Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.
A child whose needs, abilities, or other characteristics vary so much from the average in mental, physical, or social areas that a greater than usual level of services is needed to facilitate the child's maximum potential development.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.
The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.

A chiropractic service arrangement for musculoskeletal complaints in industry: a pilot study. (1/1298)

Chiropractic services are commonly used by workers with musculoskeletal problems, especially low back and neck complaints. Research into the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this approach is, however, difficult to design without prior pilot studies. This study followed 32 workers with these complaints attending one such service and used five measures of outcome over a 6-month period. These measured pain (VAS), disability (FLP), quality of life (SF-36), perceived benefit and satisfaction with care. Additionally, sickness costs to the companies were recorded over two years encompassing the study period. Treatment utilization was also monitored. Over half the population were chronic sufferers. The effect sizes were large for pain and for seven out of eight dimensions of the SF-36 questionnaire at 6-month follow-up, although not for disability (FLP). High levels of satisfaction and perceived improvement were reported and sickness costs to the companies fell. However, the sample size in this pilot study was small and did not include controls. We would, therefore, recommend a full cost-effectiveness study incorporating a randomized trial in this area.  (+info)

Women's interest in vaginal microbicides. (2/1298)

CONTEXT: Each year, an estimated 15 million new cases of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV, occur in the United States. Women are not only at a disadvantage because of their biological and social susceptibility, but also because of the methods that are available for prevention. METHODS: A nationally representative sample of 1,000 women aged 18-44 in the continental United States who had had sex with a man in the last 12 months were interviewed by telephone. Analyses identified levels and predictors of women's worry about STDs and interest in vaginal microbicides, as well as their preferences regarding method characteristics. Numbers of potential U.S. microbicide users were estimated. RESULTS: An estimated 21.3 million U.S. women have some potential current interest in using a microbicidal product. Depending upon product specifications and cost, as many as 6.0 million women who are worried about getting an STD would be very interested in current use of a microbicide. These women are most likely to be unmarried and not cohabiting, of low income and less education, and black or Hispanic. They also are more likely to have visited a doctor for STD symptoms or to have reduced their sexual activity because of STDs, to have a partner who had had other partners in the past year, to have no steady partner or to have ever used condoms for STD prevention. CONCLUSIONS: A significant minority of women in the United States are worried about STDs and think they would use vaginal microbicides. The development, testing and marketing of such products should be expedited.  (+info)

Raising the bar: the use of performance guarantees by the Pacific Business Group on Health. (3/1298)

In 1996 the Pacific Business Group on Health (PBGH) negotiated more than two dozen performance guarantees with thirteen of California's largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) on behalf the seventeen large employers in its Negotiating Alliance. The negotiations put more than $8 million at risk for meeting performance targets with the goal of improving the performance of all health plans. Nearly $2 million, or 23 percent of the premium at risk, was refunded to the PBGH by the HMOs for missed targets. The majority of plans met their targets for satisfaction with the health plan and physicians, as well as cesarean section, mammography, Pap smear, and prenatal care rates. However, eight of the thirteen plans missed their targets for childhood immunizations, refunding 86 percent of the premium at risk.  (+info)

Clinicians' satisfaction with a hospital blood transfusion service: a marketing analysis of a monopoly supplier. (4/1298)

One of the objectives of the NHS reforms is to improve customer focus within the health service. In a study to assess the quality of customer service provided by the Edinburgh and South East Scotland Blood Transfusion Service a 19 item questionnaire survey of the main clinical users of the service was performed to ascertain their satisfaction, measured on a 5 point anchored scale, with important aspects of the service, including medical consultation, diagnostic services, blood and blood components or products and their delivery, and general satisfaction with the service. Of 122 clinicians in medical and surgical disciplines in five hospitals in Edinburgh, 72 (59%) replied. Fourteen (22%) indicated dissatisfaction with any aspect of the medical consultation service, owing to inadequate follow up of clinical contacts and unsatisfactory routing of incoming calls. Diagnostic services were criticised for the presentation, communication, and interpretation of results. The restricted availability of whole blood, the necessity to order platelets and plasma through the duty blood transfusion service doctor, and the use of a group and screen policy, attracted criticism from a small number of clinicians. Ten of 68 respondents expressed dissatisfaction with delivery of blood and components to the wards and theatres. The findings indicate that the clinicians served by this blood transfusion service are largely satisfied with the service. Changes are being implemented to improve reporting of laboratory results and measures taken to improve liaison with clinicians.  (+info)

Diabetes care: who are the experts? (5/1298)

OBJECTIVES: To identify issues that patients and professionals consider important in diabetes care and differences in their priorities for care and to determine patients' and professionals' judgements of the relative importance of their chosen priorities. DESIGN: Structured group interviews using the nominal group technique. SETTING: Five district health authorities on Tyneside. SUBJECTS: Five nominal groups: expert (seven), non-expert (seven) health care professionals; insulin dependent (four), non-insulin dependent patients (eight); and carers of diabetic patients (eight). MAIN MEASURES: Items important in diabetes care to each nominal group (themes of care), ranked into a series of "top 10" items for each group, and allocated a score according to relative importance to individual members; scores were standardised by individual weighting and group weighting for comparison within and between groups. RESULTS: Patients and professionals agreed that information given to patients, interaction between professionals and patients, patient autonomy, and access were important for good diabetes care, but the importance assigned to each differed. Thus the professionals emphasised empathy and aspects of good communication and patients the desire to know enough to live a "normal" life. Differences were also found within the patient groups; these related to changes in patients' needs at specific points in the development of their illness and in their orientations to care. CONCLUSION: Patients differ from professionals in their orientation to diabetes care, and they can, and should, be involved in setting priorities for care. Since these priorities are dynamic further work is needed to explore the nature of patient satisfaction with diabetes care.  (+info)

Involving consumers in assessing service quality: benefits of using a qualitative approach. (6/1298)

Although important to users, practice standards rarely incorporate users' views of care provided. These views are a valuable source of information, even though there are limits to their value. To improve the standards of care in a 20 bed hospital elderly care unit caring for acute medical conditions a qualitative approach was used. Patients' and carers' perceptions of care and problems with the process of care in the unit were elicited with a specially designed semistructured interview schedule in 83 separate tape recorded interviews with a research nurse in patients' homes. In all, 50 patients and 35 carers were interviewed between 6 June 1991 and 28 May 1992. Of the 50 patients, 33 were female; seven patients were aged less than 80 years, 16, 80-85; 21, 86-90; and six over 90. A total of 16 patients lived with spouses or other carers, two with non-carers, and 32 lived alone, 18 of whom received informal care. Content analysis of the interviews disclosed patients' and carers' general satisfaction with individualised professional care and planning of follow up services on discharge but dissatisfaction in the lack of information about and involvement in treatment and care and about specific staff notes. These findings have prompted remedial changes in clinical practice in the unit; they have also formed the structure of a criterion based survey of practice. The authors conclude that the qualitative approach suited elderly users and also provided the basis for the findings to be incorporated into a continuous audit cycle through a process of feedback and standard setting.  (+info)

The privatization of health care in three Latin American social security systems. (7/1298)

Most Latin American social security institutes are direct providers of medical care services to their beneficiaries. As many of the institutes have developed serious financial problems over the course of the last decade and a half, they have come under increasing attack for (a) exacerbating inequalities in access to and use of health care, (b) further heightening the geographic overconcentration of services, (c) focusing a disproportionate amount of resources on high technology, curative care to the near total exclusion of primary health care, and (d) being administratively top heavy and, more generally, inefficient. In the past few years, many Latin American countries have begun searching for methods to ameliorate these problems. This paper analyzes three recent efforts, all of which involve some degree of privatization: (1) El Salvador's partial privatization of specialty physician outpatient consultations, (2) Peru's minor surgery and its decentralized ambulatory care programme, and (3) Nicaragua's "administrative services only' approach wherein social security beneficiaries choose to join a certified public or private provider organization for one year, and, on behalf of the individual, social security pays the organization a fixed, annual, per capita fee to provide all health care for the enrollee. The paper also identifies political and technical considerations, as well as health care market characteristics that have shaped these efforts and that condition their likelihood of success, including: the size, composition, level of capacity utilization, degree of organization and geographic distribution of private sector resources; relative prices in the private vis-a-vis the public sector; and the size and nature of the private health insurance market. Other Latin American countries would do well to examine these factors and characteristics before embarking on efforts to reform their own social security health care delivery systems.  (+info)

Satisfaction with telephone advice from an accident and emergency department: identifying areas for service improvement. (8/1298)

OBJECTIVES: Members of the public often telephone general practice, accident and emergency departments, and other health services for advice. However, satisfaction related to telephone consultation has received relatively little attention. This study aimed to describe the views of callers to an accident and emergency department who expressed any element of dissatisfaction about their telephone consultation. This was part of a larger study intended to help identify areas for service improvement. METHODS: A telephone consultation record form was used to document details of advice calls made to the accident and emergency department over a three month period. Callers who provided a telephone number were followed up within 72 hours. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed, and explored using content analysis for emerging themes related to dissatisfaction. RESULTS: 203 callers were contacted within 72 hours of their call, of which 197 (97%) agreed to participate. 11 (5.6%) expressed global dissatisfaction, and a further 34 (17%) callers expressed at least one element of dissatisfaction at some point during the interview. Sources of dissatisfaction fell into four broad categories, each of which included more specific aspects of dissatisfaction: 36 (80%) callers were dissatisfied with advice issues, 31 (69%) with process aspects, such as the interpersonal skills of the staff member who took the call, 23 (51%) due to lack of acknowledgement of physical or emotional needs, and 11 (24%) due to access problems. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the findings of other work and identifies three issues for particular consideration in improving the practice of telephone consultation: (a) training of health professionals at both undergraduate and specialist levels should cover telephone communication skills, (b) specific attention needs to be given to ensuring that the information and advice given over the phone is reliable and consistent, and (c) organisational change is required, including the introduction of departmental policies for telephone advice which should become the subject of regular audit.  (+info)

Consumer satisfaction in a medical context refers to the degree to which a patient or their family is content with the healthcare services, products, or experiences they have received. It is a measure of how well the healthcare delivery aligns with the patient's expectations, needs, and preferences. Factors that contribute to consumer satisfaction may include the quality of care, communication and interpersonal skills of healthcare providers, accessibility and convenience, affordability, and outcomes. High consumer satisfaction is associated with better adherence to treatment plans, improved health outcomes, and higher patient loyalty.

An "exceptional child" is a term used in the field of education and healthcare to describe a child who differs from their peers in terms of their development, learning, or behavior due to a disability, disorder, or other special need. This term encompasses a wide range of conditions, including but not limited to:

1. Intellectual disabilities: Children with below-average intellectual ability and significant limitations in adaptive behaviors such as communication, self-care, and social skills.
2. Developmental disabilities: Children with delays or impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional, or linguistic development that affect their daily functioning. Examples include autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, and Down syndrome.
3. Learning disabilities: Children who have difficulties processing or understanding information, which can impact their academic performance. Dyslexia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia are examples of specific learning disabilities.
4. Behavioral disorders: Children with persistent patterns of disruptive, aggressive, or inattentive behavior that interfere with their social, emotional, or educational development. Examples include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and conduct disorder (CD).
5. Sensory impairments: Children with visual, auditory, or other sensory impairments that affect their ability to perceive or interact with their environment.
6. Physical disabilities: Children with limitations in mobility, strength, or coordination due to conditions such as spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, or cerebral palsy.
7. Chronic illnesses: Children with ongoing medical conditions that require specialized care and management, such as cystic fibrosis, diabetes, or epilepsy.
8. Giftedness: Children who demonstrate exceptional intellectual ability, creativity, or talent in one or more areas, which may require specialized educational support to meet their unique needs.

The term "exceptional child" emphasizes the importance of recognizing and addressing the unique strengths, challenges, and needs of these children, as well as providing them with appropriate education, healthcare, and social supports to help them reach their full potential.

Patient satisfaction is a concept in healthcare quality measurement that reflects the patient's perspective and evaluates their experience with the healthcare services they have received. It is a multidimensional construct that includes various aspects such as interpersonal mannerisms of healthcare providers, technical competence, accessibility, timeliness, comfort, and communication.

Patient satisfaction is typically measured through standardized surveys or questionnaires that ask patients to rate their experiences on various aspects of care. The results are often used to assess the quality of care provided by healthcare organizations, identify areas for improvement, and inform policy decisions. However, it's important to note that patient satisfaction is just one aspect of healthcare quality and should be considered alongside other measures such as clinical outcomes and patient safety.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "job satisfaction" is not a medical term or concept. It falls under the domain of occupational or organizational psychology and refers to the degree to which employees like their jobs and are content with their role in the organization. High job satisfaction is generally associated with positive outcomes such as increased productivity, lower turnover rates, and better mental health. However, low job satisfaction can contribute to stress, burnout, and other negative health outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Personal Satisfaction" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the feeling of contentment or fulfillment one derives from achieving their personal goals or desires. However, in a medical context, it might be used to assess a person's quality of life or their satisfaction with their healthcare or treatment outcomes.

"The dimensionality of consumption emotion patterns and consumer satisfaction." Journal of consumer research (1991): 84-91. ... Customer satisfaction provides a leading indicator of consumer purchase intentions and loyalty. The authors also wrote that " ... A multi-decade decline in consumer satisfaction since the 1970s was observed. A majority of respondents felt that their ... In operation, satisfaction is somehow similar to attitude as it can be evaluated as the sum of satisfactions with some features ...
American Customer Satisfaction Index. 1 June 2016. Retrieved 3 September 2021. "Consumer Reports survey Mediacom is the worst ... The February 2010 issue of Consumer Reports ranked Mediacom 15th of 16 in TV service, 24th of 27 in Internet service, and last ... In a survey conducted by Consumer Reports magazine in 2012, Mediacom is the worst cable provider in the country according to ... The deepening of this trend was affirmed in the June 2012 issue of Consumer Reports, in which Mediacom was poorly ranked ...
The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) is an economic indicator that measures the satisfaction of consumers across the ... 2010) "The Effect of Customer Satisfaction on Consumer Spending Growth." Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 47, 28-35 Fornell ... The Australian Customer Satisfaction Index The American Customer Satisfaction Index National Quality Research Center (self- ... 80, 92-107 "Central American Customer Satisfaction Index (CACSI)." "The Customer Satisfaction Index of Puerto Rico (CSIPR)." ...
"Consumer confidence is wilting as the pandemic ravages the economy". Axios. Retrieved 2020-09-22. "Online job ads index rises ... Job Satisfaction; surveys of the C-Suite's top priorities for the year ahead; trends in CEO succession and boardroom diversity ... "Consumer confidence declines for third straight month - CBS News". www.cbsnews.com. Retrieved 2023-08-15. "Forbes Profile". ... Guilford, Gwynn (2020-04-28). "Coronavirus Prompts Record Souring of Consumers' Outlook-and Hope Pain Will Be Short-Lived". ...
One of the largest internet based consumer-review services, Rateitall.com reports the average consumer review of Comcast as 1.6 ... In 2004 and 2007, the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) survey found that Comcast had the worst customer satisfaction ... "Cable TV Subscribers Still Unhappy, New Consumer Reports Survey Shows". consumerreports.org/. Consumer Reports. Retrieved ... As its customer satisfaction eroded by 7% over the past year, revenue increased by 12%." The ACSI analysis also addresses this ...
"Response determinants in satisfaction judgments." Journal of consumer research 14, no. 4 (1988): 495-507. DeSarbo, Wayne S., ...
Engagement extends beyond mere satisfaction. Loyalty - Retention: Highly engaged consumers are more loyal. Increasing the ... satisfaction, involvement, Word of Mouth advertising, complaining and more. Satisfaction: Satisfaction is simply the foundation ... Stimulating a consumer's engagement with a brand is the only way to increase brand loyalty and, therefore, "the best measure of ... This is partly due to the fact that 51% of U.S. and U.K. consumers use YouTube for shopping and product research, a service ...
His early paper about consumer satisfaction with medical care in Psychological Bulletin is a highly cited article. Lebow has ... Lebow, J. L. (1982). Consumer satisfaction with mental health treatment. Psychological Bulletin, 91, 244-259. "Lebow, Jay". ...
These can be customer satisfaction dimensions. On the other hand, many things affect the total cost of ownership of software ... 2004) Calculations of consumer surplus is one way that software firms can keep track of their perception by customers in an ... Consumer surplus for software products can be calculated differently from other products. Customers tend to buy products with ... These authors suggest that the price of software should be based on its consumer surplus. Pricing strategies can be used to ...
Consumer satisfaction results have been mixed. While a 2005 survey by the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association found ... There is also debate about consumer satisfaction with these plans. HSAs were established as part of the Medicare Prescription ... Some policy analysts say that consumer satisfaction doesn't reflect quality of health care. Researchers at RAND Corporation and ... Some consumer organizations, such as Consumers Union[citation needed], and many medical organizations, such as the American ...
The 2006 American Customer Satisfaction Index conducted by the University of Michigan found that customer satisfaction with ... "CIS Consumer Information". naic.org. Archived from the original on May 30, 2020. Retrieved May 23, 2020. "Oregon Department of ... In addition, Farmers' satisfaction level was the most improved from 2005 to 2006 among the companies surveyed. In March 2006, ... "Oregon Department of Consumer & Business Services: Oregon State Auto Complaint Report" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) ...
Christgau, Robert (1981). "Consumer Guide '70s: R". Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies. Ticknor & Fields. ... Browne, David (20 September 2002). "Satisfaction?". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 30 November 2018. "Rolling Stone : The ... Christgau, Robert (16 June 1975). "Christgau's Consumer Guide". The Village Voice. New York. Retrieved 27 May 2013. "I'd Much ...
"Talking Cars with Consumer Reports #32: Worst Car Ever". Consumer Reports. 15 May 2014. Archived from the original on 18 March ... Weil, Dan (14 January 2022). "The 10 Worst Cars for Owner Satisfaction". TheStreet. Retrieved 24 July 2022. Cadogan, John (15 ... Consumer Reports stated that its cramped interior and sluggish engine made it "a chore to drive", and was unable to name a ... Consumer Reports placed the Mirage among the 10 Worst Cars of 2013, commenting "handling is clumsy and the interior is ...
"Insight 07 - Health and Social Services in Ireland - a survey of consumer satisfaction" (PDF). HSE.ie. 2007. Archived (PDF) ... The 2008 Health Consumer Powerhouse Euro Health Consumer Index report ranked Ireland's public healthcare system 11th out of 31 ... "Euro Health Consumer Index 2018" (PDF). Health Consumer Powerhouse. Retrieved 11 July 2019. " ... The Euro health consumer index 2018 report continues to rank the accessibility of Ireland's Health system as the worst in ...
2008 AutoPacific Vehicle Satisfaction Award (GTI) 2008 Consumer Reports - Top Hatchback (Golf/Rabbit) 2008 Car and Driver - Top ... "CNN Top Compact Sporty Car: Consumer Reports". money.cnn.com. Retrieved 27 June 2013. "AutoPacific Announces 2008 Vehicle ... "VW Rabbit Ranked Best in Tests of Affordable Hatchbacks: Consumer Reports". Pressroom.consumerreports.org. Retrieved 7 October ... Satisfaction Award Winners". The Auto Channel. Retrieved 6 April 2022. " ...
... price-conscious consumer. Research proved quite the opposite. Consumer satisfaction for generics was very high; 93% of those ... In the 1980s and 90s, consumers were more concerned about value. Today's consumer is more conscious of what they are purchasing ... Furthermore, evidence suggested consumers viewed the quality of generics to be at least as good as those of private brands. ... This means consumers were no longer responding to, or willing to pay for, the extensive branding and advertising campaigns ...
"Publix earns top spot in consumer satisfaction survey". DrugStoreNews.com. February 17, 2010. Retrieved November 28, 2017. "J.D ... Publix Pharmacies consistently ranked number one for customer satisfaction in supermarket pharmacies in several surveys ...
2012 The Volt ranked first, for the second year in a row, in Consumer Reports' list of owner-satisfaction based on its 2012 ... "Owner satisfaction - Which cars would owners buy again?". Consumer Reports. Retrieved December 1, 2011. "Kelley Blue Book ... 2011 The Volt ranked first in Consumer Reports' list of owner-satisfaction based on its 2011 Annual Auto Survey, with 93% ... Jensen, Cheryl (December 1, 2011). "With an Asterisk, Chevrolet Volt Tops Consumer Reports Owner Satisfaction Survey". The New ...
Journal of Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction and Complaining Behavior. 26: 1-18. Anghelcev, George (2015). "Unintended ... Satisfaction Perceived risk: WOM can be used to warn other potential buyers that a product is not what it claims to be. An ... Previous consumers can help describe strengths and weaknesses of products and help make the correct decision. Relevance of a ... This may be the case as consumers feel that it wasn't in the source's interest to tell what their full perceptions were of the ...
Consumer research typically looks at materialism in two ways: one as a collection of personality traits; and the other as an ... Scitovsky, Tibor (1976). The joyless economy: The psychology of human satisfaction. New York: Oxford University Press. Belk, ... Belk, Russell W. (1985). "Materialism: Trait aspects of living in the material world". Journal of Consumer Research. 12 (3): ... Richins, Marsha L. (1994). "Valuing things: The public and the private meanings of possessions". Journal of Consumer Research. ...
Booton Herndon (1972). Satisfaction Guaranteed: An Unconventional Report to Today's Consumers. McGraw-Hill Book Company. ISBN ...
Karthik Bharadwaj (April 2012). "Consumer satisfaction level towards Cycle Pure Agarbattis" (pdf). Visvesvaraya Technological ... Halmaddi has a particular interest to some consumers, possibly through its association with the popular Satya Nag Champa. It is ...
... increase in the satisfaction of basic human needs; increase in consumer self-sufficiency; and increase in social participation ...
Consumer customers get more satisfaction at less cost. This type of well-being generation can only partially be calculated from ... In the interaction, consumers can be identified in two roles both of which generate well-being. Consumers can be both customers ... The satisfaction of needs originates from the use of the commodities which are produced. The need satisfaction increases when ... In households and the public sector this means that more need satisfaction is achieved at less cost. For this reason, the ...
Westbrook, R.A. (1980). "Intrapersonal affective influences on consumer satisfaction with products". Journal of Consumer ... He claimed that satisfaction with self-esteem led to feelings of self-confidence that, once attained, led to a desire for "self ... Locander, William B.; Hermann, Peter W. (1979). "The Effect of Self-Confidence and Anxiety on Information Seeking in Consumer ... Suh, E.; Diener, E.; Oishi, S.; Triandis, H.C. (1988). "The shifting basis of life satisfaction judgments across cultures: ...
... consumer financial behaviour, environmentally friendly consumer behaviour and energy saving in households. He is the founder ( ... Satisfaction with leisure time activities. Journal of leisure Research, 13(4), pp.337-352.(Cited 437 times, according to Google ... Journal of consumer research, 16(1), pp.98-105. (Cited 433 times, according to Google Scholar. ) Van Raaij, W.F., 1986. ... Consumer research on tourism mental and behavioral constructs. Annals of Tourism Research, 13(1), pp.1-9. (Cited 315 times, ...
... on consumer satisfaction. It was revealed in her research that, compared to a condition where consumers chose for themselves, ... Durante, Kristina M.; Griskevicius, Vladas (January 19, 2018). "Evolution and consumer psychology". Consumer Psychology Review ... Chance Encounters in the Marketplace Enhance Consumer Satisfaction". Journal of Marketing. 85 (4): 141-157. doi:10.1177/ ... Hormonal influences on consumer behavior. Journal of Consumer Research, 37(6), 921-934. Hill, S. E., Rodeheffer, C. D., ...
Journal of Texas Consumer Law. Reprinted with permission from the National Consumer Law Center. Andreoni J. (2005). Trust, ... In the United States, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1976 provides for enforcement of a satisfaction guarantee warranty. In ... Consumer protection laws implemented by statute, however, provide additional remedies as it is not usually expected that a ... In 1975 the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act was passed to strengthen warranties on consumer goods. Among other things, under the law ...
When consumers act this way, their utility and satisfaction improves. All production in real time occurs in the short-run. The ... In this time frame, consumers may act irrationally and use biases to make decisions. A common bias is the use short-cuts known ... Since there are constraints in the short-run, consumers must make decisions in quick time with respect to their current level ... Thus, it becomes difficult for businesses, who are tasked to forecast the demand curves of consumers, to make their own ideal ...
Kochkin S (January 2010). "MarkeTrak VIII: Consumer satisfaction with hearing aids is slowly increasing". The Hearing Journal. ... With this testing, digital cordless phone manufacturers will be able to inform consumers about which products will work with ... The action establishes a new category of over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids, enabling consumers with perceived mild to ... Post-market, Health Canada monitors the performance of the hearing aid and any consumer complaints. Hearing aid financial ...

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