Conscious Sedation: A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Deep Sedation: Drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients cannot be easily aroused but respond purposely following repeated painful stimulation. The ability to independently maintain ventilatory function may be impaired. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)Midazolam: A short-acting hypnotic-sedative drug with anxiolytic and amnestic properties. It is used in dentistry, cardiac surgery, endoscopic procedures, as preanesthetic medication, and as an adjunct to local anesthesia. The short duration and cardiorespiratory stability makes it useful in poor-risk, elderly, and cardiac patients. It is water-soluble at pH less than 4 and lipid-soluble at physiological pH.Hydroxyzine: A histamine H1 receptor antagonist that is effective in the treatment of chronic urticaria, dermatitis, and histamine-mediated pruritus. Unlike its major metabolite CETIRIZINE, it does cause drowsiness. It is also effective as an antiemetic, for relief of anxiety and tension, and as a sedative.Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Preanesthetic Medication: Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Anesthesia, Rectal: Procedure involving the instillation of an anesthetic into the rectum.Alphaprodine: An opioid analgesic chemically related to and with an action resembling that of MEPERIDINE, but more rapid in onset and of shorter duration. It has been used in obstetrics, as pre-operative medication, for minor surgical procedures, and for dental procedures. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1067)Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Anesthesia Recovery Period: The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Meperidine: A narcotic analgesic that can be used for the relief of most types of moderate to severe pain, including postoperative pain and the pain of labor. Prolonged use may lead to dependence of the morphine type; withdrawal symptoms appear more rapidly than with morphine and are of shorter duration.Chloral Hydrate: A hypnotic and sedative used in the treatment of INSOMNIA.Endoscopy, Digestive System: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.Dentistry, Operative: That phase of clinical dentistry concerned with the restoration of parts of existing teeth that are defective through disease, trauma, or abnormal development, to the state of normal function, health, and esthetics, including preventive, diagnostic, biological, mechanical, and therapeutic techniques, as well as material and instrument science and application. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 2d ed, p237)Burns, Electric: Burns produced by contact with electric current or from a sudden discharge of electricity.Anesthesia, Intravenous: Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.Diazepam: A benzodiazepine with anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, sedative, muscle relaxant, and amnesic properties and a long duration of action. Its actions are mediated by enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID activity.Dental Implantation: The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.Manifest Anxiety Scale: True-false questionnaire made up of items believed to indicate anxiety, in which the subject answers verbally the statement that describes him.Gastric Balloon: An inflatable device implanted in the stomach as an adjunct to therapy of morbid obesity. Specific types include the silicone Garren-Edwards Gastric Bubble (GEGB), approved by the FDA in 1985, and the Ballobes Balloon.Dexmedetomidine: A imidazole derivative that is an agonist of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS. It is closely-related to MEDETOMIDINE, which is the racemic form of this compound.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Analgesia: Methods of PAIN relief that may be used with or in place of ANALGESICS.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Dental Facilities: Use for material on dental facilities in general or for which there is no specific heading.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.

Bilateral neck exploration under hypnosedation: a new standard of care in primary hyperparathyroidism? (1/663)

OBJECTIVE: The authors review their experience with initial bilateral neck exploration under local anesthesia and hypnosedation for primary hyperparathyroidism. Efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness of this new approach are examined. BACKGROUND: Standard bilateral parathyroid exploration under general anesthesia is associated with significant risk, especially in an elderly population. Image-guided unilateral approaches, although theoretically less invasive, expose patients to the potential risk of missing multiple adenomas or asymmetric hyperplasia. Initial bilateral neck exploration under hypnosedation may maximize the strengths of both approaches while minimizing their weaknesses. METHODS: In a consecutive series of 121 initial cervicotomies for primary hyperparathyroidism performed between 1995 and 1997, 31 patients were selected on the basis of their own request to undergo a conventional bilateral neck exploration under local anesthesia and hypnosedation. Neither preoperative testing of hypnotic susceptibility nor expensive localization studies were done. A hypnotic state (immobility, subjective well-being, and increased pain thresholds) was induced within 10 minutes; restoration of a fully conscious state was obtained within several seconds. Patient comfort and quiet surgical conditions were ensured by local anesthesia of the collar incision and minimal intravenous sedation titrated throughout surgery. Both peri- and postoperative records were examined to assess the safety and efficacy of this new approach. RESULTS: No conversion to general anesthesia was needed. No complications were observed. All the patients were cured with a mean follow-up of 18 +/- 12 months. Mean operating time was <1 hour. Four glands were identified in 84% of cases, three glands in 9.7%. Adenomas were found in 26 cases; among these, 6 were ectopic. Hyperplasia, requiring subtotal parathyroidectomy and transcervical thymectomy, was found in five cases (16.1%), all of which had gone undetected by localization studies when requested by the referring physicians. Concomitant thyroid lobectomy was performed in four cases. Patient comfort and recovery and surgical conditions were evaluated on visual analog scales as excellent. Postoperative analgesic consumption was minimal. Mean length of hospital stay was 1.5 +/- 0.5 days. CONCLUSIONS: Initial bilateral neck exploration for primary hyperparathyroidism can be performed safely, efficiently, and cost-effectively under hypnosedation, which may therefore be proposed as a new standard of care.  (+info)

A risk management audit: are we complying with the national guidelines for sedation by non-anaesthetists? (2/663)

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of a preprinted form in ensuring an improved and sustained quality of documentation of clinical data in compliance with the national guidelines for sedation by non-anaesthetists. DESIGN: The process of retrospective case note audit was used to identify areas of poor performance, reiterate national guidelines, introduce a post-sedation advice sheet, and demonstrate improvement. SETTING: Emergency Department, Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton. SUBJECTS: Forty seven patients requiring sedation for relocation of a dislocated shoulder or manipulation of a Colles' fracture between July and October 1996 and July and October 1997. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Evidence that the following items had been documented: consent for procedure, risk assessment, monitored observations, prophylactic use of supplementary oxygen, and discharging patients with printed advice. Case note review was performed before (n = 23) and after (n = 24) the introduction of a sedation audit form. Notes were analysed for the above outcome measures. The monitored observations analysed included: pulse oximetry, respiratory rate, pulse rate, blood pressure, electrocardiography, and conscious level. RESULTS: Use of the form significantly improved documentation of most parameters measured. CONCLUSIONS: Introduction of the form, together with staff education, resulted in enhanced documentation of data and improved conformity with national guidelines. A risk management approach to preempting critical incidents following sedation, can be adopted in this area of emergency medicine.  (+info)

Sedation depends on the level of sensory block induced by spinal anaesthesia. (3/663)

We have investigated the relationship between the extent of spinal block and occurrence of sedation. In a first series of 43 patients, the distribution of sedation score (measured on the Ramsey scale) was related to the extent of spinal block (pinprick). In a second series of 33 patients, the relationship between sedation score and spinal block persisted after injection of midazolam 1 mg. This study confirmed that high spinal block was associated with increased sedation.  (+info)

Feasibility of endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms with local anesthesia with intravenous sedation. (4/663)

PURPOSE: Local anesthesia has been shown to reduce cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity rates in patients who undergo selected peripheral vascular procedures. The efforts to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) with endovascular techniques have largely been driven by the desire to reduce the mortality and morbidity rates as compared with those associated with open aneurysm repair. Early results have indicated a modest degree of success in this goal. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of endovascular repair of AAAs with local anesthesia. METHODS: During a 14-month period, 47 patients underwent endovascular repair of infrarenal AAAs with local anesthesia that was supplemented with intravenous sedation. Anesthetic monitoring was selective on the basis of comorbidities. The patient ages ranged from 48 to 93 years (average age, 74.4 +/- 9.8 years). Of the 47 patients, 55% had significant coronary artery disease, 30% had significant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and 13% had diabetes. The average anesthesia grade was 3.1, with 30% of the patients having an average anesthesia grade of 4. The mean aortic aneurysm diameter was 5.77 cm (range, 4.5 to 12.0 cm). All the implanted grafts were bifurcated in design. RESULTS: Endovascular repair of the infrarenal AAA was successful for all 47 patients. One patient required the conversion to general anesthesia to facilitate the repair of an injured external iliac artery via a retroperitoneal approach. The operative mortality rate was 0. No patient had a myocardial infarction or had other cardiopulmonary complications develop in the perioperative period. The average operative time was 170 minutes, and the average blood loss was 623 mL (range, 100 to 2500 mL). The fluid requirements averaged 2491 mL. Of the 47 patients, 46 (98%) tolerated oral intake and were ambulatory within 24 hours of graft implantation. The patients were discharged from the hospital an average of 2.13 days after the procedure, with 87% of the patients discharged less than 48 hours after the graft implantation. Furthermore, at least 30% of the patients could have been discharged on the first postoperative day except for study protocol requirements for computed tomographic scanning at 48 hours. CONCLUSION: This is the first reported series that describes the use of local anesthesia for the endovascular repair of infrarenal AAAs. Our preliminary results indicate that the endovascular treatment of AAAs with local anesthesia is feasible and can be performed safely in a patient population with significant comorbidities. The significant potential advantages include decreased cardiopulmonary morbidity rates, shorter hospital stays, and lower hospital costs. A definitive evaluation of the benefits of local anesthesia will necessitate a direct comparison with other anesthetic techniques.  (+info)

Epidurography and therapeutic epidural injections: technical considerations and experience with 5334 cases. (5/663)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Even in experienced hands, blind epidural steroid injections result in inaccurate needle placement in up to 30% of cases. The use of fluoroscopy and radiologic contrast material provides confirmation of accurate needle placement within the epidural space. We describe our technique and experience with contrast epidurography and therapeutic epidural steroid injections, and review the frequency of systemic and neurologic complications. METHODS: Epidural steroid injections were performed in 5489 consecutive outpatients over a period of 5 1/2 years by three procedural neuroradiologists. In 155 cases (2.8%), the injections were done without contrast material owing to either confirmed or suspected allergy. The remaining 5334 injections were performed after epidurography through the same needle. Patients and referring clinicians were instructed to contact us first regarding complications or any problem potentially related to the injection. In addition, the referring clinicians' offices were instructed to contact us regarding any conceivable procedure-related complications. RESULTS: Only 10 patients in the entire series required either oral (n = 5) or intravenous (n = 5) sedation. Four complications (0.07%) required either transport to an emergency room (n = 2) or hospitalization (n = 2). None of the complications required surgical intervention, and all were self-limited with regard to symptoms and imaging manifestations. Fluoroscopic needle placement and epidurography provided visual confirmation of accurate needle placement, distribution of the injectate, and depiction of epidural space disease. CONCLUSION: Epidurography in conjunction with epidural steroid injections provides for safe and accurate therapeutic injection and is associated with an exceedingly low frequency of untoward sequelae. It can be performed safely on an outpatient basis and does not require sedation or special monitoring.  (+info)

Intranasal midazolam plasma concentration profile and its effect on anxiety associated with dental procedures. (6/663)

The objectives of this study were to describe the serum concentration time profile for midazolam following intranasal administration to adult dental surgery patients and to ascertain the effect of midazolam on anxiety. Six female patients received a single 20 mg (0.32 to 0.53 mg/kg) dose of midazolam. Blood samples were collected at 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 min following dose administration. Midazolam plasma concentrations were determined by gas chromatography. Anxiety was evaluated using a 100-mm visual analogue scale. The maximum concentration of midazolam was reached 25.8 min (range 18 to 35 min) following dose administration. Maximum concentrations were variable. However, there was no relationship between the weight-adjusted dose and maximal concentration. Patients experiencing baseline anxiety exhibited a trend toward reduction in their measured anxiety score (P = 0.06). Plasma concentrations above the hypothesized minimum effective concentration for sedative effects were attained when midazolam was administered intranasally to adult dental patients.  (+info)

Comparison of oral chloral hydrate with intramuscular ketamine, meperidine, and promethazine for pediatric sedation--preliminary report. (7/663)

Fifteen consecutive pediatric patients ranging from 3 to 5 years old were selected to receive one of three sedative/hypnotic techniques. Group 1 received oral chloral hydrate 50 mg/kg, and groups 2 and 3 received intramuscular ketamine 2 mg/kg and 3 mg/kg, respectively. In addition to ketamine, patients in groups 2 and 3 received transmucosal intramuscular injections of meperidine and promethazine into the masseter muscle. Sedation for the satisfactory completion of restorative dentistry was obtained for over 40 min on average in the chloral hydrate group, but completion of dental surgery longer than 40 min was achieved in groups 2 and 3 only by intravenous supplements of ketamine.  (+info)

Illinois Dental Anesthesia and Sedation Survey for 1996. (8/663)

Dentists in the state of Illinois who possess a permit to administer sedation or general anesthesia were surveyed. A 71% response rate was achieved. Of the respondents, 86% held permits for deep sedation/general anesthesia and 14% held permits for parenteral conscious sedation. By practice specialty, 84% were oral and maxillofacial surgeons, 11% were general dentists, 5% were periodontists, and fewer than 1% were dental anesthesiologists. Advanced Cardiac Life Support training was possessed by 85% of the respondents. The most common anesthesia team configuration (82%) was a single operator-anesthetist and two additional assistants. Only 4% reported use of a nurse anesthetist, and 2% used an additional MD or DDS anesthesiologist. The vast majority (97%) of the practitioners do not intubate in the office on a routine basis. Supplemental oxygen was used by 81% of the respondents whenever intravenous agents were used. A total of 151,335 anesthetics were administered during the year. One mortality occurred in a patient with an undisclosed pre-existing cardiac condition. Four other events were reported that required medical intervention or hospital evaluation; however, no permanent injuries were reported. Other practice characteristics were described.  (+info)

  • One of our sedation nurses stays with you at all times to monitor the effects of the sedative and to make sure you're comfortable. (eveshamplace.co.uk)
  • When you choose oral sedation, you must have a responsible adult who can drive you to and from your appointment and spend some time with you after the appointment until the sedative wears off completely. (aspen-dentist.com)
  • Conscious sedation is regulated by states: providers must be trained and licensed to administer sedation drugs with continuing education requirements. (amrixdmd.com)
  • According to Benharash, the conscious sedation TAVR program at UCLA was modelled in part on the "minimalist" approach piloted at Emory University . (tctmd.com)
  • At UCLA, conscious sedation is now used in "basically everybody," who is a candidate for transfemoral TAVR, he said. (tctmd.com)
  • For trans-subclavian/axillary approach vs. transfemoral approach TAVR, I'll put in a supraclavicular block right after Cordis/large-bore PIV venous access for patient comfort while still utilizing conscious sedation/MAC. (wordpress.com)
  • They should monitor sedation activity, assess the need for sedation, oversee the local implementation of national guidelines, and audit the safety and adverse effects of sedation practices in their unit. (bmj.com)