyrotomy, Endotracheal Intubation, Endotracheal Tube, Rapid Sequence Induction, Heimlich Maneuver, Heimlich Maneuver for Infants, Mechanical Ventilation, Continuous Positive Airways Pressure, Positive End-Expiratory Pressure, Ventilator Troubleshooting, Ventilator Weaning, Thoracentesis, Polysomnogram, Advanced Airway, Chest Tube, Needle Thoracentesis, Nasotracheal Intubation, Cricothyrotomy, Small Caliber Chest Tube, Tactile Orotracheal Intubation, Simple Needle Aspiration of Pneumothorax, Extraglottic Device, Video Laryngoscope, Endotracheal Intubation Preparation, Direct Laryngoscope, Endotracheal Intubation Preoxygenation, Tracheostomy, High Flow Nasal Cannula, BIPAP, Post-Intubation Sedation and Analgesia, Noninvasive Ventilation, CPAP for Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Advanced Airway in Children, Elastic Bougie, Laryngospasm Notch Maneuver.
Over 22 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea. The causes and intensity of symptoms of sleep apnea vary person to person, so its important to be aware of the treatment options available. Fortunately, Mercy Health has a new treatment for those who suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea called the Inspire Therapy.. Medical Director of Sleep Medicine Dr. Christopher Morgan stopped by to explain what sleep apnea is, what symptoms to look out for, and the technology behind new treatment options.. Obstructive sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder, causing breathing to repeatedly stop and start during sleep. Symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness, snoring, stopping breathing during sleep, insomnia, excessive nighttime urination, awakening with a dry mouth or sore throat, morning headache, high blood pressure and nighttime sweating.. Patients should treat their sleep apnea so they dont experience daytime fatigue and sleepiness, which can increase the risk for car accidents and ...
Please note the hotline information at the bottom of this posting. It is a press release issued by RESMED regarding ASV. If you have any questions/concerns about your specific type of machine, please call the hotline. ResMed Provides Update on Phase IV SERVE-HF Study of Adaptive Servo-Ventilation (ASV) Therapy In Central Sleep Apnea and Chronic Heart Failure. Study Did Not Meet Primary Endpoint. Safety Signal of Increased Cardiovascular Mortality Found For ASV Therapy In People With Predominant Central Sleep Apnea and Symptomatic Chronic Heart Failure. Results and Safety Signal Observed Only In This Specific Study Population San Diego, Calif. - May 13, 2015 - ResMed (NYSE: RMD) today announced that SERVE-HF, a multinational, multicenter, randomized controlled Phase IV trial did not meet its primary endpoint. SERVE-HF was designed to assess whether the treatment of moderate to severe predominant central sleep apnea with Adaptive Servo-Ventilation (ASV) therapy could reduce mortality and morbidity ...
A 50-year-old African woman was referred to our sleep center for severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Because she had alveolar hypoventilation and had failed previous obstructive sleep apnea syndrome therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation was started. In May 2015, she had a normal residual apnea/hypopnea index calculated by the ventilator software with no hypoventilation. Six months later, severe hypoxemia without hypercapnia was noted. Contrast transthoracic echocardiography showed right-to-left shunt through a patent foramen ovale. This finding prompted a decrease in expiratory and inspiratory positive airway pressures, after which the ventilator software recorded a normal residual apnea/hypopnea index and the blood gas values improved.. CONCLUSION ...

Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for apnea of...Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for apnea of...

Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) for apnea of ... Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is a useful method of respiratory support which reduces the incidence of ... Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation. Positive-Pressure Respiration / methods*. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. ... Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is a simple, effective mode of respiratory support for older children ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Nasal-intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation/11869635.html

Cheyne-Stokes respiration - How is Cheyne-Stokes respiration abbreviated?Cheyne-Stokes respiration - How is Cheyne-Stokes respiration abbreviated?

Cardiovascular consequences of sleep apnea: III-impact of continuous positive airway pressure treatment/Uyku apnesinin ... Continuous Synopsis Record (International Ship and Port Facility Security code). CSR. Code de la Sécurité Routière (French: ... A sophisticated three-layer algorithm distinguishes between obstructed and clear airway apneas and periodic breathing, such as ... partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood, and oxygen saturation and provides significant reductions in plasma ...
more infohttps://acronyms.thefreedictionary.com/Cheyne-Stokes+respiration

Safety Alert Issued for ASV (Adaptive Servoventilation) Treatment in Patients with Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea -...Safety Alert Issued for ASV (Adaptive Servoventilation) Treatment in Patients with Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea -...

... and did not include any other treatment modality such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or auto-adjusting positive ... airway pressure (APAP).. SERVE-HF did not meet its primary endpoint, however this study provides valuable, practice-changing ... Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep disorder in which the throat muscles relax, block the airways and stop the flow of ... interrupting continuous sleep. In central sleep apnea, this occurs more than five times per hour of sleep. ...
more infohttps://myapnea.org/forum/safety-alert-issued-for-asv-treatment-adaptive-servoventilation-asv-in-patients-with-heart-failure-and-central-sleep-apnea

Continuous positive airway pressure - WikipediaContinuous positive airway pressure - Wikipedia

Continuous positive airway pressure. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a form of positive airway pressure ... Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is the pressure in the lungs (alveolar pressure) above atmospheric pressure (the ... Werman, Howard A.; Karren, K; Mistovich, Joseph (2014). "Continuous Positive Airway Pressure(CPAP)". In Werman A. Howard; ... "Continuous positive airway pressure for children with undifferentiated respiratory distress in Ghana: an open-label, cluster, ...
more infohttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_positive_airway_pressure

Continuous positive airway pressure | BMJ OpenContinuous positive airway pressure | BMJ Open

Combination of obstructive sleep apnoea and insomnia treated by continuous positive airway pressure with the SensAwake pressure ... Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on neurocognitive architecture and function in patients with obstructive sleep ... Extrapulmonary effects of continuous airway pressure on patients with obstructive sleep apnoea: protocol for an overview of ...
more infohttps://bmjopen.bmj.com/keyword/continuous-positive-airway-pressure

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Demo Kit | Renesas ElectronicsContinuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Demo Kit | Renesas Electronics

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is a non-invasive therapy treatment for Sleep Apnea condition. It delivers constant ... The CPAP Motor control functional module demonstrate the controlling of the airway pressure. The motor can accelerate and ... It is a combination of both OSA and CSA where there is blockage in the upper airway and the brain cannot process well to ... Air stops flowing into the lung because of a blockage or obstruction in the upper airway (i.e. the nose or throat). This ...
more infohttps://www.renesas.com/sg/en/solutions/healthcare/personal-medical-device/continuous-positive-airway-pressure.html

Continuous positive airway pressure | Define Continuous positive airway pressure at Dictionary.comContinuous positive airway pressure | Define Continuous positive airway pressure at Dictionary.com

Continuous positive airway pressure definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and ... continuous positive airway pressure. n.. *A technique of respiratory therapy for individuals breathing with or without ... mechanical assistance in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by ... continuous positive pressure breathing. *continuous positive pressure ventilation. *continuous processing. *continuous spectrum ...
more infohttps://www.dictionary.com/browse/continuous-positive-airway-pressure

Continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sle...: Ingenta ConnectContinuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sle...: Ingenta Connect

Continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea reduces resting heart rate but does not affect ... Uncontrolled reports suggest that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may reduce dysrhythmia frequency and resting heart ...
more infohttps://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bsc/jsr/2009/00000018/00000003/art00007

Comparison of empirical continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP...: Ingenta ConnectComparison of empirical continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP...: Ingenta Connect

Comparison of empirical continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment versus initial portable sleep monitoring followed ... We compared two algorithms for initiating continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for patients with suspected OSA. ... In predicting CPAP adherence at 6 months, the likelihood ratio positive for algorithms I and II was 2.7 and 5.27 respectively. ...
more infohttps://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bsc/imj/2012/00000042/00000006/art00004

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure | Medical City DallasContinuous Positive Airway Pressure | Medical City Dallas

Learn more about Continuous Positive Airway Pressure at Medical City Dallas DefinitionReasons for the Use of CPAPPossible ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is pressure that is delivered into your airway by a machine. ... Chowdhuri S. Continuous positive airway pressure for the treatment of sleep apnea. Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America. ... Have a stay in a sleep lab to determine the correct amount of airway pressure for you ...
more infohttps://medicalcityhospital.com/hl/?/104276/CPAP&com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language=1

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Cardiometabolic Risk - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govContinuous Positive Airway Pressure and Cardiometabolic Risk - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

The BiPAP machine delivers two levels of pressure. Inspiratory Positive Airway Pressure (IPAP) is a high amount of pressure, ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Cardiometabolic Risk. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Impact of Treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) on Cardiometabolic Risk ... study is that children with sleep disordered breathing will benefit from treatment with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure ( ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01403194

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) for Sleep ApneaContinuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) for Sleep Apnea

... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy uses a machine ... Home , Health Information , Health Library , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) for Sleep Apnea ... A CPAP machine increases air pressure in the throat so your airway does not collapse when you breathe in. You use CPAP at home ...
more infohttps://www.billingsclinic.com/health-info/library/document-viewer/?id=zm2674

Age- and gender-dependent adherence with continuous positive airway pressure therapy.  - PubMed - NCBIAge- and gender-dependent adherence with continuous positive airway pressure therapy. - PubMed - NCBI

Age- and gender-dependent adherence with continuous positive airway pressure therapy.. Woehrle H1, Graml A, Weinreich G. ... Several studies have analysed adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy but little is known on the ... 5.4±4.5/h), mask pressure (8.8±2.0 vs. 8.4±1.9 cm H(2)O), and leakage (0.13±0.16 vs. 0.11±0.15l/s) than females. ... mask pressure, leakage, period of use (hours of use/night), and efficiency (days of use/total days). Patterns of use and ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22033117?dopt=Abstract

Continuous positive airway pressure and lung inflation in sleep apnea patients.  - PubMed - NCBIContinuous positive airway pressure and lung inflation in sleep apnea patients. - PubMed - NCBI

Continuous positive airway pressure and lung inflation in sleep apnea patients.. Verbraecken J1, Willemen M, De Cock W, Van de ... It was shown in normals that an important decrease in upper airway resistance can be obtained with continuous positive airway ... pressure (CPAP). It was suggested that lung inflation in patients with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) could also be a mechanism of ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11464081?dopt=Abstract

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) After Adenotonsillectomy in Children - Tabular View - ClinicalTrials.govContinuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) After Adenotonsillectomy in Children - Tabular View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) After Adenotonsillectomy in Children. The safety and scientific validity of this ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) After Adenotonsillectomy in Children. Official Title ICMJE Sleep-Disordered ... when continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) could still provide definitive relief from SDB. Preliminary data from our group ... and sleepiness in children can improve with Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment after AT, and (2) to identify ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT01554527

Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy: the challenge to effective treatment.  - PubMed - NCBIAdherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy: the challenge to effective treatment. - PubMed - NCBI

Despite the high efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to reverse upper airway obstruction in sleep apnea, ... Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy: the challenge to effective treatment.. Weaver TE1, Grunstein RR. ... continuous positive airway pressure. Reprinted by permission from Reference . ... Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008 Feb 15;5(2):173-178. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18250209?dopt=Abstract

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) - Tests and Treatments - Rush University Medical CenterContinuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) - Tests and Treatments - Rush University Medical Center

Continuous positive airway pressure, better known as CPAP, is the most common treatment for patients diagnosed with moderate to ... an implantable device that helps keep the airway open during sleep. Learn more about upper airway stimulation. ... The mask is connected via a tube to a machine that sends a steady and gentle stream of pressurized air through your airways, ... If you are unable to tolerate CPAP, a thorough airway evaluation with specialists in the Section of Sleep Surgery can determine ...
more infohttps://www.rush.edu/services/test-treatment/continuous-positive-airway-pressure-cpap

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure | Harvard Catalyst Profiles | Harvard CatalystContinuous Positive Airway Pressure | Harvard Catalyst Profiles | Harvard Catalyst

Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure*Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure. *Bilevel Continuous Positive Airway ... "Continuous Positive Airway Pressure" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Continuous Positive Airway ... "Continuous Positive Airway Pressure" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, ... Couples experiences with continuous positive airway pressure treatment: a dyadic perspective. Sleep Health. 2017 10; 3(5):362- ...
more infohttps://connects.catalyst.harvard.edu/Profiles/display/Concept/Continuous%20Positive%20Airway%20Pressure

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea | NorthShoreContinuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea | NorthShore

Read our Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea encyclopedia resources online. ... An auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure (APAP) can automatically decrease or increase the air pressure as needed ... nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) lowers blood pressure during both the day and the night.footnote 7, footnote ... Continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) uses a machine to help a person who has obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) ...
more infohttps://www.northshore.org/healthresources/encyclopedia/encyclopedia.aspx?documenthwid=hw48752

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) | American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck SurgeryContinuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) | American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

The most common and effective nonsurgical treatment for sleep apnea is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or CPAP which is ... The most common and effective nonsurgical treatment for sleep apnea is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or CPAP which is ... Instead, it creates a flow of air pressure when you inhale that is strong enough to keep your airway passages open. Once your ... Alternatively, you may be placed on a self- adjusting CPAP machine which will determine the pressure needed to keep the airway ...
more infohttp://www.entnet.org/content/continuous-positive-airway-pressure-cpap

Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devices Market Research Report - Forecast to 2027Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devices Market Research Report - Forecast to 2027

Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure(CPAP) Devices Market, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure(CPAP) Devices ... Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devices Market, By Product Type. Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure ( ... Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devices Market By, Automation. Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure ( ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Devices Market Expected to Reach 7.1% of CAGR by 2027. Global Continuous Positive ...
more infohttp://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/continuous-positive-airway-pressure-cpap-devices-market-expected-to-reach-71-of-cagr-by-2027-927300.htm

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Acetazolamide to Treat Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients at AltitudeContinuous Positive Airway Pressure and Acetazolamide to Treat Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients at Altitude

... clinicaltrials.gov The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure in ... Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in obstructive sleep apnea patients: The Apnea Positive ... and short-term studies have demonstrated a modest reduction in blood pressure with continuous positive airway pressure therapy ... Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Acetazolamide to Treat Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients at Altitude. 2014-08-27 03:21:11 ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/75372/Continuous-Positive-Airway-Pressure-and-Acetazolamide-to-Treat-Sleep-Apnea-Syndrome-Patients.html

Five-year effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.Five-year effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

There have been very few studies assessing the long-term physiological effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure ( ... There have been very few studies assessing the long-term physiological effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure ( ... series of 65 obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome patients treated for 5 yrs with nasal continuous positive airway pressure, ... Positive-Pressure Respiration* / methods. Prospective Studies. Pulmonary Circulation / physiology. Respiratory Function Tests. ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Five-year-effects-nasal-continuous/9426098.html

Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Market Professional Survey Report 2016 : ReportsnReportsGlobal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Market Professional Survey Report 2016 : ReportsnReports

Notes: Production, means the output of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure... ... 114 Pages Report] Check for Discount on Global Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Market Professional Survey Report ... Table Type I Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Overview Table Type II Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device ... Table Type I Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Overview Table Type II Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device ...
more infohttp://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/702830-global-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-device-market-professional-survey-report-2016.html

Effectiveness and Side-Effects of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in 66 Patients with Sleep Apnea |...Effectiveness and Side-Effects of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in 66 Patients with Sleep Apnea |...

Since upper airway obstruction has been recognized as the crucial factor in the development of obstructive sleep apnea, ... Obstructive Sleep Apnea Sleep Apnea Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Obstructive Sleep ... Schweitzer, P.K., Chambers, G.W., Birkenmeier, N., and Walsh, J.K., 1987, Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ... Effectiveness and Side-Effects of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in 66 Patients with Sleep Apnea. ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4757-9850-0_6
  • 1988, Die nasale 'Continuous positive airway pressure' (nCPAP)-Therapie-Praktische Erfahrungen bei 54 Patienten, Prax. (springer.com)
  • End expiratory esophageal pressure was measured on NCPAP and on NC, and the gas flow on NC was adjusted to generate an end expiratory esophageal pressure equal to that measured on NCPAP. (aappublications.org)
  • Increased sympathetic tone may result from recurrent nocturnal hypoxia (or hypercapnia), sleep fragmentation, or greater pleural pressure falls due to the increased inspiratory effort which develops during hypopnoeas and apnoeas 20 . (ersjournals.com)
  • Elwell CE, Owen-Reece H, Wyatt JS, Cope M, Reynolds EO, Delpy DT (1996) Influence of respiration and changes in expiratory pressure on cerebral haemoglobin concentration measured by near infrared spectroscopy. (springer.com)
  • An auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure (APAP) can automatically decrease or increase the air pressure as needed. (northshore.org)
  • The investigators propose a multicentric controlled randomized trial whose goal is to evaluate the possibility of a prediction of the efficiency of APAP (automatic continuous positive airw. (bioportfolio.com)
  • As the authors have pointed out, infants are dependent on neural input for airway maintenance. (asahq.org)
  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • Snoring-related mechanical trauma may also cause airway inflammation [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Bowie RA, O'Connor PJ, Hardman JG, Mahajan RP (2001) The effect of continuous positive airway pressure on cerebral blood flow velocity in awake volunteers. (springer.com)
  • 7 The pressure generated is determined by a number of factors including the structure of the NC, gas flow through it, and the anatomy of the infant's airway. (aappublications.org)
  • One technique uses short binasal prongs-for example, Hudson prongs-where the pressure in the device is generated by a continuous flow of gas past the nasal prongs with the distal end placed a set depth under water. (bmj.com)
  • With high flow, bubbling is very vigorous with a high pressure amplitude. (bmj.com)
  • Flow can be reduced to a level where bubbling almost stops, but pressure is maintained with the meniscus still at the bottom of the underwater tube. (bmj.com)
  • Slow bubbling was achieved by lowering the gas flow to the point when the bubbling "just" occurred so that the pressure was maintained with the gas/water meniscus at the end of the underwater tube. (bmj.com)
  • You will have to spend the night at a sleep laboratory to find the air pressure levels that work best for you. (northshore.org)
  • Airway inflammation can be assessed by measuring the levels of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)