Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Psychology, Clinical: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological methods of recognizing and treating behavior disorders.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Psychology, Comparative: The branch of psychology concerned with similarities or differences in the behavior of different animal species or of different races or peoples.Psychology, Educational: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological aspects of teaching and the formal learning process in school.Psychology, Experimental: The branch of psychology which seeks to learn more about the fundamental causes of behavior by studying various psychologic phenomena in controlled experimental situations.Psychology, Medical: A branch of psychology in which there is collaboration between psychologists and physicians in the management of medical problems. It differs from clinical psychology, which is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of behavior disorders.Psychology, Industrial: The branch of applied psychology concerned with the application of psychologic principles and methods to industrial problems including selection and training of workers, working conditions, etc.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Ecological and Environmental Phenomena: Ecological and environmental entities, characteristics, properties, relationships and processes.Negotiating: The process of bargaining in order to arrive at an agreement or compromise on a matter of importance to the parties involved. It also applies to the hearing and determination of a case by a third party chosen by the parties in controversy, as well as the interposing of a third party to reconcile the parties in controversy.Economics, Behavioral: The combined discipline of psychology and economics that investigates what happens in markets in which some of the agents display human limitations and complications.Behavioral Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.Unconscious (Psychology): Those forces and content of the mind which are not ordinarily available to conscious awareness or to immediate recall.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.War: Hostile conflict between organized groups of people.Gestalt Theory: A system which emphasizes that experience and behavior contain basic patterns and relationships which cannot be reduced to simpler components; that is, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.Behaviorism: A psychologic theory, developed by John Broadus Watson, concerned with studying and measuring behaviors that are observable.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Psychophysiology: The study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior.Cognitive Science: The study of the precise nature of different mental tasks and the operations of the brain that enable them to be performed, engaging branches of psychology, computer science, philosophy, and linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Self Psychology: Psychoanalytic theory focusing on interpretation of behavior in reference to self. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Terms, 1994) This elaboration of the psychoanalytic concepts of narcissism and the self, was developed by Heinz Kohut, and stresses the importance of the self-awareness of excessive needs for approval and self-gratification.Displacement (Psychology): The process by which an emotional or behavioral response that is appropriate for one situation appears in another situation for which it is inappropriate.Psychology, Military: The branch of applied psychology concerned with psychological aspects of selection, assignment, training, morale, etc., of Armed Forces personnel.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Psychology, Applied: The science which utilizes psychologic principles to derive more effective means in dealing with practical problems.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Codependency (Psychology): A relational pattern in which a person attempts to derive a sense of purpose through relationships with others.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Latency Period (Psychology): The period from about 5 to 7 years to adolescence when there is an apparent cessation of psychosexual development.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Neurobiology: The study of the structure, growth, activities, and functions of NEURONS and the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Personal Construct Theory: A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Introversion (Psychology): A state in which attention is largely directed inward upon one's self.Character: In current usage, approximately equivalent to personality. The sum of the relatively fixed personality traits and habitual modes of response of an individual.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Neuropsychology: A branch of psychology which investigates the correlation between experience or behavior and the basic neurophysiological processes. The term neuropsychology stresses the dominant role of the nervous system. It is a more narrowly defined field than physiological psychology or psychophysiology.Criminal Psychology: The branch of psychology which investigates the psychology of crime with particular reference to the personality factors of the criminal.Race Relations: Cultural contacts between people of different races.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Ego: The conscious portion of the personality structure which serves to mediate between the demands of the primitive instinctual drives, (the id), of internalized parental and social prohibitions or the conscience, (the superego), and of reality.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Retention (Psychology): The persistence to perform a learned behavior (facts or experiences) after an interval has elapsed in which there has been no performance or practice of the behavior.Child Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in children.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Civil Disorders: Deliberate and planned acts of unlawful behavior engaged in by aggrieved segments of the population in seeking social change.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Regression (Psychology): A return to earlier, especially to infantile, patterns of thought or behavior, or stage of functioning, e.g., feelings of helplessness and dependency in a patient with a serious physical illness. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994).Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Systems Theory: Principles, models, and laws that apply to complex interrelationships and interdependencies of sets of linked components which form a functioning whole, a system. Any system may be composed of components which are systems in their own right (sub-systems), such as several organs within an individual organism.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Psychoanalytic Theory: Conceptual system developed by Freud and his followers in which unconscious motivations are considered to shape normal and abnormal personality development and behavior.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Imprinting (Psychology): A particular kind of learning characterized by occurrence in very early life, rapidity of acquisition, and relative insusceptibility to forgetting or extinction. Imprinted behavior includes most (or all) behavior commonly called instinctive, but imprinting is used purely descriptively.Transference (Psychology): The unconscious transfer to others (including psychotherapists) of feelings and attitudes which were originally associated with important figures (parents, siblings, etc.) in one's early life.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Mental Processes: Conceptual functions or thinking in all its forms.Resilience, Psychological: The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.BooksScience: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Countertransference (Psychology): Conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient which may interfere with treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Games, Experimental: Games designed to provide information on hypotheses, policies, procedures, or strategies.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Gyrus Cinguli: One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Problem Solving: A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.Stroop Test: Timed test in which the subject must read a list of words or identify colors presented with varying instructions and different degrees of distraction. (Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary. 8th ed.)Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Forgiveness: Excusing or pardoning for an offense or release of anger or resentment.Individuality: Those psychological characteristics which differentiate individuals from one another.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.United StatesKnowledge of Results (Psychology): A principle that learning is facilitated when the learner receives immediate evaluation of learning performance. The concept also hypothesizes that learning is facilitated when the learner is promptly informed whether a response is correct, and, if incorrect, of the direction of error.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Empathy: An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Sex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Allied Health Occupations: Occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians, and are qualified by special training and, frequently, by licensure to work in supporting roles in the health care field. These occupations include, but are not limited to, medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Mating Preference, Animal: The selection or choice of sexual partner in animals. Often this reproductive preference is based on traits in the potential mate, such as coloration, size, or behavioral boldness. If the chosen ones are genetically different from the rejected ones, then NATURAL SELECTION is occurring.Concept Formation: A cognitive process involving the formation of ideas generalized from the knowledge of qualities, aspects, and relations of objects.Financial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Psychopathology: The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Set (Psychology): Readiness to think or respond in a predetermined way when confronted with a problem or stimulus situation.Weapons: Devices or tools used in combat or fighting in order to kill or incapacitate.Psychopharmacology: The study of the effects of drugs on mental and behavioral activity.Empirical Research: The study, based on direct observation, use of statistical records, interviews, or experimental methods, of actual practices or the actual impact of practices or policies.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Creativity: The ability to generate new ideas or images.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Denial (Psychology): Refusal to admit the truth or reality of a situation or experience.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Decision Theory: A theoretical technique utilizing a group of related constructs to describe or prescribe how individuals or groups of people choose a course of action when faced with several alternatives and a variable amount of knowledge about the determinants of the outcomes of those alternatives.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Hypnosis: A state of increased receptivity to suggestion and direction, initially induced by the influence of another person.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Entrepreneurship: The organization, management, and assumption of risks of a business or enterprise, usually implying an element of change or challenge and a new opportunity.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Social Dominance: Social structure of a group as it relates to the relative social rank of dominance status of its members. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Sick Role: Set of expectations that exempt persons from responsibility for their illness and exempt them from usual responsibilities.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Hospitals, Religious: Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Psychophysiologic Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physical symptoms that are affected by emotional factors and involve a single organ system, usually under AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM control. (American Psychiatric Glossary, 1988)Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Motivational Interviewing: It is a client-centered, directive method for eliciting intrinsic motivation to change using open-ended questions, reflective listening, and decisional balancing. This nonjudgmental, nonconfrontational interviewing style is designed to minimize a patient's resistance to change by creating an interaction that supports open discussion of risky or problem behavior.Uncertainty: The condition in which reasonable knowledge regarding risks, benefits, or the future is not available.Human Engineering: The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.
The first edition had #9 and #10 as one connection and this is open to future discovery as there are conflicting studies. This ...
Although such deadlines were seldom met, it was a point of potential conflict. He also agreed to allow the brotherhood to ... Department of Psychology), concludes that "even if El Greco were astigmatic, he would have adapted to it, and his figures, ...
... the body language is in conflict with it. The child does not know how to respond to the conflict between the words and the body ... Thus, the essence of a double bind is two conflicting demands, each on a different logical level, neither of which can be ... Conflicts in communication are common and often we ask "What do you mean?" or seek clarification in other ways. This is called ... A double bind is a dilemma in communication in which an individual (or group) receives two or more conflicting messages, with ...
The protection of archaeological finds for the public from catastrophes, wars and armed conflicts is increasingly being ... UNIFIL - Action plan to preserve heritage sites during conflict, 12 Apr 2019. ... which can be summarized as a conflict between a need to remain respectful toward sacred burial sites and the academic benefit ...
... and the form of such conflicts.[42] In economic theorizing, the labor market mediates all such conflicts such that employers ... Journal of Economic Psychology. 57: 86-101. doi:10.1016/j.joep.2016.10.002. hdl:10419/114164.. ... and some conflicts of interests are seen as inherent in the employment relationship (e.g., wages v. profits). Lastly, the ... Any conflicts that exist are seen as a manifestation of poor human resource management policies or interpersonal clashes such ...
... and an autocratic leadership and an authoritarian way of settling conflicts or dealing with disagreements, on the other. An ... Crowd psychology. *Divide and rule. *Fear appeal. *Fear mongering. *Fit in or fuck off ...
Journal of Comparative Psychology. 126 (4): 433-445. doi:10.1037/a0028858. PMID 22866769.. ... and conflicts with human fisheries. In late 2005, the southern resident killer whales, which swim in British Columbia and ... and habitat disturbance caused by noise and conflicts with boats are the most significant worldwide threats.[3] ... killer whales were hunted along Japanese coasts out of public concern for potential conflicts with fisheries. Such cases ...
Hersen P, Sturmey M (2012). Handbook of evidence-based practice in clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. pp. 594-5. ISBN 978 ... However this theory is controversial since there is conflicting evidence.[7]. Hormonal factorsEdit. Since females are more ... the cumulative evidence has been described as conflicting, with moderate evidence that TMD can occasionally follow whiplash ...
This type of planning can lead to conflict with non-emergency management regulatory bodies, which require the development of ... Managerial psychology. *Managerialism. *Organization development. *Organizational behavior management. *Pointy-haired Boss. * ...
Another is fingles, insinuated in Eric to be an important part of human psychology. Their absence, according to the Creator, ... The sex of the World Turtle is pivotal in proving or disproving a number of conflicting theories about the destination of Great ...
... and in situations of armed conflict such as systematic war rape.[77] In order to address and end gendered violence, solutions ... Developmental Psychology. 37 (1): 115-125. doi:10.1037/0012-1649.37.1.115.. ...
The psychology department at The New School has had issues with sexual harassment. According to a December 2017 account in the ... was strongly criticised by faculty and other members of the university community as a power-grab involving potential conflicts ...
... imparted by the contradiction and conflict of the various forces and tendencies acting on a given body, or within a given ...
The concept is often invoked in discussions of the conflict between an increasing opportunity for homosocialization and the ...
"Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines. 54 (10): 1120-34. doi:10.1111/jcpp.12114. PMC 3829379. PMID ... For example, studies of the 5-HTTLPR gene and stress resulting in modified risk of depression have had conflicting results.[17] ... "Annual Review of Clinical Psychology. 7: 383-409. doi:10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-032210-104518. PMC 3647367. PMID 21219196.. ...
"Developmental Psychology. 17 (5): 595-603. doi:10.1037/0012-1649.17.5.595.. *^ Kohlberg, Lawrence; Carol Gilligan (1971). The ... both psychologically and in balancing conflicting social-value claims. The process of resolving conflicting claims to reach an ... Woolfolk, Anita (2012). Educational Psychology. Prentice Hall. p. 101. ISBN 9780132893589. .. *^ Waller, Bruce (2005). Consider ... 2002). "The 100 Most Eminent Psychologists of the 20th Century". Review of General Psychology. 6 (2): 139-15. CiteSeerX 10.1. ...
But I find it is much better on WP to try not to guess at the agenda or psychology of an editor, and rather to focus on WP ... No, I don't work for the Centre for Effective Altruism and have no hidden agenda or conflicts of interest. Please assume good ... There was no determination of a conflict of interest, and that discussion has not been added to since January 15. This is a ... when there is so much activity and conflict, a handful of pages like I do. That does not merit a COI tag. This has already been ...
They signal yielding in a hierarchy conflict or a need for help.[34] Low mood or extreme low mood (also known as depression) ... Maestripieri, D. (2005). "Book Reviews: Primate Psychology". Animal Behaviour. 69: 245-248. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2004.08.001. ... Brüne M. (2006). "The evolutionary psychology of obsessive-compulsive disorder: the role of cognitive metarepresentation". ...
"Journal of Family Psychology. 25 (6): 885-894. doi:10.1037/a0025423. PMC 3874382. PMID 21928888.. CS1 maint: ref=harv (link). ... found that women report markedly higher rates of fear during marital conflicts.[44] However, a rejoinder argued that Jacobson's ... "Psychology of Men & Masculinity. 2 (2): 75-85. doi:10.1037/1524-9220.2.2.75.. CS1 maint: ref=harv (link). Pdf. ... "Psychology Today. 4 (6): l07-l12.. CS1 maint: ref=harv (link). *Also available as: Stark, R.; McEvoy, J. (1972), "Middle class ...
The poor face an expensive process of recovering from vulnerability, just to face another conflict which then restarts the ...
They are resolved by applying the science of logic and psychology together with mathematics, the supreme solution finder being ... Behavioral dilemmas resulting from conflicting potentials set by inexperienced and/or malicious users of the robot for the ...
Differential psychology[edit]. Galton's study of human abilities ultimately led to the foundation of differential psychology ... How Sir Francis Galton's Work Caused his Disciples to Reach Conflicting Conclusions About the Hereditary Mechanism". Science & ... Hergenhahn, B. R.; Henley, Tracy (2013). An Introduction to the History of Psychology. Cengage Learning. ISBN 978-1-133-95809-3 ... and psychology.[42] Galton's later statistical study of the probability of extinction of surnames led to the concept of Galton- ...
"What causes war?: an introduction to theories of international conflict. Lexington Books. pp. 160-192. ISBN 978-0-7391-0112-4. ... Stimulus-response models are applied in international relations,[2] psychology,[3] risk assessment,[4] neuroscience,[5] ... In psychology, stimulus response theory concerns forms of classical conditioning in which a stimulus becomes paired response in ... "What is the stimulus-response theory in psychology?".. .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output . ...
Conflicts[eedit , eedit soorce]. A skunk an a Californie raccoon (P. s. psora) share cat food morsels in a Hollywood, ... Davis, H. B. (October 1907). "The Raccoon: A Study in Animal Intelligence". The American Journal of Psychology. Champaign, ...
This idea is in conflict with Buddhist beliefs of interconnections between all. The enemy is not the "other" but the idea that ... with particular attention to ecclesiology and its engagement with church-world conflicts; Jewish-Christian relations…; politics ...
Class conflict[edit]. Main article: Class conflict. Class conflict, frequently referred to as "class warfare" or "class ... Psychology Press. p. 39. ISBN 978-0-415-27546-0. .. CS1 maint: uses editors parameter (link). ... Hazelrigg, Lawrence E. & Lopreato, Joseph; Class, Conflict, and Mobility: Theories and Studies of Class Structure (1972). ... In Marxist theory, the class structure of the capitalist mode of production is characterized by the conflict between two main ...
He says that evolutionary psychology suggests that humans naturally tend to be self-interested. He further argues that the ... whereas taking an impartial standpoint and equally considering the interests of all sentient beings is in conflict with what we ... and experiments in psychology offer hope that self-interested people will make short-term sacrifices for the good of others, if ...
"How Well Do Meta-Analyses Disclose Conflicts of Interests in Underlying Research Studies". The Cochrane Collaboration website. ... Conflict of interest disclosure, however, is not systematically nor consistently dealt with by journals which publish ... A 2011 study done to disclose possible conflicts of interests [COI] in underlying research studies used for medical meta- ... Marion Nestle (October 2001). "Food company sponsorship of nutrition research and professional activities: a conflict of ...
Psychology has been used for political purposes in despotic states such as the former Soviet Union, where dissidents were ... It says researchers must disclose conflicts of interest. Does the mere existence of "WatchingTheDeniers" web site or SkS ... A quick Googling of Brembs shows little in the climate arena, nothing in psychology, no more leftist thought than many of the ... One could imagine, for example, a public figure being undermined because of a psychology paper that psychoanalyzed him or her ...
Conflict of Interest. The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial ... Holzkamp, K. (2015). "Conduct of everyday life as a basic concept of critical psychology," in Psychology and the Conduct of ... Data were gathered in two cohorts (see Table 1). The first cohort consisted of 65 students of Psychology and was tested between ... Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1990). Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience. New York, NY: Harper & Row. ...
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Hes taking no prisoners, and its very interesting he never once mentioned Hungarys conflicts with the IMF over fiscal policy ... A Glimpse Into the Stubborn Psychology of Fish. "Its only when the school of fish stream towards the exits in unison that the ... The psychology of fish always leads them from a state of comfortable wealth to one of utter destitution over time, as they ... Thats the hallmark of a sharks psychology right before he/she blows sky high:. "Im such a clever player, yet so deep in the ...
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However, important issues of analysis, and political and commercial conflicts of interest still need to be addressed. ... However, important issues of analysis, and political and commercial conflicts of interest still need to be addressed. ... REF 2014: Oxford Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience excels * Russell Foster recognised in New Year Honours ...
Great Britain has been a witness to many conflicts that had led to a shift in international and regional politics, triggering ... Piaget and Vygotsky were very influential in the psychology field in relation to the cognitive development theory. This paper ... education and psychology in which the subject of research serves as his/her own control. It does not use another individual or ...
fDepartment of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720. *Find this author on Google Scholar ... The authors declare no conflict of interest.. *. This article is a PNAS Direct Submission. ...
In Frontiers in Psychology. 52th Academy of Aphasia Conference, Miami, FL, USA, October 05, 2014 - October 07, 2014. Frontiers ... In Frontiers in Psychology. 54th Academy of Aphasia Conference, Llandudno, United Kingdom, October 16, 2016 - October 18, 2016 ...
But this decision conflicts with almost 100 years of decisions on taxes. ... which is far closer to a hard science than sociology or psychology. But economics does have a highly accurate method of ...
Remember that there is wealth of information, but also that there could be conflicting details it is essential to confirm this ... In the present day, comparable principals of shade psychology are being utilized across the web to insight interaction and ...
I said I am confused about tooth decay versus tooth wear and conflicting statements I have heard about such. ... Childrens environmental psychology, behaviour and education and wellbeing: The role of connection to nature ...
True, psychology is fun. If you applied the transference concept properly, as in my case, it would be even more interesting. ... Evolution and all of the other science that conflicts with your beliefs could be disproved today and it still doesnt provide ...
This creates a new conflict. A society cannot live with the tension between the State and nature and thus is left with two ... There is but one anthropology, one humanity, one anatomy, and one psychology in the Kingdom of God, "by image & likeness." What ... This creates a new conflict. A society cannot live with the tension between the State and nature and thus is left with two ... His solution is to try and locate orientation in biology in order to resolve the conflict. Further, his approach has serious ...
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In "The Psychology of the Transference" he writes of the fourfold nature of the transforming process using the language of ... One is unconscious wholeness; two is the conflict of opposites; three points to a potential resolution; the third is the ... It is Also Called a form of "Mystic Psychology" . The seven Principles The book devotes a chapter to each of its seven " ...
... conflict and context. Amercan Journal of Community Psychology. 46(1-2), pp. 167-178. 0091-0562. ... Duckett, P., Sixsmith, J. and Kagan, C. (2008) Researching pupil well-being in UK secondary schools: Community psychology and ... Sixsmith, J. (2010) Urban regeneration. Other presented to: Third International Conference on Community Psychology, Puebla, ... Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section (QMiP): Multiple Transformations of Qualitative Data, De Montfort University, ...
Any conflict within the group could put the social unit at risk for harm against predators, or energy spent in conflict could ... Mathematics Medical Billing Office Skills Parenting and Family Personal Development Pet and Animal Care Psychology Science Self ... So very early on, the human brain began to develop the complex skills of conflict resolution. Through such tolerance and ...
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  • During his life, Carl Jung followed his intuition and insights informed by his clinic practice as a psychologist and psychiatrist to define what we know today as analytic psychology. (sapience2112.com)
  • While I worked on the drawing, I was also reading a collection of lectures C.G. Jung gave to his peers at the Institute of Medical Psychology in London between September 30 to October 4, 1935. (sapience2112.com)
  • This is the third in our series of essays by Rupert Sheldrake on the implications of his hypothesis of Formative Causation for the psychology of C. G. Jung. (satyacenter.com)
  • Shifts of visuospatial attention to invisible (metacontrast-masked) singletons: Clues from reaction times and event-related potential: Advances in Cognitive Psychology Vol 2(1) 2006, 61-76. (wikia.org)
  • In this book, which is less technical in style, I place the hypothesis of formative causation in its broad historical, philosophical, and scientific contexts, summarize its main chemical and biological implications, and explore its consequences in the realms of psychology, society, and culture. (satyacenter.com)
  • The period from 1700 to 1840 produced some highly sophisticated psychological theorizing that became central to German intellectual and cultural life long before the commonly accepted start of psychology as a discipline in the late. (cellarstories.com)
  • The psychology of fish always leads them from a state of comfortable wealth to one of utter destitution over time , as they incessantly chase their losses, throwing bad money after even worse money. (blogspot.com)
  • Whilst there seems to be an overall consensus favouring autonomy over beneficence, tensions along this fine balance are magnified in jurisdictionswhere legislation leads to a dual loyalty conflict for the physician. (rian.ie)
  • To find a negotiation & conflict management grad program for your educational and career goals, filter your search by selecting the program (on-campus and online) and the degree type. (gradschools.com)