Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Birth Certificates: Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.Certificate of Need: A certificate issued by a governmental body to an individual or organization proposing to construct or modify a health facility, or to offer a new or different service. The process of issuing the certificate is also included.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Coroners and Medical Examiners: Physicians appointed to investigate all cases of sudden or violent death.Vital Statistics: Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.United StatesEducation, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Forms and Records Control: A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the development, maintenance, and handling of forms and records.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.Hospital Records: Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.CaliforniaInternational Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.): A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Maternal Age: The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Education, Distance: Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)EnglandSex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.WashingtonEducation, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Work Capacity Evaluation: Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.Sick Leave: An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.OhioSex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Drowning: Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Fetal Mortality: Number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more in a given population. Late fetal mortality is death after of 28 weeks or more.WalesInfant Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of infants.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Birth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Education, Nursing, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.North CarolinaPrevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.TexasQuality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Bias (Epidemiology): Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.MarylandLife Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Great BritainAfrican Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.UtahCompetency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.New YorkEducation, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.SwedenTeaching: The educational process of instructing.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.OklahomaHealth Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.New JerseyOdds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.AccidentsWounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Gravidity: The number of pregnancies, complete or incomplete, experienced by a female. It is different from PARITY, which is the number of offspring borne. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.AlaskaBrazilMarital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.New York CityWebcasts as Topic: Transmission of live or pre-recorded audio or video content via connection or download from the INTERNET.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.OregonMothers: Female parents, human or animal.MaineRespiratory Tract NeoplasmsRural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Return to Work: Resumption of normal work routine following a hiatus or period of absence due to injury, disability, or other reasons.Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.Parity: The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Paternal Age: Age of the biological father.United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration: An office in the Department of Labor responsible for developing and establishing occupational safety and health standards.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Clinical Coding: Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Funeral Rites: Those customs and ceremonies pertaining to the dead.Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of services provided for obstetric and gynecologic patients.MissouriWisconsinCase-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Mortuary Practice: Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.KentuckyMedical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Illegitimacy: The state of birth outside of wedlock. It may refer to the offspring or the parents.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.MassachusettsPremature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Aviation: Design, development, manufacture, and operation of heavier-than-air AIRCRAFT.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.District of Columbia: A federal area located between Maryland and Virginia on the Potomac river; it is coextensive with Washington, D.C., which is the capital of the United States.Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.NorwayInternet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Death, Sudden: The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.Marriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.South CarolinaEmployment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.ScotlandSudden Infant Death: The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)Health Information Management: Management of the acquisition, organization, retrieval, and dissemination of health information.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.MichiganEthics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.
  • This growing affluence and view of pets will continue to increase the demand for veterinary care and cause the field to grow faster than average through 2018. (ctcd.edu)
  • Kirsty Gaither, MA, MLIS, educational technology manager, actively supports the continued development of innovative, digital instructional content, and provides technological solutions for a variety of faculty needs. (atsu.edu)
  • Last week, the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences and the Veterinary Medical Center held the annual Resident and Intern Certificate Presentation and Reception at the historic Station 67 in Columbus. (osu.edu)
  • The Principles of Clinical Toxicology Certificate Program is a basic to intermediate-level program for scientists who work in laboratories that perform toxicology testing as well as other health care professionals with an interest in learning more about toxicology. (aacc.org)
  • Enroll today in the next session of instructor-led online classes. (ifebp.org)
  • Participants must inform the instructor(s) at the first class meeting that the course is being taken for mandatory CPE hours for N.Y.S. Licensed accountants. (cuny.edu)
  • Outreach classes also provide overview information regarding OSHA, including workers' rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint. (cuny.edu)
  • The certificate that a Nobel laureate receives is also called a diploma. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Australia, there are three varieties of Diploma currently recognized by the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF): a "Diploma", a qualification granted by vocational education and training (VET) sector or university. (wikipedia.org)
  • NOTE: Certificate acceptance is contingent on state and/or organization requirements-EPA cannot guarantee acceptance. (epa.gov)
  • All nominees in this new category will be individually introduced at the breakfast by the nominating organization and will be awarded a special certificate of appreciation in addition to being considered, in the pool of other board nominees, for the Arts Board Member of the Year. (asu.edu)
  • Classes are supplemented with 6 special topic presentations, field trips, and hands-on experiences. (uarts.edu)