Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, the transparent membrane that lines the inner surface of the eyelids and covers the white part of the eye, resulting in symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, burning, discharge, and increased sensitivity to light.
Purulent infections of the conjunctiva by several species of gram-negative, gram-positive, or acid-fast organisms. Some of the more commonly found genera causing conjunctival infections are Haemophilus, Streptococcus, Neisseria, and Chlamydia.
Conjunctivitis due to hypersensitivity to various allergens.
Inflammation, often mild, of the conjunctiva caused by a variety of viral agents. Conjunctival involvement may be part of a systemic infection.
An infection of the eyes characterized by the presence in conjunctival epithelial cells of inclusion bodies indistinguishable from those of trachoma. It is acquired by infants during birth and by adults from swimming pools. The etiological agent is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS whose natural habitat appears to be the genito-urinary tract. Inclusion conjunctivitis is a less severe disease than trachoma and usually clears up spontaneously.
A highly contagious disease characterized by subconjunctival hemorrhage, sudden swelling of the eyelids and congestion, redness, and pain in the eye. Epidemic conjunctivitis caused by Enterovirus 70 (EV-70) was first described in Africa in 1969. It is caused also by Coxsackievirus A24 variant (CA24v). Epidemics by this organism have appeared most frequently in Asia.
The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The POLLEN is one cause of HAYFEVER.
A species of ENTEROVIRUS infecting humans and containing 11 serotypes, all coxsackieviruses.
Acute conjunctival inflammation in the newborn, usually caused by maternal gonococcal infection. The causative agent is NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE. The baby's eyes are contaminated during passage through the birth canal.
Simultaneous inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.
Inflammation of the eyelids.
Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.
The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.
Virus diseases caused by the ADENOVIRIDAE.
Respiratory and conjunctival infections caused by 33 identified serotypes of human adenoviruses.
A genus of CHLAMYDOPHILA infecting primarily birds. It contains eight known serovars, some of which infect more than one type of host, including humans.
Inflammation of the iris characterized by circumcorneal injection, aqueous flare, keratotic precipitates, and constricted and sluggish pupil along with discoloration of the iris.
A chronic infection of the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA caused by CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS.
The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.
Type species of CHLAMYDIA causing a variety of ocular and urogenital diseases.
Diseases affecting the eye.
Infection with CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI (formerly Chlamydia psittaci), transmitted to humans by inhalation of dust-borne contaminated nasal secretions or excreta of infected BIRDS. This infection results in a febrile illness characterized by PNEUMONITIS and systemic manifestations.
A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE whose members preferentially inhabit the intestinal tract of a variety of hosts. The genus contains many species. Newly described members of human enteroviruses are assigned continuous numbers with the species designated "human enterovirus".
A plant genus of the family TAXODIACEAE. Its POLLEN is one of the major ALLERGENS.
Conjunctival diseases refer to a broad range of disorders that affect the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane covering the inner surface of the eyelids and the outer layer of the eyeball, causing symptoms such as redness, itching, irritation, discharge, and/or inflammation.
The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CHLAMYDIA.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Intraocular hemorrhage from the vessels of various tissues of the eye.
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.
Agents that are used to treat allergic reactions. Most of these drugs act by preventing the release of inflammatory mediators or inhibiting the actions of released mediators on their target cells. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p475)
Infections with bacteria of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE.
Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
Pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).
A silver salt with powerful germicidal activity. It has been used topically to prevent OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM.
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 7 and neuraminidase 3. It was first detected in turkeys in Britain in 1963 and there have been several outbreaks on poultry farms since that time. A couple cases of human infections have been reported.
A genus of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE whose species cause a variety of diseases in vertebrates including humans, mice, and swine. Chlamydia species are gram-negative and produce glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS.
Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS, causing a wide range of diseases in humans. Infections are mostly asymptomatic, but can be associated with diseases of the respiratory, ocular, and gastrointestinal systems. Serotypes (named with Arabic numbers) have been grouped into species designated Human adenovirus A-F.
Enterovirus Infections are acute viral illnesses caused by various Enterovirus serotypes, primarily transmitted through the fecal-oral route, manifesting as a wide range of clinical symptoms, from asymptomatic or mild self-limiting fever to severe and potentially life-threatening conditions, such as meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, and neonatal sepsis-like illness, depending on the age, immune status, and serotype of the infected individual.
A species of ENTEROVIRUS infecting humans and consisting of 2 serotypes: Human enterovirus 68 and Human enterovirus 70.
Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 7 and neuraminidase 7. The H7N7 subtype produced an epidemic in 2003 which was highly pathogenic among domestic birds (POULTRY). Some infections in humans were reported.
Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.
An infant during the first month after birth.
A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Inflammation of the cornea.
Infections of the eye caused by minute intracellular agents. These infections may lead to severe inflammation in various parts of the eye - conjunctiva, iris, eyelids, etc. Several viruses have been identified as the causative agents. Among these are Herpesvirus, Adenovirus, Poxvirus, and Myxovirus.
Number of patients who need to be treated in order to prevent one additional bad outcome. It is the inverse of Absolute Risk Reduction.
Subacute inflammation of the inguinal lymph glands caused by certain immunotypes of CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS. It is a sexually transmitted disease in the U.S. but is more widespread in developing countries. It is distinguished from granuloma venereum (see GRANULOMA INGUINALE), which is caused by Calymmatobacterium granulomatis.
A form of fluorescent antibody technique utilizing a fluorochrome conjugated to an antibody, which is added directly to a tissue or cell suspension for the detection of a specific antigen. (Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)
Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the eye.
Microorganisms that have undergone greater changes than normal in morphology, physiology, or cultural characteristics.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New Hampshire" is a geographical location and not a medical term or concept, so it doesn't have a medical definition. It is a state in the northeastern United States, known for its scenic beauty and the White Mountains. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or healthcare services in the state of New Hampshire, I would be happy to help with those!
Inflammation of the NASOPHARYNX, usually including its mucosa, related lymphoid structure, and glands.
Loss of epithelial tissue from the surface of the cornea due to progressive erosion and necrosis of the tissue; usually caused by bacterial, fungal, or viral infection.
Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.
An iodinated polyvinyl polymer used as topical antiseptic in surgery and for skin and mucous membrane infections, also as aerosol. The iodine may be radiolabeled for research purposes.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
Eyelid diseases refer to various medical conditions that affect the function, structure, or appearance of the eyelids, including inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, congenital, and traumatic disorders, which can impact vision, comfort, and overall ocular health.
A heterogeneous group of infections produced by coxsackieviruses, including HERPANGINA, aseptic meningitis (MENINGITIS, ASEPTIC), a common-cold-like syndrome, a non-paralytic poliomyelitis-like syndrome, epidemic pleurodynia (PLEURODYNIA, EPIDEMIC) and a serious MYOCARDITIS.
##### Not a valid request: I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Maine" is a state in the northeastern United States and not a medical term or condition with a specific definition in the healthcare context.
Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.
Dibenzoxepins are heterocyclic compounds consisting of a seven-membered oxepin ring fused with two benzene rings, which have been used as building blocks in the synthesis of various pharmaceutical agents, including some antidepressants and antipsychotics.

Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to enterovirus 70 in India. (1/25)

An outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis occurred in Delhi, India, during August and September 1996. The etiologic agent was confirmed as enterovirus type 70 by a modified centrifugation-enhanced culture method followed by immunofluorescence and neutralization tests. After nearly a decade, this virus is reemerging as a cause of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in India.  (+info)

Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis caused by coxsackievirus A24 variant, South Korea, 2002. (2/25)

In summer 2002, a nationwide outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis occurred in South Korea. The etiologic agent was confirmed as coxsackievirus A24 variant (CA24v) by virus isolation and sequencing of a part of the VP1 gene. Phylogentic analysis, based on the protease 3C sequences, showed that the Korean isolates were clustered into a lineage distinct from the CA24v isolates reported in previous outbreaks in Asia.  (+info)

An outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Melaka, Malaysia. (3/25)

This paper reports a second outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to coxsackievirus A24 in peninsular Malaysia. Between June 2002 and early October 2003, 10,327 patients, comprising 3,261 children and 7,066 adults, were treated for acute conjunctivitis in 11 government health clinics in the Melaka Tengah district of the state of Melaka. The figure grossly underestimates the size of the outbreak; as no patients treated in private clinics in the same district were included. Institution and household surveillance showed that the commonest presenting clinical feature of the illness was eye-discharge (91.2%), followed by foreign body sensation (81.8%), pain (78.3%) and subconjunctival haemorrhage (74.4%). The mean duration of illness was 6.5 and five days for patients with and without subconjunctival haemorrhage respectively.  (+info)

Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreak caused by Coxsackievirus A24--Puerto Rico, 2003. (4/25)

Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is an epidemic form of highly contagious conjunctivitis and is characterized by sudden onset of painful, swollen, red eyes, with conjunctival hemorrhaging and excessive tearing. Since 1981, when AHC was first detected in the Western Hemisphere, three major epidemics had occurred until 2003, all affecting the Caribbean. During August-October 2003, a fourth epidemic occurred in Puerto Rico (2000 population: 3.8 million). This report summarizes the outbreak investigation conducted by the Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDOH), which documented an estimated 490,000 persons with illness, including >51,000 cases reported by physicians; demonstrated laboratory evidence of Coxsackievirus A24 (CA24); and determined that school-aged children (i.e., aged 5-18 years) and those living in crowded urban areas were at highest risk. To control outbreaks of AHC, prevention methods (e.g., frequent hand washing and avoidance of sharing towels and bedding) should be targeted to groups at highest risk, and information should be disseminated after the first report of AHC in the area.  (+info)

Rapid identification of the coxsackievirus A24 variant by molecular serotyping in an outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis. (5/25)

We evaluated the clinical applicability of a molecular serotyping method for determination of the cause of epidemic acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis. Seventy conjunctival swab specimens from individuals involved in a nationwide acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreak were tested. Viral culture and a molecular biology-based assay were compared by directly using clinical specimens. On the one hand, virus culture was done to isolate the enteroviruses, and serotyping was done by a coxsackievirus A24 variant-specific PCR. On the other hand, the original clinical specimens were directly screened for enterovirus by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR with panenterovirus-specific primers. Enterovirus screening-positive specimens were subjected to RT-PCR for detection of the VP1 region of enterovirus, and the amplicons were sequenced. Molecular serotyping was done by calculating the pairwise identity scores for the sequences with the maximum identities to the sequences of known prototype enteroviruses. Thirty-two specimens (45.7%) were culture positive, whereas 37 specimens (52.8%) were screening PCR positive (P < 0.001). The VP1 regions were amplified from 21 of the 37 specimens (56.8%), and the products amplified from 9 specimens were appropriately sequenced. These nine sequences were homologous with the sequence of the coxsackievirus A24 variant. Molecular serotyping by direct use of clinical specimens without cell culture could be applied for the rapid identification of the causative agent of epidemic acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis.  (+info)

Enterovirus 70 binds to different glycoconjugates containing alpha2,3-linked sialic acid on different cell lines. (6/25)

Enterovirus 70 (EV70), the causative agent of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, exhibits a restricted tropism for conjunctival and corneal cells in vivo but infects a wide spectrum of mammalian cells in culture. Previously, we demonstrated that human CD55 is a receptor for EV70 on HeLa cells but that EV70 also binds to sialic acid-containing receptors on a variety of other human cell lines. Virus recognition of sialic acid attached to underlying glycans by a particular glycosidic linkage may contribute to host range, tissue tropism, and pathogenesis. Therefore, we tested the possibility that EV70 binds to alpha2,3-linked sialic acid, like other viruses associated with ocular infections. Through the use of linkage-specific sialidases, sialyltransferases, and lectins, we show that EV70 recognizes alpha2,3-linked sialic acid on human corneal epithelial cells and on U-937 cells. Virus attachment to both cell lines is CD55 independent and sensitive to benzyl N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosaminide, an inhibitor of O-linked glycosylation. Virus binding to corneal cells, but not U-937 cells, is inhibited by proteinase K, but not by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C treatment. These results are consistent with the idea that a major EV70 receptor on corneal epithelial cells is an O-glycosylated, non-glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane glycoprotein containing alpha2,3-linked sialic acid, while sialylated receptors on U-937 cells are not proteinaceous.  (+info)

Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis and coxsackievirus A24v, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2004. (7/25)

An outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) occurred in Rio de Janeiro in 2004. Coxsackievirus A24v (CA24v) was identified as the etiologic agent, and partial sequences from the VP1 gene show that the isolates are closely related to CA24v viruses that previously caused AHC epidemics in South Korea and French Guiana.  (+info)

Acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreak in the city of Fortaleza, northeast Brazil. (8/25)

BACKGROUND/AIM: Between February and May 2003 an epidemic of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis affected more than 200 000 people in all five geographic regions of Brazil (north, south, midwestern, southeast, and northeast). The aim was to identify the aetiological agent and to describe clinical aspects of this outbreak in a group of patients treated at the ophthalmology department of the Hospital Walter Cantidio (OD-HWC) at the Universidade Federal do Ceara, in the city of Fortaleza, capital of the state of Ceara, northeastern Brazil. METHODS: Conjunctival swabs were collected from patients who spontaneously went to the laboratory of virology. Specimens were inoculated in HEp-2 and RD cell lines. The viral isolation was confirmed by performing reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and indirect immunofluorescence assay. RESULTS: Viral conjunctivitis was diagnosed in 56 patients but only 24 of them allowed the collection of samples. Of 24 conjunctival swabs tested, 11 were positive for a variant of coxsackie virus A24 (CA24v) and one of the isolates reacted with anti-adenovirus monoclonal antibodies. CONCLUSION: CA24v was confirmed as the aetiological agent of this outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in the city of Fortaleza.  (+info)

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, a thin, clear membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the outer surface of the eye. The condition can cause redness, itching, burning, tearing, discomfort, and a gritty feeling in the eyes. It can also result in a discharge that can be clear, yellow, or greenish.

Conjunctivitis can have various causes, including bacterial or viral infections, allergies, irritants (such as smoke, chlorine, or contact lens solutions), and underlying medical conditions (like dry eye or autoimmune disorders). Treatment depends on the cause of the condition but may include antibiotics, antihistamines, anti-inflammatory medications, or warm compresses.

It is essential to maintain good hygiene practices, like washing hands frequently and avoiding touching or rubbing the eyes, to prevent spreading conjunctivitis to others. If you suspect you have conjunctivitis, it's recommended that you consult an eye care professional for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Bacterial conjunctivitis is a type of conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva) that is caused by bacterial infection. The most common bacteria responsible for this condition are Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae.

The symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis include redness, swelling, and pain in the eye, along with a thick, sticky discharge that can cause the eyelids to stick together, especially upon waking up. Other symptoms may include tearing, itching, and sensitivity to light. Bacterial conjunctivitis is highly contagious and can spread easily through contact with infected individuals or contaminated objects such as towels, handkerchiefs, or makeup.

Treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis typically involves the use of antibiotic eye drops or ointments to eliminate the infection. In some cases, oral antibiotics may also be prescribed. It is important to seek medical attention if you suspect that you have bacterial conjunctivitis, as untreated infections can lead to serious complications such as corneal ulcers and vision loss.

Allergic conjunctivitis is a type of conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva, the membrane that covers the white part of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelids) caused by an allergic reaction to substances such as pollen, dust mites, or pet dander. It is often characterized by redness, itching, watering, and swelling of the eyes. In some cases, the eyes may also become sensitive to light. Allergic conjunctivitis is not contagious and can be treated with medications such as antihistamines, decongestants, or mast cell stabilizers.

Viral conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the thin membrane that covers the white part of the eye (sclera) and the inner surface of the eyelids, caused by a viral infection. The condition is often characterized by redness, watering, gritty or burning sensation in the eyes, and a clear, watery discharge. In some cases, it may also cause swelling of the eyelids and light sensitivity.

The most common viruses that can cause conjunctivitis are adenoviruses, which are responsible for about 65-90% of all viral conjunctivitis cases. Other viruses that can cause the condition include herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus (which causes chickenpox and shingles), and picornaviruses.

Viral conjunctivitis is highly contagious and can spread easily through direct contact with infected individuals or contaminated surfaces. It typically affects one eye first and then spreads to the other eye within a few days. The condition usually resolves on its own within 1-2 weeks, although in some cases it may take longer to clear up completely.

There is no specific treatment for viral conjunctivitis, and antibiotics are not effective against viral infections. However, cool compresses and artificial tears can help alleviate symptoms such as discomfort and dryness. It is important to practice good hygiene, such as washing hands frequently and avoiding touching the eyes, to prevent the spread of the virus to others.

Inclusion conjunctivitis is a type of bacterial conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva) that is caused by specific types of bacteria, most commonly Chlamydia trachomatis. It is also known as trachoma, which is a leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide. The infection leads to the formation of small, inclusion-containing intracytoplasmic inclusions in the conjunctival epithelial cells, hence the name "inclusion conjunctivitis."

The symptoms of inclusion conjunctivitis include redness, irritation, and discharge from the eyes. It can also cause swelling of the lymph nodes near the ears. In severe cases, it can lead to scarring and damage to the cornea, potentially resulting in vision loss. The infection is typically spread through direct contact with eye or nose discharge from an infected person, and it can also be sexually transmitted.

Treatment for inclusion conjunctivitis usually involves antibiotics, such as azithromycin or doxycycline, to eliminate the bacteria causing the infection. It is important to complete the full course of treatment to ensure that the infection is fully cleared and to prevent recurrence. In addition, good hygiene practices, such as frequent handwashing and avoiding sharing personal items like towels and washcloths, can help prevent the spread of the infection.

Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis is a condition characterized by the sudden onset of inflammation and bleeding in the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane that covers the white part of the eye (sclera) and lines the inner surface of the eyelids. This type of conjunctivitis typically causes redness, pain, and sensitivity to light, as well as a gritty or foreign body sensation in the eye.

The bleeding in acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis is caused by the rupture of small blood vessels in the conjunctiva. This can result in the appearance of small red spots (petechiae) or larger blood blisters (hematomas) on the surface of the eye. In some cases, the bleeding may be severe enough to partially obscure vision.

Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis is usually caused by a viral infection, most commonly by enteroviruses such as coxsackievirus A24 and adenovirus type 8. It can also be caused by other infectious agents, including bacteria and certain parasites.

The condition typically resolves on its own within one to two weeks, although in severe cases medical treatment may be necessary to manage symptoms and prevent complications. Treatment may include artificial tears or lubricants to relieve dryness and irritation, as well as antibiotics if a bacterial infection is suspected.

Preventive measures such as good hygiene practices, including frequent hand washing and avoiding touching the eyes with unwashed hands, can help prevent the spread of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis. It is also important to avoid sharing personal items such as towels or washcloths with others who may be infected.

The conjunctiva is the mucous membrane that lines the inner surface of the eyelids and covers the front part of the eye, also known as the sclera. It helps to keep the eye moist and protected from irritants. The conjunctiva can become inflamed or infected, leading to conditions such as conjunctivitis (pink eye).

'Ambrosia' is a term that does not have a specific medical definition. In general, it refers to the food or drink of the Greek gods, said to confer immortality upon them. It has been used in various contexts outside of its mythological origins, such as in botany to refer to certain types of plants, and in popular culture to name a genus of weed pollen that can cause severe allergic reactions. However, it does not have a technical medical meaning.

Enterovirus C, Human (HEV-C) is a type of enterovirus that infects humans. Enteroviruses are small viruses that belong to the Picornaviridae family and consist of a single strand of RNA enclosed in a protein shell. They are named "enteroviruses" because they are typically found in the gastrointestinal tract and are transmitted through the fecal-oral route.

HEV-C includes several serotypes, such as Coxsackievirus A21, A24, B3, B5, and Echovirus 9, 11, 16, 30. These viruses can cause a range of illnesses, from mild symptoms like fever, rash, and sore throat to more severe diseases such as meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, and paralysis.

HEV-C infections are common worldwide, and they often occur in children and young adults. The viruses can be spread through respiratory droplets, contaminated food or water, and direct contact with infected individuals. In many cases, HEV-C infections may not cause any symptoms or only mild ones, but some people may develop severe illnesses that require hospitalization.

Prevention measures include practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands frequently, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and avoiding sharing food, drinks, or utensils with infected persons. There is no specific treatment for HEV-C infections, but supportive care can help manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Ophthalmia Neonatorum is a medical term that refers to a conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva) occurring in the first 28 days of life, often presenting with purulent discharge and redness of the eye. It can be caused by various microorganisms, including bacteria such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, or bacterial flora from the mother's birth canal or hospital environment. Immediate treatment is necessary to prevent potential blindness and other complications. Prophylaxis with erythromycin ointment is often recommended for all newborns.

Keratoconjunctivitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of both the cornea (the clear, outer layer at the front of the eye) and the conjunctiva (the mucous membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the white part of the eye).

The condition can cause symptoms such as redness, pain, sensitivity to light, watery eyes, and a gritty or burning sensation in the eyes. Keratoconjunctivitis can be caused by various factors, including viral or bacterial infections, allergies, or environmental irritants like dust, smoke, or chemical fumes.

Treatment for keratoconjunctivitis depends on the underlying cause of the condition and may include medications such as antibiotics, antivirals, or anti-inflammatory agents to reduce inflammation and relieve symptoms. In some cases, artificial tears or lubricants may also be recommended to help keep the eyes moist and comfortable.

Blepharitis is a common inflammatory condition that affects the eyelids, specifically the eyelash follicles and the edges of the eyelids (called the "eyelid margins"). It can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, burning, and a crusty or flaky buildup on the lashes. Blepharitis can be caused by a variety of factors, including bacterial infection, skin disorders like seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea, and meibomian gland dysfunction. It is often a chronic condition that requires ongoing treatment to manage symptoms and prevent recurrence.

Ophthalmic solutions are sterile, single-use or multi-dose preparations in a liquid form that are intended for topical administration to the eye. These solutions can contain various types of medications, such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatory agents, antihistamines, or lubricants, which are used to treat or prevent ocular diseases and conditions.

The pH and osmolarity of ophthalmic solutions are carefully controlled to match the physiological environment of the eye and minimize any potential discomfort or irritation. The solutions may be packaged in various forms, including drops, sprays, or irrigations, depending on the intended use and administration route.

It is important to follow the instructions for use provided by a healthcare professional when administering ophthalmic solutions, as improper use can lead to eye injury or reduced effectiveness of the medication.

In medical terms, "tears" are a clear, salty liquid that is produced by the tear glands (lacrimal glands) in our eyes. They serve to keep the eyes moist, protect against dust and other foreign particles, and help to provide clear vision by maintaining a smooth surface on the front of the eye. Tears consist of water, oil, and mucus, which help to prevent evaporation and ensure that the tears spread evenly across the surface of the eye. Emotional or reflexive responses, such as crying or yawning, can also stimulate the production of tears.

Adenoviridae infections refer to diseases caused by members of the Adenoviridae family of viruses, which are non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses. These viruses can infect a wide range of hosts, including humans, animals, and birds. In humans, adenovirus infections can cause a variety of symptoms, depending on the specific type of virus and the age and immune status of the infected individual.

Common manifestations of adenovirus infections in humans include:

1. Respiratory illness: Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory tract infections, such as bronchitis, pneumonia, and croup. They can also cause conjunctivitis (pink eye) and pharyngoconjunctival fever.
2. Gastrointestinal illness: Some types of adenoviruses can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain, particularly in children and immunocompromised individuals.
3. Genitourinary illness: Adenoviruses have been associated with urinary tract infections, hemorrhagic cystitis, and nephritis.
4. Eye infections: Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis is a severe form of conjunctivitis caused by certain adenovirus types.
5. Central nervous system infections: Adenoviruses have been linked to meningitis, encephalitis, and other neurological disorders, although these are rare.

Transmission of adenoviruses typically occurs through respiratory droplets, contaminated surfaces, or contaminated water. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, such as handwashing and avoiding close contact with infected individuals. There is no specific treatment for adenovirus infections, but supportive care can help alleviate symptoms. In severe cases or in immunocompromised patients, antiviral therapy may be considered.

Adenoviruses are a group of viruses that commonly cause respiratory infections such as bronchitis, pneumonia, and fevers in humans. They can also cause conjunctivitis (pink eye), croup, and stomach and intestinal inflammation (gastroenteritis). Adenovirus infections are most common in children, but people of any age can be infected. The viruses spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through contact with contaminated surfaces or objects. There is no specific treatment for adenovirus infections, and most people recover on their own within a week or two. However, some people may develop more severe illness, particularly those with weakened immune systems. Preventive measures include frequent hand washing and avoiding close contact with infected individuals. Some adenoviruses can also cause serious diseases in people with compromised immune systems, such as transplant recipients and people undergoing cancer treatment. There are vaccines available to prevent some types of adenovirus infections in military recruits, who are at higher risk due to close living quarters and stress on the immune system from basic training.

'Chlamydophila psittaci' is a gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacterium that causes psittacosis, also known as parrot fever. It is commonly found in birds, particularly parrots and psittacines, but can also infect other bird species, mammals, and humans. In humans, it can cause a wide range of symptoms, including fever, headache, cough, and pneumonia. Human-to-human transmission is rare, and the disease is typically acquired through inhalation of dried secretions or feces from infected birds.

Iritis is a medical condition that refers to the inflammation of the iris, which is the colored part of the eye. The iris controls the size of the pupil and thus regulates the amount of light that enters the eye. Iritis can cause symptoms such as eye pain, redness, photophobia (sensitivity to light), blurred vision, and headaches. It is often treated with anti-inflammatory medications and may require prompt medical attention to prevent complications such as glaucoma or vision loss. The underlying cause of iritis can vary and may include infections, autoimmune diseases, trauma, or other conditions.

Trachoma is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. It primarily affects the eyes, causing repeated infections that lead to scarring of the inner eyelid and eyelashes turning inward (trichiasis), which can result in damage to the cornea and blindness if left untreated.

The disease is spread through direct contact with eye or nose discharge from infected individuals, often through contaminated fingers, shared towels, or flies that have come into contact with the discharge. Trachoma is prevalent in areas with poor sanitation and limited access to clean water, making it a significant public health issue in many developing countries.

Preventive measures include improving personal hygiene, such as washing hands regularly, promoting facial cleanliness, and providing safe water and sanitation facilities. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to eliminate the infection and surgery for advanced cases with trichiasis or corneal damage.

Topical administration refers to a route of administering a medication or treatment directly to a specific area of the body, such as the skin, mucous membranes, or eyes. This method allows the drug to be applied directly to the site where it is needed, which can increase its effectiveness and reduce potential side effects compared to systemic administration (taking the medication by mouth or injecting it into a vein or muscle).

Topical medications come in various forms, including creams, ointments, gels, lotions, solutions, sprays, and patches. They may be used to treat localized conditions such as skin infections, rashes, inflammation, or pain, or to deliver medication to the eyes or mucous membranes for local or systemic effects.

When applying topical medications, it is important to follow the instructions carefully to ensure proper absorption and avoid irritation or other adverse reactions. This may include cleaning the area before application, covering the treated area with a dressing, or avoiding exposure to sunlight or water after application, depending on the specific medication and its intended use.

'Chlamydia trachomatis' is a species of bacterium that is the causative agent of several infectious diseases in humans. It is an obligate intracellular pathogen, meaning it can only survive and reproduce inside host cells. The bacteria are transmitted through sexual contact, and can cause a range of genital tract infections, including urethritis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and epididymitis. In women, chlamydial infection can also lead to serious complications such as ectopic pregnancy and infertility.

In addition to genital infections, 'Chlamydia trachomatis' is also responsible for two other diseases: trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV). Trachoma is a leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide, affecting mostly children in developing countries. It is spread through contact with contaminated hands, clothing, or eye secretions. LGV is a sexually transmitted infection that can cause inflammation of the lymph nodes, rectum, and genitals.

'Chlamydia trachomatis' infections are often asymptomatic, making them difficult to diagnose and treat. However, they can be detected through laboratory tests such as nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) or culture. Treatment typically involves antibiotics such as azithromycin or doxycycline. Prevention measures include safe sex practices, regular screening for STIs, and good hygiene.

Eye diseases are a range of conditions that affect the eye or visual system, causing damage to vision and, in some cases, leading to blindness. These diseases can be categorized into various types, including:

1. Refractive errors: These include myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, and presbyopia, which affect the way light is focused on the retina and can usually be corrected with glasses or contact lenses.
2. Cataracts: A clouding of the lens inside the eye that leads to blurry vision, glare, and decreased contrast sensitivity. Cataract surgery is the most common treatment for this condition.
3. Glaucoma: A group of diseases characterized by increased pressure in the eye, leading to damage to the optic nerve and potential blindness if left untreated. Treatment includes medications, laser therapy, or surgery.
4. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): A progressive condition that affects the central part of the retina called the macula, causing blurry vision and, in advanced stages, loss of central vision. Treatment may include anti-VEGF injections, laser therapy, or nutritional supplements.
5. Diabetic retinopathy: A complication of diabetes that affects the blood vessels in the retina, leading to bleeding, leakage, and potential blindness if left untreated. Treatment includes laser therapy, anti-VEGF injections, or surgery.
6. Retinal detachment: A separation of the retina from its underlying tissue, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly with surgery.
7. Amblyopia (lazy eye): A condition where one eye does not develop normal vision, often due to a misalignment or refractive error in childhood. Treatment includes correcting the underlying problem and encouraging the use of the weaker eye through patching or other methods.
8. Strabismus (crossed eyes): A misalignment of the eyes that can lead to amblyopia if not treated promptly with surgery, glasses, or other methods.
9. Corneal diseases: Conditions that affect the transparent outer layer of the eye, such as keratoconus, Fuchs' dystrophy, and infectious keratitis, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly.
10. Uveitis: Inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, which can cause vision loss if not treated promptly with anti-inflammatory medications or surgery.

Psittacosis is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Chlamydia psittaci, which is typically found in birds. It can be transmitted to humans through inhalation of dried secretions or feces from infected birds, and less commonly, through direct contact with infected birds or their environments. The disease is characterized by symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle aches, cough, and pneumonia. In severe cases, it can lead to respiratory failure, heart inflammation, and even death if left untreated. It's important to note that psittacosis is treatable with antibiotics, and early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for a favorable prognosis.

An enterovirus is a type of virus that primarily infects the gastrointestinal tract. There are over 100 different types of enteroviruses, including polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and newer enteroviruses such as EV-D68 and EV-A71. These viruses are typically spread through close contact with an infected person, or by consuming food or water contaminated with the virus.

While many people infected with enteroviruses may not experience any symptoms, some may develop mild to severe illnesses such as hand, foot and mouth disease, herpangina, meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, and paralysis (in case of poliovirus). Infection can occur in people of all ages, but young children are more susceptible to infection and severe illness.

Prevention measures include practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands frequently with soap and water, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and not sharing food or drinks with someone who is ill. There are also vaccines available to prevent poliovirus infection.

"Cryptomeria" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is actually the scientific name for a type of evergreen tree, also known as Japanese cedar. In some cases, Cryptomeria pollen may cause allergic reactions in susceptible individuals, leading to symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, and itchy eyes. However, it is not a medical condition itself.

Conjunctival diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the conjunctiva, which is the thin, clear mucous membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the white part of the eye (known as the sclera). The conjunctiva helps to keep the eye moist and protected from irritants.

Conjunctival diseases can cause a range of symptoms, including redness, itching, burning, discharge, grittiness, and pain. Some common conjunctival diseases include:

1. Conjunctivitis (pink eye): This is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva that can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or allergies. Symptoms may include redness, itching, discharge, and watery eyes.
2. Pinguecula: This is a yellowish, raised bump that forms on the conjunctiva, usually near the corner of the eye. It is caused by an overgrowth of connective tissue and may be related to sun exposure or dry eye.
3. Pterygium: This is a fleshy growth that extends from the conjunctiva onto the cornea (the clear front part of the eye). It can cause redness, irritation, and vision problems if it grows large enough to cover the pupil.
4. Allergic conjunctivitis: This is an inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by an allergic reaction to substances such as pollen, dust mites, or pet dander. Symptoms may include redness, itching, watery eyes, and swelling.
5. Chemical conjunctivitis: This is an irritation or inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by exposure to chemicals such as chlorine, smoke, or fumes. Symptoms may include redness, burning, and tearing.
6. Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC): This is a type of allergic reaction that occurs in response to the presence of a foreign body in the eye, such as a contact lens. Symptoms may include itching, mucus discharge, and a gritty feeling in the eye.

Treatment for conjunctival diseases depends on the underlying cause. In some cases, over-the-counter medications or home remedies may be sufficient to relieve symptoms. However, more severe cases may require prescription medication or medical intervention. It is important to consult with a healthcare provider if you experience persistent or worsening symptoms of conjunctival disease.

Pollen, in a medical context, refers to the fine powder-like substance produced by the male reproductive organ of seed plants. It contains microscopic grains known as pollen grains, which are transported by various means such as wind, water, or insects to the female reproductive organ of the same or another plant species for fertilization.

Pollen can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, particularly during the spring and summer months when plants release large amounts of pollen into the air. These allergies, also known as hay fever or seasonal allergic rhinitis, can result in symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, congestion, itchy eyes, and coughing.

It is important to note that while all pollen has the potential to cause allergic reactions, certain types of plants, such as ragweed, grasses, and trees, are more likely to trigger symptoms in sensitive individuals.

Chlamydia infections are caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis and can affect multiple body sites, including the genitals, eyes, and respiratory system. The most common type of chlamydia infection is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that affects the genitals.

In women, chlamydia infections can cause symptoms such as abnormal vaginal discharge, burning during urination, and pain in the lower abdomen. In men, symptoms may include discharge from the penis, painful urination, and testicular pain or swelling. However, many people with chlamydia infections do not experience any symptoms at all.

If left untreated, chlamydia infections can lead to serious complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women, which can cause infertility and ectopic pregnancy. In men, chlamydia infections can cause epididymitis, an inflammation of the tube that carries sperm from the testicles, which can also lead to infertility.

Chlamydia infections are diagnosed through a variety of tests, including urine tests and swabs taken from the affected area. Once diagnosed, chlamydia infections can be treated with antibiotics such as azithromycin or doxycycline. It is important to note that treatment only clears the infection and does not repair any damage caused by the infection.

Prevention measures include practicing safe sex, getting regular STI screenings, and avoiding sharing towels or other personal items that may come into contact with infected bodily fluids.

A disease outbreak is defined as the occurrence of cases of a disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a given time and place. It may affect a small and localized group or a large number of people spread over a wide area, even internationally. An outbreak may be caused by a new agent, a change in the agent's virulence or host susceptibility, or an increase in the size or density of the host population.

Outbreaks can have significant public health and economic impacts, and require prompt investigation and control measures to prevent further spread of the disease. The investigation typically involves identifying the source of the outbreak, determining the mode of transmission, and implementing measures to interrupt the chain of infection. This may include vaccination, isolation or quarantine, and education of the public about the risks and prevention strategies.

Examples of disease outbreaks include foodborne illnesses linked to contaminated food or water, respiratory infections spread through coughing and sneezing, and mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika virus and West Nile virus. Outbreaks can also occur in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, where vulnerable populations may be at increased risk of infection.

An eye hemorrhage, also known as subconjunctival hemorrhage, is a condition where there is bleeding in the eye, specifically under the conjunctiva which is the clear membrane that covers the white part of the eye (sclera). This membrane has tiny blood vessels that can rupture and cause blood to accumulate, leading to a visible red patch on the surface of the eye.

Eye hemorrhages are usually painless and harmless, and they often resolve on their own within 1-2 weeks without any treatment. However, if they occur frequently or are accompanied by other symptoms such as vision changes, pain, or sensitivity to light, it is important to seek medical attention as they could indicate a more serious underlying condition. Common causes of eye hemorrhages include trauma, high blood pressure, blood thinners, and aging.

Histamine H1 antagonists, also known as H1 blockers or antihistamines, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine at the H1 receptor. Histamine is a chemical mediator released by mast cells and basophils in response to an allergic reaction or injury. It causes various symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheal and flare reactions (hives).

H1 antagonists prevent the binding of histamine to its receptor, thereby alleviating these symptoms. They are commonly used to treat allergic conditions such as hay fever, hives, and eczema, as well as motion sickness and insomnia. Examples of H1 antagonists include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratadine (Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec), and doxylamine (Unisom).

Anti-allergic agents, also known as antihistamines, are a class of medications used to treat allergies. They work by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that is released during an allergic reaction and causes symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and watery eyes.

There are two main types of antihistamines: first-generation and second-generation. First-generation antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton), can cause drowsiness and other side effects, such as dry mouth and blurred vision. They are typically used for the treatment of short-term symptoms, such as those caused by seasonal allergies or a mild reaction to an insect bite.

Second-generation antihistamines, such as loratadine (Claritin) and cetirizine (Zyrtec), are less likely to cause drowsiness and other side effects. They are often used for the long-term treatment of chronic allergies, such as those caused by dust mites or pet dander.

In addition to their use in treating allergies, antihistamines may also be used to treat symptoms of motion sickness, insomnia, and anxiety. It is important to follow the instructions on the label when taking antihistamines and to talk to a healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about using these medications.

Chlamydiaceae infections are caused by bacteria belonging to the family Chlamydiaceae, including the species Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae. These bacteria can infect various tissues in the human body and cause a range of diseases.

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) worldwide, causing urethritis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, epididymitis, and infertility in both men and women. It can also cause ocular and respiratory tract infections, including trachoma, the leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide.

Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia and bronchitis, as well as pharyngitis, sinusitis, and otitis media. It can also cause chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Chlamydia psittaci is a zoonotic pathogen that primarily infects birds but can occasionally cause severe respiratory illness in humans, known as psittacosis or ornithosis.

Diagnosis of Chlamydiaceae infections typically involves nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, which can detect the genetic material of the bacteria in clinical samples. Treatment usually involves antibiotics such as azithromycin or doxycycline, which can eliminate the infection and prevent complications. Prevention measures include safe sexual practices, proper hygiene, and avoiding contact with infected animals.

An allergen is a substance that can cause an allergic reaction in some people. These substances are typically harmless to most people, but for those with allergies, the immune system mistakenly identifies them as threats and overreacts, leading to the release of histamines and other chemicals that cause symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, rashes, hives, and difficulty breathing. Common allergens include pollen, dust mites, mold spores, pet dander, insect venom, and certain foods or medications. When a person comes into contact with an allergen, they may experience symptoms that range from mild to severe, depending on the individual's sensitivity to the substance and the amount of exposure.

Genital diseases in females refer to various medical conditions that affect the female reproductive system, including the vulva, vagina, cervix, uterus, and ovaries. These conditions can be caused by bacterial, viral, or fungal infections, hormonal imbalances, or structural abnormalities. Some common examples of genital diseases in females include bacterial vaginosis, yeast infections, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, and human papillomavirus (HPV), pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), endometriosis, uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts, and vulvar or vaginal cancer. Symptoms of genital diseases in females can vary widely depending on the specific condition but may include abnormal vaginal discharge, pain or discomfort during sex, irregular menstrual bleeding, painful urination, and pelvic pain. It is important for women to receive regular gynecological care and screenings to detect and treat genital diseases early and prevent complications.

Silver nitrate is defined as an inorganic compound with the chemical formula AgNO3. It is a white or colorless crystalline solid that is highly soluble in water. Silver nitrate is commonly used in medicine as a topical antiseptic and caustic, particularly for the treatment of wounds, ulcers, and warts. When applied to skin or mucous membranes, it can help to destroy bacteria, viruses, and fungi, and promote healing. However, it can also cause irritation and tissue damage if used inappropriately, so it should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

'Influenza A Virus, H7N3 Subtype' is a specific subtype of the Influenza A virus that is characterized by hemagglutinin protein 7 (H7) and neuraminidase protein 3 (N3) on its surface. This subtype has been known to cause outbreaks in poultry populations, and can occasionally infect humans who have close contact with infected birds. It has the potential to cause serious illness or even death, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. However, it is important to note that H7N3 influenza viruses are not currently circulating in humans and are not a direct threat to public health at this time.

Chlamydia is a bacterial infection caused by the species Chlamydia trachomatis. It is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) worldwide. The bacteria can infect the genital tract, urinary tract, eyes, and rectum. In women, it can also infect the reproductive organs and cause serious complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy.

Chlamydia is often asymptomatic, especially in women, which makes it easy to spread unknowingly. When symptoms do occur, they may include abnormal vaginal or penile discharge, burning sensation during urination, pain during sexual intercourse, and painful testicular swelling in men. Chlamydia can be diagnosed through a variety of tests, including urine tests and swab samples from the infected site.

The infection is easily treated with antibiotics, but if left untreated, it can lead to serious health complications. It's important to get tested regularly for STIs, especially if you are sexually active with multiple partners or have unprotected sex. Prevention methods include using condoms during sexual activity and practicing good personal hygiene.

Adenoviruses, Human: A group of viruses that commonly cause respiratory illnesses, such as bronchitis, pneumonia, and croup, in humans. They can also cause conjunctivitis (pink eye), cystitis (bladder infection), and gastroenteritis (stomach and intestinal infection).

Human adenoviruses are non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses that belong to the family Adenoviridae. There are more than 50 different types of human adenoviruses, which can be classified into seven species (A-G). Different types of adenoviruses tend to cause specific illnesses, such as respiratory or gastrointestinal infections.

Human adenoviruses are highly contagious and can spread through close personal contact, respiratory droplets, or contaminated surfaces. They can also be transmitted through contaminated water sources. Some people may become carriers of the virus and experience no symptoms but still spread the virus to others.

Most human adenovirus infections are mild and resolve on their own within a few days to a week. However, some types of adenoviruses can cause severe illness, particularly in people with weakened immune systems, such as infants, young children, older adults, and individuals with HIV/AIDS or organ transplants.

There are no specific antiviral treatments for human adenovirus infections, but supportive care, such as hydration, rest, and fever reduction, can help manage symptoms. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands frequently, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and not sharing personal items like towels or utensils.

Enterovirus infections are viral illnesses caused by enteroviruses, which are a type of picornavirus. These viruses commonly infect the gastrointestinal tract and can cause a variety of symptoms depending on the specific type of enterovirus and the age and overall health of the infected individual.

There are over 100 different types of enteroviruses, including polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and newer enteroviruses such as EV-D68 and EV-A71. Some enterovirus infections may be asymptomatic or cause only mild symptoms, while others can lead to more severe illnesses.

Common symptoms of enterovirus infections include fever, sore throat, runny nose, cough, muscle aches, and skin rashes. In some cases, enteroviruses can cause more serious complications such as meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle), and paralysis.

Enterovirus infections are typically spread through close contact with an infected person, such as through respiratory droplets or fecal-oral transmission. They can also be spread through contaminated surfaces or objects. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing hands frequently and avoiding close contact with sick individuals.

There are no specific antiviral treatments for enterovirus infections, and most cases resolve on their own within a few days to a week. However, severe cases may require hospitalization and supportive care, such as fluids and medication to manage symptoms. Prevention efforts include vaccination against poliovirus and surveillance for emerging enteroviruses.

Enterovirus D, human (HEV-D) is a type of enterovirus that infects humans. Enteroviruses are small viruses that belong to the Picornaviridae family and are characterized by their ability to grow in the intestines of infected individuals. HEV-D includes several serotypes, such as EV-D68 and EV-D70, which can cause a range of illnesses, from mild respiratory symptoms to severe neurological diseases.

HEV-D viruses are typically spread through close contact with an infected person, such as through coughing or sneezing, or by touching contaminated surfaces and then touching the mouth or nose. They can also be transmitted through fecal-oral transmission, particularly in children who are not yet toilet trained.

Some of the symptoms associated with HEV-D infections include fever, runny nose, cough, and muscle aches. In more severe cases, HEV-D can cause neurological complications such as meningitis, encephalitis, or acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a rare but serious condition that affects the spinal cord and can lead to paralysis.

There is no specific treatment for HEV-D infections, and most people recover on their own within a few weeks. However, hospitalization may be necessary in severe cases, particularly those involving neurological complications. Prevention measures include practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands frequently, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and cleaning and disinfecting surfaces regularly.

Bacterial eye infections, also known as bacterial conjunctivitis or bacterial keratitis, are caused by the invasion of bacteria into the eye. The most common types of bacteria that cause these infections include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae.

Bacterial conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the thin membrane that covers the white part of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelids. Symptoms include redness, swelling, pain, discharge, and a gritty feeling in the eye. Bacterial keratitis is an infection of the cornea, the clear front part of the eye. Symptoms include severe pain, sensitivity to light, tearing, and decreased vision.

Bacterial eye infections are typically treated with antibiotic eye drops or ointments. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect a bacterial eye infection, as untreated infections can lead to serious complications such as corneal ulcers and vision loss. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing your hands frequently and avoiding touching or rubbing your eyes.

"Influenza A Virus, H7N7 Subtype" is a type of influenza virus that causes respiratory illness in humans and animals. The "H" and "N" in the name refer to two proteins on the surface of the virus, hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N), respectively. In this subtype, the H7 protein is combined with the N7 protein.

H7N7 viruses are primarily avian influenza viruses, meaning they naturally infect birds. However, they can occasionally infect other animals, including humans, and have caused sporadic human infections and outbreaks, mainly in people who have close contact with infected birds or their droppings.

H7N7 infections in humans can range from mild to severe respiratory illness, and some cases have resulted in death. However, human-to-human transmission of H7N7 viruses is rare. Public health authorities closely monitor H7N7 and other avian influenza viruses due to their potential to cause a pandemic if they acquire the ability to transmit efficiently between humans.

A "newborn infant" refers to a baby in the first 28 days of life outside of the womb. This period is crucial for growth and development, but also poses unique challenges as the infant's immune system is not fully developed, making them more susceptible to various diseases.

"Newborn diseases" are health conditions that specifically affect newborn infants. These can be categorized into three main types:

1. Congenital disorders: These are conditions that are present at birth and may be inherited or caused by factors such as infection, exposure to harmful substances during pregnancy, or chromosomal abnormalities. Examples include Down syndrome, congenital heart defects, and spina bifida.

2. Infectious diseases: Newborn infants are particularly vulnerable to infections due to their immature immune systems. Common infectious diseases in newborns include sepsis (bloodstream infection), pneumonia, and meningitis. These can be acquired from the mother during pregnancy or childbirth, or from the environment after birth.

3. Developmental disorders: These are conditions that affect the normal growth and development of the newborn infant. Examples include cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, and vision or hearing impairments.

It is important to note that many newborn diseases can be prevented or treated with appropriate medical care, including prenatal care, proper hygiene practices, and timely vaccinations. Regular check-ups and monitoring of the newborn's health by a healthcare provider are essential for early detection and management of any potential health issues.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

I must clarify that the term "Guinea Pigs" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, in colloquial or informal language, it may refer to people who are used as the first to try out a new medical treatment or drug. This is known as being a "test subject" or "in a clinical trial."

In the field of scientific research, particularly in studies involving animals, guinea pigs are small rodents that are often used as experimental subjects due to their size, cost-effectiveness, and ease of handling. They are not actually pigs from Guinea, despite their name's origins being unclear. However, they do not exactly fit the description of being used in human medical experiments.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Keratitis is a medical condition that refers to inflammation of the cornea, which is the clear, dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye. The cornea plays an essential role in focusing vision, and any damage or infection can cause significant visual impairment. Keratitis can result from various causes, including bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections, as well as trauma, allergies, or underlying medical conditions such as dry eye syndrome. Symptoms of keratitis may include redness, pain, tearing, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, and a feeling of something foreign in the eye. Treatment for keratitis depends on the underlying cause but typically includes antibiotics, antivirals, or anti-fungal medications, as well as measures to alleviate symptoms and promote healing.

Viral eye infections are caused by viruses that invade different parts of the eye, leading to inflammation and irritation. Some common types of viral eye infections include conjunctivitis (pink eye), keratitis, and dendritic ulcers. These infections can cause symptoms such as redness, watering, soreness, sensitivity to light, and discharge. In some cases, viral eye infections can also lead to complications like corneal scarring and vision loss if left untreated. They are often highly contagious and can spread through contact with contaminated surfaces or respiratory droplets. Antiviral medications may be used to treat certain types of viral eye infections, but in many cases, the infection will resolve on its own over time. Preventive measures such as good hygiene and avoiding touching the eyes can help reduce the risk of viral eye infections.

Numbers Needed to Treat (NNT) is a statistical concept used in clinical medicine and research. It represents the number of patients you need to treat with a particular intervention or therapy, in order to achieve a desired outcome, compared to a control group that does not receive the treatment. The lower the NNT, the more effective the treatment is considered to be, as fewer patients need to be treated to see a benefit. It's important to note that NNT should always be interpreted within the context of the study and the specific patient population being studied.

Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually transmitted infection caused by certain strains of the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. It primarily affects the lymphatic system, leading to inflammation and swelling of the lymph nodes, particularly in the genital area.

The progression of LGV typically occurs in three stages:
1. Primary stage: A small painless papule or ulcer forms at the site of infection, usually on the genitals, within 3-30 days after exposure. This stage is often asymptomatic and resolves on its own within a few weeks.
2. Secondary stage: Within a few weeks to months after the initial infection, patients may develop painful inguinal or femoral lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes) in the groin area, which can sometimes break open and drain. Other possible symptoms include fever, chills, malaise, headache, and joint pain.
3. Tertiary stage: If left untreated, LGV can lead to chronic complications such as fibrosis (scarring) and strictures of the lymphatic vessels, genital elephantiasis (severe swelling of the genitals), and rectovaginal fistulas (abnormal connections between the rectum and vagina).

LGV is more common in tropical and subtropical regions but has been increasingly reported in industrialized countries, particularly among men who have sex with men. Diagnosis typically involves laboratory testing of fluid from an infected lymph node or a sample from the genital ulcer. Treatment consists of antibiotics such as doxycycline, azithromycin, or erythromycin, which can effectively cure the infection if administered promptly.

The Fluorescent Antibody Technique (FAT), Direct is a type of immunofluorescence assay used in laboratory diagnostic tests. It is a method for identifying and locating specific antigens in cells or tissues by using fluorescent-labeled antibodies that directly bind to the target antigen.

In this technique, a sample (such as a tissue section or cell smear) is prepared and then treated with a fluorescently labeled primary antibody that specifically binds to the antigen of interest. After washing away unbound antibodies, the sample is examined under a fluorescence microscope. If the antigen is present in the sample, it will be visible as distinct areas of fluorescence, allowing for the direct visualization and localization of the antigen within the cells or tissues.

Direct FAT is commonly used in diagnostic laboratories to identify and diagnose various infectious diseases, including bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. It can also be used to detect specific proteins or antigens in research and clinical settings.

Foreign bodies in the eye refer to any object or particle that is not normally present in the eye and becomes lodged in it. These foreign bodies can range from small particles like sand or dust to larger objects such as metal shavings or glass. They can cause irritation, pain, redness, watering, and even vision loss if they are not removed promptly and properly.

The symptoms of an eye foreign body may include:

* A feeling that something is in the eye
* Pain or discomfort in the eye
* Redness or inflammation of the eye
* Watering or tearing of the eye
* Sensitivity to light
* Blurred vision or difficulty seeing

If you suspect that you have a foreign body in your eye, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. An eye care professional can examine your eye and determine the best course of treatment to remove the foreign body and prevent any further damage to your eye.

Atypical bacterial forms refer to morphological variations of bacteria that differ from their traditional, well-described shapes. While most bacteria are classified as cocci (spherical), bacilli (rod-shaped), or spirochetes (spiral-shaped), atypical bacterial forms can include pleomorphic (variable shape) organisms, filamentous (threadlike) forms, L-forms (cell wall deficient bacteria), and other unusual morphologies.

These atypical forms may arise due to various factors such as environmental stress, genetic mutations, or the influence of antibiotics. They can be more resistant to antibiotic treatment and evade host immune responses, making them challenging to diagnose and treat. Atypical bacterial forms have been implicated in several chronic infectious diseases, including some cases of periodontitis, prostatitis, and various systemic inflammatory conditions. However, their clinical significance remains a subject of ongoing research and debate.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New Hampshire" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the 50 states in the United States of America, located in the New England region. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Nasopharyngitis is the medical term for inflammation of the nasopharynx, which is the upper part of the throat behind the nose. It is often caused by viral infections such as the common cold, but can also be due to bacterial or allergic causes. Symptoms may include a runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, sneezing, and cough.

A corneal ulcer is a medical condition that affects the eye, specifically the cornea. It is characterized by an open sore or lesion on the surface of the cornea, which can be caused by various factors such as bacterial or fungal infections, viruses, or injury to the eye.

The cornea is a transparent tissue that covers the front part of the eye and protects it from harmful particles, bacteria, and other foreign substances. When the cornea becomes damaged or infected, it can lead to the development of an ulcer. Symptoms of a corneal ulcer may include pain, redness, tearing, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, and a white spot on the surface of the eye.

Corneal ulcers require prompt medical attention to prevent further damage to the eye and potential loss of vision. Treatment typically involves antibiotics or antifungal medications to eliminate the infection, as well as pain management and measures to protect the eye while it heals. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the damage to the cornea.

Parasitic eye infections are conditions characterized by the invasion and infestation of the eye or its surrounding structures by parasites. These can be protozoans, helminths, or ectoparasites. Examples of such infections include Acanthamoeba keratitis, which is caused by a free-living amoeba found in water and soil; Toxoplasmosis, which is caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii; Loiasis, which is caused by the parasitic filarial worm Loa loa; and Demodicosis, which is caused by the mite Demodex folliculorum. Symptoms can vary depending on the type of parasite but often include redness, pain, discharge, and vision changes. Treatment typically involves antiparasitic medications and sometimes surgery to remove the parasites or damaged tissue. Prevention measures include good hygiene practices and avoiding contact with contaminated water or soil.

Povidone-Iodine is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent, which is a complex of iodine with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). This complex allows for sustained release of iodine, providing persistent antimicrobial activity. It has been widely used in various clinical settings, including as a surgical scrub, wound disinfection, and skin preparation before invasive procedures. Povidone-Iodine is effective against bacteria, viruses, fungi, and spores. The mechanism of action involves the release of iodine ions, which oxidize cellular components and disrupt microbial membranes, leading to cell death.

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

Eyelid diseases refer to a variety of medical conditions that affect the function and/or appearance of the eyelids. These can include structural abnormalities, such as entropion (inward turning of the eyelid) or ectropion (outward turning of the eyelid), as well as functional issues like ptosis (drooping of the upper eyelid). Other common eyelid diseases include blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelid margin), chalazion (a blocked oil gland in the eyelid), and cancerous or benign growths on the eyelid. Symptoms of eyelid diseases can vary widely, but often include redness, swelling, pain, itching, tearing, and sensitivity to light. Treatment for these conditions depends on the specific diagnosis and may range from self-care measures and medications to surgical intervention.

Coxsackievirus infections are a type of viral illness caused by Coxsackie A and B viruses, which belong to the family Picornaviridae. These viruses can cause a wide range of symptoms, depending on the specific strain and the age and overall health of the infected individual.

The most common types of Coxsackievirus infections are hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) and herpangina. HFMD is characterized by fever, sore throat, and a rash that typically appears on the hands, feet, and mouth. Herpangina is similar but is usually marked by painful sores in the back of the mouth or throat.

Other possible symptoms of Coxsackievirus infections include:

* Fever
* Headache
* Muscle aches
* Fatigue
* Nausea and vomiting
* Abdominal pain

In some cases, Coxsackievirus infections can lead to more serious complications, such as meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle), or pleurodynia (also known as "devil's grip," a painful inflammation of the chest and abdominal muscles).

Coxsackievirus infections are typically spread through close contact with an infected person, such as through respiratory droplets or by touching contaminated surfaces. The viruses can also be spread through fecal-oral transmission.

There is no specific treatment for Coxsackievirus infections, and most people recover on their own within a week or two. However, severe cases may require hospitalization and supportive care, such as fluids and pain relief. Prevention measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing hands frequently and avoiding close contact with sick individuals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Maine" is not a medical term or concept. It is actually the name of a state, the 23rd state to join the United States of America. Maine is located in the northeastern part of the country and is known for its rocky coastline, maritime history, and natural beauty. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to help answer those!

Allergic rhinitis, perennial type, is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the nasal passages caused by an allergic response to environmental allergens that are present throughout the year. Unlike seasonal allergic rhinitis, which is triggered by specific pollens or molds during certain times of the year, perennial allergic rhinitis is a persistent condition that occurs year-round.

Common allergens responsible for perennial allergic rhinitis include dust mites, cockroaches, pet dander, and indoor mold spores. Symptoms may include sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, itchy eyes, ears, throat, or roof of the mouth. Treatment options typically involve avoiding exposure to the offending allergens, if possible, as well as medications such as antihistamines, nasal corticosteroids, and leukotriene receptor antagonists to manage symptoms. Immunotherapy (allergy shots) may also be recommended for long-term management in some cases.

Dibenzoxepins are a class of organic compounds that contain a seven-membered ring consisting of two benzene rings fused to an oxygen atom. This structure is a heterocyclic compound, and dibenzoxepins are aromatic in nature. They can be found in some natural sources, but many dibenzoxepin derivatives are synthesized for use in pharmaceuticals and other applications.

In the medical field, certain dibenzoxepin derivatives have been explored for their potential therapeutic benefits. For instance, some of these compounds have shown promise as anti-inflammatory, analgesic (pain-relieving), and antipyretic (fever-reducing) agents. Additionally, some dibenzoxepin derivatives are being investigated for their potential use in treating neurological disorders such as depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia due to their ability to interact with various neurotransmitter systems in the brain.

It is important to note that while these compounds have shown promise in preclinical studies, further research is needed to establish their safety and efficacy in humans before they can be approved as medications. Additionally, individual dibenzoxepin derivatives may have different properties, indications, and side effects, so it's essential to consult medical literature or healthcare professionals for specific information on each compound.

... (AHC) (also spelled acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis) is a derivative of the highly ... Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis at eMedicine Chowell, George et al. " Characterization of an Outbreak of Acute Hemorrhagic ... Wright, P. W.; Strauss, G. H.; Langford, M. P. (January 1992). "Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis". American Family Physician. ... contagious conjunctivitis virus, otherwise known as pink eye. Symptoms include excessively red, swollen eyes as well as ...
Conjunctiva Corneal limbus REISAKU KONO; APOLLO 11 DISEASE OR ACUTE HEMORRHAGIC CONJUNCTIVITIS: A PANDEMIC OF A NEW ENTEROVIRUS ... Acute Haemmorrhagic Conjunctivitis is the inflammation of the conjunctiva of sudden onset. It presents as a reddening of the ... Acute Haemmorrhagic Conjunctivitis is normally recognized by the affected individual upon waking. The eyelids stick together ... A common form of the condition that occurs every rainy season is the seasonal conjunctivitis popularly referred to as "Apollo" ...
... acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis; and hand, foot, and mouth disease. Both group A and group B coxsackieviruses can cause ...
Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis is a highly contagious disease caused by one of two enteroviruses, enterovirus 70 and ... The most common cause of infectious conjunctivitis is viral conjunctivitis. It is estimated that acute conjunctivitis affects 6 ... "Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)". MedicineNet. Archived from the original on 22 June 2013. "Acute Bacterial Conjunctivitis - Eye ... Sheikh, Aziz; Hurwitz, Brian (2008), "BACTERIAL CONJUNCTIVITIS 372.05 (Infective Conjunctivitis, Mucopurulent Conjunctivitis, ...
Enterovirus 70: causes outbreaks of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis. Enterovirus 94: has been associated with a single case of ... Five subtypes have been identified to date: Enterovirus 68: causes respiratory disease, and is associated with acute flaccid ...
... acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, aseptic meningitis, myocarditis, severe neonatal sepsis-like disease, acute flaccid paralysis ... Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis can be caused by enteroviruses. Herpangina is caused by Coxsackie A virus, and causes a ... Type B enteroviruses are responsible for a vast number of mild and acute infections. They have been reported to remain in the ... A 2007 study suggested that acute respiratory or gastrointestinal infections associated with enterovirus may be a factor in ...
Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to enterovirus 70 in India. Emerg Infect Dis 1999;5(2):267-9. Hall CB. Nosocomial ... Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreak caused by Coxsackievirus A24--Puerto Rico, 2003. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2004;53(28 ... Transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome during intubation and mechanical ventilation. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2004; ... Hemorrhagic fever viruses as biological weapons: medical and public health management. JAMA 2002;287(18):2391-405. www.bt.cdc. ...
After Georges passed, cases of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis were found around the British Virgin Islands and other islands ... "Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis-St Croix, US Virgin Islands, September-October 1998". JAMA. American Medical Association. 280 ...
Wadia has explored neurological manifestations of Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to enterovirus E 70. He described a new ... "A study of the neurological disorder associated with acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to enterovirus 70". J Neurol ...
Other diseases include acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis (A24 specifically), herpangina, and aseptic meningitis (both Coxsackie ...
... acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis, Rabies, Herpes simplex, Buffalo pox, Measles, and Poliomyelitis were also initiated. A ... In 1995 it has been redesignated as the WHO Collaborating Centre for Arbovirus and Haemorrhagic Fever Reference and Research ... The NIV is identified today as the WHO Collaborating Centres for arboviruses reference and hemorrhagic fever reference and ... First detection of human meta-pneumovirus from acute pneumonia cases in India. Discovered Chandipura virus involvement in ...
Severe hypertension Viral hemorrhagic fever Coagulation disorder (congenital or acquired) Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis ( ... Causes can include coughing, vomiting, heavy lifting, straining during acute constipation or the act of "bearing down" during ...
... conjunctivitis, viral MeSH C11.187.183.240.216 - conjunctivitis, acute hemorrhagic MeSH C11.187.183.394 - keratoconjunctivitis ... conjunctivitis, viral MeSH C11.294.800.250.250 - conjunctivitis, acute hemorrhagic MeSH C11.294.800.270 - cytomegalovirus ... conjunctivitis, allergic MeSH C11.187.183.220 - conjunctivitis, bacterial MeSH C11.187.183.220.250 - conjunctivitis, inclusion ... conjunctivitis, bacterial MeSH C11.294.354.220.250 - conjunctivitis, inclusion MeSH C11.294.354.220.625 - ophthalmia neonatorum ...
... a series of American space missions that ultimately landed men on the Moon Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, referred to ...
They die with a serous, foamy, or haemorrhagic discharge coming out of the nose. In acute cases, animals are recumbent, ... There can be periodontitis or serous nasal exudate and conjunctivitis. Nasal discharge becomes mucopurulent and may obstruct ... Body temperature is high (40.5 to 41 °C) in the beginning of the onset in acute cases. The most typical signs are seen in the ... The virus can be detected in acute cases from various swabs and blood samples, using PCR and ELISA. Antibodies can also be ...
... acute hemorrhagic MeSH C02.782.687.359.213 - coxsackievirus infections MeSH C02.782.687.359.213.165 - conjunctivitis, acute ... conjunctivitis, acute hemorrhagic MeSH C02.325.465.450 - keratitis, dendritic MeSH C02.440.435.100 - hepatitis b, chronic MeSH ... dengue hemorrhagic fever MeSH C02.782.417.400 - cgi?mode=&term=Hemorrhagic+Fever,+American hemorrhagic fever, american MeSH ... hemorrhagic fever, ebola MeSH C02.782.417.435 - hemorrhagic fever, omsk MeSH C02.782.417.450 - hemorrhagic fever with renal ...
... acute disseminated MeSH C20.111.258.250.425 - leukoencephalitis, acute hemorrhagic MeSH C20.111.258.250.500 - multiple ... conjunctivitis, allergic MeSH C20.543.480.343 - dermatitis, atopic MeSH C20.543.480.370 - food hypersensitivity MeSH C20.543. ... acute hemorrhagic MeSH C20.111.258.500 - myasthenia gravis MeSH C20.111.258.500.300 - myasthenia gravis, autoimmune, ... acute MeSH C20.683.515.639.550.512 - leukemia, myelocytic, acute MeSH C20.683.515.695 - leukemia, plasmacytic MeSH C20.683. ...
Acute signs of FCV include fever, conjunctivitis, nasal discharge, sneezing, and ulceration of the mouth (stomatitis). ... A form of FCV has been found to cause a particularly severe systemic disease in cats, similar to rabbit hemorrhagic disease ( ...
... acute, lower GU tract 098.4 Conjunctivitis, gonococcal 098.8 Gonococcal infection of other specified sites 098.86 Gonococcal ... hemorrhagic) pneumonitis 052.2 Postvaricella myelitis 052.7 Chickenpox with other specified complications 052.8 Chickenpox with ... 005 Other poisoning (bacterial) 005.0 Staphylococcal food poisoning 006 Amoebiasis 006.0 Acute amoebic dysentery without ... acute 070.4 Other specified viral hepatitis with mention of hepatic coma 070.5 Other specified viral hepatitis without mention ...
... acute and chronic pyelonephritis) Lowe's syndrome Medullary cystic disease Nephrotic syndrome (acute glomerulonephritis, ... Asthma Atopic dermatitis Atopic eczema Hay fever Urticaria Vernal conjunctivitis Acne rosacea Albinism Atopic dermatitis ... "Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo: Clinical Observations in 103 Patients". The Journal of ... Granulomatosis with polyangiitis may also cause inflammation of the optic nerve, ophthalmoplegia, conjunctivitis, keratitis, ...
A combination of conjunctivitis and tonsillitis is particularly common with adenovirus infections. Some children (especially ... Rarely, adenovirus can cause hemorrhagic cystitis (inflammation of the urinary bladder-a form of urinary tract infection-with ... Lee B, Damon CF, Platts-Mills JA (October 2020). "Pediatric acute gastroenteritis associated with adenovirus 40/41 in low- ... A doctor may give antibiotic eyedrops for conjunctivitis, while awaiting results of bacterial cultures, and to help prevent ...
Domingues, Renan Barros; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio (2009). "Management of acute viral encephalitis in Brazil". Braz J Infect Dis ... Flaviviruses, Viral encephalitis, Hemorrhagic fevers, Insect-borne diseases, Biological weapons). ... The disease first presents with fever, headache, vomiting, and conjunctivitis, then progresses to neurological symptoms ( ...
... hemorrhagic smallpox, measles, and fulminant viral hepatitis. Non-infectious diseases that can be confused with MVD are acute ... conjunctivitis, and malaise. Early Organ Phase: Day 5 up to Day 13. Symptoms include prostration, dyspnea, edema, conjunctival ... "Marburg haemorrhagic fever". Health Topics A to Z. Retrieved 2011-09-25. "Outbreak Table , Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever , CDC". ... "Marburg hemorrhagic fever outbreak continues in Uganda". October 2012. "WHO , Marburg haemorrhagic fever in Uganda - update". ...
Kidney failure* is common in dogs and may be found in acute or chronic forms. It is defined by a loss of function of about 75 ... Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis is a disease of dogs characterized by sudden vomiting and bloody diarrhea. The symptoms are usually ... Conjunctivitis* is inflammation of the conjunctiva. In dogs it is most commonly caused by mechanical irritation (such as by ... Acute kidney injury can be caused by loss of blood supply, hypercalcemia, or toxins such as ethylene glycol (antifreeze) or ...
In acute stages of this virus, rest, antipyretics and analgesics are used to subside symptoms. Most use non-steroidal anti- ... Due to hemorrhagic complications, aspirin should be avoided. Infected individuals should avoid mosquito exposure by staying ... and conjunctivitis. Symptoms can last several days to weeks, but death resulting from this infection is rare. Most people ... However, more severe instances can lead to hemorrhagic fever, internal bleeding, and breathing difficulty, which can be fatal. ...
... embryopathy Acute anxiety Acute articular rheumatism Acute erythroblastic leukemia Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis Acute ... type II Athabaskan brain stem dysgenesis Atherosclerosis Athetosis Athlete's foot Atopic dermatitis Atopic conjunctivitis ... dysmorphism Arachnoid cysts Arachnoiditis Arakawa's syndrome II Arbovirosis Arc syndrome AREDYLD syndrome Argentine hemorrhagic ... aniridia Acute lymphocytic leukemia Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia Acute monoblastic leukemia Acute monocytic leukemia Acute ...
Subsequently, depending on the immune status of the pigs, the acute infection may be continued with a persistent stage with ... Other members of the family Arteriviridae include: equine arteritis virus (EAV), simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV), wobbly ... conjunctivitis. Neurological signs could be seen in some cases. The common lesions at necropsy may include inflammation of ... PRRSV infection starts with an acute infection during which tonsils and lungs serve as preferential sites of infection leading ...
He developed an acute illness with severe nausea, vomiting, fatigue and headache. He was diagnosed with acute aseptic ... bilateral conjunctivitis and meningismus. The next day the patient became hypotensive and delirious. Later respiratory failure ... excluding Rift Valley fever and Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever)". Manual of diagnostic tests and vaccines for terrestrial ... Prior to 1956 there were no known cases of acute infections of Cache Valley virus (CVV) in humans. However antibodies against ...
The cause of death in early hemorrhagic cases is commonly due to heart failure and pulmonary edema. In late hemorrhagic cases, ... The clinical definition of ordinary smallpox is an illness with acute onset of fever equal to or greater than 38.3 °C (101 °F) ... leading to complications such as conjunctivitis, keratitis, corneal ulcer, iritis, iridocyclitis, and atrophy of the optic ... Hemorrhagic and flat types have the highest fatality rates. The fatality rate for flat or late hemorrhagic type smallpox is 90 ...
Many people continue to have symptoms after the "acute phase" resolves, termed the "post-acute phase" for symptoms lasting ... Others experience eye problems, namely sensitivity to light, conjunctivitis, and pain behind the eye. This first set of ... September 2012). "Interferon response factors 3 and 7 protect against Chikungunya virus hemorrhagic fever and shock". Journal ... In the acute phase of chikungunya, the virus is typically present in the areas where symptoms present, specifically skeletal ...
Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) (also spelled acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis) is a derivative of the highly ... Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis at eMedicine Chowell, George et al. " Characterization of an Outbreak of Acute Hemorrhagic ... Wright, P. W.; Strauss, G. H.; Langford, M. P. (January 1992). "Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis". American Family Physician. ... contagious conjunctivitis virus, otherwise known as pink eye. Symptoms include excessively red, swollen eyes as well as ...
Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is characterized by conjunctival congestion, vascular dilatation, and onset of edema. ... encoded search term (Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis) and Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis What to Read Next on Medscape ... Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis. Updated: Apr 04, 2023 * Author: Jean Deschênes, MD, FRCSC; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD ... The prevalence of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is lower in the United States than in developing countries. Because of ...
Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis -- St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, September-October 1998 Hurricane Georges struck the U.S. ... Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis. In: Darrell RW, ed. Viral disease of the eye. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1985:165-96. ... Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis caused by coxsackievirus A24 variant -- Puerto Rico. MMWR 1988;37:123-4,129. ... Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis caused by coxsackievirus A24 -- Caribbean. MMWR 1987;36:245-6. ...
Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis and Coxsackievirus A24v, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2004 Fernando N. Tavares*, Eliane V. Costa*, ... Phylogenetic analysis of CA24 strains isolated during the acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks in Rio de Janeiro in 2003 ... Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis and Coxsackievirus A24v, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2004. ...
acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis. specific acute endemic conjunctivitis with eyelid swelling, tearing, conjunctival hemorrhages ...
Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreak caused by Coxsackievirus A24-Puerto Rico, 2003. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2004;53(28 ... Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to enterovirus 70 in India. Emerg Infect Dis 1999;5(2):267-9. ... Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in a tertiary hospital in Singapore, linked to an index patient with atypical ... Transmission of Ebola hemorrhagic fever: a study of risk factors in family members, Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo, ...
Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis (Apollo/Pink Eye) We are seeing a number of people in some clinics with red eyes with ...
Categories: Conjunctivitis, Acute Hemorrhagic Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Role of enhanced receptor engagement in the evolution of a pandemic acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis virus ...
During the acute phase, 40 children presented at median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 7 (5-10) years with fever, ... The details during the acute phase (clinical features, investigations, treatment, and outcome) and follow-up (symptoms, ... Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIC-S) is a hyperinflammatory manifestation of severe acute respiratory syndrome ... 4 During the acute phase, four (10%) cases had hemorrhagic nonpurulent conjunctivitis, 20 two (5%) had digital gangrene, 21 one ...
Recent epidemic of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Calcutta. BK Baidya, RN Basu, AK Chakraborty. September-October 1983, ... Glucose estimation in tear fluid in normal eyes and in acute mucopurulent conjunctivitis. Ajit Sinha, IM Prasad, A Rahman. ... Effect of therapeutic agents on acute ocular toxicity of methyl alcohol (An experimental study). PK Khosla, AK Gupta, HK Tewari ...
Haemorrhagic conjunctivitis. *In pregnancy, viruses that cause HFMD can cause first trimester spontaneous miscarriage or ... Loss of nerve function in a limb (acute flaccid paralysis). *Pulmonary oedema and pneumonia ...
Viral Conjunctivitis - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - Medical ... Outbreaks of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, a rare conjunctivitis associated with infection by enterovirus type 70, have ... Diagnosis of conjunctivitis and differentiation between bacterial Acute Bacterial Conjunctivitis Acute conjunctivitis can be ... and noninfectious conjunctivitis Allergic Conjunctivitis Allergic conjunctivitis is an acute, intermittent, or chronic ...
Conjunctivitis Acute bacterial S Chlamydia S Gonococcal S Acute viral (acute hemorrhagic) C DI Coxsackievirus disease (see ... Viral/hemorrhagic conjunctivitis Viral hemorrhagic infections (Ebola, Lassa, or Marburg ... acute conjunctivitis of newborn) S Gonorrhea S Granuloma inguinale (donovanosis, granuloma venereum) S Guillain-Barre syndrome ... Update: management of patients with suspected viral hemorrhagic fever -- United States. MMWR 1995;44:475-479. APPENDIX A. Type ...
... and hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, which may be prevented or diminished by prophylaxis with a local corticosteroid eye drop ... Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia. Remission induction. * IV. *100-200 mg/m2/day IV continuous infusion for 5-10 days; begin second ... Acute pancreatitis reported to occur in a patient receiving injection by continuous infusion and in patients being treated who ... Case of anaphylaxis resulting in acute cardiopulmonary arrest and required resuscitation reported; occurred immediately after ...
Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis (AHC). 26/10/2017 Latest News, Medical Alert 3,785 Views ... Please find below: Updated Case Definition for suspected cases of Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis (AHC) Red eye patient ...
... acute enterocolitis, bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, melena, pseudomembranous colitis, pancytopenia, granulocytopenia, ... conjunctivitis, stomatitis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, exfoliative dermatitis, erythema multiforme, ... In acute rodent toxicity studies, a single oral 5600 mg/kg dose produced no adverse effects. Toxic signs and symptoms following ... SERIOUS ACUTE HYPERSENSITIVITY REACTIONS MAY REQUIRE TREATMENT WITH EPINEPHRINE AND OTHER EMERGENCY MEASURES, INCLUDING OXYGEN ...
ACUTE GENERAL HAEMORRHAGIC PERITONITIS Br Med J 1916; 2 :40 (Published 08 July 1916) ... A CASE OF PNEUMOCOCCIC CONJUNCTIVITIS Br Med J 1916; 2 :41 (Published 08 July 1916) ...
... acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, aseptic meningitis, myocarditis, and neonatal infections.. TaqMan PCR Kit Click to expand ...
Coxsackievirus A24 Variant Associated with Acute Haemorrhagic Conjunctivitis Cases, French Guiana, 2017.. Enfissi, Antoine; ... A molecular investigative approach to an outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Egypt, October 2010. ...
Acute Exposure. Phosgene oxime is an urticant or nettle agent capable of producing erythema, wheals, and urticaria. It is ... Mild conjunctivitis beginning more than 12 hours after exposure is unlikely to progress to a severe lesion. The patient should ... There are no human data; however, animal studies suggest that hemorrhagic inflammatory lesions may occur throughout the ... Conjunctivitis beginning earlier and other effects such as lid swelling and signs/symptoms of inflammation indicate need for ...
Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis caused by enterovirus type 70: an epidemic in American Samoa. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1985 Sep. 34( ... Kono R. Apollo 11 disease or acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis: a pandemic of a new enterovirus infection of the eyes. Am J ... Clinical findings and results of treatment in an outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in southern Florida. Am J ... Arnow PM, Hierholzer JC, Higbee J. Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis: A mixed virus outbreak among Vietnamese refugees on Guam. ...
Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis 40% * Epigenetic changes induced by maternal factors during fetal life: Implication for type 1 ...
acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis DOID:11227 * lacrimal gland adenocarcinoma DOID:298 * mature T-cell and NK-cell lymphoma ...
Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis.. Wright PW, Strauss GH, Langford MP. Am Fam Physician 1992 Jan;45(1):173-8. PMID: 1309404 ... Epidemic hemorrhagic keratoconjunctivitis.. Yang YF, Hung PT, Lin LK, Green IJ, Hung SC. Am J Ophthalmol 1975 Aug;80(2):192-7. ...
Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis *Rapidly progressive. *Infection starts ipsilaterally, but rapidly involves the fellow eye ... "Coxsackie B3/B4-Related Acute Flaccid Myelitis". Neurocrit Care. doi:10.1007/s12028-017-0377-8. PMID 28324262.. CS1 maint: ...
Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis; Hyperacute Bacterial Conjunctivitis (HBC); Koch-Weeks conjunctivitis Overview. Historical ... Differentiating Conjunctivitis from other Diseases. Epidemiology and Demographics. Risk Factors. Screening. Natural History, ... Retrieved from "https://www.wikidoc.org/index.php?title=Conjunctivitis&oldid=1661058" ...
  • Characterization of an Outbreak of Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis in Mexico, 2003. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aseptic meningitis in infants younger than 2 years of age: acute illness and neurologic complications. (medscape.com)
  • Some of the symptoms of these viruses include mild respiratory illness (the common cold), hand, foot and mouth disease, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, aseptic meningitis, myocarditis, severe neonatal sepsis-like disease, acute flaccid paralysis, and the related acute flaccid myelitis. (seleneriverpress.com)
  • In AHC, a prominent hemorrhagic component soon appears that is characteristic of this infection. (medscape.com)
  • Viral conjunctivitis is a highly contagious acute conjunctival infection usually caused by an adenovirus. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Overview of Conjunctivitis Conjunctival inflammation typically results from infection, allergy, or irritation. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Outbreaks of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, a rare conjunctivitis associated with infection by enterovirus type 70, have occurred in Africa and Asia. (msdmanuals.com)
  • We examined virus distribution and associated inflammation within nasal and periocular tissues during the acute phase of H1N1 IAV infection in ferrets following intranasal or ocular inoculation. (cdc.gov)
  • The Ghana Optometric Association (GOA) has confirmed the surge in Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis, popularly known as 'Apollo' an eye infection. (nsemgh.com)
  • In literature, this entity is known by different names: post-acute COVID-19 sequelae, post-COVID syndrome, post-COVID condition, long COVID, COVID long-haulers, post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection, etc. (springer.com)
  • Most studies defined PCS as the persistence of acute symptoms or the development of new symptoms beyond 4 wk after an acute COVID-19 infection [ 5 ]. (springer.com)
  • Other serious clinical manifestations include disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) and gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum, a severe form of conjunctivitis affecting newborn infants who acquire the infection in the birth canal. (pediagenosis.com)
  • Epidemic keratitis and conjunctivitis are caused by adenovirus infection of the eye, which is highly contagious and can be sporadic or epidemiological. (sansureglobal.com)
  • Pharyngeal conjunctival fever is a viral conjunctivitis characterized by acute follicular conjunctivitis with upper respiratory tract infection and fever. (sansureglobal.com)
  • In the early days of the pandemic when information on COVID-19 infection was lacking, all COVID-19 positive patients were admitted into acute hospitals for. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and its corresponding coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was first reported as a cluster of pneumonia cases in. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Phylogenetic analysis of CA24 strains isolated during the acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks in Rio de Janeiro in 2003 and 2004. (cdc.gov)
  • Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis is a severe form of viral conjunctivitis that is usually caused by adenovirus serotypes Ad 5, 8, 11, 13, 19, and 37. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Genotype HAdV-D is associated with conjunctivitis and HAdV-D53 and HAdV-D54 have been associated with epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • What is the difference between Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis and Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis (VKC): great question! (drcremers.com)
  • Perinatal infections may result in inclusion conjunctivitis and pneumonia in newborns. (cdc.gov)
  • In immunocompromised populations (eg, HIV-infected patients, patients after solid organ transplantation, and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation), HAdv can be reactivated or produce new infections, and even disseminated HAdv infections can occur, causing multiple organ infections such as enteritis, hemorrhagic cystitis, hepatitis, and pneumonia. (sansureglobal.com)
  • Mumps Mumps is an acute, contagious, systemic viral disease, usually causing painful enlargement of the salivary glands, most commonly the parotids. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Mumps is an acute viral illness caused by an enveloped RNA virus that belongs to the genus Rubulavirus , in the family Paramyxoviridae . (health.mil)
  • The secondary stage can include a syndrome featuring cervical, inguinal, and/or femoral lymphadenopathy that may rupture or an anorectal syndrome featuring proctocolitis (including mucoid or hemorrhagic rectal discharge, anal pain, constipation, fever, and/or tenesmus). (cdc.gov)
  • Crimean Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) cases are reported continuously from epidemiological week 8, 2014. (who.int)
  • Clinical features include a prodrome marked by high fever followed by the onset of cough, runny nose, and red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis). (health.mil)
  • Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is characterized by conjunctival congestion, vascular dilatation, and onset of edema. (medscape.com)
  • Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) (also spelled acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis) is a derivative of the highly contagious conjunctivitis virus, otherwise known as pink eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • Measles is a highly contagious acute viral respiratory illness caused by a single-stranded, enveloped RNA virus with 1 serotype. (health.mil)
  • Smallpox is an acute, contagious disease caused by the variola virus, a member of the genus Orthopoxvirus , in the Poxviridae family (see the image below). (medscape.com)
  • Local ophthalmologists considered the symptoms characteristic of viral acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC). (cdc.gov)
  • Caution and appropriate personal protective equipment should be used when examining patients with conjunctivitis, systemic symptoms, and travel from high-risk regions. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Persistent or new symptoms after acute coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) are a well-known entity in the adult population, with an estimated global prevalence of 0.43 (95% CI: 0.39, 0.46) [ 1 ]. (springer.com)
  • Hepatitis A is characterized by acute inflammation and is generally self-feeding in the liver . (muysalud.com)
  • The viruses in the family Picornaviridae (picornaviruses) cause acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC). (medscape.com)
  • Non-poliovirus enteroviruses (NPEV) are infectious agents which can determine various illness in human such as hand-foot-mouth syndrome, angina, respiratory diseases, acute or chronic heart disease, diarrhea, pancreatitis, acute hemorrhagic, and conjunctivitis. (academicjournals.org)
  • The birds examined had evidence of extensive subcutaneous haemorrhage, pericardial, epicardial and endocardial haemorrhage, and haemorrhagic/necrotising enteritis. (agriculture.gov.au)
  • Apollo, formally called Acute Haemorrhagic Conjunctivitis, or simply conjunctivitis, is one of the most common eye infections here in Nigeria. (healthguide.ng)
  • A spectrum of immune dysregulation has been described following SARS-CoV-2 infections-from the cytokine storm in the acute phase, to hyperinflammatory syndromes that occur after. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has been implicated in having post-COVID-19 sequelae in both adults and children. (springer.com)
  • COVID-19 COVID-19 is an acute, sometimes severe, respiratory illness caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes respiratory disease in mink similar to human COVID-19. (cdc.gov)
  • The specific high-sensitivity enzymatic reporter unlocking (SHERLOCK) assay detected severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA with high sensitivity and specificity in hundreds of nasopharyngeal and throat swab samples collected at Siriraj Hospital in Thailand. (nature.com)
  • One adult in each household was asked whether any members of the household had developed conjunctivitis (defined as the onset of redness, tearing, swelling, itching, and/or burning around one or both eyes of at least 1 day's duration) within the preceding 8 weeks. (cdc.gov)
  • Den återstående sjukdomar beskrivs som "Disease X" och som representeras av kunskapen att en allvarlig internationell epidemi kan orsakas av ett smittämne som för närvarande är okänt som sjukdomsframkallande hos människor. (umu.se)
  • Foundations of the severe acute respiratory syndrome preparedness and response plan for healthcare facilities. (cdc.gov)
  • Investigation of a nosocomial outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Toronto, Canada. (cdc.gov)
  • Guillain-Barré syndrome is an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy and, in the postpolio era, is the most common cause of generalized paralysis. (medscape.com)
  • Immediately thereafter, health authorities on St. Croix (1998 population: approximately 50,000) became aware of increased numbers of cases of conjunctivitis. (cdc.gov)
  • During September, one of the two public health clinics on the island recorded 88 cases of conjunctivitis, compared with three cases during August. (cdc.gov)
  • Approximately 10% of households reported at least one case of conjunctivitis, and cases were distributed widely across the island. (cdc.gov)
  • Coxsackievirus A24 Variant Associated with Acute Haemorrhagic Conjunctivitis Cases, French Guiana, 2017. (bvsalud.org)
  • however, animal studies suggest that hemorrhagic inflammatory lesions may occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract. (cdc.gov)
  • The recommendations are intended primarily for use in the care of patients in acute-care hospitals, although some of the recommendations may be applicable for some patients receiving care in subacute-care or extended-care facilities. (cdc.gov)
  • Secondary corneal ulcer in a case of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis treated with steroids. (medscape.com)
  • A case was defined as physician-diagnosed conjunctivitis since August 31. (cdc.gov)
  • Contact with the eyes may result in severe pain, conjunctivitis, and keratitis. (cdc.gov)