The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.
The comparative and theoretical study of culture, often synonymous with cultural anthropology.
The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.
Includes mechanisms or programs which control the numbers of individuals in a population of humans or animals.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Removal of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS or contaminants for the general protection of the environment. This is accomplished by various chemical, biological, and bulk movement methods, in conjunction with ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING.
A course of action or principle adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual that concerns human interactions with nature and natural resources.
Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.
The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.
Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.
Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.
Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.
The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)
Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.
The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.
Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.
The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.
The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.
The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.
The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)
The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.
Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.
Number of individuals in a population relative to space.
A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.
The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.
A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.
Bone marrow-derived lymphocytes that possess cytotoxic properties, classically directed against transformed and virus-infected cells. Unlike T CELLS; and B CELLS; NK CELLS are not antigen specific. The cytotoxicity of natural killer cells is determined by the collective signaling of an array of inhibitory and stimulatory CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. A subset of T-LYMPHOCYTES referred to as NATURAL KILLER T CELLS shares some of the properties of this cell type.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
Planned management, use, and preservation of energy resources.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.
The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.
The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.
Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.
Activities performed by humans.
The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.
Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.
The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Warm-blooded vertebrate animals belonging to the class Mammalia, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.
Animals having a vertebral column, members of the phylum Chordata, subphylum Craniata comprising mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes.
A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).
Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.
Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.
Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
Databases containing information about NUCLEIC ACIDS such as BASE SEQUENCE; SNPS; NUCLEIC ACID CONFORMATION; and other properties. Information about the DNA fragments kept in a GENE LIBRARY or GENOMIC LIBRARY is often maintained in DNA databases.
The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.
Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.
The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.
The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of organisms which inhabit the OCEANS AND SEAS.
The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.
The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.
Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).
A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).
A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.
Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)
A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.
Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.
VERTEBRATES belonging to the class amphibia such as frogs, toads, newts and salamanders that live in a semiaquatic environment.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.

From pre-hispanic to future conservation alternatives: lessons from Mexico. (1/2885)

In this paper, we review some past and present trends in biodiversity conservation in Mexico and explore possible explanations of why, in spite of this long history of depredation and ineffective conservation policies, the ecosystems have been able to cope with and retain most of their biological components. We suggest a hypothesis based on the persistence of a complex mosaic of past and present traditional land uses as a possible explanation for this resilience. We propose an agenda for the scope of future conservation research and policy, particularly the need to take the socioeconomic context of environmental degradation into account. We put forth a series of questions that we think need to be investigated if the conservation research community is to participate in developing solutions for the future welfare of the human species and of biodiversity on earth.  (+info)

Gardenification of tropical conserved wildlands: multitasking, multicropping, and multiusers. (2/2885)

Tropical wildlands and their biodiversity will survive in perpetuity only through their integration into human society. One protocol for integration is to explicitly recognize conserved tropical wildlands as wildland gardens. A major way to facilitate the generation of goods and services by a wildland garden is to generate a public-domain Yellow Pages for its organisms. Such a Yellow Pages is part and parcel of high-quality search-and-delivery from wildland gardens. And, as they and their organisms become better understood, they become higher quality biodiversity storage devices than are large freezers. One obstacle to wildland garden survival is that specific goods and services, such as biodiversity prospecting, lack development protocols that automatically shunt the profits back to the source. Other obstacles are that environmental services contracts have the unappealing trait of asking for the payment of environmental credit card bills and implying delegation of centralized governmental authority to decentralized social structures. Many of the potential conflicts associated with wildland gardens may be reduced by recognizing two sets of social rules for perpetuating biodiversity and ecosystems, one set for the wildland garden and one set for the agroscape. In the former, maintaining wildland biodiversity and ecosystem survival in perpetuity through minimally damaging use is paramount, while in the agroscape, wild biodiversity and ecosystems are tools for a healthy and productive agroecosystem, and the loss of much of the original is acceptable.  (+info)

Exposure to airborne microorganisms and volatile organic compounds in different types of waste handling. (3/2885)

Occupational exposure of workers to airborne microorganisms and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in different types of waste treatment situations was examined during summer time. Microorganisms were collected as stationary samples using a six-stage Andersen impactor, while for VOCs both personal and stationary sampling was conducted. The exposure at the waste handling facility was considerably greater than at landfill sites or in waste collection. The concentrations of viable fungi were maximally 10(5) cfu/m3, and the concentrations of both total culturable bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria exceeded the proposed occupational exposure limit values (OELV), being 10(4) and 10(3) cfu/m3, respectively. Exposure to VOCs in the waste handling facility was three times higher than at the landfill sites, being at highest 3000 microg/m3, considered to be the limit for discomfort. The use of personal protective equipment at work, thorough hand washing and changing clothes after the work shift are strongly recommended in the waste handling facility and the landfill sites.  (+info)

Global assessment of deforestation related to tobacco farming. (4/2885)

OBJECTIVES: To assess the global amount of forest and woodland consumed annually for curing tobacco between 1990 and 1995; to estimate tobacco's share in total deforestation; to rank tobacco-growing countries by the degree of impact of tobacco deforestation; and to indicate environmental criticality emerging from tobacco's impact on forest resources. DESIGN: Production of country-specific estimates of forests/woodlands needed and depleted on the basis of growing stock/increment of woody biomass involved and wood consumption of tobacco. Comparison of results with secondary statistics on forest cover, deforestation, and population development. RESULTS: An estimated 200,000 ha of forests/woodlands are removed by tobacco farming each year. Deforestation mainly occurs in the developing world, amounting to 1.7% of global net losses of forest cover or 4.6% of total national deforestation. Environmental criticality exists or is emerging in 35 countries with an estimated serious, high, and medium degree of tobacco-related deforestation, mainly in southern Africa, middle east, south, and east Asia, South America, and the Caribbean. CONCLUSION: The hypothesis that deforestation from tobacco production does not have a significant negative effect has to be challenged. For empirical validation, the globally significant pattern of estimated tobacco-related environmental damage ought to be included in international research agendas on global environmental change, to become an integral and rational part of tobacco control policy.  (+info)

Role of reproductive technologies and genetic resource banks in animal conservation. (5/2885)

In combination with modem reproductive technologies, there is potential to use frozen and stored germplasm (genetic resource banks) to support conservation measures for the maintenance of genetic diversity in threatened species. However, turning this idea into reality is a complex process, requiring interdisciplinary collaboration and clearly defined goals. As the number of species deserving the attention of conservation scientists is overwhelmingly large, yet detailed knowledge of reproductive physiology is restricted to relatively few of them, choosing which species to conserve is one of the most difficult issues to be tackled. Besides the direct application of technologically advanced reproductive procedures, modern approaches to non-invasive endocrine monitoring play an important role in optimizing the success of natural breeding programmes. Through the analysis of urine and faecal samples, this type of technology provides invaluable management information about the reproductive status of diverse species. For example, it is possible to diagnose pregnancy and monitor oestrous cycles in elephants and rhinos without causing stress through restraint for sample collection. In this review, we identify the potential contribution of reproductive biology and genetic resource banks to animal conservation, but also highlight the complexity of issues determining the extent to which this potential can be achieved.  (+info)

Late patency of recycled internal mammary artery: verification by Doppler echocardiography and coronary angiography. (6/2885)

We report the case of a 57-year-old man who had presented with exertional angina early in 1997 and had subsequently undergone myocardial revascularization with the use of both internal mammary arteries. Two months after surgery, the patient was readmitted to the hospital with unstable angina. Coronary angiography revealed a 90% occlusion of the left internal mammary artery anastomosis, which was attached to the left anterior descending coronary artery. At reoperation, the left internal mammary artery was detached from the left anterior descending coronary artery, probed and injected with papaverine, checked for patency, and regrafted to the same coronary artery. Recycling of the left internal mammary artery was facilitated by the harvesting and routing technique that had been used during the previous operation. At the patient's 1-year follow-up visit, both Doppler echocardiography and coronary angiography showed patency of the recycled graft. We conclude that recycling of the left internal mammary artery is a safe and effective option in selected patients who require reoperation after myocardial revascularization.  (+info)

Robustness of reserve selection procedures under temporal species turnover. (7/2885)

Complementarity-based algorithms for the selection of reserve networks emphasize the need to represent biodiversity features efficiently, but this may not be sufficient to maintain those features in the long term. Here, we use data from the Common Birds Census in Britain as an exemplar data set to determine guidelines for the selection of reserve networks which are more robust to temporal turnover in features. The extinction patterns found over the 1981-1991 interval suggest that two such guidelines are to represent species in the best sites where they occur (higher local abundance) and to give priority to the rarer species. We tested five reserve selection strategies, one which finds the minimum representation set and others which incorporate the first or both guidelines proposed. Strategies were tested in terms of their efficiency (inversely related to the total area selected) and effectiveness (inversely related to the percentage of species lost) using data on eight pairs of ten-year intervals. The minimum set strategy was always the most efficient, but suffered higher species loss than the others, suggesting that there is a trade-off between efficiency and effectiveness. A desirable compromise can be achieved by embedding the concerns about the long-term maintenance of the biodiversity features of interest in the complementarity-based algorithms.  (+info)

Subcutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis in captive tiger quolls (Dasyurus maculatus). (8/2885)

From July 1989 to October 1998, 9/37 (24%) adult captive tiger quolls (Dasyurus maculatus) were diagnosed with atypical mycobacterial infection involving the subcutis and skin. Females were more often affected than males (seven females, two males). Grossly, lesions presented as focal thickenings, plaques, and abscesses within the subcutis, often with fistulous tracts. The subcutis and skin overlying cervical and thoracic regions were the primary sites of infection. Cytology of subcutaneous impression smears from all nine affected tiger quolls revealed pyogranulomatous inflammation admixed with several acid-fast bacilli. Histologically, all tiger quolls had nodular to diffuse pyogranulomatous panniculitis and cellulitis. Small numbers of acid-fast bacilli were noted histologically in 7/9 (78%) animals. Skin cultures from seven tiger quolls were positive for one or more different Runyon group IV mycobacteria. The disease described in these tiger quolls is similar to subcutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis of humans and domestic animals.  (+info)

The conservation of natural resources refers to the responsible use and management of natural resources, such as water, soil, minerals, forests, and wildlife, in a way that preserves their availability for future generations. This may involve measures such as reducing waste and pollution, promoting sustainable practices, protecting habitats and ecosystems, and engaging in careful planning and decision-making to ensure the long-term sustainability of these resources. The goal of conservation is to balance the needs of the present with the needs of the future, so that current and future generations can continue to benefit from the many goods and services that natural resources provide.

Ethnology is a branch of anthropology that focuses on the systematic study of the cultural, biological, social, and linguistic diversity of human groups both past and present. It involves the comparison and analysis of different ethnic groups, their customs, beliefs, and practices, with the aim of understanding the underlying patterns and processes that shape human culture and society.

In a medical context, ethnology can be used to study the cultural factors that influence health outcomes and healthcare practices among different populations. This may include examining traditional healing systems, attitudes towards illness and disease, and the social determinants of health in different ethnic groups. The insights gained from such research can help inform the development of culturally sensitive healthcare policies and interventions that are tailored to the needs of diverse communities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Forestry" is not a medical term. Forestry is the science and practice of managing forests, plantations, and associated resources for timber, wildlife, recreation, conservation, and other benefits. It involves the application of ecological principles, silvicultural techniques, and management strategies to ensure the sustainability and health of forest ecosystems.

"Population control" is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions. However, it is a concept that is often discussed in the context of public health and societal planning. In this context, population control refers to the practices and policies aimed at managing the size and growth rate of a population, with the goal of achieving a sustainable balance between population size and available resources.

Population control measures may include:

1. Family planning programs that provide access to contraception and education about reproductive health.
2. Public health initiatives that address maternal and child health, infectious diseases, and other factors that affect fertility rates.
3. Social and economic policies that promote gender equality, education, and economic opportunities for women, who often have a disproportionate impact on fertility rates.
4. In some cases, more coercive measures such as forced sterilization or abortion, which are widely considered to be unethical and violations of human rights.

It's important to note that population control is a complex and controversial issue, with many different perspectives and approaches. While some argue that managing population growth is essential for achieving sustainable development and reducing poverty, others argue that it is a violation of individual freedoms and human rights.

An "ecosystem" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of ecology and environmental science. However, I can provide you with the general ecological definition of an ecosystem:

An ecosystem is a community of living organisms interacting with each other and their non-living environment, including both biotic factors (plants, animals, microorganisms) and abiotic factors (climate, soil, water, and air). These interactions create a complex network of relationships that form the foundation of ecological processes, such as energy flow, nutrient cycling, and population dynamics.

While there is no direct medical definition for an ecosystem, understanding the principles of ecosystems can have important implications for human health. For example, healthy ecosystems can provide clean air and water, regulate climate, support food production, and offer opportunities for recreation and relaxation, all of which contribute to overall well-being. Conversely, degraded ecosystems can lead to increased exposure to environmental hazards, reduced access to natural resources, and heightened risks of infectious diseases. Therefore, maintaining the health and integrity of ecosystems is crucial for promoting human health and preventing disease.

Environmental remediation is the process of treating, removing, or containing contamination from environmental media such as soil, groundwater, sediment, or surface water for the purpose of reducing the impact on human health and the environment. The goal of environmental remediation is to return the contaminated area to its original state, or to a state that is safe for use and poses no significant risk to human health or the environment. This process often involves various techniques such as excavation, soil washing, bioremediation, chemical treatment, and thermal treatment. The specific method used depends on the type and extent of contamination, as well as site-specific conditions.

Environmental policy refers to the regulations, guidelines, and practices established by federal, state, or local governments to protect natural resources, human health, and the environment from potential harm caused by human activities. These policies aim to balance economic development with environmental sustainability through various measures such as:

1. Setting standards for air and water quality, waste management, and hazardous substance handling.
2. Encouraging sustainable practices in industries, agriculture, transportation, and energy production.
3. Promoting conservation efforts, habitat restoration, and biodiversity preservation.
4. Implementing monitoring programs to assess environmental impacts and enforce regulations.
5. Providing education and awareness campaigns to engage the public in environmentally responsible behaviors.

Environmental policies can be mandatory or voluntary and may involve various stakeholders, including government agencies, businesses, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and communities. The primary goal of environmental policy is to minimize negative human impacts on ecosystems while promoting a healthy and sustainable environment for present and future generations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Fisheries" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Fisheries are places or practices concerned with the catching, processing, or selling of fish, shellfish, and other forms of aquatic life. They can refer to commercial operations, recreational activities, or scientific research related to aquatic species. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help answer those for you!

I apologize for any confusion, but "agriculture" is not a term that has a medical definition. Agriculture refers to the cultivation and breeding of animals, plants, and fungi for food, fiber, biofuel, medicinal plants, and other products used to sustain and enhance human life. It is an important industry and practice that has been developed over thousands of years and continues to play a critical role in global food production and security.

Biodiversity is the variety of different species of plants, animals, and microorganisms that live in an ecosystem. It also includes the variety of genes within a species and the variety of ecosystems (such as forests, grasslands, deserts, and oceans) that exist in a region or on Earth as a whole. Biodiversity is important for maintaining the health and balance of ecosystems, providing resources and services such as food, clean water, and pollination, and contributing to the discovery of new medicines and other useful products. The loss of biodiversity can have negative impacts on the functioning of ecosystems and the services they provide, and can threaten the survival of species and the livelihoods of people who depend on them.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "population growth" is actually a demographic term rather than a medical one. It refers to the increase in the size of a population over time, typically due to births and immigrants exceeding deaths and emigrants. It is commonly used in discussions of societal development, resource management, and environmental impact, among other fields.

If you have any questions related to medical definitions or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help with those as well!

Traditional medicine (TM) refers to health practices, approaches, knowledge and beliefs incorporating plant, animal and mineral-based medicines, spiritual therapies, manual techniques and exercises, applied singularly or in combination to treat, diagnose and prevent illnesses or maintain well-being. Although traditional medicine has been practiced since prehistoric times, it is still widely used today and may include:

1. Traditional Asian medicines such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and qigong from China; Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani and Siddha from India; and Jamu from Indonesia.
2. Traditional European herbal medicines, also known as phytotherapy.
3. North American traditional indigenous medicines, including Native American and Inuit practices.
4. African traditional medicines, such as herbal, spiritual, and manual techniques practiced in various African cultures.
5. South American traditional medicines, like Mapuche, Curanderismo, and Santo Daime practices from different countries.

It is essential to note that traditional medicine may not follow the scientific principles, evidence-based standards, or quality control measures inherent to conventional (also known as allopathic or Western) medicine. However, some traditional medicines have been integrated into modern healthcare systems and are considered complementary or alternative medicines (CAM). The World Health Organization encourages member states to develop policies and regulations for integrating TM/CAM practices into their healthcare systems, ensuring safety, efficacy, and quality while respecting cultural diversity.

Environmental pollution is the introduction or presence of harmful substances, energies, or objects in the environment that can cause adverse effects on living organisms and ecosystems. These pollutants can be in the form of chemical, physical, or biological agents that contaminate air, water, soil, or noise levels, exceeding safe limits established by environmental regulations.

Examples of environmental pollution include:

1. Air pollution: The presence of harmful substances such as particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the air that can cause respiratory and other health problems.
2. Water pollution: Contamination of water sources with chemicals, heavy metals, pathogens, or other pollutants that can harm aquatic life and make the water unsafe for human consumption or recreational use.
3. Soil pollution: The presence of harmful substances such as heavy metals, pesticides, and industrial waste in soil that can reduce soil fertility, contaminate crops, and pose a risk to human health.
4. Noise pollution: Excessive noise levels from transportation, industrial activities, or other sources that can cause stress, sleep disturbances, and hearing loss in humans and animals.
5. Light pollution: The excessive use of artificial light that can disrupt ecosystems, affect human circadian rhythms, and contribute to energy waste.

Environmental pollution is a significant global health issue that requires urgent attention and action from governments, industries, and individuals to reduce pollutant emissions, promote sustainable practices, and protect the environment for future generations.

Ecology is not a medical term, but rather a term used in the field of biology. It refers to the study of the relationships between living organisms and their environment. This includes how organisms interact with each other and with their physical surroundings, such as climate, soil, and water. Ecologists may study the distribution and abundance of species, the flow of energy through an ecosystem, and the effects of human activities on the environment. While ecology is not a medical field, understanding ecological principles can be important for addressing public health issues related to the environment, such as pollution, climate change, and infectious diseases.

Climate change, as defined medically, refers to the long-term alterations in the statistical distribution of weather patterns caused by changes in the Earth's climate system. These changes can have significant impacts on human health and wellbeing.

Medical professionals are increasingly recognizing the importance of addressing climate change as a public health issue. The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified climate change as one of the greatest threats to global health in the 21st century, with potential impacts including increased heat-related mortality, more frequent and severe natural disasters, changes in the distribution of infectious diseases, and decreased food security.

Climate change can also exacerbate existing health disparities, as vulnerable populations such as children, the elderly, low-income communities, and those with chronic medical conditions are often disproportionately affected by its impacts. As a result, addressing climate change is an important public health priority, and medical professionals have a critical role to play in advocating for policies and practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote adaptation to the changing climate.

Environmental monitoring is the systematic and ongoing surveillance, measurement, and assessment of environmental parameters, pollutants, or other stressors in order to evaluate potential impacts on human health, ecological systems, or compliance with regulatory standards. This process typically involves collecting and analyzing data from various sources, such as air, water, soil, and biota, and using this information to inform decisions related to public health, environmental protection, and resource management.

In medical terms, environmental monitoring may refer specifically to the assessment of environmental factors that can impact human health, such as air quality, water contamination, or exposure to hazardous substances. This type of monitoring is often conducted in occupational settings, where workers may be exposed to potential health hazards, as well as in community-based settings, where environmental factors may contribute to public health issues. The goal of environmental monitoring in a medical context is to identify and mitigate potential health risks associated with environmental exposures, and to promote healthy and safe environments for individuals and communities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "trees" is not a medical term. It is a common term used in various fields, including biology, ecology, and dendrology, to refer to a woody perennial plant with a single stem or trunk that supports branches and leaves in most species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, please provide more context so I can offer an accurate and helpful response.

Ethnobotany is the scientific study of the traditional knowledge, practices, and beliefs about plants held by a particular group of people or culture. It involves the documentation and analysis of the ways in which people use plants for medicinal, food, shelter, clothing, dye, ritual, and other purposes. The field of ethnobotany draws on anthropology, botany, ecology, chemistry, and geography to understand the complex relationships between human cultures and their plant resources.

Ethnobotanists may conduct fieldwork with communities to learn about their traditional plant use, documenting this knowledge through interviews, observations, and collections of plant specimens. They may also study the ecological and cultural factors that shape plant use and management, as well as the impacts of globalization, environmental change, and other forces on traditional plant knowledge and practices.

The information gathered through ethnobotanical research can have important implications for conservation, human health, and sustainable development. For example, traditional plant remedies may provide leads for the development of new drugs or therapies, while understanding the cultural significance of plants can help inform efforts to protect biodiversity and support the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.

The term "environment" in a medical context generally refers to the external conditions and surroundings that can have an impact on living organisms, including humans. This includes both physical factors such as air quality, water supply, soil composition, temperature, and radiation, as well as biological factors such as the presence of microorganisms, plants, and animals.

In public health and epidemiology, the term "environmental exposure" is often used to describe the contact between an individual and a potentially harmful environmental agent, such as air pollution or contaminated water. These exposures can have significant impacts on human health, contributing to a range of diseases and disorders, including respiratory illnesses, cancer, neurological disorders, and reproductive problems.

Efforts to protect and improve the environment are therefore critical for promoting human health and preventing disease. This includes measures to reduce pollution, conserve natural resources, promote sustainable development, and mitigate the impacts of climate change.

Animal husbandry is the practice of breeding and raising animals for agricultural purposes, such as for the production of meat, milk, eggs, or fiber. It involves providing proper care for the animals, including feeding, housing, health care, and breeding management. The goal of animal husbandry is to maintain healthy and productive animals while also being mindful of environmental sustainability and animal welfare.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geography" is not a term that has a medical definition. Geography is a field of study that deals with the location and distribution of physical and cultural features on Earth's surface, as well as how humans interact with and affect those features. It is not a concept that is typically used in a medical context. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Food Supply" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a more general term related to the availability and distribution of food. However, in a broader public health context, "food supply" can refer to the overall system and infrastructure that provides food to a population, including agricultural practices, food processing, distribution, and accessibility. Ensuring a safe and adequate food supply is an important aspect of public health and preventive medicine.

Health resources refer to the personnel, facilities, equipment, and supplies that are used in the delivery of healthcare services. This includes:

1. Human resources: Healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and allied health professionals.

2. Physical resources: Hospitals, clinics, laboratories, and other healthcare facilities.

3. Technological resources: Medical equipment and technology used for diagnosis and treatment, such as MRI machines, CT scanners, and electronic health records.

4. Financial resources: Funding for healthcare services, including public and private insurance, government funding, and out-of-pocket payments.

5. Informational resources: Research findings, evidence-based practices, and health education materials that inform healthcare decision-making.

The adequate availability, distribution, and utilization of these health resources are crucial for ensuring access to quality healthcare services and improving population health outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "population density" is actually a term used in population geography and epidemiology, rather than medical terminology. It refers to the number of people living in a specific area or region, usually measured as the number of people per square mile or square kilometer.

However, understanding population density can be important in public health and medicine because it can influence various factors related to health outcomes and healthcare delivery, such as:

1. Disease transmission rates: Higher population densities can facilitate the spread of infectious diseases, particularly those that are transmitted through close contact between individuals.
2. Access to healthcare services: Areas with lower population density might have fewer healthcare resources and providers available, making it more challenging for residents to access necessary medical care.
3. Health disparities: Population density can contribute to health inequities, as urban areas often have better access to healthcare, education, and economic opportunities than rural areas, leading to differences in health outcomes between these populations.
4. Environmental factors: Higher population densities might lead to increased pollution, noise, and other environmental hazards that can negatively impact health.

Therefore, while "population density" is not a medical definition per se, it remains an essential concept for understanding various public health and healthcare issues.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. The term "fishes" is not typically used in a medical context. "Fish" or "fishes" refers to any aquatic organism belonging to the taxonomic class Actinopterygii (bony fish), Chondrichthyes (sharks and rays), or Agnatha (jawless fish).

However, if you are referring to a condition related to fish or consuming fish, there is a medical issue called scombroid fish poisoning. It's a foodborne illness caused by eating spoiled or improperly stored fish from the Scombridae family, which includes tuna, mackerel, and bonito, among others. The bacteria present in these fish can produce histamine, which can cause symptoms like skin flushing, headache, diarrhea, and itchy rash. But again, this is not related to the term "fishes" itself but rather a condition associated with consuming certain types of fish.

Population dynamics, in the context of public health and epidemiology, refers to the study of the changes in size and structure of a population over time, as well as the factors that contribute to those changes. This can include birth rates, death rates, migration patterns, aging, and other demographic characteristics. Understanding population dynamics is crucial for planning and implementing public health interventions, such as vaccination programs or disease prevention strategies, as they allow researchers and policymakers to identify vulnerable populations, predict future health trends, and evaluate the impact of public health initiatives.

A conserved sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to a pattern of nucleotides (in DNA or RNA) or amino acids (in proteins) that has remained relatively unchanged over evolutionary time. These sequences are often functionally important and are highly conserved across different species, indicating strong selection pressure against changes in these regions.

In the case of protein-coding genes, the corresponding amino acid sequence is deduced from the DNA sequence through the genetic code. Conserved sequences in proteins may indicate structurally or functionally important regions, such as active sites or binding sites, that are critical for the protein's activity. Similarly, conserved non-coding sequences in DNA may represent regulatory elements that control gene expression.

Identifying conserved sequences can be useful for inferring evolutionary relationships between species and for predicting the function of unknown genes or proteins.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

The term "Theoretical Models" is used in various scientific fields, including medicine, to describe a representation of a complex system or phenomenon. It is a simplified framework that explains how different components of the system interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall behavior of the system. Theoretical models are often used in medical research to understand and predict the outcomes of diseases, treatments, or public health interventions.

A theoretical model can take many forms, such as mathematical equations, computer simulations, or conceptual diagrams. It is based on a set of assumptions and hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms that drive the system. By manipulating these variables and observing the effects on the model's output, researchers can test their assumptions and generate new insights into the system's behavior.

Theoretical models are useful for medical research because they allow scientists to explore complex systems in a controlled and systematic way. They can help identify key drivers of disease or treatment outcomes, inform the design of clinical trials, and guide the development of new interventions. However, it is important to recognize that theoretical models are simplifications of reality and may not capture all the nuances and complexities of real-world systems. Therefore, they should be used in conjunction with other forms of evidence, such as experimental data and observational studies, to inform medical decision-making.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

An endangered species is a species of animal, plant, or other organism that is at risk of becoming extinct because its population is declining or threatened by changing environmental or demographic factors. This term is defined and used in the context of conservation biology and wildlife management to identify species that need protection and preservation efforts.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) maintains a "Red List" of species, categorizing them based on their extinction risk. The categories include "Critically Endangered," "Endangered," "Vulnerable," and "Near Threatened." A species is considered endangered if it meets certain criteria indicating that it faces a very high risk of extinction in the wild.

The primary causes for species to become endangered include habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, pollution, climate change, overexploitation, and introduction of invasive species. Conservation efforts often focus on protecting habitats, managing threats, and implementing recovery programs to help endangered species recover their populations and reduce the risk of extinction.

Natural Killer (NK) cells are a type of lymphocyte, which are large granular innate immune cells that play a crucial role in the host's defense against viral infections and malignant transformations. They do not require prior sensitization to target and destroy abnormal cells, such as virus-infected cells or tumor cells. NK cells recognize their targets through an array of germline-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors that detect the alterations in the cell surface molecules of potential targets. Upon activation, NK cells release cytotoxic granules containing perforins and granzymes to induce target cell apoptosis, and they also produce a variety of cytokines and chemokines to modulate immune responses. Overall, natural killer cells serve as a critical component of the innate immune system, providing rapid and effective responses against infected or malignant cells.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Resource allocation in a medical context refers to the process of distributing and managing healthcare resources, such as budget, staff, equipment, and supplies, in an efficient and equitable manner to meet the health needs of a population. This involves prioritizing the use of resources to maximize benefits, improve patient outcomes, and ensure fair access to healthcare services. It is a critical aspect of healthcare planning and management, particularly in situations where resources are limited or there are competing demands for them.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Internet" is a term that pertains to the global network of interconnected computers and servers that enable the transmission and reception of data via the internet protocol (IP). It is not a medical term and does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Biological evolution is the change in the genetic composition of populations of organisms over time, from one generation to the next. It is a process that results in descendants differing genetically from their ancestors. Biological evolution can be driven by several mechanisms, including natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow, and mutation. These processes can lead to changes in the frequency of alleles (variants of a gene) within populations, resulting in the development of new species and the extinction of others over long periods of time. Biological evolution provides a unifying explanation for the diversity of life on Earth and is supported by extensive evidence from many different fields of science, including genetics, paleontology, comparative anatomy, and biogeography.

Genetic variation refers to the differences in DNA sequences among individuals and populations. These variations can result from mutations, genetic recombination, or gene flow between populations. Genetic variation is essential for evolution by providing the raw material upon which natural selection acts. It can occur within a single gene, between different genes, or at larger scales, such as differences in the number of chromosomes or entire sets of chromosomes. The study of genetic variation is crucial in understanding the genetic basis of diseases and traits, as well as the evolutionary history and relationships among species.

The principle of "Conservation of Energy Resources" is not a medical term or concept, but rather it is a fundamental principle in the field of physics and environmental science. It refers to the need to manage and use energy resources in a sustainable way, by avoiding waste and finding ways to reuse or recycle them. This principle has important implications for public health, as the depletion of non-renewable energy sources and the negative impacts of energy production on the environment can have significant effects on human health. For example, air pollution from fossil fuel combustion can contribute to respiratory diseases and other health problems, while climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions can exacerbate a range of health risks. Therefore, conserving energy resources is an important aspect of promoting public health and preventing disease.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Computational biology is a branch of biology that uses mathematical and computational methods to study biological data, models, and processes. It involves the development and application of algorithms, statistical models, and computational approaches to analyze and interpret large-scale molecular and phenotypic data from genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and other high-throughput technologies. The goal is to gain insights into biological systems and processes, develop predictive models, and inform experimental design and hypothesis testing in the life sciences. Computational biology encompasses a wide range of disciplines, including bioinformatics, systems biology, computational genomics, network biology, and mathematical modeling of biological systems.

"Extinction, Biological" refers to the state or process of a species or taxonomic group becoming extinct, meaning that there are no surviving members remaining alive anywhere in the world. This can occur due to various factors such as environmental changes, competition with other species, overexploitation by humans, or a combination of these and other elements. It is an important concept in the field of biology and conservation, as the extinction of a species can have significant impacts on ecosystems and biodiversity.

Genomics is the scientific study of genes and their functions. It involves the sequencing and analysis of an organism's genome, which is its complete set of DNA, including all of its genes. Genomics also includes the study of how genes interact with each other and with the environment. This field of study can provide important insights into the genetic basis of diseases and can lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and treatments.

A genetic database is a type of biomedical or health informatics database that stores and organizes genetic data, such as DNA sequences, gene maps, genotypes, haplotypes, and phenotype information. These databases can be used for various purposes, including research, clinical diagnosis, and personalized medicine.

There are different types of genetic databases, including:

1. Genomic databases: These databases store whole genome sequences, gene expression data, and other genomic information. Examples include the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) GenBank, the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ).
2. Gene databases: These databases contain information about specific genes, including their location, function, regulation, and evolution. Examples include the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, the Universal Protein Resource (UniProt), and the Gene Ontology (GO) database.
3. Variant databases: These databases store information about genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions/deletions (INDELs), and copy number variations (CNVs). Examples include the Database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (dbSNP), the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), and the International HapMap Project.
4. Clinical databases: These databases contain genetic and clinical information about patients, such as their genotype, phenotype, family history, and response to treatments. Examples include the ClinVar database, the Pharmacogenomics Knowledgebase (PharmGKB), and the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR).
5. Population databases: These databases store genetic information about different populations, including their ancestry, demographics, and genetic diversity. Examples include the 1000 Genomes Project, the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP), and the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND).

Genetic databases can be publicly accessible or restricted to authorized users, depending on their purpose and content. They play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of genetics and genomics, as well as improving healthcare and personalized medicine.

Sequence homology in nucleic acids refers to the similarity or identity between the nucleotide sequences of two or more DNA or RNA molecules. It is often used as a measure of biological relationship between genes, organisms, or populations. High sequence homology suggests a recent common ancestry or functional constraint, while low sequence homology may indicate a more distant relationship or different functions.

Nucleic acid sequence homology can be determined by various methods such as pairwise alignment, multiple sequence alignment, and statistical analysis. The degree of homology is typically expressed as a percentage of identical or similar nucleotides in a given window of comparison.

It's important to note that the interpretation of sequence homology depends on the biological context and the evolutionary distance between the sequences compared. Therefore, functional and experimental validation is often necessary to confirm the significance of sequence homology.

I am not aware of a widely accepted medical definition for the term "software," as it is more commonly used in the context of computer science and technology. Software refers to programs, data, and instructions that are used by computers to perform various tasks. It does not have direct relevance to medical fields such as anatomy, physiology, or clinical practice. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help with those instead!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Human Activities" is a very broad term and not something that typically has a specific medical definition. Human activities can encompass everything from physical movement like exercise or daily chores, to mental activities like work or hobbies, to social interactions, and more.

However, in a medical context, human activities might be discussed in terms of their impact on health. For example, certain activities could be considered "healthy" if they contribute to physical fitness, stress reduction, or overall well-being. Conversely, other activities might be seen as "risky" or "unhealthy" if they increase the likelihood of injury or disease.

If you're looking for information on a more specific concept related to human activities and health, please provide more details so I can give a more accurate response.

A genome is the complete set of genetic material (DNA, or in some viruses, RNA) present in a single cell of an organism. It includes all of the genes, both coding and noncoding, as well as other regulatory elements that together determine the unique characteristics of that organism. The human genome, for example, contains approximately 3 billion base pairs and about 20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes.

The term "genome" was first coined by Hans Winkler in 1920, derived from the word "gene" and the suffix "-ome," which refers to a complete set of something. The study of genomes is known as genomics.

Understanding the genome can provide valuable insights into the genetic basis of diseases, evolution, and other biological processes. With advancements in sequencing technologies, it has become possible to determine the entire genomic sequence of many organisms, including humans, and use this information for various applications such as personalized medicine, gene therapy, and biotechnology.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

A User-Computer Interface (also known as Human-Computer Interaction) refers to the point at which a person (user) interacts with a computer system. This can include both hardware and software components, such as keyboards, mice, touchscreens, and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). The design of the user-computer interface is crucial in determining the usability and accessibility of a computer system for the user. A well-designed interface should be intuitive, efficient, and easy to use, minimizing the cognitive load on the user and allowing them to effectively accomplish their tasks.

I am not aware of a medical definition for the term "birds." Birds are a group of warm-blooded vertebrates constituting the class Aves, characterized by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, and lightweight but strong skeletons. Some birds, such as pigeons and chickens, have been used in medical research, but the term "birds" itself does not have a specific medical definition.

Synteny, in the context of genetics and genomics, refers to the presence of two or more genetic loci (regions) on the same chromosome, in the same relative order and orientation. This term is often used to describe conserved gene organization between different species, indicating a common ancestry.

It's important to note that synteny should not be confused with "colinearity," which refers to the conservation of gene content and order within a genome or between genomes of closely related species. Synteny is a broader concept that can also include conserved gene order across more distantly related species, even if some genes have been lost or gained in the process.

In medical research, synteny analysis can be useful for identifying conserved genetic elements and regulatory regions that may play important roles in disease susceptibility or other biological processes.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

Mammals are a group of warm-blooded vertebrates constituting the class Mammalia, characterized by the presence of mammary glands (which produce milk to feed their young), hair or fur, three middle ear bones, and a neocortex region in their brain. They are found in a diverse range of habitats and come in various sizes, from tiny shrews to large whales. Examples of mammals include humans, apes, monkeys, dogs, cats, bats, mice, raccoons, seals, dolphins, horses, and elephants.

A group of chordate animals (Phylum Chordata) that have a vertebral column, or backbone, made up of individual vertebrae. This group includes mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish. Vertebrates are characterized by the presence of a notochord, which is a flexible, rod-like structure that runs along the length of the body during development; a dorsal hollow nerve cord; and pharyngeal gill slits at some stage in their development. The vertebral column provides support and protection for the spinal cord and allows for the development of complex movements and behaviors.

A multigene family is a group of genetically related genes that share a common ancestry and have similar sequences or structures. These genes are arranged in clusters on a chromosome and often encode proteins with similar functions. They can arise through various mechanisms, including gene duplication, recombination, and transposition. Multigene families play crucial roles in many biological processes, such as development, immunity, and metabolism. Examples of multigene families include the globin genes involved in oxygen transport, the immune system's major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, and the cytochrome P450 genes associated with drug metabolism.

According to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), biological products are "products that are made from or contain a living organism or its derivatives, such as vaccines, blood and blood components, cells, genes, tissues, and proteins." These products can be composed of sugars, proteins, nucleic acids, or complex combinations of these substances, and they can come from many sources, including humans, animals, microorganisms, or plants.

Biological products are often used to diagnose, prevent, or treat a wide range of medical conditions, and they can be administered in various ways, such as through injection, inhalation, or topical application. Because biological products are derived from living organisms, their manufacturing processes can be complex and must be tightly controlled to ensure the safety, purity, and potency of the final product.

It's important to note that biological products are not the same as drugs, which are chemically synthesized compounds. While drugs are designed to interact with specific targets in the body, such as enzymes or receptors, biological products can have more complex and varied mechanisms of action, making them potentially more difficult to characterize and regulate.

Chromosome mapping, also known as physical mapping, is the process of determining the location and order of specific genes or genetic markers on a chromosome. This is typically done by using various laboratory techniques to identify landmarks along the chromosome, such as restriction enzyme cutting sites or patterns of DNA sequence repeats. The resulting map provides important information about the organization and structure of the genome, and can be used for a variety of purposes, including identifying the location of genes associated with genetic diseases, studying evolutionary relationships between organisms, and developing genetic markers for use in breeding or forensic applications.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

An algorithm is not a medical term, but rather a concept from computer science and mathematics. In the context of medicine, algorithms are often used to describe step-by-step procedures for diagnosing or managing medical conditions. These procedures typically involve a series of rules or decision points that help healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care.

For example, an algorithm for diagnosing a particular type of heart disease might involve taking a patient's medical history, performing a physical exam, ordering certain diagnostic tests, and interpreting the results in a specific way. By following this algorithm, healthcare professionals can ensure that they are using a consistent and evidence-based approach to making a diagnosis.

Algorithms can also be used to guide treatment decisions. For instance, an algorithm for managing diabetes might involve setting target blood sugar levels, recommending certain medications or lifestyle changes based on the patient's individual needs, and monitoring the patient's response to treatment over time.

Overall, algorithms are valuable tools in medicine because they help standardize clinical decision-making and ensure that patients receive high-quality care based on the latest scientific evidence.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Microsatellite repeats, also known as short tandem repeats (STRs), are repetitive DNA sequences made up of units of 1-6 base pairs that are repeated in a head-to-tail manner. These repeats are spread throughout the human genome and are highly polymorphic, meaning they can have different numbers of repeat units in different individuals.

Microsatellites are useful as genetic markers because of their high degree of variability. They are commonly used in forensic science to identify individuals, in genealogy to trace ancestry, and in medical research to study genetic diseases and disorders. Mutations in microsatellite repeats have been associated with various neurological conditions, including Huntington's disease and fragile X syndrome.

Health care rationing refers to the deliberate limitation or restriction of medical services, treatments, or resources provided to patients based on specific criteria or guidelines. These limitations can be influenced by various factors such as cost-effectiveness, scarcity of resources, evidence-based medicine, and clinical appropriateness. The primary goal of health care rationing is to ensure fair distribution and allocation of finite medical resources among a population while maximizing overall health benefits and minimizing harm.

Rationing can occur at different levels within the healthcare system, including individual patient care decisions, insurance coverage policies, and governmental resource allocation. Examples of rationing include prioritizing certain treatments based on their proven effectiveness, restricting access to high-cost procedures with limited clinical benefits, or setting age limits for specific interventions.

It is important to note that health care rationing remains a controversial topic due to ethical concerns about potential disparities in care and the balance between individual patient needs and societal resource constraints.

'Information Storage and Retrieval' in the context of medical informatics refers to the processes and systems used for the recording, storing, organizing, protecting, and retrieving electronic health information (e.g., patient records, clinical data, medical images) for various purposes such as diagnosis, treatment planning, research, and education. This may involve the use of electronic health record (EHR) systems, databases, data warehouses, and other digital technologies that enable healthcare providers to access and share accurate, up-to-date, and relevant information about a patient's health status, medical history, and care plan. The goal is to improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and coordination of healthcare delivery by providing timely and evidence-based information to support clinical decision-making and patient engagement.

Genetic models are theoretical frameworks used in genetics to describe and explain the inheritance patterns and genetic architecture of traits, diseases, or phenomena. These models are based on mathematical equations and statistical methods that incorporate information about gene frequencies, modes of inheritance, and the effects of environmental factors. They can be used to predict the probability of certain genetic outcomes, to understand the genetic basis of complex traits, and to inform medical management and treatment decisions.

There are several types of genetic models, including:

1. Mendelian models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of simple genetic traits that follow Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment. Examples include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked inheritance.
2. Complex trait models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of complex traits that are influenced by multiple genes and environmental factors. Examples include heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
3. Population genetics models: These models describe the distribution and frequency of genetic variants within populations over time. They can be used to study evolutionary processes, such as natural selection and genetic drift.
4. Quantitative genetics models: These models describe the relationship between genetic variation and phenotypic variation in continuous traits, such as height or IQ. They can be used to estimate heritability and to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to trait variation.
5. Statistical genetics models: These models use statistical methods to analyze genetic data and infer the presence of genetic associations or linkage. They can be used to identify genetic risk factors for diseases or traits.

Overall, genetic models are essential tools in genetics research and medical genetics, as they allow researchers to make predictions about genetic outcomes, test hypotheses about the genetic basis of traits and diseases, and develop strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short, single-pass DNA sequences that are derived from cDNA libraries. They represent a quick and cost-effective method for large-scale sequencing of gene transcripts and provide an unbiased view of the genes being actively expressed in a particular tissue or developmental stage. ESTs can be used to identify and study new genes, to analyze patterns of gene expression, and to develop molecular markers for genetic mapping and genome analysis.

I apologize for any confusion, but "plants" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "plants" refers to a large and diverse group of organisms that obtain their energy through photosynthesis, which is the process of converting sunlight into chemical energy. Plants are typically characterized by having cells with cell walls containing cellulose, chloroplasts containing the pigment chlorophyll, and the ability to synthesize their own food through photosynthesis.

In a medical or biological context, you might be thinking of "plant-based" or "phytomedicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as a form of medicine or treatment. Phytomedicines have been used for thousands of years in many traditional systems of medicine, and some plant-derived compounds have been found to have therapeutic benefits in modern medicine as well. However, "plants" itself does not have a medical definition.

Proteins are complex, large molecules that play critical roles in the body's functions. They are made up of amino acids, which are organic compounds that are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs. They are essential for the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues, and they play a crucial role in many biological processes, including metabolism, immune response, and cellular signaling. Proteins can be classified into different types based on their structure and function, such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, and structural proteins. They are found in various foods, especially animal-derived products like meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like beans, nuts, and grains.

A nucleic acid database is a type of biological database that contains sequence, structure, and functional information about nucleic acids, such as DNA and RNA. These databases are used in various fields of biology, including genomics, molecular biology, and bioinformatics, to store, search, and analyze nucleic acid data.

Some common types of nucleic acid databases include:

1. Nucleotide sequence databases: These databases contain the primary nucleotide sequences of DNA and RNA molecules from various organisms. Examples include GenBank, EMBL-Bank, and DDBJ.
2. Structure databases: These databases contain three-dimensional structures of nucleic acids determined by experimental methods such as X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Examples include the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the Nucleic Acid Database (NDB).
3. Functional databases: These databases contain information about the functions of nucleic acids, such as their roles in gene regulation, transcription, and translation. Examples include the Gene Ontology (GO) database and the RegulonDB.
4. Genome databases: These databases contain genomic data for various organisms, including whole-genome sequences, gene annotations, and genetic variations. Examples include the Human Genome Database (HGD) and the Ensembl Genome Browser.
5. Comparative databases: These databases allow for the comparison of nucleic acid sequences or structures across different species or conditions. Examples include the Comparative RNA Web (CRW) Site and the Sequence Alignment and Modeling (SAM) system.

Nucleic acid databases are essential resources for researchers to study the structure, function, and evolution of nucleic acids, as well as to develop new tools and methods for analyzing and interpreting nucleic acid data.

Population Genetics is a subfield of genetics that deals with the genetic composition of populations and how this composition changes over time. It involves the study of the frequency and distribution of genes and genetic variations in populations, as well as the evolutionary forces that contribute to these patterns, such as mutation, gene flow, genetic drift, and natural selection.

Population genetics can provide insights into a wide range of topics, including the history and relationships between populations, the genetic basis of diseases and other traits, and the potential impacts of environmental changes on genetic diversity. This field is important for understanding evolutionary processes at the population level and has applications in areas such as conservation biology, medical genetics, and forensic science.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Wild animals are those species of animals that are not domesticated or tamed by humans and live in their natural habitats without regular human intervention. They can include a wide variety of species, ranging from mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, to insects and other invertebrates.

Wild animals are adapted to survive in specific environments and have behaviors, physical traits, and social structures that enable them to find food, shelter, and mates. They can be found in various habitats such as forests, grasslands, deserts, oceans, rivers, and mountains. Some wild animals may come into contact with human populations, particularly in urban areas where their natural habitats have been destroyed or fragmented.

It is important to note that the term "wild" does not necessarily mean that an animal is aggressive or dangerous. While some wild animals can be potentially harmful to humans if provoked or threatened, many are generally peaceful and prefer to avoid contact with people. However, it is essential to respect their natural behaviors and habitats and maintain a safe distance from them to prevent any potential conflicts or harm to either party.

Genetic selection, also known as natural selection, is a fundamental mechanism of evolution. It refers to the process by which certain heritable traits become more or less common in a population over successive generations due to differential reproduction of organisms with those traits.

In genetic selection, traits that increase an individual's fitness (its ability to survive and reproduce) are more likely to be passed on to the next generation, while traits that decrease fitness are less likely to be passed on. This results in a gradual change in the distribution of traits within a population over time, leading to adaptation to the environment and potentially speciation.

Genetic selection can occur through various mechanisms, including viability selection (differential survival), fecundity selection (differences in reproductive success), and sexual selection (choices made by individuals during mating). The process of genetic selection is driven by environmental pressures, such as predation, competition for resources, and changes in the availability of food or habitat.

Molecular sequence annotation is the process of identifying and describing the characteristics, functional elements, and relevant information of a DNA, RNA, or protein sequence at the molecular level. This process involves marking the location and function of various features such as genes, regulatory regions, coding and non-coding sequences, intron-exon boundaries, promoters, introns, untranslated regions (UTRs), binding sites for proteins or other molecules, and post-translational modifications in a given molecular sequence.

The annotation can be manual, where experts curate and analyze the data to predict features based on biological knowledge and experimental evidence. Alternatively, computational methods using various bioinformatics tools and algorithms can be employed for automated annotation. These tools often rely on comparative analysis, pattern recognition, and machine learning techniques to identify conserved sequence patterns, motifs, or domains that are associated with specific functions.

The annotated molecular sequences serve as valuable resources in genomic and proteomic studies, contributing to the understanding of gene function, evolutionary relationships, disease associations, and biotechnological applications.

I apologize for the confusion, but "Marine Biology" is not a medical term. Instead, it is a branch of biology that deals with the study of marine organisms, their behaviors, and their interactions with the marine environment. Marine biologists investigate various aspects of marine life, such as the ecology, physiology, and genetics of marine plants, animals, and microorganisms. They also study the impact of human activities on marine ecosystems and work towards conservation efforts to protect these environments.

Reproduction, in the context of biology and medicine, refers to the process by which organisms produce offspring. It is a complex process that involves the creation, development, and growth of new individuals from parent organisms. In sexual reproduction, this process typically involves the combination of genetic material from two parents through the fusion of gametes (sex cells) such as sperm and egg cells. This results in the formation of a zygote, which then develops into a new individual with a unique genetic makeup.

In contrast, asexual reproduction does not involve the fusion of gametes and can occur through various mechanisms such as budding, fragmentation, or parthenogenesis. Asexual reproduction results in offspring that are genetically identical to the parent organism.

Reproduction is a fundamental process that ensures the survival and continuation of species over time. It is also an area of active research in fields such as reproductive medicine, where scientists and clinicians work to understand and address issues related to human fertility, contraception, and genetic disorders.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Animal migration is a seasonal movement of animals from one place to another, typically over long distances, to find food, reproduce, or escape harsh conditions. This phenomenon is observed in various species, including birds, mammals, fish, and insects. The routes and destinations of these migrations are often genetically programmed and can be quite complex. Animal migration has important ecological consequences and is influenced by factors such as climate change, habitat loss, and human activities.

A plant genome refers to the complete set of genetic material or DNA present in the cells of a plant. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the development and functioning of the plant, including its structural and functional characteristics. The plant genome includes both coding regions that contain instructions for producing proteins and non-coding regions that have various regulatory functions.

The plant genome is composed of several types of DNA molecules, including chromosomes, which are located in the nucleus of the cell. Each chromosome contains one or more genes, which are segments of DNA that code for specific proteins or RNA molecules. Plants typically have multiple sets of chromosomes, with each set containing a complete copy of the genome.

The study of plant genomes is an active area of research in modern biology, with important applications in areas such as crop improvement, evolutionary biology, and medical research. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to determine the complete sequences of many plant genomes, providing valuable insights into their structure, function, and evolution.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

A protein database is a type of biological database that contains information about proteins and their structures, functions, sequences, and interactions with other molecules. These databases can include experimentally determined data, such as protein sequences derived from DNA sequencing or mass spectrometry, as well as predicted data based on computational methods.

Some examples of protein databases include:

1. UniProtKB: a comprehensive protein database that provides information about protein sequences, functions, and structures, as well as literature references and links to other resources.
2. PDB (Protein Data Bank): a database of three-dimensional protein structures determined by experimental methods such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
3. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool): a web-based tool that allows users to compare a query protein sequence against a protein database to identify similar sequences and potential functional relationships.
4. InterPro: a database of protein families, domains, and functional sites that provides information about protein function based on sequence analysis and other data.
5. STRING (Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins): a database of known and predicted protein-protein interactions, including physical and functional associations.

Protein databases are essential tools in proteomics research, enabling researchers to study protein function, evolution, and interaction networks on a large scale.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Rivers" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical term referring to large, flowing bodies of water that usually empty into a sea or an ocean. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oceans and Seas" are not medical terms. Generally speaking, an ocean is a large body of saltwater that covers a majority of the Earth's surface, and a sea is a smaller body of saltwater that may be partially enclosed by land. However, if you have any questions related to marine biology or environmental science, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "tropical climate" is not a medical term. It is a geographical term that refers to the climate of tropical regions, which are located around the equator. These regions are characterized by high temperatures and consistent rainfall throughout the year.

However, it's worth noting that certain environmental factors, such as climate, can have an impact on human health. For instance, tropical climates can contribute to the spread of certain diseases, like malaria and dengue fever, due to the presence of mosquitoes that thrive in warm, wet environments. But a "tropical climate" itself is not a medical condition or diagnosis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Natural Language Processing" (NLP) is actually a subfield of artificial intelligence that focuses on the interaction between computers and human language. It involves developing algorithms and software to understand, interpret, and generate human language in a valuable way.

In a medical context, NLP can be used to analyze electronic health records, clinical notes, and other forms of medical documentation to extract meaningful information, support clinical decision-making, and improve patient care. For example, NLP can help identify patients at risk for certain conditions, monitor treatment responses, and detect adverse drug events.

However, NLP is not a medical term or concept itself, so it doesn't have a specific medical definition.

Agricultural crops refer to plants that are grown and harvested for the purpose of human or animal consumption, fiber production, or other uses such as biofuels. These crops can include grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and legumes, among others. They are typically cultivated using various farming practices, including traditional row cropping, companion planting, permaculture, and organic farming methods. The choice of crop and farming method depends on factors such as the local climate, soil conditions, and market demand. Proper management of agricultural crops is essential for ensuring food security, promoting sustainable agriculture, and protecting the environment.

Protein sequence analysis is the systematic examination and interpretation of the amino acid sequence of a protein to understand its structure, function, evolutionary relationships, and other biological properties. It involves various computational methods and tools to analyze the primary structure of proteins, which is the linear arrangement of amino acids along the polypeptide chain.

Protein sequence analysis can provide insights into several aspects, such as:

1. Identification of functional domains, motifs, or sites within a protein that may be responsible for its specific biochemical activities.
2. Comparison of homologous sequences from different organisms to infer evolutionary relationships and determine the degree of similarity or divergence among them.
3. Prediction of secondary and tertiary structures based on patterns of amino acid composition, hydrophobicity, and charge distribution.
4. Detection of post-translational modifications that may influence protein function, localization, or stability.
5. Identification of protease cleavage sites, signal peptides, or other sequence features that play a role in protein processing and targeting.

Some common techniques used in protein sequence analysis include:

1. Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA): A method to align multiple protein sequences to identify conserved regions, gaps, and variations.
2. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool): A widely-used tool for comparing a query protein sequence against a database of known sequences to find similarities and infer function or evolutionary relationships.
3. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs): Statistical models used to describe the probability distribution of amino acid sequences in protein families, allowing for more sensitive detection of remote homologs.
4. Protein structure prediction: Methods that use various computational approaches to predict the three-dimensional structure of a protein based on its amino acid sequence.
5. Phylogenetic analysis: The construction and interpretation of evolutionary trees (phylogenies) based on aligned protein sequences, which can provide insights into the historical relationships among organisms or proteins.

I apologize for any confusion, but "wetlands" is a term related to environmental science and ecology rather than medicine. Wetlands are transitional areas between land and water that are characterized by the presence of water, which can be permanent or temporary. They are critical ecosystems that provide various important functions, such as water filtration, flood control, and habitat for diverse plant and animal life, including many species of migratory birds.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, please don't hesitate to ask!

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Biomass is defined in the medical field as a renewable energy source derived from organic materials, primarily plant matter, that can be burned or converted into fuel. This includes materials such as wood, agricultural waste, and even methane gas produced by landfills. Biomass is often used as a source of heat, electricity, or transportation fuels, and its use can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on fossil fuels.

In the context of human health, biomass burning can have both positive and negative impacts. On one hand, biomass can provide a source of heat and energy for cooking and heating, which can improve living standards and reduce exposure to harmful pollutants from traditional cooking methods such as open fires. On the other hand, biomass burning can also produce air pollution, including particulate matter and toxic chemicals, that can have negative effects on respiratory health and contribute to climate change.

Therefore, while biomass has the potential to be a sustainable and low-carbon source of energy, it is important to consider the potential health and environmental impacts of its use and implement appropriate measures to minimize any negative effects.

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the genetic material present in the cells of all living organisms, including plants. In plants, DNA is located in the nucleus of a cell, as well as in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Plant DNA contains the instructions for the development, growth, and function of the plant, and is passed down from one generation to the next through the process of reproduction.

The structure of DNA is a double helix, formed by two strands of nucleotides that are linked together by hydrogen bonds. Each nucleotide contains a sugar molecule (deoxyribose), a phosphate group, and a nitrogenous base. There are four types of nitrogenous bases in DNA: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). Adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, forming the rungs of the ladder that make up the double helix.

The genetic information in DNA is encoded in the sequence of these nitrogenous bases. Large sequences of bases form genes, which provide the instructions for the production of proteins. The process of gene expression involves transcribing the DNA sequence into a complementary RNA molecule, which is then translated into a protein.

Plant DNA is similar to animal DNA in many ways, but there are also some differences. For example, plant DNA contains a higher proportion of repetitive sequences and transposable elements, which are mobile genetic elements that can move around the genome and cause mutations. Additionally, plant cells have cell walls and chloroplasts, which are not present in animal cells, and these structures contain their own DNA.

'Drosophila melanogaster' is the scientific name for a species of fruit fly that is commonly used as a model organism in various fields of biological research, including genetics, developmental biology, and evolutionary biology. Its small size, short generation time, large number of offspring, and ease of cultivation make it an ideal subject for laboratory studies. The fruit fly's genome has been fully sequenced, and many of its genes have counterparts in the human genome, which facilitates the understanding of genetic mechanisms and their role in human health and disease.

Here is a brief medical definition:

Drosophila melanogaster (droh-suh-fih-luh meh-lon-guh-ster): A species of fruit fly used extensively as a model organism in genetic, developmental, and evolutionary research. Its genome has been sequenced, revealing many genes with human counterparts, making it valuable for understanding genetic mechanisms and their role in human health and disease.

Amphibians are a class of cold-blooded vertebrates that include frogs, toads, salamanders, newts, and caecilians. They are characterized by their four-limbed body structure, moist skin, and double circulation system with three-chambered hearts. Amphibians are unique because they have a life cycle that involves two distinct stages: an aquatic larval stage (usually as a tadpole or larva) and a terrestrial adult stage. They typically start their lives in water, undergoing metamorphosis to develop lungs and legs for a land-dwelling existence. Many amphibians are also known for their complex reproductive behaviors and vocalizations.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

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Natural Resources Conservation Areas, Washington Department of Natural Resources, 2018, retrieved 2018-06-06 "Natural Resources ... This is a list of Natural Resources Conservation Areas (NRCAs), part of the Washington Natural Areas Program managed by ... 472 acres (1.91 km2) Clark County Lacamas Prairie Natural Area: This combined natural area preserve (NAP) and natural resources ... Washington Department of Natural Resources. Clallam County Shipwreck Point NRCA: This site includes one of the last, easily ...
... Retrieved on October 18, 2010. "Department of Conservation and ... of Conservation and Natural Resources". Archived from the original on 2006-12-11. Retrieved 2006-12-09. "Contact DCNR Archived ... The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR), established on July 1, 1995, is the agency in the U.S ... Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (Webarchive template wayback links, Articles with short ...
The Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation (Burmese: သယံဇာတနှင့်သဘာဝပတ်ဝန်းကျင်ထိန်းသိမ်းရေး ဝန်ကြီးဌာန; ... Union Minister Office Forest Department Dry Zone Greening Department Environmental Conservation Department Survey Department ... founded by the merger of the Ministry of Mines and the Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forestry by then-president ...
... the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. The agency superseded the Montana Council on Natural Resources and ... Task Force on Natural Resources and Conservation (December 10, 1971). Reorganization Plan: Montana Department of Natural ... Task Force on Natural Resources and Conservation 1971, pp. 7-24. "Governor-elect Gianforte Announces Director of the Department ... The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) is a government agency in the executive branch state of ...
The African Convention on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (known also as Algiers Convention) is a continent- ... their Natural State of 1933 and has been superseded by the African Convention on Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources ( ... Nature conservation in South Africa, Nature conservation in Tanzania, Nature conservation in Uganda, Environment of Africa, ... Nature conservation in Africa, Animal treaties, All stub articles, African law stubs, Treaty stubs). ...
Prior to the 117th Congress, it was named the Subcommittee on Conservation, Forestry and Natural Resources. This subcommittee ... The U.S. Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Conservation, Climate, Forestry, and Natural Resources is one of five subcommittees ... Conservation, Forestry and Credit Jurisdiction. Committee website, Subcommittee page v t e (Wikipedia articles in need of ... soil conservation, stream channelization, and watershed and flood control programs involving structures of less than 4,000 acre ...
Conservation authority Rattlesnake Point "Crawford Lake Conservation Area". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources ... Crawford Lake Conservation Area is a conservation area owned and operated by Conservation Halton near the community of ... Natural Resources Canada. Retrieved 2018-08-18. "Crawford Lake Indian Village Site". Archived from the original on 28 August ... The conservation area also has 19 kilometres (12 mi) of hiking and cross-country skiing and snowshoeing trails with connections ...
"Marine Conservation Zones in Wales". Natural Resources Wales. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 19 February ... "Nature Conservation Marine Protected Areas". Scottish Natural History. Dualchas Nàdair na h-Alba. Retrieved 19 February 2016. " ... There are 128 marine protected areas in Welsh seas and Natural Resources Wales (Cyfoeth Naturiol Cymru) is consulting with the ... Skomer Marine Conservation Zone (around the island of Skomer) is the only site in Wales designated as a Marine Conservation ...
"Natural Areas Report: Boyd Conservation Area and Adjacent Lands". Government of Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. ... "Boyd Conservation Area". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada. Retrieved July 29, 2019. " ... Boyd Conservation Area is a suburban land preserve owned and operated by the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority in the ... Conservation areas in Ontario, Protected areas of the Regional Municipality of York, Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest) ...
Natural Resources Canada. Retrieved 2018-01-11. Your Guide to Conservation Areas In Ontario (PDF). Conservation Ontario. 2011. ... Located near the community of Lanark, it is operated by the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority. The Purdon Conservation ... p. 49.[permanent dead link] "Purdon Conservation Area". Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority. Retrieved 2018-01-11. ... A smaller grouping of the orchids was discovered in the 1930s by Joe Purdon, after whom the conservation area is named, and who ...
Natural Resources Canada. Retrieved 2016-12-22. "Gould Lake Conservation Area". Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority. ... 2013 Gould Lake Conservation Area Retrieved December 19, 2013 Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources - Ontario's Forest Regions ... The conservation area contains much of Gould Lake. The conservation area lies just north of the bedrock scarp that denotes the ... Gould Lake Conservation Area is a rural conservation area located in the Canadian Shield northwest of the community of Sydenham ...
Natural Resources Canada. Retrieved 2014-05-10. "Foley Mountain Conservation Area". Rideau Valley Conservation Authority. ... Foley Mountain Conservation Area, the highest conservation area in the Rideau Valley, overlooks Upper Rideau Lake and Westport ... Foley Mountain Conservation Area is operated by the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority. Wikimedia Commons has media related ... The 300 km Rideau Trail, linking Kingston and Ottawa, passes through the conservation area. ...
In 1935, the Natural Resources Committee was created to understand, plan and use natural resources. Following World War II, the ... preservation of natural resources, and the protection of natural resources and ecosystems. Then, in 1960, the Multiple-Use ... Forest conservation involves the upkeep of the natural resources within a forest that are beneficial for both humans and the ... Gifford Pinchot made conservation a popular word in its application to natural resources. Throughout the next two decades, ...
Natural Resources and Conservation. 3. 1 (3): 65-76. doi:10.13189/nrc.2013.010302. "Over 60 Endangered Animals, Birds Seized on ... is an independent voluntary organization that is devoted to the conservation of Jordan's natural resources; it was established ... RSCN has the mission of protecting and managing the natural resources of Jordan, for it is responsible for protecting wildlife ... Promoting the sustainable use of natural resources. The organization has made a number of important achievements, including the ...
Natural Resources Conservation Service. "Mississippi River Basin Healthy Watersheds Initiative" (PDF). USDA. Archived from the ... Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in an attempt to improve the health of the Mississippi River Basin. The ... With increase of natural prairie land being converted to land for agricultural and urban use, there has been an excess of ... Conservation practices can be used as alternative crops to reduce phosphorus and nitrate pollution in the River. They are ...
"Conservation Security Program". U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Retrieved April 19, 2018. "Conservation ... "Kansas , Natural Resources Conservation Service". June 8, 2023. United States Code: Title 16: Conservation [sections] 901-End ... CongressDaily 17:9 Conservation reserve program. 2007. Natural Resources Conservation Service. Washington, D.C. Available from ... The program was administered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), an agency of the United States Department of ...
"Natural Resources Conservation Service". Retrieved 2007-11-06. "Conservation Effects Assessment Project Bibliographies". ... The CEAP's vision is to enhance "natural resources and healthier ecosystems through improved conservation effectiveness and ... Watershed in Oklahoma Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Arizona Lead USDA agencies Natural Resources Conservation Services ... The goal is "to improve efficacy of conservations practices and programs by quantifying conservation effects and providing the ...
A conservation authority is a local, community-based natural resource management agency based in Ontario, Canada. Conservation ... Ministry of Natural Resources. Ministry of Natural Resources. Government of Ontario. Retrieved 2014-08-08. (Webarchive template ... Conservation Authority Grey Sauble Conservation Hamilton Conservation Authority Kawartha Conservation Kettle Creek Conservation ... "Conservation Authorities"". Retrieved 8 August 2014. "Home page". Conservation Ontario: Natural Champions. 2009. Archived from ...
"45 New Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves". Ministry of Natural Resources. 2005-05-09. Archived from the original on ... "Natural Areas Report: Bennet Lake Esker Kame Complex". Ministry of Natural Resources. Retrieved 2008-03-11.[dead link] " ... 2004 in a filing to the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, and designated a conservation reserve by Schedule 251 of Ontario ... The Bennet Lake Esker Kame Complex Conservation Reserve is a Canadian conservation reserve in the townships of Boyle and ...
Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is the lead agency in this effort, and completed appraisals in the early 1980s ... "Natural resources conservation service". (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, ... a national plan for soil and water conservation on private lands based on an inventory and appraisal of existing resource ... The Soil and Water Conservation Act (RCA) is a 1977 law (P.L. 95-192) that requires the United States Department of Agriculture ...
ISBN 1-57233-828-8. "Natural Resources Conservation Service" (PDF). Temporary Forest Openings for Wildlife. United States ... Stephenson, Steven L., A Natural History of the Central Appalachians, 2013, West Virginia University Press, West Virginia, ISBN ... 1999 Revised Land and Resource Management Plan for the Jefferson National Forest, Management Bulletin R8-MB 115E. Roanoke, ... degree of protection by reducing the negative environmental impact of road construction and thus promoting the conservation of ...
Energy conservation and natural resources. Reducing the amount of waste generated, through source reduction and recycling ... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Pub. L.Tooltip Public Law (United States) 94-580, 90 Stat. 2795, 42 U.S.C. § 6901 et ... The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), enacted in 1976, is the principal federal law in the United States governing ... Works related to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act at Wikisource RCRA Orientation Manual (EPA, 2014): A good textbook- ...
The Minnesota Bison Conservation Herd is a project of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) to raise and manage ... Wildlife conservation in Canada, Nature conservation in the United States, Great Plains, Mammal conservation). ... Conservation herds are in mostly small and isolated populations. Large herds on extensive landscapes where natural limiting ... as well as its natural and cultural resources The DOI manages approximately one third of North America's bison in conservation ...
Media related to Natural Resources Conservation Service at Wikimedia Commons Natural Resources Conservation Service - Official ... Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), formerly known as the Soil Conservation Service (SCS), is an agency of the ... "Agricultural Conservation Easement Program". NRCS. Retrieved 2020-10-14. "USDA NRCS - Natural Resources Conservation Service". ... Natural Resources Conservation Service. Archived from the original on 2017-08-04. Retrieved January 27, 2018. U.S. Natural ...
Conservation Basics Conserving our natural resources is a vital part of creating and maintaining healthy ecosystems on our ... Conservation Basics Conserving our natural resources is a vital part of creating and maintaining healthy ecosystems on our ... Conservation Concerns Tool Use this tool to learn about natural resource concerns that may impact your ag operation (farmers. ... Conservation Concerns Tool Use this tool to learn about natural resource concerns that may impact your ag operation (farmers. ...
The mission of the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is to address the natural resource conservation on private ... USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service in North Carolina helps private landowners protect and enhance natural resources. ... USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service in Georgia helps private landowners protect and enhance natural resources. ... Conservation Basics Conserving our natural resources is a vital part of creating and maintaining healthy ecosystems on our ...
This book is a reprint of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism and Natural Resource Conservation in the Polar Regions that was ... Arctic; maritime heritage resources; precautionary approaches; maritime cultural landscapes; ecotourism; Arctic; corporate ... Arctic; maritime heritage resources; precautionary approaches; maritime cultural landscapes; ecotourism; Arctic; corporate ... common-pool resources; sustainable management; tourism; polar; search and rescue; SAR; Arctic; Svalbard; AISSat-1; Ortelius; ...
A LIFE IN CONSERVATION. "Environmental Conservation Officer (ECO) Nate Favreau knows Paul Smiths College. From 2005 - 2006, he ... meet with natural resource professionals from forest rangers to climate change specialists; become acquainted with the ecology ... political and economic dimensions of natural resources management. ... Explain the historical role and value of science in policy formation designed to protect, maintain, and restore natural and ...
Energy resources diagram , Conservation Of Natural Resources .... * Graphs And Pie Chart On Conservation Of Natural Resources ... Graph Observation Of Conservation Of Natural Resources * ... Graph Of Conservation Of Natural Resources * Graph For ... Graph Of The Conservation Of Natural Resources * ... Graph On Conservation Of Natural Resources * Graph And ... Explanation Of Conservation Of Natural Resources In India. * ... Graphs Of Conservation Of Natural Resources * Graph Explanation ...
Our World View: Wildlife Conservation with Natural Resource Management. Posted 23 January 2013 ... Environment sectors and this year has introduced an exciting new degree course in Wildlife Conservation with Natural Resource ... If like us, you are passionate about wildlife and conservation and want to find out more, please come and visit us on one of ... I am involved with the Shropshire Bat Group, the Shropshire Mammal Group and also do voluntary work with Natural England on a ...
Title 9 - Conservation and Natural Resources. *Code of Alabama - Title 9: Conservation and Natural Resources - Section 9-11-413 ... Code of Alabama - Title 9: Conservation and Natural Resources - Section 9-11-413 - License fee; issuance of license; license to ... fees are remitted and shall be paid into the Game and Fish Fund of the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. ... to operate hunting preserves shall be issued on forms prescribed by the Commissioner of Conservation and Natural Resources ...
Home » Government » Boards & Commissions » Conservation of Natural Resources Commission » Conservation of Natural Resources ... Conservation of Natural Resources Commission Subcommittee 2024 Agendas. Downloads:. * Agri-Business April 17 2024 Agenda (pdf) ...
Factors affecting natural resource conservation investments of residents in the Lower Big Walnut Creek watershed, Ohio. T.L. ... Factors affecting natural resource conservation investments of residents in the Lower Big Walnut Creek watershed, Ohio ... Factors affecting natural resource conservation investments of residents in the Lower Big Walnut Creek watershed, Ohio ... Factors affecting natural resource conservation investments of residents in the Lower Big Walnut Creek watershed, Ohio ...
Open access academic research from top universities on the subject of Natural Resources and Conservation ... All Articles in Natural Resources and Conservation Follow Faceted Search 9,836 full-text articles. Page 4 of 309. ... Natural Resources and Conservation Commons™ Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.® ... Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Reimagining Large River Management Using The Resist-Accept-Direct (Rad) Framework In ...
The UMRBA Water Quality Executive Committee provides suggestions to the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) for ... UMRBA Natural Resources Conservation Service Comment Letter April 7, 2023. The UMRBA Water Quality Executive Committee provides ... suggestions to the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) for improving NRCSs Mississippi River Basin Healthy ...
Targeting Natural Resource Corruption. Harnessing knowledge, generating evidence, and supporting innovative policy and practice ... This Resource Guide introduces some foundational principles and common considerations for research into conservation-focused ... Why is the bribe being asked for and/or given? Is it to gain access to a site or resource, get information, avoid a complicated ... Practitioners are therefore encouraged to review resources such as "Sampling Methods for Web and e-Mail Surveys" in "The Sage ...
The Natural Resource Conservation Services (NRCS) has staff who work exclusively with private landowners to improve soil health ... The information contained on the Natural Resources Stewardship Directory on this website is an amalgamation of publicly- ... The Farm Service Agency administers several conservation-focused programs including the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) in ... Soil and Water Conservation District staff provide assessment, planning, design, and cost share assistance to reduce soil loss ...
Klimas, S. T., Yetter, A. P., Hagy, H. M., & Osborn, J. M. (2017). Condition of Natural Resources Conservation Service Wetland ... T1 - Condition of Natural Resources Conservation Service Wetland Easements in Illinois Final Progress Report Period: 31 August ... BT - Condition of Natural Resources Conservation Service Wetland Easements in Illinois Final Progress Report Period: 31 August ... Klimas, ST, Yetter, AP, Hagy, HM & Osborn, JM 2017, Condition of Natural Resources Conservation Service Wetland Easements in ...
In 2021, the locations with a relatively high number of Natural Resource Conservation & Research degree recipients are Crow ... The most common degree awarded to students studying Natural Resource Conservation & Research is a bachelors degree. ... the locations with the highest concentration of Natural Resource Conservation & Research degree recipients are Berkeley, CA, ... Research is from the 2 Digit Course Natural Resources & Conservation.. PUMAS with a relatively high number of Natural Resources ...
The Natural Resources and Outdoor Recreation Trust Fund, when funded, would support quality of life and natural resource ... Natural Resources and Outdoor Recreation Trust Fund. INHF has been a leader in efforts to develop a permanent funding source to ... We work to ensure that appropriations to our state agencies that protect natural resources have the necessary funding to carry ... And yet, barely one percent of our entire state budget helps protect Iowas soil, water and other natural resources. ...
... Conservation Academy Tagged amphibian, CTP, ecology, hiking, natural resources, nature, reptile, snake Meet ... Natural Resources Conservation Academy Tagged environmental education, intern, natural resources, nature, NRCA, UConn ... Natural Resources Conservation Academy Tagged Cockaponset State Forest, DEEP, Fenton River, GIS, mapping, natural resources, ... Posted in Conservation Training Partnerships Tagged alltrails, biodiversity, conservation, CTP, epicollect, geospatial, natural ...
Natural Resource Projects *Natural Resource Projects. *Indigenous Engagement. *About Natural Resource Project Reviews * ... Natural Resource Projects * Natural Resource Projects * Indigenous Engagement * About Natural Resource Project Reviews * ...
I ponder the impacts to conservation of natural resources. ... and its Affect on Conservation of Natural Resources. access_ ... I also wonder if the division we see will ultimately hurt the goal of conservation of natural resources. ... How Conservation Is Funded. The Pittman-Robertson Act, enacted in the 1930s provides money for conservation from an excise tax ... Because a passionate user of the resource is one who will fight for the resource. But unless we figure out how to come together ...
Natural Resources, Conservation, and the Environment. Course Language Semester Credit Course. ENVI 3001 PRAG: European ... Students are encouraged to use public libraries and take advantage of Charles University resources. ...
NATURAL RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION.. *. Environmental Science.. * PARKS, RECREATION, LEISURE, AND FITNESS STUDIES.. ... community.okstate.edu/departments/multicultural-affairs/lgbtq-resources.html ... Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety ...
Conservation scientists and foresters manage the land quality of forests, parks, rangelands, and other natural resources. ... Conservation scientists and foresters typically need a bachelors degree in forestry, natural resources, or a related field. ... Conservation scientists and foresters typically need a bachelors degree in forestry, natural resources, or a related field. ... Conservation scientists and foresters manage the land quality of forests, parks, rangelands, and other natural resources. ...
Discover the latest minnesota jobs and internships in conservation, wildlife, ecology, forestry, environmental education, ... Natural Resources Field Crew Member Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa. Two Harbors, MN. The Lake County SWCD Field Crew ... Natural Resources Specialist Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board. Minneapolis, MN. Assist in maintaining native plant ... Master of Natural Resources Virginia Tech. Online & Hybrid. Earn your Masters in 1 year. Gain credentials and competencies ...
We at PBCAI (Palawan Biodiversity Conservation Advocates, Inc.) envision Palawan to have healthy and rich natural resources ... Palawan Biodiversity Conservation Advocates. Actively working for protection, conservation, enhancement, and sustainable ... Marine Conservation and Protection Project Thru Functional Community-Based Solid Waste Management Initiatives. This is a ... Development of project proposals for future conservation projects that could benefit the province of Palawan and Puerto ...
Agriculture, Natural Resources and Conservation Wildlife Science Bachelor. Modified on January 31, 2024 ...
Green Conservation Products located at 1628 W Williams Dr, Phoenix, AZ 85027 - reviews, ratings, hours, phone number, ... Conservation Department Near Me in Phoenix, AZ. Natural Resources Conservation. 230 N 1st Ave #509. Phoenix, AZ 85003 (602) 280 ... Natural Resources Division. 1616 W Adams St # 425. Phoenix, AZ 85007 (602) 542-4625 ( 0 Reviews ) ... Q What is the phone number for Green Conservation Products?. A The phone number for Green Conservation Products is: (888) 333- ...
Get Natural Resources and Conservation Services Bid & RFP opportunities from cities, counties, state agencies, school districts ... Nevada Bids , By Category , Natural Resources and Conservation Services. Natural Resources and Conservation Services Bids & ... Commission on Mineral Resources Department: 500 - Commission on Mineral Resource View Now. ...
Natural Resources and Conservation program.. *03.0104 Environmental Sciences must be reported under Agriculture, Natural ... 13- Agriculture, Natural Resources and Conservation. 01. Agriculture, Agriculture Operations and Related Sciences ... 03.02 Natural Resources Management and Policy. 03.03 Fishing and Fisheries Sciences and Management. 03.05 Forestry. 03.06 ... Resources and Conservation program.. Note: Dental, Medical and Veterinary Residency Programs offered in teaching hospitals and ...
Natural Resources Council of Maine says DEP downplayed environmental impact of Bald Mountain mining. ... Maine conservation group issues environmental scorecard for Legislature. * Published September 25, 2013 ...
  • Palawan Biodiversity Conservation Advocates, Inc. (palawanconservationists.com)
  • We at PBCAI (Palawan Biodiversity Conservation Advocates, Inc.) envision Palawan to have healthy and rich natural resources sustainably providing ecosystems goods and services to the local populations thru the dynamic process of resource-proprietorship and sustainable development and initiatives. (palawanconservationists.com)
  • Conservation land managers work for land trusts or other conservation organizations to protect the wildlife habitats, biodiversity, scenic value, and other specific attributes of preserves and conservation lands. (bls.gov)
  • The MSc in Biodiversity, Conservation and Management aims to provide a critical and conceptually sophisticated understanding of biodiversity science and the socio-economic, political, cultural and institutional contexts within which management and policy decisions are made. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Biodiversity science, Conservation ethics and values, and Biodiversity policy and management, delivered through eight core modules: conservation landscapes, conservation biogeography, conservation governance, species responses to climate change, conservation and society, economics of the environment, global change and the biosphere and biodiversity technologies. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The aim of the course is to train future leaders in biodiversity, conservation and natural resource management. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Thus the course teaches conservation as a dynamic discipline integral to all the major areas of human concern - social and environmental governance, political economy, spatial planning, agriculture, population growth, livelihoods, human and institutional capacity, investment and markets, in addition to the hard science of biodiversity. (ox.ac.uk)
  • LUCSUS research on forest management, ecosystem services, Indigenous' knowledge, genetic resources, nature conservation and human-nature relationships aims to contribute towards sustainable conservation and tackle biodiversity loss. (lu.se)
  • We study societal and natural dimensions of biodiversity loss, its drivers and impacts, and interlinked challenges of climate change, land use, energy systems and habitat loss. (lu.se)
  • Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), formerly known as the Soil Conservation Service (SCS), is an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that provides technical assistance to farmers and other private landowners and managers. (wikipedia.org)
  • A world where the livestock sector sustainably contributes to the welfare of people and conservation of natural resources. (fao.org)
  • Adressing the challenge of sustainably meeting the natural resource demands of a rapidly urbanizing world. (lu.se)
  • Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) consolidated four programs from the 2008 Farm Bill. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) is a partner-driven approach to conservation that funds solutions to natural resource challenges on agricultural land. (usda.gov)
  • Its mission is to improve, protect, and conserve natural resources on private lands through a cooperative partnership with state and local agencies. (wikipedia.org)
  • For over 80 years, we've helped America's farmers, ranchers, and landowners conserve our nation's resources through our voluntary programs and science-based solutions. (usda.gov)
  • Conservation Technical Assistance (CTA) provides our nation's farmers, ranchers and forestland owners with the knowledge and tools they need to conserve, maintain and restore the natural resources on their lands and improve the health of their operations for the future. (usda.gov)
  • To conserve and enhance our natural resources in cooperation with individuals and organizations to improve the quality of life in Iowa and ensure a legacy for future generations. (iowadnr.gov)
  • Natural Resources Programs aim to conserve, protect, and develop natural resources on public and private lands in order to ensure that agriculture will continue to be productive and economically viable in Oregon. (oregon.gov)
  • Conservation scientists and foresters typically need a bachelor's degree in forestry, natural resources, or a related field. (bls.gov)
  • Jacinta further demonstrated that the KGDEP in collaboration with the Department of Forestry and Range Resources (DFRR) conducted entrepreneurial and production training for 15 BORAVAST members (9 female/6 male) to spearhead this business venture. (undp.org)
  • UT provides the same first year as track one, but with year two at UCL focusing on environmental challenges related to agriculture, forestry and nature conservation in the context of climate change. (lu.se)
  • Conserving our natural resources is a vital part of creating and maintaining healthy ecosystems on our nation's lands. (usda.gov)
  • The technical resources and references NRCS provides uses science-based technology to aid conservation planning and benefit soil, water, air, plants, and animals for productive lands and healthy ecosystems. (usda.gov)
  • NRCS offers these services to private land owners, conservation districts, tribes, and other types of organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grassley, ranking member, will convene a hearing to hear testimony from organizations and land owners with a significant stake in land that can be sold or contributed for conservation purposes. (senate.gov)
  • The main programs include: The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) provides assistance to landowners to help them improve their soil, water and related natural resources, including grazing lands, wetlands, and wildlife habitat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our natural resource conservation programs help people reduce soil erosion, enhance water supplies, improve water quality, increase wildlife habitat, and reduce damage caused by floods and other natural disasters. (usda.gov)
  • In fact, it is hunters and anglers who fund the majority of fish and wildlife conservation through taxes on fishing and hunting equipment. (kempoutside.com)
  • In fact, one could argue a heavy-handed approach to gun control legislation could seriously damage the funding mechanism for wildlife conservation. (kempoutside.com)
  • I have long thought hunters and anglers shouldn't have to shoulder the lion's share of the costs of conservation, and I was pleased to spend the last 2 years of my career as a wildlife biologist working on the Recovering America's Wildlife Act . (kempoutside.com)
  • This act would provide new and sufficient funding for wildlife conservation. (kempoutside.com)
  • Staff Development Training - Sea Grass and Mangrove Assessment with resource persons from World Wildlife Fund conducted on October 13-15, 2020. (palawanconservationists.com)
  • The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and U.S. Fish and Wildlife are investigating the incidents. (wpr.org)
  • The Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) was another consolidation effort of the 2014 Farm Bill, which includes the former Grasslands Reserve Program, Farm, and Ranch Lands Protection Program, and Wetlands Reserve Program. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conservation scientists and foresters evaluate data on forest and soil quality, assessing damage to trees and forest lands caused by fires and logging activities. (bls.gov)
  • The agency was founded largely through the efforts of Hugh Hammond Bennett, a soil conservation pioneer who worked for the Department of Agriculture from 1903 to 1952. (wikipedia.org)
  • The service was transferred to the Department of Agriculture on March 23, 1935, and was shortly thereafter combined with other USDA units to form the Soil Conservation Service by the Soil Conservation and Domestic Allotment Act of 1935. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 1980s, there were around 3,000 local Soil Conservation Service districts throughout the United States, each with elected executive boards. (wikipedia.org)
  • They contain technical information about the conservation of soil, water, air, and related plant and animal resources. (usda.gov)
  • Conservation scientists and foresters study forest and soil quality. (bls.gov)
  • About 3,000 openings for conservation scientists and foresters are projected each year, on average, over the decade. (bls.gov)
  • The course content is rooted in our established strengths in conservation biogeography, governance and planning, in global change and in research design. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Her subject is on communitarian governance and management of natural resources and peacebuilding in Colombia. (lu.se)
  • Examples include policy positions in government departments, such as the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), management positions in global conservation NGOs, such as Conservation International and WWF, technical positions in sustainability consultancies, and expert roles in international bodies such as IUCN. (ox.ac.uk)
  • One example is the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), set up to quantify the benefits of agricultural conservation efforts promoted and supported by programs in the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (2002 Farm Bill). (wikipedia.org)
  • The "Conservation" title of the Farm Bill (Title II in the 2014 bill) provides the funding to agricultural producers, and a conservation plan must be included. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 12th Workshop on Applied Computing for Environmental and Natural Resources Management (WCAMA) aims to promote the effective integration of the computing area (methodologies and tools) with environmental issues (policy and management). (wikicfp.com)
  • Natural resource management is a complex and dynamic activity and requires the integration between actors in the social, political and technological fields to be effectively developed and implemented. (wikicfp.com)
  • In this context, we aim to discuss the development of methodologies and tools for the management of the environment and natural resources. (wikicfp.com)
  • On his part, the Deputy Permanent secretary in the Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources Conservation and Tourism Mr. Gaogakwe Phorano applauded the BORAVAST communities for giving women an opportunity to play a leading role in the management of Community Trusts. (undp.org)
  • I find that local context, institutional support, and changes in environmental perception are determining factors to sustainable resource management. (lu.se)
  • ITC provides advanced remote sensing and entrepreneurship for natural resource management. (lu.se)
  • Palgrave Studies in Natural Resource Management). (lu.se)
  • Saeed Bagheri , a Max Weber post-doctoral fellow in the law department at the EUI , spoke first about the peace-building role of the natural/energy resource management in post-Islamic state Iraq. (lu.se)
  • Likewise, to carry out these environmental education strategies, it is important to know some specific parameters, such as biological diversity and conservation, in addition to the conservation policies carried out by each nation. (bvsalud.org)
  • Not to be outdone by hunters, anglers advocated for the Dingell-Johnson Act in the 1950's, which taxes fishing equipment for conservation of aquatic resources. (kempoutside.com)
  • Results were processed within two structural equation models, which showed that present orientation negatively affected water conservation. (bvsalud.org)
  • Water conservation did not correlate with past orientation. (bvsalud.org)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Conservation of natural resources. (who.int)
  • These districts provided financial as well as technical support, such as assistance inventorying natural resources, to land owners in their conservation efforts upon request. (wikipedia.org)
  • The SCS was in charge of 500 Civilian Conservation Corps camps between 1933 and 1942. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conservation scientists and foresters manage the land quality of forests, parks, rangelands, and other natural resources. (bls.gov)
  • Most of the people that are concerned with nongame species conservation tend to be liberal minded. (kempoutside.com)
  • Natural resources and the human environment for food and agriculture. (who.int)
  • The two-day conference "The Nature of Peace: Exploring links between the natural environment and peacebuilding in post-conflict societies" recently took place in Lund. (lu.se)
  • The research group focused on the role of the natural environment in post-conflict societies, posing many questinos: What role does nature have in peace building? (lu.se)
  • How is the natural environment considered in fragile states that need to develop quickly, during reconstruction period? (lu.se)
  • Through environmental education, we seek to make people aware of the problems of the natural and social environment from their school education in childhood to generate values, new attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs aimed at caring for the environment and learning new relationships between people. (bvsalud.org)
  • Septiembre - Octubre 2022, Vol. LXII (5), 1067-1078 to make people aware of the problems of the natural and social environment from school education in childhood (Nada et al . (bvsalud.org)
  • Development of project proposals for future conservation projects that could benefit the province of Palawan and Puerto Princesa City. (palawanconservationists.com)
  • Committee on Taxation will release a document describing current tax law treatment of land conservation as well as a number of proposals to encourage land conservation. (senate.gov)
  • Three hundred individuals at a Mexican city responded to Zimbardo s Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI), and self-reported how frequently they engaged in water conservation practices. (bvsalud.org)
  • Experience Iowa's natural beauty and all the fun our state parks offer. (iowadnr.gov)
  • As part of the Federal Crop Insurance Reform and Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994, the agency was renamed the Natural Resources Conservation Service during the tenure of Chief Paul Johnson. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), established by the 2008 Farm Bill, is targeted to producers who maintain a higher level of environmental stewardship. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hearing is meant to lay the ground work for future expansions of tax incentives to promote land conservation. (senate.gov)
  • This requires finding balance between the conservation of the natural resources and maintaining the livelihoods of people living in these areas. (lu.se)
  • This paper explores the relationship between people s time perspective and their tendency towards a responsible and sustainable use of natural resources. (bvsalud.org)
  • Stratégie régionale pour la protection de l' environnement et l' utilisation rationnelle des ressources naturelles dans les pays membres de la CEE pendant la période allant jusqu' en l' an 2000 et au-delà : adoptée par la Commission économique pour l' Europe à sa quarante-troisième session (1988 dans sa décision E (43. (who.int)
  • Does peace always bring sustainable development together with better protection of the natural environments? (lu.se)
  • Providing grounded answers to these questions is of vital importance not only in order to safeguard and guarantee the sustainable use and protection of natural resources in post-conflict scenarios, but also -and even most importantly- to make sure that human rights are protected and respected throughout the process, in particular in connection with local populations in situation of vulnerability," says Fuentes. (lu.se)
  • Iowa's natural resources plates include the state bird and flower, pheasant, eagle, buck and a Brook trout. (iowadnr.gov)
  • Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for conservation scientists and foresters. (bls.gov)
  • The Act gives the Board of Natural Resources the power to adopt technical regulations for the land application of sewage sludge. (gsu.edu)
  • They tend to want more government intervention when it comes to conservation, especially when it comes into opposition from development. (kempoutside.com)
  • Encontré que el contexto local, el apoyo de instituciones, y cambios en la percepción ambiental son factores determinantes para el manejo sostenible de recursos naturales. (lu.se)
  • I analyze and discuss the potential of this type of conservation scheme as an alternative to traditional protected area approaches. (lu.se)
  • I can't guarantee I will always agree with everything someone says, but I am always willing to find ways to work together for the good of the resource. (kempoutside.com)
  • Most conservation scientists and foresters work full time, and schedules may vary. (bls.gov)
  • Time perspective, Conservation (ecological behavior), Hermosillo (Mexico). (bvsalud.org)
  • Conservation scientists manage, improve, and protect natural resources. (bls.gov)
  • Will the desires of specific user groups for their activity continue to cause infighting when we should be pulling together for the good of the resources we all love? (kempoutside.com)
  • International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. (who.int)
  • In this thesis I study a community-based conservation initiative in El Almorzadero páramo. (lu.se)
  • Mediante la educación ambiental se busca concientizar a las personas sobre los problemas del ambiente natural y social desde su formación escolar en la niñez para generar valores, nuevas actitudes, comportamientos y creencias orientadas al cuidado del medio ambiente y el aprendizaje de nuevas relaciones entre las personas. (bvsalud.org)