Computed tomography modalities which use a cone or pyramid-shaped beam of radiation.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Photosensitive afferent neurons located primarily within the FOVEA CENTRALIS of the MACULA LUTEA. There are three major types of cone cells (red, blue, and green) whose photopigments have different spectral sensitivity curves. Retinal cone cells operate in daylight vision (at photopic intensities) providing color recognition and central visual acuity.
Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.
Bulbous enlargement of the growing tip of nerve axons and dendrites. They are crucial to neuronal development because of their pathfinding ability and their role in synaptogenesis.
Imaging methods that result in sharp images of objects located on a chosen plane and blurred images located above or below the plane.
X-ray image-detecting devices that make a focused image of body structures lying in a predetermined plane from which more complex images are computed.
Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.
A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)
The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.
The use of a device composed of thermoluminescent material for measuring exposure to IONIZING RADIATION. The thermoluminescent material emits light when heated. The amount of light emitted is proportional to the amount of ionizing radiation to which the material has been exposed.
Materials used as reference points for imaging studies.
An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.
The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.
Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)
An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.
The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).
Photosensitive proteins expressed in the CONE PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are the protein components of cone photopigments. Cone opsins are classified by their peak absorption wavelengths.
Computed tomography where there is continuous X-ray exposure to the patient while being transported in a spiral or helical pattern through the beam of irradiation. This provides improved three-dimensional contrast and spatial resolution compared to conventional computed tomography, where data is obtained and computed from individual sequential exposures.
The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.
An articulation between the condyle of the mandible and the articular tubercle of the temporal bone.
Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.
Tomography using radioactive emissions from injected RADIONUCLIDES and computer ALGORITHMS to reconstruct an image.
The total absence of teeth from either the mandible or the maxilla, but not both. Total absence of teeth from both is MOUTH, EDENTULOUS. Partial absence of teeth in either is JAW, EDENTULOUS, PARTIALLY.
Types of spiral computed tomography technology in which multiple slices of data are acquired simultaneously improving the resolution over single slice acquisition technology.
The closeness of a determined value of a physical dimension to the actual value.
A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)
Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.
Three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging with the added dimension of time, to follow motion during imaging.
Projection of near-IR light (INFRARED RAYS), in the 700-1000 nm region, across an object in parallel beams to an array of sensitive photodetectors. This is repeated at various angles and a mathematical reconstruction provides three dimensional MEDICAL IMAGING of tissues. Based on the relative transparency of tissues to this spectra, it has been used to monitor local oxygenation, brain and joints.
Diseases of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE surrounding the root of the tooth, which is distinguished from DENTAL PULP DISEASES inside the TOOTH ROOT.
The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.
Screens which absorb the energy in the x-ray beam that has penetrated the patient and convert this energy into a light pattern which has as nearly as possible the same information as the original x-ray beam. The more light a screen produces for a given input of x-radiation, the less x-ray exposure and thus shorter exposure time are needed to expose the film. In most film-screen systems, the film is sandwiched between two screens in a cassette so that the emulsion on each side is exposed to the light from its contiguous screen.
Descriptive anatomy based on three-dimensional imaging (IMAGING, THREE-DIMENSIONAL) of the body, organs, and structures using a series of computer multiplane sections, displayed by transverse, coronal, and sagittal analyses. It is essential to accurate interpretation by the radiologist of such techniques as ultrasonic diagnosis, MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING, and computed tomography (TOMOGRAPHY, X-RAY COMPUTED). (From Lane & Sharfaei, Modern Sectional Anatomy, 1992, Preface)
Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.
Computer-assisted mathematical calculations of beam angles, intensities of radiation, and duration of irradiation in radiotherapy.
A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.
A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)
The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.
A tomographic technique for obtaining 3-dimensional images with transmission electron microscopy.
Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.
Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).
A film base coated with an emulsion designed for use with x-rays.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.
A dead body, usually a human body.
The ratio of radiation dosages required to produce identical change based on a formula comparing other types of radiation with that of gamma or roentgen rays.
The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.
'Mandibular diseases' refer to various medical conditions that primarily affect the structure, function, or health of the mandible (lower jawbone), including but not limited to infections, tumors, developmental disorders, and degenerative diseases.
Moving a patient into a specific position or POSTURE to facilitate examination, surgery, or for therapeutic purposes.
Use of optic and geometric techniques to enhance radiographic image quality and interpretation. It includes use of microfocal X-ray tubes and intensifying fluoroscopic screens.
Reference points located by visual inspection, palpation, or computer assistance, that are useful in localizing structures on or within the human body.
One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.
Technique involving the passage of X-rays through oral structures to create a film record while a central tab or wing of dental X-ray film is being held between upper and lower teeth.
The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.
A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.
The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).
Tomography using x-ray transmission.
A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).
The use of a radiation monitoring device composed of material which emits light after being illuminated. The amount of light emitted is proportional to the amount of IONIZING RADIATION to which the material has been previously exposed.
A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)
Photosensitive afferent neurons located in the peripheral retina, with their density increases radially away from the FOVEA CENTRALIS. Being much more sensitive to light than the RETINAL CONE CELLS, the rod cells are responsible for twilight vision (at scotopic intensities) as well as peripheral vision, but provide no color discrimination.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Resorption in which cementum or dentin is lost from the root of a tooth owing to cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity in conditions such as trauma of occlusion or neoplasms. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Radiography of the SALIVARY GLANDS or ducts following injection of contrast medium.
The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)
The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.
A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.
A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.
The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.
Radiation protection, also known as radiation safety, is the science and practice of protecting people and the environment from harmful ionizing radiation exposure while allowing for the safe medical, industrial, and research uses of such radiation.
The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)
The use of pre-treatment imaging modalities to position the patient, delineate the target, and align the beam of radiation to achieve optimal accuracy and reduce radiation damage to surrounding non-target tissues.
Behavior of LIGHT and its interactions with itself and materials.
Either of a pair of bones that form the prominent part of the CHEEK and contribute to the ORBIT on each side of the SKULL.
Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.
An abnormal hardening or increased density of bone tissue.
Computer systems or programs used in accurate computations for providing radiation dosage treatment to patients.
Photosensitive proteins expressed in the ROD PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are the protein components of rod photoreceptor pigments such as RHODOPSIN.
The measurement of radiation by photography, as in x-ray film and film badge, by Geiger-Mueller tube, and by SCINTILLATION COUNTING.
CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY that combines several intensity-modulated beams to provide improved dose homogeneity and highly conformal dose distributions.
Devices which accelerate electrically charged atomic or subatomic particles, such as electrons, protons or ions, to high velocities so they have high kinetic energy.
The dense rock-like part of temporal bone that contains the INNER EAR. Petrous bone is located at the base of the skull. Sometimes it is combined with the MASTOID PROCESS and called petromastoid part of temporal bone.
Modality of computed tomography in which the patient is irradiated in a spiral path around the body with a cone or pyramid-shaped beam.
The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
Bony outgrowth usually found around joints and often seen in conditions such as ARTHRITIS.
Positively-charged atomic nuclei that have been stripped of their electrons. These particles have one or more units of electric charge and a mass exceeding that of the Helium-4 nucleus (alpha particle).
A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).
A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.
Specialized cells that detect and transduce light. They are classified into two types based on their light reception structure, the ciliary photoreceptors and the rhabdomeric photoreceptors with MICROVILLI. Ciliary photoreceptor cells use OPSINS that activate a PHOSPHODIESTERASE phosphodiesterase cascade. Rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells use opsins that activate a PHOSPHOLIPASE C cascade.
A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).
The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.
Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.
Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.
The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.
The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.
Fractures of the lower jaw.
The use of an external beam of PROTONS as radiotherapy.
The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)
The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.
Photosensitive protein complexes of varied light absorption properties which are expressed in the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are OPSINS conjugated with VITAMIN A-based chromophores. Chromophores capture photons of light, leading to the activation of opsins and a biochemical cascade that ultimately excites the photoreceptor cells.
The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Fixed or removable devices that join teeth together. They are used to repair teeth that are mobile as a result of PERIODONTITIS.
One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)
Combination or superimposition of two images for demonstrating differences between them (e.g., radiograph with contrast vs. one without, radionuclide images using different radionuclides, radiograph vs. radionuclide image) and in the preparation of audiovisual materials (e.g., offsetting identical images, coloring of vessels in angiograms).
Adjustment of the eyes under conditions of low light. The sensitivity of the eye to light is increased during dark adaptation.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Defects of color vision are mainly hereditary traits but can be secondary to acquired or developmental abnormalities in the CONES (RETINA). Severity of hereditary defects of color vision depends on the degree of mutation of the ROD OPSINS genes (on X CHROMOSOME and CHROMOSOME 3) that code the photopigments for red, green and blue.
Irrigation of the nose with saline or irrigation solutions for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is used to remove irritants, allergens, or microorganisms from the nose.
Malocclusion in which the mandible and maxilla are anteroposteriorly normal as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (i.e., in neutroclusion), but in which individual teeth are abnormally related to each other.
Peculiarities associated with the internal structure, form, topology, or architecture of organisms that distinguishes them from others of the same species or group.
The comparison of the quantity of meaningful data to the irrelevant or incorrect data.
Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.
Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.
Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.
Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.
The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.
The total amount of a chemical, metal or radioactive substance present at any time after absorption in the body of man or animal.
Coagulated exudate isolated from several species of the tropical tree Palaquium (Sapotaceae). It is the trans-isomer of natural rubber and is used as a filling and impression material in dentistry and orthopedics and as an insulator in electronics. It has also been used as a rubber substitute.
Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)
Discrete concentrations of energy, apparently massless elementary particles, that move at the speed of light. They are the unit or quantum of electromagnetic radiation. Photons are emitted when electrons move from one energy state to another. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)
The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.
Determination, by measurement or comparison with a standard, of the correct value of each scale reading on a meter or other measuring instrument; or determination of the settings of a control device that correspond to particular values of voltage, current, frequency or other output.
Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.
Photosensitive proteins in the membranes of PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS such as the rods and the cones. Opsins have varied light absorption properties and are members of the G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS family. Their ligands are VITAMIN A-based chromophores.
The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.
An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Radiotherapy where there is improved dose homogeneity within the tumor and reduced dosage to uninvolved structures. The precise shaping of dose distribution is achieved via the use of computer-controlled multileaf collimators.
A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of dental care.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
Specialized PHOTOTRANSDUCTION neurons in the vertebrates, such as the RETINAL ROD CELLS and the RETINAL CONE CELLS. Non-visual photoreceptor neurons have been reported in the deep brain, the PINEAL GLAND and organs of the circadian system.
The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.
A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304)
Radiotherapy using high-energy (megavolt or higher) ionizing radiation. Types of radiation include gamma rays, produced by a radioisotope within a teletherapy unit; x-rays, electrons, protons, alpha particles (helium ions) and heavy charged ions, produced by particle acceleration; and neutrons and pi-mesons (pions), produced as secondary particles following bombardment of a target with a primary particle.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
Devices for accelerating protons or electrons in closed orbits where the accelerating voltage and magnetic field strength varies (the accelerating voltage is held constant for electrons) in order to keep the orbit radius constant.
A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.
The use of combination of imaging techniques or platforms (e.g., MRI SCAN and PET SCAN) encompassing aspects of anatomical, functional, or molecular imaging methods.
Unstable isotopes of fluorine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. F atoms with atomic weights 17, 18, and 20-22 are radioactive fluorine isotopes.
Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.
Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.
Mental processing of chromatic signals (COLOR VISION) from the eye by the VISUAL CORTEX where they are converted into symbolic representations. Color perception involves numerous neurons, and is influenced not only by the distribution of wavelengths from the viewed object, but also by its background color and brightness contrast at its boundary.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A collective term for interstitial, intracavity, and surface radiotherapy. It uses small sealed or partly-sealed sources that may be placed on or near the body surface or within a natural body cavity or implanted directly into the tissues.
Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.
An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
A specialized field of physics and engineering involved in studying the behavior and properties of light and the technology of analyzing, generating, transmitting, and manipulating ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION in the visible, infrared, and ultraviolet range.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
An oval area in the retina, 3 to 5 mm in diameter, usually located temporal to the posterior pole of the eye and slightly below the level of the optic disk. It is characterized by the presence of a yellow pigment diffusely permeating the inner layers, contains the fovea centralis in its center, and provides the best phototropic visual acuity. It is devoid of retinal blood vessels, except in its periphery, and receives nourishment from the choriocapillaris of the choroid. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
The adjustment of the eye to variations in the intensity of light. Light adaptation is the adjustment of the eye when the light threshold is increased; DARK ADAPTATION when the light is greatly reduced. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.
Rate of energy dissipation along the path of charged particles. In radiobiology and health physics, exposure is measured in kiloelectron volts per micrometer of tissue (keV/micrometer T).
The use of a heavy ion particle beam for radiotherapy, such as the HEAVY IONS of CARBON.
The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.
Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.
Hereditary, progressive degeneration of the neuroepithelium of the retina characterized by night blindness and progressive contraction of the visual field.
Neurons of the innermost layer of the retina, the internal plexiform layer. They are of variable sizes and shapes, and their axons project via the OPTIC NERVE to the brain. A small subset of these cells act as photoreceptors with projections to the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS, the center for regulating CIRCADIAN RHYTHM.
Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.
In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)
Penetrating electromagnetic radiation emitted when the inner orbital electrons of an atom are excited and release radiant energy. X-ray wavelengths range from 1 pm to 10 nm. Hard X-rays are the higher energy, shorter wavelength X-rays. Soft x-rays or Grenz rays are less energetic and longer in wavelength. The short wavelength end of the X-ray spectrum overlaps the GAMMA RAYS wavelength range. The distinction between gamma rays and X-rays is based on their radiation source.
Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
'Eye proteins' are structural or functional proteins, such as crystallins, opsins, and collagens, located in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, lens, retina, and aqueous humor, that contribute to maintaining transparency, refractive power, phototransduction, and overall integrity of the visual system.
Examination of the interior of the eye with an ophthalmoscope.
Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The prototypical and most well-studied member of the semaphorin family. Semaphorin-3A is an axon-repulsive guidance cue for migrating neurons in the developing nervous system. It has so far been found only in vertebrates, and binds to NEUROPILIN-1/plexin complex receptors on growth cones. Like other class 3 semaphorins, it is a secreted protein.
Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.
The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.
The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.
The relationship between the dose of administered radiation and the response of the organism or tissue to the radiation.
Detection and counting of scintillations produced in a fluorescent material by ionizing radiation.
Analytical technique for studying substances present at enzyme concentrations in single cells, in situ, by measuring light absorption. Light from a tungsten strip lamp or xenon arc dispersed by a grating monochromator illuminates the optical system of a microscope. The absorbance of light is measured (in nanometers) by comparing the difference between the image of the sample and a reference image.
X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.
The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Radiographic visualization of the body between the thorax and the pelvis, i.e., within the peritoneal cavity.
LIGHT, it's processes and properties, and the characteristics of materials interacting with it.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
Pieces of glass or other transparent materials used for magnification or increased visual acuity.
Function of the human eye that is used in bright illumination or in daylight (at photopic intensities). Photopic vision is performed by the three types of RETINAL CONE PHOTORECEPTORS with varied peak absorption wavelengths in the color spectrum (from violet to red, 400 - 700 nm).
In tissue culture, hairlike projections of neurons stimulated by growth factors and other molecules. These projections may go on to form a branched tree of dendrites or a single axon or they may be reabsorbed at a later stage of development. "Neurite" may refer to any filamentous or pointed outgrowth of an embryonal or tissue-culture neural cell.
The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.
Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the eye or of vision disorders.
Unstable isotopes of carbon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. C atoms with atomic weights 10, 11, and 14-16 are radioactive carbon isotopes.
The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Type of vision test used to determine COLOR VISION DEFECTS.
Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.
Organs which might be damaged during exposure to a toxin or to some form of therapy. It most frequently refers to healthy organs located in the radiation field during radiation therapy.
A genus of the Ambystomatidae family. The best known species are the axolotl AMBYSTOMA MEXICANUM and the closely related tiger salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. They may retain gills and remain aquatic without developing all of the adult characteristics. However, under proper changes in the environment they metamorphose.
Measurement of distances or movements by means of the phenomena caused by the interference of two rays of light (optical interferometry) or of sound (acoustic interferometry).

Correction of patient positioning errors based on in-line cone beam CTs: clinical implementation and first experiences. (1/574)

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was the clinical implementation of a kV cone beam CT (CBCT) for setup correction in radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: For evaluation of the setup correction workflow, six tumor patients (lung cancer, sacral chordoma, head-and-neck and paraspinal tumor, and two prostate cancer patients) were selected. All patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, five of them with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For patient fixation, a scotch cast body frame or a vacuum pillow, each in combination with a scotch cast head mask, were used. The imaging equipment, consisting of an x-ray tube and a flat panel imager (FPI), was attached to a Siemens linear accelerator according to the in-line approach, i.e. with the imaging beam mounted opposite to the treatment beam sharing the same isocenter. For dose delivery, the treatment beam has to traverse the FPI which is mounted in the accessory tray below the multi-leaf collimator. For each patient, a predefined number of imaging projections over a range of at least 200 degrees were acquired. The fast reconstruction of the 3D-CBCT dataset was done with an implementation of the Feldkamp-David-Kress (FDK) algorithm. For the registration of the treatment planning CT with the acquired CBCT, an automatic mutual information matcher and manual matching was used. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Bony landmarks were easily detected and the table shifts for correction of setup deviations could be automatically calculated in all cases. The image quality was sufficient for a visual comparison of the desired target point with the isocenter visible on the CBCT. Soft tissue contrast was problematic for the prostate of an obese patient, but good in the lung tumor case. The detected maximum setup deviation was 3 mm for patients fixated with the body frame, and 6 mm for patients positioned in the vacuum pillow. Using an action level of 2 mm translational error, a target point correction was carried out in 4 cases. The additional workload of the described workflow compared to a normal treatment fraction led to an extra time of about 10-12 minutes, which can be further reduced by streamlining the different steps. CONCLUSION: The cone beam CT attached to a LINAC allows the acquisition of a CT scan of the patient in treatment position directly before treatment. Its image quality is sufficient for determining target point correction vectors. With the presented workflow, a target point correction within a clinically reasonable time frame is possible. This increases the treatment precision, and potentially the complex patient fixation techniques will become dispensable.  (+info)

Cone-beam micro-CT system based on LabVIEW software. (2/574)

Construction of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for laboratory research usually requires integration of different software and hardware components. As a result, building and operating such a complex system require the expertise of researchers with significantly different backgrounds. Additionally, writing flexible code to control the hardware components of a CBCT system combined with designing a friendly graphical user interface (GUI) can be cumbersome and time consuming. An intuitive and flexible program structure, as well as the program GUI for CBCT acquisition, is presented in this note. The program was developed in National Instrument's Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) graphical language and is designed to control a custom-built CBCT system but has been also used in a standard angiographic suite. The hardware components are commercially available to researchers and are in general provided with software drivers which are LabVIEW compatible. The program structure was designed as a sequential chain. Each step in the chain takes care of one or two hardware commands at a time; the execution of the sequence can be modified according to the CBCT system design. We have scanned and reconstructed over 200 specimens using this interface and present three examples which cover different areas of interest encountered in laboratory research. The resulting 3D data are rendered using a commercial workstation. The program described in this paper is available for use or improvement by other researchers.  (+info)

On-line target position localization in the presence of respiration: a comparison of two methods. (3/574)

PURPOSE: To compare two "four-dimensional" methods for image-guided target localization in the presence of respiration. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Four-dimensional image guidance was performed with two methods. A respiration-correlated computed tomography (RCCT) was acquired on a CT simulator, and an average CT (AVG-CT) image was generated from the RCCT. A respiration-correlated cone-beam CT (RC-CBCT) and a free-breathing cone-beam CT (FB-CBCT) were acquired. The "RCCT method" consisted of calculating the mean target position on both the RCCT and RC-CBCT, registering the RCCT to the RC-CBCT, and determining the shift in the mean target position from the planned mean position. The "AVG-CT method" consisted of registering the AVG-CT to the FB-CBCT. The ability of each to measure the shift in the mean target position was compared, both in a respiratory phantom and in 8 patients. RESULTS: In phantom, the RCCT and AVG-CT methods were able to measure the true mean target position to within 0.15 cm and 0.10 cm, respectively. In the patient study, the mean error between the methods was 0.13 cm (left-right), 0.14 cm (anterior-posterior), and 0.10 cm (cranio-caudal). The error was not observed to vary with tumor position or magnitude of tumor motion. CONCLUSIONS: Respiration may impact the on-line image guidance process. The RCCT method enables localization of the mean tumor position and measurement of changes in the motion pattern, whereas the AVG-CT method is simple, fast, and easily implemented. We found the methods to be nearly equivalent in detecting shifts in the mean tumor position.  (+info)

Development of three-dimensional FE modeling system from the limited cone beam CT images for orthodontic tipping tooth movement. (4/574)

Previously, numerous three-dimensional finite element (FE) models of the dentoalveolar complex have been developed and stress analyses of orthodontic tooth movements were reported. Most of the models were, however, developed based on average anatomical data, but not on individual data. The aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate dentoalveolar stress distribution by lingual and distal tipping tooth movements using FE models of individual teeth based on the limited cone beam CT (3DX) images. Three extracted teeth (lower canine, upper molar, and lower molar) were used to test the three-dimensional reconstruction procedure in terms of accuracy and reproducibility in linear dimensions and sizes. From the stress analysis of the three different models, the equivalent stress in tipping movement concentrated at the cervical region of the PDL and bone crest in all teeth. It was suggested that the FE modeling technique based on 3DX in this study is recommended for the individual determination of optimal orthodontic force for effective tooth movement.  (+info)

Balancing radiation dose and image quality: clinical applications of neck volume CT. (5/574)

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Monte Carlo investigations of megavoltage cone-beam CT using thick, segmented scintillating detectors for soft tissue visualization. (6/574)

Megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) is a highly promising technique for providing volumetric patient position information in the radiation treatment room. Such information has the potential to greatly assist in registering the patient to the planned treatment position, helping to ensure accurate delivery of the high energy therapy beam to the tumor volume while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Presently, CBCT systems using conventional MV active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are commonly used in portal imaging, require a relatively large amount of dose to create images that are clinically useful. This is due to the fact that the phosphor screen detector employed in conventional MV AMFPIs utilizes only approximately 2% of the incident radiation (for a 6 MV x-ray spectrum). Fortunately, thick segmented scintillating detectors can overcome this limitation, and the first prototype imager has demonstrated highly promising performance for projection imaging at low doses. It is therefore of definite interest to examine the potential performance of such thick, segmented scintillating detectors for MV CBCT. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation energy deposition were used to examine reconstructed images of cylindrical CT contrast phantoms, embedded with tissue-equivalent objects. The phantoms were scanned at 6 MV using segmented detectors having various design parameters (i.e., detector thickness as well as scintillator and septal wall materials). Due to constraints imposed by the nature of this study, the size of the phantoms was limited to approximately 6 cm. For such phantoms, the simulation results suggest that a 40 mm thick, segmented CsI detector with low density septal walls can delineate electron density differences of approximately 2.3% and 1.3% at doses of 1.54 and 3.08 cGy, respectively. In addition, it was found that segmented detectors with greater thickness, higher density scintillator material, or lower density septal walls exhibit higher contrast-to-noise performance. Finally, the performance of various segmented detectors obtained at a relatively low dose (1.54 cGy) was compared with that of a phosphor screen similar to that employed in conventional MV AMFPIs. This comparison indicates that for a phosphor screen to achieve the same contrast-to-noise performance as the segmented detectors approximately 18 to 59 times more dose is required, depending on the configuration of the segmented detectors.  (+info)

In vivo comparison of conventional and cone beam CT synthesized cephalograms. (7/574)

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Asymmetric vascular stent: feasibility study of a new low-porosity patch-containing stent. (8/574)

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Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique that uses a cone-shaped X-ray beam to create detailed, cross-sectional images of the body. In dental and maxillofacial radiology, CBCT is used to produce three-dimensional images of the teeth, jaws, and surrounding bones.

CBCT differs from traditional computed tomography (CT) in that it uses a cone-shaped X-ray beam instead of a fan-shaped beam, which allows for a faster scan time and lower radiation dose. The X-ray beam is rotated around the patient's head, capturing data from multiple angles, which is then reconstructed into a three-dimensional image using specialized software.

CBCT is commonly used in dental implant planning, orthodontic treatment planning, airway analysis, and the diagnosis and management of jaw pathologies such as tumors and fractures. It provides detailed information about the anatomy of the teeth, jaws, and surrounding structures, which can help clinicians make more informed decisions about patient care.

However, it is important to note that CBCT should only be used when necessary, as it still involves exposure to ionizing radiation. The benefits of using CBCT must be weighed against the potential risks associated with radiation exposure.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Retinal cone photoreceptor cells are specialized neurons located in the retina of the eye, responsible for visual phototransduction and color vision. They are one of the two types of photoreceptors, with the other being rods, which are more sensitive to low light levels. Cones are primarily responsible for high-acuity, color vision during daylight or bright-light conditions.

There are three types of cone cells, each containing different photopigments that absorb light at distinct wavelengths: short (S), medium (M), and long (L) wavelengths, which correspond to blue, green, and red light, respectively. The combination of signals from these three types of cones allows the human visual system to perceive a wide range of colors and discriminate between them. Cones are densely packed in the central region of the retina, known as the fovea, which provides the highest visual acuity.

Dental radiography is a specific type of imaging that uses radiation to produce detailed images of the teeth, bones, and soft tissues surrounding them. It is a crucial tool in dental diagnostics and treatment planning. There are several types of dental radiographs, including:

1. Intraoral Radiographs: These are taken inside the mouth and provide detailed images of individual teeth or small groups of teeth. They can help detect cavities, assess periodontal health, plan for restorations, and monitor tooth development in children. Common types of intraoral radiographs include bitewing, periapical, and occlusal radiographs.
2. Extraoral Radiographs: These are taken outside the mouth and provide images of larger areas, such as the entire jaw or skull. They can help diagnose issues related to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), detect impacted teeth, assess bone health, and identify any abnormalities in the facial structure. Common types of extraoral radiographs include panoramic, cephalometric, and sialography radiographs.
3. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT): This is a specialized type of dental radiography that uses a cone-shaped X-ray beam to create detailed 3D images of the teeth, bones, and soft tissues. It is particularly useful in planning complex treatments such as dental implants, orthodontic treatment, and oral surgery.

Dental radiographs are typically taken using a specialized machine that emits a low dose of radiation. Patients are provided with protective lead aprons to minimize exposure to radiation. The frequency of dental radiographs depends on the patient's individual needs and medical history. Dentists follow strict guidelines to ensure that dental radiography is safe and effective for their patients.

Growth cones are specialized structures found at the tips of growing neurites (axons and dendrites) during the development and regeneration of the nervous system. They were first described by Santiago Ramón y Cajal in the late 19th century. Growth cones play a crucial role in the process of neurogenesis, guiding the extension and pathfinding of axons to their appropriate targets through a dynamic interplay with environmental cues. These cues include various guidance molecules, such as netrins, semaphorins, ephrins, and slits, which bind to receptors on the growth cone membrane and trigger intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately determine the direction of axonal outgrowth.

Morphologically, a growth cone consists of three main parts: the central domain (or "C-domain"), the peripheral domain (or "P-domain"), and the transition zone connecting them. The C-domain contains microtubules and neurofilaments, which provide structural support and transport materials to the growing neurite. The P-domain is rich in actin filaments and contains numerous membrane protrusions called filopodia and lamellipodia, which explore the environment for guidance cues and facilitate motility.

The dynamic behavior of growth cones allows them to navigate complex environments, make decisions at choice points, and ultimately form precise neural circuits during development. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate growth cone function is essential for developing strategies to promote neural repair and regeneration in various neurological disorders and injuries.

Tomography is a medical imaging technique used to produce cross-sectional images or slices of specific areas of the body. This technique uses various forms of radiation (X-rays, gamma rays) or sound waves (ultrasound) to create detailed images of the internal structures, such as organs, bones, and tissues. Common types of tomography include Computerized Tomography (CT), Positron Emission Tomography (PET), and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The primary advantage of tomography is its ability to provide clear and detailed images of internal structures, allowing healthcare professionals to accurately diagnose and monitor a wide range of medical conditions.

X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner is a medical imaging device that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sections can then be manipulated, through either additional computer processing or interactive viewing, to show various bodily structures and functions in 2D or 3D.

In contrast to conventional X-ray imaging, CT scanning provides detailed images of many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT is often used when rapid, detailed images are needed such as in trauma situations or for the detection and diagnosis of stroke, cancer, appendicitis, pulmonary embolism, and musculoskeletal disorders.

CT scanning is associated with some risks, particularly from exposure to ionizing radiation, which can lead to cancer and other diseases. However, the benefits of CT scanning, in particular its ability to detect life-threatening conditions early and accurately, generally outweigh the risks. As a result, it has become an important tool in modern medicine.

Radiographic image enhancement refers to the process of improving the quality and clarity of radiographic images, such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI images, through various digital techniques. These techniques may include adjusting contrast, brightness, and sharpness, as well as removing noise and artifacts that can interfere with image interpretation.

The goal of radiographic image enhancement is to provide medical professionals with clearer and more detailed images, which can help in the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. This process may be performed using specialized software or hardware tools, and it requires a strong understanding of imaging techniques and the specific needs of medical professionals.

Dental digital radiography is a type of medical imaging that uses digital sensors instead of traditional X-ray film to produce highly detailed images of the teeth, gums, and surrounding structures. This technology offers several advantages over conventional dental radiography, including:

1. Lower radiation exposure: Digital sensors require less radiation to produce an image compared to traditional film, making it a safer option for patients.
2. Instant results: The images captured by digital sensors are immediately displayed on a computer screen, allowing dentists to quickly assess the patient's oral health and discuss any findings with them during the appointment.
3. Improved image quality: Digital radiography produces clearer and more precise images compared to traditional film, enabling dentists to better detect issues such as cavities, fractures, or tumors.
4. Enhanced communication: The ability to easily manipulate and enhance digital images allows for better communication between dental professionals and improved patient education.
5. Environmentally friendly: Digital radiography eliminates the need for chemical processing and disposal of used film, making it a more environmentally conscious choice.
6. Easy storage and retrieval: Digital images can be stored electronically and accessed easily for future reference or consultation with other dental professionals.
7. Remote consultations: Digital images can be shared remotely with specialists or insurance companies, facilitating faster diagnoses and treatment planning.

The mandible, also known as the lower jaw, is the largest and strongest bone in the human face. It forms the lower portion of the oral cavity and plays a crucial role in various functions such as mastication (chewing), speaking, and swallowing. The mandible is a U-shaped bone that consists of a horizontal part called the body and two vertical parts called rami.

The mandible articulates with the skull at the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) located in front of each ear, allowing for movements like opening and closing the mouth, protrusion, retraction, and side-to-side movement. The mandible contains the lower teeth sockets called alveolar processes, which hold the lower teeth in place.

In medical terminology, the term "mandible" refers specifically to this bone and its associated structures.

Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) is a passive dosimetry technique used to measure ionizing radiation exposure. It utilizes the property of certain materials, known as thermoluminescent materials or TLDs, to emit light when they are heated after being exposed to radiation.

The process involves exposing a TLD material, such as lithium fluoride (LiF) or calcium sulfate (CaSO4), to ionizing radiation. The radiation causes electrons in the material to become trapped in metastable energy levels. When the TLD material is subsequently heated, these trapped electrons are released and return to their ground state, emitting light in the process. The intensity of this thermoluminescent glow is proportional to the amount of radiation exposure the material has received.

TLDs offer several advantages over other dosimetry techniques. They can be used to measure both acute and chronic radiation exposures, are relatively insensitive to environmental factors such as temperature and humidity, and can be read out multiple times for comparison or calibration purposes. Additionally, TLD materials can be made into small, lightweight badges that can be worn by individuals to monitor their personal radiation exposure.

Overall, thermoluminescent dosimetry is a valuable tool in radiation protection, providing an accurate and reliable means of measuring ionizing radiation exposure for medical, industrial, and research applications.

Fiducial markers, also known as fiducials, are small markers that are often used in medical imaging to help identify and target specific locations within the body. These markers can be made of various materials, such as metal or plastic, and are typically placed at or near the site of interest through a minimally invasive procedure.

In radiation therapy, fiducial markers are often used to help ensure that the treatment is accurately targeted to the correct location. The markers can be seen on imaging scans, such as X-rays or CT scans, and can be used to align the treatment beam with the target area. This helps to improve the precision of the radiation therapy and reduce the risk of harm to surrounding healthy tissue.

Fiducial markers may also be used in other medical procedures, such as image-guided surgery or interventional radiology, to help guide the placement of instruments or devices within the body.

Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) is a type of nuclear medicine imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material, called a radiotracer, to produce detailed, three-dimensional images. This technique measures metabolic activity within the body, such as sugar metabolism, to help distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue, identify cancerous cells, or examine the function of organs.

During a PET scan, the patient is injected with a radiotracer, typically a sugar-based compound labeled with a positron-emitting radioisotope, such as fluorine-18 (^18^F). The radiotracer accumulates in cells that are metabolically active, like cancer cells. As the radiotracer decays, it emits positrons, which then collide with electrons in nearby tissue, producing gamma rays. A special camera, called a PET scanner, detects these gamma rays and uses this information to create detailed images of the body's internal structures and processes.

PET is often used in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide both functional and anatomical information, allowing for more accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Common applications include detecting cancer recurrence, staging and monitoring cancer, evaluating heart function, and assessing brain function in conditions like dementia and epilepsy.

Three-dimensional (3D) imaging in medicine refers to the use of technologies and techniques that generate a 3D representation of internal body structures, organs, or tissues. This is achieved by acquiring and processing data from various imaging modalities such as X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, or confocal microscopy. The resulting 3D images offer a more detailed visualization of the anatomy and pathology compared to traditional 2D imaging techniques, allowing for improved diagnostic accuracy, surgical planning, and minimally invasive interventions.

In 3D imaging, specialized software is used to reconstruct the acquired data into a volumetric model, which can be manipulated and viewed from different angles and perspectives. This enables healthcare professionals to better understand complex anatomical relationships, detect abnormalities, assess disease progression, and monitor treatment response. Common applications of 3D imaging include neuroimaging, orthopedic surgery planning, cancer staging, dental and maxillofacial reconstruction, and interventional radiology procedures.

In the field of medical imaging, "phantoms" refer to physical objects that are specially designed and used for calibration, quality control, and evaluation of imaging systems. These phantoms contain materials with known properties, such as attenuation coefficients or spatial resolution, which allow for standardized measurement and comparison of imaging parameters across different machines and settings.

Imaging phantoms can take various forms depending on the modality of imaging. For example, in computed tomography (CT), a common type of phantom is the "water-equivalent phantom," which contains materials with similar X-ray attenuation properties as water. This allows for consistent measurement of CT dose and image quality. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), phantoms may contain materials with specific relaxation times or magnetic susceptibilities, enabling assessment of signal-to-noise ratio, spatial resolution, and other imaging parameters.

By using these standardized objects, healthcare professionals can ensure the accuracy, consistency, and reliability of medical images, ultimately contributing to improved patient care and safety.

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses low-coherence light to capture high-resolution cross-sectional images of biological tissues, particularly the retina and other ocular structures. OCT works by measuring the echo time delay of light scattered back from different depths within the tissue, creating a detailed map of the tissue's structure. This technique is widely used in ophthalmology to diagnose and monitor various eye conditions such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma.

Radiation dosage, in the context of medical physics, refers to the amount of radiation energy that is absorbed by a material or tissue, usually measured in units of Gray (Gy), where 1 Gy equals an absorption of 1 Joule of radiation energy per kilogram of matter. In the clinical setting, radiation dosage is used to plan and assess the amount of radiation delivered to a patient during treatments such as radiotherapy. It's important to note that the biological impact of radiation also depends on other factors, including the type and energy level of the radiation, as well as the sensitivity of the irradiated tissues or organs.

Cone opsins are a type of photopigment protein found in the cone cells of the retina, which are responsible for color vision. There are three types of cone opsins in humans, each sensitive to different wavelengths of light: short-wavelength (S) sensitive cone opsin (also known as blue cone opsin), medium-wavelength (M) sensitive cone opsin (also known as green cone opsin), and long-wavelength (L) sensitive cone opsin (also known as red cone opsin).

These cone opsins are activated by light, which triggers a chemical reaction that sends signals to the brain and enables us to perceive color. Differences in the genes that code for these cone opsins can result in variations in color perception and can contribute to individual differences in color vision. Certain genetic mutations can also lead to various forms of color blindness, including red-green color blindness and blue-yellow color blindness.

Spiral Computed Tomography (CT), also known as Helical CT, is a type of computed tomography scan in which the X-ray tube and detector rotate around the patient in a spiral path, capturing data as the table moves the patient through the scanner. This continuous spiral motion allows for faster and more detailed volumetric imaging of internal organs and structures, reducing the need for multiple slices and providing improved image reconstruction. It is commonly used to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, including cancer, heart disease, and trauma injuries.

The mandibular condyle is a part of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the human body. It is a rounded eminence at the end of the mandible (lower jawbone) that articulates with the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone in the skull, allowing for movements such as opening and closing the mouth, chewing, speaking, and swallowing. The mandibular condyle has both a fibrocartilaginous articular surface and a synovial joint capsule surrounding it, which provides protection and lubrication during these movements.

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the articulation between the mandible (lower jaw) and the temporal bone of the skull. It's a complex joint that involves the movement of two bones, several muscles, and various ligaments. The TMJ allows for movements like rotation and translation, enabling us to open and close our mouth, chew, speak, and yawn. Dysfunction in this joint can lead to temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), which can cause pain, discomfort, and limited jaw movement.

Computer-assisted radiographic image interpretation is the use of computer algorithms and software to assist and enhance the interpretation and analysis of medical images produced by radiography, such as X-rays, CT scans, and MRI scans. The computer-assisted system can help identify and highlight certain features or anomalies in the image, such as tumors, fractures, or other abnormalities, which may be difficult for the human eye to detect. This technology can improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis, and may also reduce the risk of human error. It's important to note that the final interpretation and diagnosis is always made by a qualified healthcare professional, such as a radiologist, who takes into account the computer-assisted analysis in conjunction with their clinical expertise and knowledge.

Emission computed tomography (ECT) is a type of tomographic imaging technique in which an emission signal from within the body is detected to create cross-sectional images of that signal's distribution. In Emission-Computed Tomography (ECT), a radionuclide is introduced into the body, usually through injection, inhalation or ingestion. The radionuclide emits gamma rays that are then detected by external gamma cameras.

The data collected from these cameras is then used to create cross-sectional images of the distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the body. This allows for the identification and quantification of functional information about specific organs or systems within the body, such as blood flow, metabolic activity, or receptor density.

One common type of Emission-Computed Tomography is Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), which uses a single gamma camera that rotates around the patient to collect data from multiple angles. Another type is Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which uses positron-emitting radionuclides and detects the coincident gamma rays emitted by the annihilation of positrons and electrons.

Overall, ECT is a valuable tool in medical imaging for diagnosing and monitoring various diseases, including cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders.

"Edentulous jaw" is a medical term used to describe a jaw that is missing all of its natural teeth. The term "edentulous" is derived from the Latin word "edentulus," which means "without teeth." This condition can affect either the upper jaw (maxilla) or the lower jaw (mandible), or both, resulting in a significant impact on an individual's ability to eat, speak, and maintain proper facial structure.

Edentulism is often associated with aging, as tooth loss becomes more common in older adults due to factors like gum disease, tooth decay, and injury. However, it can also affect younger individuals who have lost their teeth due to various reasons. Dental professionals typically recommend the use of dentures or dental implants to restore oral function and aesthetics for patients with edentulous jaws.

Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a type of computed tomography (CT) scan that uses multiple rows of detectors to acquire several slices of images simultaneously, thereby reducing the total time required for the scan and improving the spatial resolution. This technology allows for faster scanning of moving organs, such as the heart, and provides high-resolution images with detailed information about various body structures, including bones, soft tissues, and blood vessels. MDCT has numerous applications in diagnostic imaging, interventional procedures, and cancer staging and treatment follow-up.

Dimensional measurement accuracy refers to the degree of closeness with which the measured dimension of a object or feature corresponds to its true value. It is usually expressed as a tolerance, which indicates the maximum allowable deviation from the true value. This measurement accuracy can be affected by various factors such as the precision and calibration of the measuring instrument, the skill and experience of the person taking the measurement, and environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity. High dimensional measurement accuracy is essential in many fields, including manufacturing, engineering, and scientific research, to ensure that parts and products meet specified dimensions and function properly.

Computer-assisted image processing is a medical term that refers to the use of computer systems and specialized software to improve, analyze, and interpret medical images obtained through various imaging techniques such as X-ray, CT (computed tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), ultrasound, and others.

The process typically involves several steps, including image acquisition, enhancement, segmentation, restoration, and analysis. Image processing algorithms can be used to enhance the quality of medical images by adjusting contrast, brightness, and sharpness, as well as removing noise and artifacts that may interfere with accurate diagnosis. Segmentation techniques can be used to isolate specific regions or structures of interest within an image, allowing for more detailed analysis.

Computer-assisted image processing has numerous applications in medical imaging, including detection and characterization of lesions, tumors, and other abnormalities; assessment of organ function and morphology; and guidance of interventional procedures such as biopsies and surgeries. By automating and standardizing image analysis tasks, computer-assisted image processing can help to improve diagnostic accuracy, efficiency, and consistency, while reducing the potential for human error.

A tooth root is the part of a tooth that is embedded in the jawbone and cannot be seen when looking at a person's smile. It is the lower portion of a tooth that typically has a conical shape and anchors the tooth to the jawbone through a periodontal ligament. The tooth root is covered by cementum, a specialized bone-like tissue, and contains nerve endings and blood vessels within its pulp chamber.

The number of roots in a tooth can vary depending on the type of tooth. For example, incisors typically have one root, canines may have one or two roots, premolars usually have one or two roots, and molars often have two to four roots. The primary function of the tooth root is to provide stability and support for the crown of the tooth, allowing it to withstand the forces of biting and chewing.

Panoramic radiography is a specialized type of dental X-ray imaging that captures a panoramic view of the entire mouth, including the teeth, upper and lower jaws, and surrounding structures. It uses a special machine that rotates around the head, capturing images as it moves. This technique provides a two-dimensional image that is helpful in diagnosing and planning treatment for various dental conditions such as impacted teeth, bone abnormalities, and jaw disorders.

The panoramic radiograph can also be used to assess the development and positioning of wisdom teeth, detect cysts or tumors in the jaws, and evaluate the effects of trauma or injury to the mouth. It is a valuable tool for dental professionals as it allows them to see a comprehensive view of the oral structures, which may not be visible with traditional X-ray techniques.

It's important to note that while panoramic radiography provides valuable information, it should be used in conjunction with other diagnostic tools and clinical examinations to ensure accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) is not a separate type of imaging technology, but rather an advanced application of standard computed tomography (CT). In 4D CT, the traditional three dimensions of CT images (x, y, and z axes representing width, height, and depth respectively) are combined with a fourth dimension - time. This technique allows for the visualization and analysis of changes in structures or processes over time.

In other words, 4D CT is a series of CT scans taken at multiple time points, creating a dynamic volumetric dataset that can be used to assess temporal changes within anatomy or physiology. This approach has been increasingly applied in various clinical settings such as:

1. Monitoring respiratory motion during radiation therapy planning and treatment delivery.
2. Assessing the function of organs like the heart, lungs, or gastrointestinal tract.
3. Studying the dynamics of blood flow and vascular structures.
4. Evaluating the response to treatments, such as tumor shrinkage or changes in organ size and shape.

Overall, 4D CT provides valuable information for better understanding and managing various medical conditions by capturing the spatial and temporal complexities of biological systems.

Optical Tomography (OT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses light to visualize and measure the optical properties of tissue, such as absorption and scattering coefficients. This modality can be used to produce cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of internal structures, providing functional information about tissue physiology. It has applications in various fields including biomedical research, dermatology, and oncology for the detection and monitoring of diseases. There are different types of optical tomography, such as diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which differ in their light sources, detection schemes, and data analysis methods.

Periapical diseases are a group of conditions that affect the periapical tissue, which is the tissue located at the tip of the tooth roots. These diseases are primarily caused by bacterial infections that originate from the dental pulp, the soft tissue inside the tooth. The most common types of periapical diseases include:

1. Periapical periodontitis: This is an inflammatory reaction of the periapical tissues due to the spread of infection from the dental pulp. It can cause symptoms such as pain, swelling, and tenderness in the affected area.
2. Periapical abscess: An abscess is a collection of pus that forms in response to an infection. A periapical abscess occurs when the infection from the dental pulp spreads to the periapical tissue, causing pus to accumulate in the area. This can cause severe pain, swelling, and redness in the affected area.
3. Periapical granuloma: A granuloma is a mass of inflammatory cells that forms in response to an infection. A periapical granuloma is a small, benign tumor-like growth that develops in the periapical tissue due to chronic inflammation caused by a bacterial infection.

Periapical diseases are typically treated with root canal therapy, which involves removing the infected dental pulp and cleaning and sealing the root canals to prevent further infection. In some cases, extraction of the affected tooth may be necessary if the infection is too severe or if the tooth is not salvageable.

The alveolar process is the curved part of the jawbone (mandible or maxilla) that contains sockets or hollow spaces (alveoli) for the teeth to be embedded. These processes are covered with a specialized mucous membrane called the gingiva, which forms a tight seal around the teeth to help protect the periodontal tissues and maintain oral health.

The alveolar process is composed of both compact and spongy bone tissue. The compact bone forms the outer layer, while the spongy bone is found inside the alveoli and provides support for the teeth. When a tooth is lost or extracted, the alveolar process begins to resorb over time due to the lack of mechanical stimulation from the tooth's chewing forces. This can lead to changes in the shape and size of the jawbone, which may require bone grafting procedures before dental implant placement.

X-ray intensifying screens are medical imaging devices that contain phosphorescent materials, which emit light in response to the absorption of X-ray radiation. They are used in conjunction with X-ray film to enhance the visualization of radiographic images by converting X-rays into visible light. The screens are placed inside a cassette, along with the X-ray film, and exposed to X-rays during medical imaging procedures such as radiography or fluoroscopy.

The phosphorescent materials in the intensifying screens absorb most of the X-ray energy and re-emit it as visible light, which then exposes the X-ray film. This process increases the efficiency of the X-ray exposure, reducing the amount of radiation required to produce a diagnostic image. The use of intensifying screens can significantly improve the quality and detail of radiographic images while minimizing patient exposure to ionizing radiation.

Cross-sectional anatomy refers to the study and visualization of the internal structures of the body as if they were cut along a plane, creating a two-dimensional image. This method allows for a detailed examination of the relationships between various organs, tissues, and structures that may not be as easily appreciated through traditional observation or examination.

In cross-sectional anatomy, different imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound are used to create detailed images of the body's internal structures at various depths and planes. These images can help medical professionals diagnose conditions, plan treatments, and assess the effectiveness of interventions.

Cross-sectional anatomy is an important tool in modern medicine, as it provides a more comprehensive understanding of the human body than traditional gross anatomy alone. By allowing for a detailed examination of the internal structures of the body, cross-sectional anatomy can help medical professionals make more informed decisions about patient care.

An artifact, in the context of medical terminology, refers to something that is created or introduced during a scientific procedure or examination that does not naturally occur in the patient or specimen being studied. Artifacts can take many forms and can be caused by various factors, including contamination, damage, degradation, or interference from equipment or external sources.

In medical imaging, for example, an artifact might appear as a distortion or anomaly on an X-ray, MRI, or CT scan that is not actually present in the patient's body. This can be caused by factors such as patient movement during the scan, metal implants or other foreign objects in the body, or issues with the imaging equipment itself.

Similarly, in laboratory testing, an artifact might refer to a substance or characteristic that is introduced into a sample during collection, storage, or analysis that can interfere with accurate results. This could include things like contamination from other samples, degradation of the sample over time, or interference from chemicals used in the testing process.

In general, artifacts are considered to be sources of error or uncertainty in medical research and diagnosis, and it is important to identify and account for them in order to ensure accurate and reliable results.

Computer-assisted radiotherapy planning (CARP) is the use of computer systems and software to assist in the process of creating a treatment plan for radiotherapy. The goal of radiotherapy is to deliver a precise and effective dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing exposure to healthy tissue. CARP involves using imaging data, such as CT or MRI scans, to create a 3D model of the patient's anatomy. This model is then used to simulate the delivery of radiation from different angles and determine the optimal treatment plan. The use of computers in this process allows for more accurate and efficient planning, as well as the ability to easily adjust the plan as needed.

Emission-Computed Tomography, Single-Photon (SPECT) is a type of nuclear medicine imaging procedure that generates detailed, three-dimensional images of the distribution of radioactive pharmaceuticals within the body. It uses gamma rays emitted by a radiopharmaceutical that is introduced into the patient's body, and a specialized gamma camera to detect these gamma rays and create tomographic images. The data obtained from the SPECT imaging can be used to diagnose various medical conditions, evaluate organ function, and guide treatment decisions. It is commonly used to image the heart, brain, and bones, among other organs and systems.

An impacted tooth is a condition where a tooth fails to erupt into the oral cavity within its expected time frame, resulting in its partial or complete entrapment within the jawbone or soft tissues. This commonly occurs with wisdom teeth (third molars) but can affect any tooth. Impacted teeth may cause problems such as infection, decay of adjacent teeth, gum disease, or cyst formation, and they may require surgical removal.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

A cuspid, also known as a canine tooth or cuspid tooth, is a type of tooth in mammals. It is the pointiest tooth in the dental arch and is located between the incisors and bicuspids (or premolars). Cuspids have a single cusp or pointed tip that is used for tearing and grasping food. In humans, there are four cuspids, two on the upper jaw and two on the lower jaw, one on each side of the dental arch.

Cephalometry is a medical term that refers to the measurement and analysis of the skull, particularly the head face relations. It is commonly used in orthodontics and maxillofacial surgery to assess and plan treatment for abnormalities related to the teeth, jaws, and facial structures. The process typically involves taking X-ray images called cephalograms, which provide a lateral view of the head, and then using various landmarks and reference lines to make measurements and evaluate skeletal and dental relationships. This information can help clinicians diagnose problems, plan treatment, and assess treatment outcomes.

Electron microscope tomography (EMT) is a 3D imaging technique used in electron microscopy. It involves collecting a series of images of a sample at different tilt angles, and then using computational algorithms to reconstruct the 3D structure of the sample from these images.

In EMT, a sample is prepared and placed in an electron microscope, where it is exposed to a beam of electrons. The electrons interact with the atoms in the sample, producing contrast that allows the features of the sample to be visualized. By tilting the sample and collecting images at multiple angles, a range of perspectives can be obtained, which are then used to create a 3D reconstruction of the sample.

EMT is a powerful tool for studying the ultrastructure of cells and tissues, as it allows researchers to visualize structures that may not be visible using other imaging techniques. It has been used to study a wide range of biological systems, including viruses, bacteria, organelles, and cells.

EMT is a complex technique that requires specialized equipment and expertise to perform. However, it can provide valuable insights into the structure and function of biological systems, making it an important tool in the field of biology and medicine.

A tooth fracture is a dental health condition characterized by a break or crack in the tooth structure. It can occur in different parts of the tooth, including the crown (the visible part), root, or filling. Tooth fractures can result from various factors such as trauma, biting or chewing on hard objects, grinding or clenching teeth, and having large, old amalgam fillings that weaken the tooth structure over time. Depending on the severity and location of the fracture, it may cause pain, sensitivity, or affect the tooth's functionality and appearance. Treatment options for tooth fractures vary from simple bonding to root canal treatment or even extraction in severe cases. Regular dental check-ups are essential for early detection and management of tooth fractures.

The temporal bone is a paired bone that is located on each side of the skull, forming part of the lateral and inferior walls of the cranial cavity. It is one of the most complex bones in the human body and has several important structures associated with it. The main functions of the temporal bone include protecting the middle and inner ear, providing attachment for various muscles of the head and neck, and forming part of the base of the skull.

The temporal bone is divided into several parts, including the squamous part, the petrous part, the tympanic part, and the styloid process. The squamous part forms the lateral portion of the temporal bone and articulates with the parietal bone. The petrous part is the most medial and superior portion of the temporal bone and contains the inner ear and the semicircular canals. The tympanic part forms the lower and anterior portions of the temporal bone and includes the external auditory meatus or ear canal. The styloid process is a long, slender projection that extends downward from the inferior aspect of the temporal bone and serves as an attachment site for various muscles and ligaments.

The temporal bone plays a crucial role in hearing and balance, as it contains the structures of the middle and inner ear, including the oval window, round window, cochlea, vestibule, and semicircular canals. The stapes bone, one of the three bones in the middle ear, is entirely encased within the petrous portion of the temporal bone. Additionally, the temporal bone contains important structures for facial expression and sensation, including the facial nerve, which exits the skull through the stylomastoid foramen, a small opening in the temporal bone.

An X-ray film, also known as radiograph, is a medical imaging tool that uses X-rays to create images of the body's internal structures. The film itself is a light-sensitive material that reacts to the X-rays passing through the body and records the resulting shadows and patterns on its surface.

The process involves exposing the patient to a controlled amount of X-ray radiation, which passes through the body and is absorbed differently by various tissues and structures. Denser materials such as bone absorb more X-rays and appear white or light gray on the film, while less dense materials such as soft tissues absorb fewer X-rays and appear darker.

Once the X-ray exposure is complete, the film is developed using a chemical process that produces a visible image of the internal structures. This image can then be analyzed by medical professionals to diagnose injuries, diseases, or other conditions affecting the body's internal structures.

It's worth noting that in modern medical imaging, digital X-ray sensors have largely replaced traditional X-ray film, offering several advantages such as reduced radiation exposure, faster image processing, and easier storage and retrieval of images.

Equipment design, in the medical context, refers to the process of creating and developing medical equipment and devices, such as surgical instruments, diagnostic machines, or assistive technologies. This process involves several stages, including:

1. Identifying user needs and requirements
2. Concept development and brainstorming
3. Prototyping and testing
4. Design for manufacturing and assembly
5. Safety and regulatory compliance
6. Verification and validation
7. Training and support

The goal of equipment design is to create safe, effective, and efficient medical devices that meet the needs of healthcare providers and patients while complying with relevant regulations and standards. The design process typically involves a multidisciplinary team of engineers, clinicians, designers, and researchers who work together to develop innovative solutions that improve patient care and outcomes.

X-ray microtomography, often referred to as micro-CT, is a non-destructive imaging technique used to visualize and analyze the internal structure of objects with high spatial resolution. It is based on the principles of computed tomography (CT), where multiple X-ray images are acquired at different angles and then reconstructed into cross-sectional slices using specialized software. These slices can be further processed to create 3D visualizations, allowing researchers and clinicians to examine the internal structure and composition of samples in great detail. Micro-CT is widely used in materials science, biology, medicine, and engineering for various applications such as material characterization, bone analysis, and defect inspection.

A cadaver is a deceased body that is used for medical research or education. In the field of medicine, cadavers are often used in anatomy lessons, surgical training, and other forms of medical research. The use of cadavers allows medical professionals to gain a deeper understanding of the human body and its various systems without causing harm to living subjects. Cadavers may be donated to medical schools or obtained through other means, such as through consent of the deceased or their next of kin. It is important to handle and treat cadavers with respect and dignity, as they were once living individuals who deserve to be treated with care even in death.

Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) is a term used in radiation biology and medicine to describe the relative effectiveness of different types or energies of ionizing radiation in causing biological damage, compared to a reference radiation such as high-energy photons (X-rays or gamma rays). RBE takes into account the differences in biological impact between various types of radiation, which can be due to differences in linear energy transfer (LET), quality factor, and other factors. It is used to estimate the biological effects of mixed radiation fields, such as those encountered in radiotherapy treatments that combine different types or energies of radiation. The RBE value for a specific type of radiation is determined through experimental studies that compare its biological impact to that of the reference radiation.

The maxillary sinuses, also known as the antrums of Highmore, are the largest of the four pairs of paranasal sinuses located in the maxilla bones. They are air-filled cavities that surround the nasolacrimal duct and are situated superior to the upper teeth and lateral to the nasal cavity. Each maxillary sinus is lined with a mucous membrane, which helps to warm, humidify, and filter the air we breathe. Inflammation or infection of the maxillary sinuses can result in conditions such as sinusitis, leading to symptoms like facial pain, headaches, and nasal congestion.

Mandibular diseases refer to conditions that affect the mandible, or lower jawbone. These diseases can be classified as congenital (present at birth) or acquired (developing after birth). They can also be categorized based on the tissues involved, such as bone, muscle, or cartilage. Some examples of mandibular diseases include:

1. Mandibular fractures: These are breaks in the lower jawbone that can result from trauma or injury.
2. Osteomyelitis: This is an infection of the bone and surrounding tissues, which can affect the mandible.
3. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders: These are conditions that affect the joint that connects the jawbone to the skull, causing pain and limited movement.
4. Mandibular tumors: These are abnormal growths that can be benign or malignant, and can develop in any of the tissues of the mandible.
5. Osteonecrosis: This is a condition where the bone tissue dies due to lack of blood supply, which can affect the mandible.
6. Cleft lip and palate: This is a congenital deformity that affects the development of the face and mouth, including the lower jawbone.
7. Mandibular hypoplasia: This is a condition where the lower jawbone does not develop properly, leading to a small or recessed chin.
8. Developmental disorders: These are conditions that affect the growth and development of the mandible, such as condylar hyperplasia or hemifacial microsomia.

Patient positioning in a medical context refers to the arrangement and placement of a patient's body in a specific posture or alignment on a hospital bed, examination table, or other medical device during medical procedures, surgeries, or diagnostic imaging examinations. The purpose of patient positioning is to optimize the patient's comfort, ensure their safety, facilitate access to the surgical site or area being examined, enhance the effectiveness of medical interventions, and improve the quality of medical images in diagnostic tests.

Proper patient positioning can help prevent complications such as pressure ulcers, nerve injuries, and respiratory difficulties. It may involve adjusting the height and angle of the bed, using pillows, blankets, or straps to support various parts of the body, and communicating with the patient to ensure they are comfortable and aware of what to expect during the procedure.

In surgical settings, patient positioning is carefully planned and executed by a team of healthcare professionals, including surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, and surgical technicians, to optimize surgical outcomes and minimize risks. In diagnostic imaging examinations, such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRIs, patient positioning is critical for obtaining high-quality images that can aid in accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

Radiographic magnification is a phenomenon that occurs during radiographic imaging where the image produced appears larger than the actual size of the object being imaged. This can occur due to several reasons, including the use of a focal distance that is shorter than the object-to-image receptor distance (SID), or when using a grid that is misaligned with the X-ray beam.

In some cases, radiographic magnification may be intentionally used as a technique to improve image quality for small structures or to enhance visualization of certain details in an image. However, it can also lead to distortion and decreased image sharpness if not properly controlled. Therefore, it is important to carefully consider the benefits and potential drawbacks of radiographic magnification when using this technique in medical imaging.

Anatomic landmarks are specific, identifiable structures or features on the body that are used as references in medicine and surgery. These landmarks can include bones, muscles, joints, or other visible or palpable features that help healthcare professionals identify specific locations, orient themselves during procedures, or measure changes in the body.

Examples of anatomic landmarks include:

* The anterior iliac spine, a bony prominence on the front of the pelvis that can be used to locate the hip joint.
* The cubital fossa, a depression at the elbow where the median nerve and brachial artery can be palpated.
* The navel (umbilicus), which serves as a reference point for measuring distances in the abdomen.
* The xiphoid process, a small piece of cartilage at the bottom of the breastbone that can be used to locate the heart and other structures in the chest.

Anatomic landmarks are important for accurate diagnosis, treatment planning, and surgical procedures, as they provide reliable and consistent reference points that can help ensure safe and effective care.

The maxilla is a paired bone that forms the upper jaw in vertebrates. In humans, it is a major bone in the face and plays several important roles in the craniofacial complex. Each maxilla consists of a body and four processes: frontal process, zygomatic process, alveolar process, and palatine process.

The maxillae contribute to the formation of the eye sockets (orbits), nasal cavity, and the hard palate of the mouth. They also contain the upper teeth sockets (alveoli) and help form the lower part of the orbit and the cheekbones (zygomatic arches).

Here's a quick rundown of its key functions:

1. Supports the upper teeth and forms the upper jaw.
2. Contributes to the formation of the eye sockets, nasal cavity, and hard palate.
3. Helps shape the lower part of the orbit and cheekbones.
4. Partakes in the creation of important sinuses, such as the maxillary sinus, which is located within the body of the maxilla.

Bitewing radiography is a type of dental x-ray examination that involves taking multiple images of the teeth while they are bite together. These x-rays primarily provide a detailed view of the crowns of the upper and lower teeth in a single view, allowing dentists to diagnose and monitor interdental decay (decay between teeth), dental caries, and any bone loss around fillings or near the gum line. Bitewing radiographs are essential for detecting dental problems at an early stage, which can help prevent further damage and costly treatments in the future. They are typically taken annually or biennially during routine dental checkups.

The skull base is the lower part of the skull that forms the floor of the cranial cavity and the roof of the facial skeleton. It is a complex anatomical region composed of several bones, including the frontal, sphenoid, temporal, occipital, and ethmoid bones. The skull base supports the brain and contains openings for blood vessels and nerves that travel between the brain and the face or neck. The skull base can be divided into three regions: the anterior cranial fossa, middle cranial fossa, and posterior cranial fossa, which house different parts of the brain.

A tooth is classified as "unerupted" when it has not yet penetrated through the gums and entered the oral cavity. This can apply to both primary (baby) teeth and permanent (adult) teeth. The reasons for a tooth's failure to erupt can vary, including crowding of teeth, lack of sufficient space, or anatomical barriers such as bone or soft tissue. In some cases, unerupted teeth may need to be monitored or treated, depending on the specific situation and any symptoms experienced by the individual.

Observer variation, also known as inter-observer variability or measurement agreement, refers to the difference in observations or measurements made by different observers or raters when evaluating the same subject or phenomenon. It is a common issue in various fields such as medicine, research, and quality control, where subjective assessments are involved.

In medical terms, observer variation can occur in various contexts, including:

1. Diagnostic tests: Different radiologists may interpret the same X-ray or MRI scan differently, leading to variations in diagnosis.
2. Clinical trials: Different researchers may have different interpretations of clinical outcomes or adverse events, affecting the consistency and reliability of trial results.
3. Medical records: Different healthcare providers may document medical histories, physical examinations, or treatment plans differently, leading to inconsistencies in patient care.
4. Pathology: Different pathologists may have varying interpretations of tissue samples or laboratory tests, affecting diagnostic accuracy.

Observer variation can be minimized through various methods, such as standardized assessment tools, training and calibration of observers, and statistical analysis of inter-rater reliability.

X-ray tomography, also known as computed tomography (CT) or computerized axial tomography (CAT), is a medical imaging technique that uses X-rays to create detailed cross-sectional images of the body. In this technique, an X-ray source and detectors rotate around the patient, acquiring multiple X-ray projections at different angles. A computer then processes these projections to reconstruct tomographic images (slices) of the internal structures of the body, such as bones, organs, and soft tissues.

The term "tomography" comes from the Greek words "tome," meaning slice or section, and "graphein," meaning to write or record. X-ray tomography allows radiologists and other medical professionals to visualize and diagnose various conditions, such as fractures, tumors, infections, and internal injuries, more accurately and efficiently than with traditional X-ray imaging techniques.

It is important to note that while X-ray tomography provides valuable diagnostic information, it does involve exposure to ionizing radiation. Therefore, the benefits of the examination should outweigh the potential risks, and the use of this technique should be justified based on clinical necessity and patient safety considerations.

Orthodontics is a specialized branch of dentistry that focuses on the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. This involves correcting teeth that are improperly positioned, often using braces or other appliances to move them into the correct position over time. The goal of orthodontic treatment is to create a healthy, functional bite and improve the appearance of the teeth and face.

Orthodontists are dental specialists who have completed additional training beyond dental school in order to become experts in this field. They use various techniques and tools, such as X-rays, models of the teeth, and computer imaging, to assess and plan treatment for each individual patient. The type of treatment recommended will depend on the specific needs and goals of the patient.

Orthodontic treatment can be beneficial for people of all ages, although it is most commonly started during childhood or adolescence when the teeth and jaws are still growing and developing. However, more and more adults are also seeking orthodontic treatment to improve their smile and oral health.

Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) Dosimetry is a radiation measurement technique that is used to determine the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in various materials. It is based on the principle that certain types of crystalline materials, such as aluminum oxide or quartz, can store energy from ionizing radiation within their crystal lattice structure. This stored energy can be released and measured in the form of luminescence when the material is exposed to light of a specific wavelength.

In OSL dosimetry, a small sample of the material is irradiated with ionizing radiation, causing it to store energy in the form of trapped electrons within the crystal lattice. The sample is then stimulated with light, typically from a laser or LED source, which causes the trapped electrons to release their stored energy as light. The intensity of this emitted light is proportional to the absorbed dose of radiation and can be measured using a photomultiplier tube or other sensitive light detector.

OSL dosimetry has several advantages over other radiation measurement techniques, including its high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and ability to measure both acute and chronic exposures. It is also non-destructive, meaning that the same sample can be measured multiple times, making it useful for long-term monitoring applications. OSL dosimetry is used in a variety of fields, including radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, environmental monitoring, and space exploration.

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD) refer to a group of conditions that cause pain and dysfunction in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the muscles that control jaw movement. The TMJ is the hinge joint that connects the lower jaw (mandible) to the skull (temporal bone) in front of the ear. It allows for movements required for activities such as eating, speaking, and yawning.

TMD can result from various causes, including:

1. Muscle tension or spasm due to clenching or grinding teeth (bruxism), stress, or jaw misalignment
2. Dislocation or injury of the TMJ disc, which is a small piece of cartilage that acts as a cushion between the bones in the joint
3. Arthritis or other degenerative conditions affecting the TMJ
4. Bite problems (malocclusion) leading to abnormal stress on the TMJ and its surrounding muscles
5. Stress, which can exacerbate existing TMD symptoms by causing muscle tension

Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders may include:
- Pain or tenderness in the jaw, face, neck, or shoulders
- Limited jaw movement or locking of the jaw
- Clicking, popping, or grating sounds when moving the jaw
- Headaches, earaches, or dizziness
- Difficulty chewing or biting
- Swelling on the side of the face

Treatment for TMD varies depending on the severity and cause of the condition. It may include self-care measures (like eating soft foods, avoiding extreme jaw movements, and applying heat or cold packs), physical therapy, medications (such as muscle relaxants, pain relievers, or anti-inflammatory drugs), dental work (including bite adjustments or orthodontic treatment), or even surgery in severe cases.

Retinal rod photoreceptor cells are specialized neurons in the retina of the eye that are primarily responsible for vision in low light conditions. They contain a light-sensitive pigment called rhodopsin, which undergoes a chemical change when struck by a single photon of light. This triggers a cascade of biochemical reactions that ultimately leads to the generation of electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve.

Rod cells do not provide color vision or fine detail, but they allow us to detect motion and see in dim light. They are more sensitive to light than cone cells, which are responsible for color vision and detailed sight in bright light conditions. Rod cells are concentrated at the outer edges of the retina, forming a crescent-shaped region called the peripheral retina, with fewer rod cells located in the central region of the retina known as the fovea.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

Root resorption is a process that occurs when the body's own cells, called odontoclasts, break down and destroy the hard tissue of the tooth root. This can occur as a result of various factors such as trauma, infection, or orthodontic treatment. In some cases, it may be a normal part of the tooth development and eruption process in children. However, excessive or pathological root resorption can lead to weakening and loss of the tooth. It is often asymptomatic and discovered during routine dental x-rays.

Sialography is a medical imaging technique used to examine the ducts (salivary glands) that carry saliva from the salivary glands to the mouth. In this procedure, a radiopaque contrast material is injected into the salivary gland, and then X-rays or other forms of imaging are taken to visualize the shape and any abnormalities in the ducts.

The contrast material outlines the ducts on the images, allowing healthcare professionals to identify any blockages, narrowing, dilations, stones, or other abnormalities that may be present in the salivary glands. Sialography is typically used to diagnose and manage conditions such as salivary gland inflammation, obstruction, or infection.

It's worth noting that sialography has been largely replaced by newer imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, CT scans, and MRI, which do not require the injection of a contrast material and are generally considered safer and more comfortable for patients. However, sialography may still be used in certain cases where these other methods are not sufficient to make an accurate diagnosis.

In the context of dentistry, a molar is a type of tooth found in the back of the mouth. They are larger and wider than other types of teeth, such as incisors or canines, and have a flat biting surface with multiple cusps. Molars are primarily used for grinding and chewing food into smaller pieces that are easier to swallow. Humans typically have twelve molars in total, including the four wisdom teeth.

In medical terminology outside of dentistry, "molar" can also refer to a unit of mass in the apothecaries' system of measurement, which is equivalent to 4.08 grams. However, this usage is less common and not related to dental or medical anatomy.

Equipment Failure Analysis is a process of identifying the cause of failure in medical equipment or devices. This involves a systematic examination and evaluation of the equipment, its components, and operational history to determine why it failed. The analysis may include physical inspection, chemical testing, and review of maintenance records, as well as assessment of design, manufacturing, and usage factors that may have contributed to the failure.

The goal of Equipment Failure Analysis is to identify the root cause of the failure, so that corrective actions can be taken to prevent similar failures in the future. This is important in medical settings to ensure patient safety and maintain the reliability and effectiveness of medical equipment.

A tooth socket, also known as an alveolus (plural: alveoli), refers to the hollow cavity or space in the jawbone where a tooth is anchored. The tooth socket is part of the alveolar process, which is the curved part of the maxilla or mandible that contains multiple tooth sockets for the upper and lower teeth, respectively.

Each tooth socket has a specialized tissue called the periodontal ligament, which attaches the root of the tooth to the surrounding bone. This ligament helps absorb forces generated during biting and chewing, allowing for comfortable and efficient mastication while also maintaining the tooth's position within the jawbone. The tooth socket is responsible for providing support, stability, and nourishment to the tooth through its blood vessels and nerves.

A nonvital tooth is one that no longer has a living or viable pulp, which contains the nerves and blood vessels inside the tooth. This condition can occur due to various reasons such as tooth decay that has progressed deeply into the tooth, dental trauma, or previous invasive dental procedures. As a result, the tooth loses its sensitivity to temperature changes and may darken in color. Nonvital teeth typically require root canal treatment to remove the dead pulp tissue, disinfect the canals, and fill them with an inert material to preserve the tooth structure and function.

An algorithm is not a medical term, but rather a concept from computer science and mathematics. In the context of medicine, algorithms are often used to describe step-by-step procedures for diagnosing or managing medical conditions. These procedures typically involve a series of rules or decision points that help healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care.

For example, an algorithm for diagnosing a particular type of heart disease might involve taking a patient's medical history, performing a physical exam, ordering certain diagnostic tests, and interpreting the results in a specific way. By following this algorithm, healthcare professionals can ensure that they are using a consistent and evidence-based approach to making a diagnosis.

Algorithms can also be used to guide treatment decisions. For instance, an algorithm for managing diabetes might involve setting target blood sugar levels, recommending certain medications or lifestyle changes based on the patient's individual needs, and monitoring the patient's response to treatment over time.

Overall, algorithms are valuable tools in medicine because they help standardize clinical decision-making and ensure that patients receive high-quality care based on the latest scientific evidence.

Radiotherapy dosage refers to the total amount of radiation energy that is absorbed by tissues or organs, typically measured in units of Gray (Gy), during a course of radiotherapy treatment. It is the product of the dose rate (the amount of radiation delivered per unit time) and the duration of treatment. The prescribed dosage for cancer treatments can range from a few Gray to more than 70 Gy, depending on the type and location of the tumor, the patient's overall health, and other factors. The goal of radiotherapy is to deliver a sufficient dosage to destroy the cancer cells while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissues.

Radiation protection, also known as radiation safety, is a field of study and practice that aims to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. It involves various measures and techniques used to minimize or eliminate exposure to ionizing radiation, such as:

1. Time: Reducing the amount of time spent near a radiation source.
2. Distance: Increasing the distance between oneself and a radiation source.
3. Shielding: Using materials that can absorb or block radiation to reduce exposure.
4. Containment: Preventing the release of radiation into the environment.
5. Training and education: Providing information and training to individuals who work with radiation sources.
6. Dosimetry and monitoring: Measuring and monitoring radiation doses received by individuals and populations.
7. Emergency planning and response: Developing plans and procedures for responding to radiation emergencies or accidents.

Radiation protection is an important consideration in various fields, including medicine, nuclear energy, research, and manufacturing, where ionizing radiation sources are used or produced.

Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 (FDG-18) is not a medical condition, but a radiopharmaceutical used in medical imaging. It is a type of glucose (a simple sugar) that has been chemically combined with a small amount of a radioactive isotope called fluorine-18.

FDG-18 is used in positron emission tomography (PET) scans to help identify areas of the body where cells are using more energy than normal, such as cancerous tumors. The FDG-18 is injected into the patient's vein and travels throughout the body. Because cancer cells often use more glucose than normal cells, they tend to absorb more FDG-18.

Once inside the body, the FDG-18 emits positrons, which interact with electrons in nearby tissue, producing gamma rays that can be detected by a PET scanner. The resulting images can help doctors locate and assess the size and activity of cancerous tumors, as well as monitor the effectiveness of treatment.

Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is a type of radiation therapy that uses medical imaging techniques to improve the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery. It allows for real-time or periodic imaging during the course of radiation treatment, which can be used to confirm the position of the targeted tumor and make any necessary adjustments to the patient's position or the radiation beam. This helps ensure that the radiation is focused on the intended target, while minimizing exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. IGRT may be used to treat a variety of cancer types and can be delivered using various radiation therapy techniques such as 3D-conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).

"Optical processes" is not a specific medical term, but rather a general term that refers to various phenomena and techniques involving the use of light in physics and engineering, which can have applications in medicine. Here are some examples of optical processes that may be relevant to medical fields:

1. Optical imaging: This refers to the use of light to create images of structures within the body. Examples include endoscopy, microscopy, and ophthalmoscopy.
2. Optical spectroscopy: This involves analyzing the interaction between light and matter to identify the chemical composition or physical properties of a sample. It can be used in medical diagnostics to detect abnormalities in tissues or fluids.
3. Laser therapy: Lasers are highly concentrated beams of light that can be used for a variety of medical applications, including surgery, pain relief, and skin treatments.
4. Optogenetics: This is a technique that involves using light to control the activity of specific cells in living organisms. It has potential applications in neuroscience and other fields of medicine.
5. Photodynamic therapy: This is a treatment that uses light to activate a photosensitizing agent, which then produces a chemical reaction that can destroy abnormal cells or tissues.

Overall, optical processes are an important part of many medical technologies and techniques, enabling doctors and researchers to diagnose and treat diseases with greater precision and effectiveness.

The zygoma is the scientific name for the cheekbone. It is a part of the facial skeleton that forms the prominence of the cheek and houses the maxillary sinus, one of the pairs of paranasal sinuses. The zygomatic bone, also known as the malar bone, contributes to the formation of the zygoma.

A dental implant is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor.

A single-tooth dental implant specifically refers to the replacement of a single missing tooth. The process typically involves three stages:

1. Placement: A titanium screw is placed into the jawbone where the missing tooth once was, acting as a root for the new tooth.
2. Osseointegration: Over several months, the jawbone grows around and fuses with the implant, creating a strong and stable foundation for the replacement tooth.
3. Restoration: A custom-made crown is attached to the implant, restoring the natural appearance and function of the missing tooth.

Single-tooth dental implants are a popular choice because they look, feel, and function like natural teeth, and they do not require the alteration of adjacent teeth, as is necessary with traditional bridgework.

Osteosclerosis is a medical term that refers to an abnormal thickening and increased density of bone tissue. This condition can occur as a result of various diseases or conditions, such as certain types of bone cancer, Paget's disease of bone, fluoride poisoning, or chronic infection of the bone. Osteosclerosis can also be seen in some benign conditions, such as osteopetrosis, which is a rare genetic disorder characterized by an excessively hard and dense skeleton.

In some cases, osteosclerosis may not cause any symptoms and may only be discovered on X-rays or other imaging studies. However, in other cases, it can lead to complications such as bone pain, fractures, or deformities. Treatment for osteosclerosis depends on the underlying cause of the condition and may include medications, surgery, or other therapies.

Computer-assisted radiotherapy, also known as computerized radiation therapy planning or treatment planning system, is a medical procedure that utilizes advanced computer software to design and implement a radiotherapy treatment plan for patients with cancer. This process involves using imaging technologies such as CT, MRI, or PET scans to create a 3D model of the tumor and surrounding healthy tissues. The software then calculates the optimal radiation dose and beam orientation to deliver the maximum radiation to the tumor while minimizing exposure to healthy tissue.

The computer-assisted radiotherapy system allows for more precise and accurate treatment planning, which can lead to improved outcomes and reduced side effects for patients undergoing radiation therapy. It also enables clinicians to simulate and compare different treatment plans, allowing them to choose the most effective and safe option for each individual patient. Additionally, the use of computer-assisted radiotherapy can increase efficiency and streamline the treatment planning process, reducing wait times for patients and improving workflow in radiotherapy departments.

Rhodopsin, also known as visual purple, is a light-sensitive protein found in the rods of the eye's retina. It is a type of opsin, a class of proteins that are activated by light and play a crucial role in vision. Rhodopsin is composed of two parts: an apoprotein called opsin and a chromophore called 11-cis-retinal. When light hits the retina, it changes the shape of the 11-cis-retinal, which in turn activates the rhodopsin protein. This activation triggers a series of chemical reactions that ultimately lead to the transmission of a visual signal to the brain. Rhodopsin is highly sensitive to light and allows for vision in low-light conditions.

Radiometry is the measurement of electromagnetic radiation, including visible light. It quantifies the amount and characteristics of radiant energy in terms of power or intensity, wavelength, direction, and polarization. In medical physics, radiometry is often used to measure therapeutic and diagnostic radiation beams used in various imaging techniques and cancer treatments such as X-rays, gamma rays, and ultraviolet or infrared light. Radiometric measurements are essential for ensuring the safe and effective use of these medical technologies.

Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a type of external beam radiation therapy that uses advanced technology to precisely target tumors while minimizing exposure to healthy tissues. In IMRT, the intensity of the radiation beam is modulated or varied during treatment, allowing for more conformal dose distributions and better sparing of normal structures. This is achieved through the use of computer-controlled linear accelerators that shape the radiation beam to match the three-dimensional shape of the tumor. The result is improved treatment accuracy, reduced side effects, and potentially higher cure rates compared to conventional radiotherapy techniques.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Particle Accelerators" are not a medical term. Particle accelerators are large pieces of scientific equipment that use electromagnetic fields to propel charged particles to high speeds and contain them in well-defined beams. They are used for a variety of purposes, including research in particle physics, nuclear physics, and synchrotron light sources in a wide range of disciplines, such as condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology, and materials science. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

The petrous bone is a part of the temporal bone, one of the 22 bones in the human skull. It is a thick and irregularly shaped bone located at the base of the skull and forms part of the ear and the cranial cavity. The petrous bone contains the cochlea, vestibule, and semicircular canals of the inner ear, which are responsible for hearing and balance. It also helps protect the brain from injury by forming part of the bony structure surrounding the brain.

The term "petrous" comes from the Latin word "petrosus," meaning "stony" or "rock-like," which describes the hard and dense nature of this bone. The petrous bone is one of the densest bones in the human body, making it highly resistant to fractures and other forms of damage.

In medical terminology, the term "petrous" may also be used to describe any structure that resembles a rock or is hard and dense, such as the petrous apex, which refers to the portion of the petrous bone that points towards the sphenoid bone.

Spiral Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CT) is a type of advanced imaging technology that combines the principles of traditional CT scanning with a cone-shaped X-ray beam and a rotating imaging system. This technique allows for the acquisition of high-resolution, three-dimensional images of the internal structures of an object or organ, typically used in medical settings to visualize the skeletal system, particularly the teeth and jaws.

During a spiral CBCT scan, the X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient's head in a continuous spiral path, capturing multiple images from various angles. These images are then reconstructed using specialized software to create detailed, cross-sectional views of the area being examined.

CBCT scans offer several advantages over traditional CT scans, including lower radiation doses, faster scan times, and improved image quality for specific applications like dental and maxillofacial imaging. However, due to the higher radiation exposure compared to conventional dental radiographs, CBCT should only be used when the benefits of the examination outweigh the risks.

The retina is the innermost, light-sensitive layer of tissue in the eye of many vertebrates and some cephalopods. It receives light that has been focused by the cornea and lens, converts it into neural signals, and sends these to the brain via the optic nerve. The retina contains several types of photoreceptor cells including rods (which handle vision in low light) and cones (which are active in bright light and are capable of color vision).

In medical terms, any pathological changes or diseases affecting the retinal structure and function can lead to visual impairment or blindness. Examples include age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, and retinitis pigmentosa among others.

An osteophyte, also known as a bone spur, is a bony projection that forms along the margins of joints, often as a result of degenerative changes in the cartilage and underlying bone. These changes are most commonly seen in conditions such as osteoarthritis, where the protective cartilage that cushions the ends of bones breaks down, leading to inflammation, pain, and reduced mobility.

Osteophytes can develop in any joint in the body, but they are most commonly found in the spine, hips, knees, and hands. They may vary in size from small bumps to large, irregular growths that can restrict joint movement and cause discomfort or pain. In some cases, osteophytes may also compress nearby nerves, leading to symptoms such as numbness, tingling, or weakness in the affected limb.

While osteophytes are often considered a sign of aging or joint degeneration, they can also be caused by other conditions that put excessive stress on the joints, such as injury, infection, or inflammatory arthritis. Treatment for osteophytes typically involves addressing the underlying cause of joint damage, along with pain management strategies such as physical therapy, medication, or in some cases, surgery.

Heavy ions, in the context of medicine, typically refer to charged particles that are used in the field of radiation therapy for cancer treatment. These particles are much heavier than electrons and carry a positive charge, unlike the negatively charged electrons or neutral photons used in conventional radiotherapy.

The term "heavy ions" is often associated with carbon ions or other ions like oxygen or neon. The high mass and charge of these particles result in unique physical properties that allow for more targeted and precise cancer treatment compared to traditional radiation therapy methods.

When heavy ions pass through tissue, they deposit most of their energy at the end of their range, creating a narrow, highly-damaging track known as the Bragg peak. This property enables clinicians to concentrate the dose of radiation within the tumor while minimizing exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. The result is a potentially more effective and less toxic treatment option for certain types of cancer, particularly those that are radioresistant or located near critical organs.

It's important to note that heavy ion therapy requires specialized equipment, such as particle accelerators and gantry systems, which limits its availability to a smaller number of medical facilities worldwide.

Endodontics is a branch of dentistry that deals with the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases or injuries of the dental pulp (the soft tissue inside the tooth that contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue) and the tissues surrounding the root of the tooth. The most common endodontic procedure is root canal therapy, which involves removing infected or inflamed pulp tissue from within the tooth, cleaning and shaping the root canals, and filling and sealing the space to prevent reinfection. Endodontists are dental specialists who have undergone additional training in this field beyond dental school.

Radiology is a medical specialty that uses imaging technologies to diagnose and treat diseases. These imaging technologies include X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, positron emission tomography (PET) scans, ultrasound, and mammography. Radiologists are medical doctors who have completed specialized training in interpreting these images to diagnose medical conditions and guide treatment plans. They also perform image-guided procedures such as biopsies and tumor ablations. The goal of radiology is to provide accurate and timely information to help physicians make informed decisions about patient care.

Electroretinography (ERG) is a medical test used to evaluate the functioning of the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. The test measures the electrical responses of the retina to light stimulation.

During the procedure, a special contact lens or electrode is placed on the surface of the eye to record the electrical activity generated by the retina's light-sensitive cells (rods and cones) and other cells in the retina. The test typically involves presenting different levels of flashes of light to the eye while the electrical responses are recorded.

The resulting ERG waveform provides information about the overall health and function of the retina, including the condition of the photoreceptors, the integrity of the inner retinal layers, and the health of the retinal ganglion cells. This test is often used to diagnose and monitor various retinal disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.

Photoreceptor cells are specialized neurons in the retina of the eye that convert light into electrical signals. These cells consist of two types: rods and cones. Rods are responsible for vision at low light levels and provide black-and-white, peripheral, and motion sensitivity. Cones are active at higher light levels and are capable of color discrimination and fine detail vision. Both types of photoreceptor cells contain light-sensitive pigments that undergo chemical changes when exposed to light, triggering a series of electrical signals that ultimately reach the brain and contribute to visual perception.

The maxillary artery is a branch of the external carotid artery that supplies the deep structures of the face and head. It originates from the external carotid artery just below the neck of the mandible and passes laterally to enter the parotid gland. Within the gland, it gives off several branches, including the deep auricular, anterior tympanic, and middle meningeal arteries.

After leaving the parotid gland, the maxillary artery travels through the infratemporal fossa, where it gives off several more branches, including the inferior alveolar, buccinator, and masseteric arteries. These vessels supply blood to the teeth, gums, and muscles of mastication.

The maxillary artery also gives off the sphenopalatine artery, which supplies the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, and palate. Additionally, it provides branches that supply the meninges, dura mater, and brain. Overall, the maxillary artery plays a critical role in providing blood flow to many structures in the head and neck region.

Radiation monitoring is the systematic and continuous measurement, assessment, and tracking of ionizing radiation levels in the environment or within the body to ensure safety and to take appropriate actions when limits are exceeded. It involves the use of specialized instruments and techniques to detect and quantify different types of radiation, such as alpha, beta, gamma, neutron, and x-rays. The data collected from radiation monitoring is used to evaluate radiation exposure, contamination levels, and potential health risks for individuals or communities. This process is crucial in various fields, including nuclear energy production, medical imaging and treatment, radiation therapy, and environmental protection.

Dental models are replicas of a patient's teeth and surrounding oral structures, used in dental practice and education. They are typically created using plaster or other materials that harden to accurately reproduce the shape and position of each tooth, as well as the contours of the gums and palate. Dental models may be used for a variety of purposes, including treatment planning, creating custom-fitted dental appliances, and teaching dental students about oral anatomy and various dental procedures. They provide a tactile and visual representation that can aid in understanding and communication between dentists, patients, and other dental professionals.

Patient care planning is a critical aspect of medical practice that involves the development, implementation, and evaluation of an individualized plan for patients to receive high-quality and coordinated healthcare services. It is a collaborative process between healthcare professionals, patients, and their families that aims to identify the patient's health needs, establish realistic goals, and determine the most effective interventions to achieve those goals.

The care planning process typically includes several key components, such as:

1. Assessment: A comprehensive evaluation of the patient's physical, psychological, social, and environmental status to identify their healthcare needs and strengths.
2. Diagnosis: The identification of the patient's medical condition(s) based on clinical findings and diagnostic tests.
3. Goal-setting: The establishment of realistic and measurable goals that address the patient's healthcare needs and align with their values, preferences, and lifestyle.
4. Intervention: The development and implementation of evidence-based strategies to achieve the identified goals, including medical treatments, therapies, and supportive services.
5. Monitoring and evaluation: The ongoing assessment of the patient's progress towards achieving their goals and adjusting the care plan as needed based on changes in their condition or response to treatment.

Patient care planning is essential for ensuring that patients receive comprehensive, coordinated, and personalized care that promotes their health, well-being, and quality of life. It also helps healthcare professionals to communicate effectively, make informed decisions, and provide safe and effective care that meets the needs and expectations of their patients.

The skull is the bony structure that encloses and protects the brain, the eyes, and the ears. It is composed of two main parts: the cranium, which contains the brain, and the facial bones. The cranium is made up of several fused flat bones, while the facial bones include the upper jaw (maxilla), lower jaw (mandible), cheekbones, nose bones, and eye sockets (orbits).

The skull also provides attachment points for various muscles that control chewing, moving the head, and facial expressions. Additionally, it contains openings for blood vessels, nerves, and the spinal cord to pass through. The skull's primary function is to protect the delicate and vital structures within it from injury and trauma.

A third molar is the most posterior of the three molars present in an adult human dental arch. They are also commonly known as wisdom teeth, due to their late eruption period which usually occurs between the ages of 17-25, a time traditionally associated with gaining maturity and wisdom.

Anatomically, third molars have four cusps, making them the largest of all the teeth. However, not everyone develops third molars; some people may have one, two, three or no third molars at all. In many cases, third molars do not have enough space to fully erupt and align properly with the rest of the teeth, leading to impaction, infection, or other dental health issues. As a result, third molars are often extracted if they cause problems or if there is a risk they will cause problems in the future.

A mandibular fracture is a break or crack in the lower jaw (mandible) bone. It can occur at any point along the mandible, but common sites include the condyle (the rounded end near the ear), the angle (the curved part of the jaw), and the symphysis (the area where the two halves of the jaw meet in the front). Mandibular fractures are typically caused by trauma, such as a direct blow to the face or a fall. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, bruising, difficulty chewing or speaking, and malocclusion (misalignment) of the teeth. Treatment usually involves immobilization with wires or screws to allow the bone to heal properly.

Proton therapy, also known as proton beam therapy, is a type of radiation therapy used in the treatment of various types of cancer. It uses a focused beam of high-energy protons instead of X-rays (photons) to deliver radiation directly to the tumor site, minimizing exposure to healthy tissues surrounding the tumor.

The main advantage of proton therapy is its ability to precisely target the tumor while sparing nearby organs and critical structures, potentially reducing side effects and complications associated with conventional radiation therapy. Proton therapy is particularly beneficial for treating tumors located close to sensitive tissues, such as those found in the brain, base of the skull, spine, eye, or prostate gland.

During proton therapy, a cyclotron or synchrotron accelerates protons to nearly the speed of light, creating a high-energy proton beam. The proton beam is then carefully aimed and directed at the tumor using advanced imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or positron emission tomography (PET) scans.

The depth of penetration and energy deposition of protons within tissue are controlled by adjusting the beam's intensity and energy. This allows for a highly conformal dose distribution, where most of the radiation is deposited directly within the tumor while minimizing exposure to healthy tissues beyond it. The Bragg peak, a characteristic feature of proton therapy, describes this distinct energy deposition pattern, where the majority of the radiation energy is released at a specific depth, just prior to stopping inside the tumor.

Proton therapy has been shown to be effective in treating various types of cancer, including brain tumors, head and neck cancers, base-of-skull tumors, spinal cord tumors, prostate cancer, lung cancer, liver cancer, and pediatric cancers. While it offers several advantages over conventional radiation therapy, proton therapy is generally more expensive and less widely available. However, its unique properties make it an increasingly popular treatment option for patients with specific types of cancer who may benefit from reduced side effects and improved quality of life during and after treatment.

The facial bones, also known as the facial skeleton, are a series of bones that make up the framework of the face. They include:

1. Frontal bone: This bone forms the forehead and the upper part of the eye sockets.
2. Nasal bones: These two thin bones form the bridge of the nose.
3. Maxilla bones: These are the largest bones in the facial skeleton, forming the upper jaw, the bottom of the eye sockets, and the sides of the nose. They also contain the upper teeth.
4. Zygomatic bones (cheekbones): These bones form the cheekbones and the outer part of the eye sockets.
5. Palatine bones: These bones form the back part of the roof of the mouth, the side walls of the nasal cavity, and contribute to the formation of the eye socket.
6. Inferior nasal conchae: These are thin, curved bones that form the lateral walls of the nasal cavity and help to filter and humidify air as it passes through the nose.
7. Lacrimal bones: These are the smallest bones in the skull, located at the inner corner of the eye socket, and help to form the tear duct.
8. Mandible (lower jaw): This is the only bone in the facial skeleton that can move. It holds the lower teeth and forms the chin.

These bones work together to protect vital structures such as the eyes, brain, and nasal passages, while also providing attachment points for muscles that control chewing, expression, and other facial movements.

The dental pulp cavity, also known as the pulp chamber, is the innermost part of a tooth that contains the dental pulp. It is located in the crown portion of the tooth and is shaped like an upside-down pyramid with the narrow end point towards the root of the tooth.

The dental pulp is a soft tissue that contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue. It plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the tooth, including providing nutrients to the dentin and producing reparative dentin.

The dental pulp cavity can become infected or inflamed due to tooth decay, trauma, or other factors, leading to symptoms such as pain, sensitivity, and swelling. In such cases, treatment options may include root canal therapy, which involves removing the infected or inflamed pulp tissue from the dental pulp cavity and sealing the space to prevent further infection.

Retinal pigments refer to the light-sensitive chemicals found in the retina, specifically within the photoreceptor cells called rods and cones. The main types of retinal pigments are rhodopsin (also known as visual purple) in rods and iodopsins in cones. These pigments play a crucial role in the process of vision by absorbing light and initiating a series of chemical reactions that ultimately trigger nerve impulses, which are then transmitted to the brain and interpreted as visual images. Rhodopsin is more sensitive to lower light levels and is responsible for night vision, while iodopsins are sensitive to specific wavelengths of light and contribute to color vision.

Radiation scattering is a physical process in which radiation particles or waves deviate from their original direction due to interaction with matter. This phenomenon can occur through various mechanisms such as:

1. Elastic Scattering: Also known as Thomson scattering or Rayleigh scattering, it occurs when the energy of the scattered particle or wave remains unchanged after the collision. In the case of electromagnetic radiation (e.g., light), this results in a change of direction without any loss of energy.
2. Inelastic Scattering: This type of scattering involves an exchange of energy between the scattered particle and the target medium, leading to a change in both direction and energy of the scattered particle or wave. An example is Compton scattering, where high-energy photons (e.g., X-rays or gamma rays) interact with charged particles (usually electrons), resulting in a decrease in photon energy and an increase in electron kinetic energy.
3. Coherent Scattering: In this process, the scattered radiation maintains its phase relationship with the incident radiation, leading to constructive and destructive interference patterns. An example is Bragg scattering, which occurs when X-rays interact with a crystal lattice, resulting in diffraction patterns that reveal information about the crystal structure.

In medical contexts, radiation scattering can have both beneficial and harmful effects. For instance, in diagnostic imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) scans, radiation scattering contributes to image noise and reduces contrast resolution. However, in radiation therapy for cancer treatment, controlled scattering of therapeutic radiation beams can help ensure that the tumor receives a uniform dose while minimizing exposure to healthy tissues.

Periodontal splints are dental devices used to stabilize and support loose teeth that have been weakened by periodontal disease (gum disease). These splints can be made from various materials such as acrylic, metal wire, or fiber-reinforced composites. They function by connecting the affected tooth or teeth to adjacent stable teeth, creating a fixed unit that helps distribute forces evenly during biting and chewing, reducing mobility and promoting healing of the periodontal tissues.

There are different types of periodontal splints, including:

1. Intra-coronal splints: These are fixed to the inside (lingual) surface of the affected teeth using dental cement or adhesive. They typically involve the use of a metal wire that is bonded to the inner surfaces of the loose teeth and connected to stable neighboring teeth.
2. Extra-coronal splints: These are fixed to the outside (labial or buccal) surface of the affected teeth using dental cement or adhesive. They usually consist of a metal wire or fiber-reinforced composite material that encircles the loose teeth and is connected to stable neighboring teeth.
3. Removable splints: These are similar to dental appliances such as dentures or orthodontic retainers, and they can be removed for cleaning and maintenance. They typically consist of an acrylic base with metal clasps or wires that hook onto the affected teeth and stable neighboring teeth.

The choice of periodontal splint depends on various factors, including the number of loose teeth, their location in the mouth, the severity of mobility, patient preferences, and oral hygiene practices. Periodontal splints are often used in conjunction with other periodontal treatments, such as scaling and root planing, to improve treatment outcomes and promote long-term dental health.

A bicuspid valve, also known as a mitral valve in the heart, is a heart valve that has two leaflets or cusps. It lies between the left atrium and the left ventricle and helps to regulate blood flow between these two chambers of the heart. In a healthy heart, the bicuspid valve opens to allow blood to flow from the left atrium into the left ventricle and closes tightly to prevent blood from flowing back into the left atrium during contraction of the ventricle.

A congenital heart defect known as a bicuspid aortic valve occurs when the aortic valve, which normally has three leaflets or cusps, only has two. This can lead to narrowing of the valve (aortic stenosis) or leakage of the valve (aortic regurgitation), which can cause symptoms and may require medical treatment.

The "subtraction technique" is not a widely recognized or established term in medical terminology. It may refer to various methods used in different medical contexts that involve subtracting or comparing measurements, values, or observations to diagnose, monitor, or treat medical conditions. However, without more specific context, it's difficult to provide an accurate medical definition of the term.

In radiology, for example, the subtraction technique is a method used in imaging to enhance the visibility of certain structures by digitally subtracting one image from another. This technique is often used in angiography to visualize blood vessels more clearly.

Therefore, it's essential to provide more context or specify the medical field when using the term "subtraction technique" to ensure accurate communication and understanding.

Dark adaptation is the process by which the eyes adjust to low levels of light. This process allows the eyes to become more sensitive to light and see better in the dark. It involves the dilation of the pupils, as well as chemical changes in the rods and cones (photoreceptor cells) of the retina. These changes allow the eye to detect even small amounts of light and improve visual acuity in low-light conditions. Dark adaptation typically takes several minutes to occur fully, but can be faster or slower depending on various factors such as age, prior exposure to light, and certain medical conditions. It is an important process for maintaining good vision in a variety of lighting conditions.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Color vision defects, also known as color blindness, are conditions in which a person has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors. The most common types of color vision defects involve the inability to distinguish between red and green or blue and yellow. These deficiencies result from an alteration or absence of one or more of the three types of cone cells in the retina that are responsible for normal color vision.

In red-green color vision defects, there is a problem with either the red or green cones, or both. This results in difficulty distinguishing between these two colors and their shades. Protanopia is a type of red-green color vision defect where there is an absence of red cone cells, making it difficult to distinguish between red and green as well as between red and black or green and black. Deuteranopia is another type of red-green color vision defect where there is an absence of green cone cells, resulting in similar difficulties distinguishing between red and green, as well as between blue and yellow.

Blue-yellow color vision defects are less common than red-green color vision defects. Tritanopia is a type of blue-yellow color vision defect where there is an absence of blue cone cells, making it difficult to distinguish between blue and yellow, as well as between blue and purple or yellow and pink.

Color vision defects are usually inherited and present from birth, but they can also result from eye diseases, chemical exposure, aging, or medication side effects. They affect both men and women, although red-green color vision defects are more common in men than in women. People with color vision defects may have difficulty with tasks that require color discrimination, such as matching clothes, selecting ripe fruit, reading colored maps, or identifying warning signals. However, most people with mild to moderate color vision defects can adapt and function well in daily life.

Nasal lavage, also known as nasal washing or saline irrigation, is a procedure in which a saline solution is used to flush out the nasal passages. This is often done to help relieve symptoms associated with nasal congestion, allergies, sinusitis, and other respiratory conditions. The process involves instilling the saline solution into one nostril and allowing it to flow out through the other, taking with it any mucus, debris, or irritants that may be present in the nasal passages. This can help promote better breathing, reduce inflammation, and alleviate symptoms such as sinus pressure, headaches, and sneezing. Nasal lavage can be performed using a variety of devices, including bulb syringes, neti pots, or specialized squeeze bottles designed specifically for this purpose.

Malocclusion, Angle Class I is a type of dental malocclusion where the misalignment of teeth is not severe enough to affect the overall function or appearance of the bite significantly. Named after Edward Angle, the founder of modern orthodontics, this classification indicates that the mesiobuccal cusp of the upper first molar is aligned with the buccal groove of the lower first molar. Although the bite appears normal, there might be crowding, spacing, or rotations present in the teeth, which can lead to aesthetic concerns and potential periodontal issues if left untreated.

An anatomic variation refers to a deviation from the typical or normal anatomical structure, position, or configuration of organs, tissues, or bodily parts. These variations can occur in any part of the body and can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired (develop later in life).

Anatomic variations are relatively common and usually do not cause any symptoms or problems. However, in some cases, they may affect the function of adjacent structures, predispose to injury or disease, or complicate medical procedures or surgeries. Therefore, it is essential for healthcare professionals to be aware of these variations during diagnoses, treatment planning, and surgical interventions.

Examples of anatomic variations include:

* Variations in the course or number of blood vessels, such as a persistent left superior vena cava or an accessory renal artery.
* Variations in the position or shape of organs, such as a mobile cecum or a horseshoe kidney.
* Variations in the number or configuration of bones, such as an extra rib or a bifid uvula.
* Variations in the innervation or sensory distribution of nerves, such as a variant course of the brachial plexus or a cross-innervated hand.

Anatomic variations can be detected through various imaging techniques, such as X-rays, CT scans, MRI scans, and ultrasound examinations. Sometimes, they are discovered during surgical procedures or autopsies. Understanding anatomic variations is crucial for accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and optimal patient outcomes.

Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is not a medical term per se, but it is widely used in various medical fields, particularly in diagnostic imaging and telemedicine. It is a measure from signal processing that compares the level of a desired signal to the level of background noise.

In the context of medical imaging (like MRI, CT scans, or ultrasound), a higher SNR means that the useful information (the signal) is stronger relative to the irrelevant and distracting data (the noise). This results in clearer, more detailed, and more accurate images, which can significantly improve diagnostic precision.

In telemedicine and remote patient monitoring, SNR is crucial for ensuring high-quality audio and video communication between healthcare providers and patients. A good SNR ensures that the transmitted data (voice or image) is received with minimal interference or distortion, enabling effective virtual consultations and diagnoses.

Alveolar bone loss refers to the breakdown and resorption of the alveolar process of the jawbone, which is the part of the jaw that contains the sockets of the teeth. This type of bone loss is often caused by periodontal disease, a chronic inflammation of the gums and surrounding tissues that can lead to the destruction of the structures that support the teeth.

In advanced stages of periodontal disease, the alveolar bone can become severely damaged or destroyed, leading to tooth loss. Alveolar bone loss can also occur as a result of other conditions, such as osteoporosis, trauma, or tumors. Dental X-rays and other imaging techniques are often used to diagnose and monitor alveolar bone loss. Treatment may include deep cleaning of the teeth and gums, medications, surgery, or tooth extraction in severe cases.

Dental implants are artificial tooth roots that are surgically placed into the jawbone to replace missing or extracted teeth. They are typically made of titanium, a biocompatible material that can fuse with the bone over time in a process called osseointegration. Once the implant has integrated with the bone, a dental crown, bridge, or denture can be attached to it to restore function and aesthetics to the mouth.

Dental implants are a popular choice for tooth replacement because they offer several advantages over traditional options like dentures or bridges. They are more stable and comfortable, as they do not rely on adjacent teeth for support and do not slip or move around in the mouth. Additionally, dental implants can help to preserve jawbone density and prevent facial sagging that can occur when teeth are missing.

The process of getting dental implants typically involves several appointments with a dental specialist called a prosthodontist or an oral surgeon. During the first appointment, the implant is placed into the jawbone, and the gum tissue is stitched closed. Over the next few months, the implant will fuse with the bone. Once this process is complete, a second surgery may be necessary to expose the implant and attach an abutment, which connects the implant to the dental restoration. Finally, the crown, bridge, or denture is attached to the implant, providing a natural-looking and functional replacement for the missing tooth.

Paranasal sinus diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the paranasal sinuses, which are air-filled cavities located within the skull near the nasal cavity. These sinuses include the maxillary, frontal, ethmoid, and sphenoid sinuses.

Paranasal sinus diseases can be caused by a variety of factors, including viral, bacterial, or fungal infections, allergies, structural abnormalities, or autoimmune disorders. Some common paranasal sinus diseases include:

1. Sinusitis: Inflammation or infection of the sinuses, which can cause symptoms such as nasal congestion, thick nasal discharge, facial pain or pressure, and reduced sense of smell.
2. Nasal polyps: Soft, benign growths that develop in the lining of the nasal passages or sinuses, which can obstruct airflow and cause difficulty breathing through the nose.
3. Sinonasal tumors: Abnormal growths that can be benign or malignant, which can cause symptoms such as nasal congestion, facial pain, and bleeding from the nose.
4. Sinus cysts: Fluid-filled sacs that form in the sinuses, which can cause symptoms similar to those of sinusitis.
5. Fungal sinusitis: Infection of the sinuses with fungi, which can cause symptoms such as nasal congestion, facial pain, and thick, discolored mucus.

Treatment for paranasal sinus diseases depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. Treatment options may include medications, such as antibiotics, antihistamines, or corticosteroids, as well as surgical intervention in more severe cases.

Endosseous dental implantation is a medical procedure that involves the placement of an artificial tooth root (dental implant) directly into the jawbone. The term "endosseous" refers to the surgical placement of the implant within the bone (endo- meaning "within" and -osseous meaning "bony"). This type of dental implant is the most common and widely used method for replacing missing teeth.

During the procedure, a small incision is made in the gum tissue to expose the jawbone, and a hole is drilled into the bone to receive the implant. The implant is then carefully positioned and secured within the bone. Once the implant has integrated with the bone (a process that can take several months), a dental crown or bridge is attached to the implant to restore function and aesthetics to the mouth.

Endosseous dental implantation is a safe and effective procedure that has a high success rate, making it an excellent option for patients who are missing one or more teeth due to injury, decay, or other causes.

The "chin" is the lower, prominent part of the front portion of the jaw in humans and other animals. In medical terms, it is often referred to as the mentum or the symphysis of the mandible. The chin helps in protecting the soft tissues of the mouth and throat during activities such as eating, speaking, and swallowing. It also plays a role in shaping the overall appearance of the face. Anatomically, the chin is formed by the fusion of the two halves of the mandible (lower jawbone) at the symphysis menti.

"Body burden" is a term used in the field of environmental health to describe the total amount of a chemical or toxic substance that an individual has accumulated in their body tissues and fluids. It refers to the overall load or concentration of a particular chemical or contaminant that an organism is carrying, which can come from various sources such as air, water, food, and consumer products.

The term "body burden" highlights the idea that people can be exposed to harmful substances unknowingly and unintentionally, leading to potential health risks over time. Some factors that may influence body burden include the frequency and duration of exposure, the toxicity of the substance, and individual differences in metabolism, elimination, and susceptibility.

It is important to note that not all chemicals or substances found in the body are necessarily harmful, as some are essential for normal bodily functions. However, high levels of certain environmental contaminants can have adverse health effects, making it crucial to monitor and regulate exposure to these substances.

Gutta-Percha is defined in the medical field as a naturally occurring rubber derived from the sap of the Palaquium gutta tree, which is native to Malaysia. It has been historically used in various medical and dental applications due to its unique properties such as being malleable yet durable when heated, and remaining stable at room temperature.

In dentistry, gutta-percha is commonly utilized as a root canal filling material, as it can be easily shaped and compacted into the root canal space to seal off the tooth from bacteria and other infectious agents. It is often used in combination with a sealer cement to ensure a proper seal and prevent reinfection of the tooth.

Overall, gutta-percha is a valuable material in medical and dental applications due to its unique properties and versatility.

An incisor is a type of tooth that is primarily designed for biting off food pieces rather than chewing or grinding. They are typically chisel-shaped, flat, and have a sharp cutting edge. In humans, there are eight incisors - four on the upper jaw and four on the lower jaw, located at the front of the mouth. Other animals such as dogs, cats, and rodents also have incisors that they use for different purposes like tearing or gnawing.

A photon is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a fundamental concept in physics. Photons are elementary particles that carry electromagnetic energy, such as light. They have no mass or electric charge and exhibit both particle-like and wave-like properties. In the context of medicine, photons are often discussed in relation to various medical imaging techniques (e.g., X-ray imaging, CT scans, and PET scans) and therapeutic interventions like laser therapy and radiation therapy, where photons are used to diagnose or treat medical conditions.

In medical terms, the "head" is the uppermost part of the human body that contains the brain, skull, face, eyes, nose, mouth, and ears. It is connected to the rest of the body by the neck and is responsible for many vital functions such as sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and thought processing. The head also plays a crucial role in maintaining balance, speech, and eating.

In the context of medicine and medical devices, calibration refers to the process of checking, adjusting, or confirming the accuracy of a measurement instrument or system. This is typically done by comparing the measurements taken by the device being calibrated to those taken by a reference standard of known accuracy. The goal of calibration is to ensure that the medical device is providing accurate and reliable measurements, which is critical for making proper diagnoses and delivering effective treatment. Regular calibration is an important part of quality assurance and helps to maintain the overall performance and safety of medical devices.

In medical terms, the orbit refers to the bony cavity or socket in the skull that contains and protects the eye (eyeball) and its associated structures, including muscles, nerves, blood vessels, fat, and the lacrimal gland. The orbit is made up of several bones: the frontal bone, sphenoid bone, zygomatic bone, maxilla bone, and palatine bone. These bones form a pyramid-like shape that provides protection for the eye while also allowing for a range of movements.

Opsins are a type of protein that are sensitive to light and play a crucial role in vision. They are found in the photoreceptor cells of the retina, which are the specialized cells in the eye that detect light. Opsins are activated by light, which triggers a series of chemical reactions that ultimately result in the transmission of a signal to the brain, allowing us to see.

There are several different types of opsins, including rhodopsin and the cone pigments, which are found in the rods and cones of the retina, respectively. Rhodopsin is responsible for dim-light vision, while the cone pigments are involved in color vision and bright-light vision.

Opsins belong to a larger family of proteins called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are involved in many different physiological processes in the body. In addition to their role in vision, opsins have also been found to be involved in other light-dependent processes, such as the regulation of circadian rhythms and the entrainment of the biological clock.

The dental arch refers to the curved shape formed by the upper or lower teeth when they come together. The dental arch follows the curve of the jaw and is important for proper bite alignment and overall oral health. The dental arches are typically described as having a U-shaped appearance, with the front teeth forming a narrower section and the back teeth forming a wider section. The shape and size of the dental arch can vary from person to person, and any significant deviations from the typical shape or size may indicate an underlying orthodontic issue that requires treatment.

A laser is not a medical term per se, but a physical concept that has important applications in medicine. The term "LASER" stands for "Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation." It refers to a device that produces and amplifies light with specific characteristics, such as monochromaticity (single wavelength), coherence (all waves moving in the same direction), and high intensity.

In medicine, lasers are used for various therapeutic and diagnostic purposes, including surgery, dermatology, ophthalmology, and dentistry. They can be used to cut, coagulate, or vaporize tissues with great precision, minimizing damage to surrounding structures. Additionally, lasers can be used to detect and measure physiological parameters, such as blood flow and oxygen saturation.

It's important to note that while lasers are powerful tools in medicine, they must be used by trained professionals to ensure safe and effective treatment.

Medical Definition:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of the internal structures of the body. The patient lies within a large, cylindrical magnet, and the scanner detects changes in the direction of the magnetic field caused by protons in the body. These changes are then converted into detailed images that help medical professionals to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as tumors, injuries, or diseases affecting the brain, spinal cord, heart, blood vessels, joints, and other internal organs. MRI does not use radiation like computed tomography (CT) scans.

Conformal radiotherapy is a type of external beam radiation therapy that uses advanced technology to conform the radiation beam to the shape of the tumor, allowing for more precise and targeted treatment while minimizing exposure to healthy surrounding tissue. This can help reduce the risk of side effects and improve the therapeutic ratio. Conformal radiotherapy techniques include 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These techniques use sophisticated imaging and treatment planning systems to create a personalized treatment plan for each patient, based on the size, shape, and location of their tumor.

A dental audit is a systematic review and evaluation of the dental records, procedures, and care provided by a dentist or dental practice. The purpose of a dental audit is to assess the quality of care, identify any areas for improvement, and ensure that appropriate policies and procedures are being followed. This can include reviews of patient records, treatment plans, billing practices, and adherence to infection control guidelines.

The results of a dental audit may be used to improve the quality of care provided to patients, reduce the risk of errors or complications, and ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. Dental audits may be conducted internally by dental practices themselves, or externally by dental organizations, insurance companies, or government agencies.

Nonparametric statistics is a branch of statistics that does not rely on assumptions about the distribution of variables in the population from which the sample is drawn. In contrast to parametric methods, nonparametric techniques make fewer assumptions about the data and are therefore more flexible in their application. Nonparametric tests are often used when the data do not meet the assumptions required for parametric tests, such as normality or equal variances.

Nonparametric statistical methods include tests such as the Wilcoxon rank-sum test (also known as the Mann-Whitney U test) for comparing two independent groups, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for comparing two related groups, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for comparing more than two independent groups. These tests use the ranks of the data rather than the actual values to make comparisons, which allows them to be used with ordinal or continuous data that do not meet the assumptions of parametric tests.

Overall, nonparametric statistics provide a useful set of tools for analyzing data in situations where the assumptions of parametric methods are not met, and can help researchers draw valid conclusions from their data even when the data are not normally distributed or have other characteristics that violate the assumptions of parametric tests.

Photoreceptor cells in vertebrates are specialized types of neurons located in the retina of the eye that are responsible for converting light stimuli into electrical signals. These cells are primarily responsible for the initial process of vision and have two main types: rods and cones.

Rods are more numerous and are responsible for low-light vision or scotopic vision, enabling us to see in dimly lit conditions. They do not contribute to color vision but provide information about the shape and movement of objects.

Cones, on the other hand, are less numerous and are responsible for color vision and high-acuity vision or photopic vision. There are three types of cones, each sensitive to different wavelengths of light: short (S), medium (M), and long (L) wavelengths, which correspond to blue, green, and red, respectively. The combination of signals from these three types of cones allows us to perceive a wide range of colors.

Both rods and cones contain photopigments that consist of a protein called opsin and a light-sensitive chromophore called retinal. When light hits the photopigment, it triggers a series of chemical reactions that ultimately lead to the generation of an electrical signal that is transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve. This process enables us to see and perceive our visual world.

Ocular vision refers to the ability to process and interpret visual information that is received by the eyes. This includes the ability to see clearly and make sense of the shapes, colors, and movements of objects in the environment. The ocular system, which includes the eye and related structures such as the optic nerve and visual cortex of the brain, works together to enable vision.

There are several components of ocular vision, including:

* Visual acuity: the clarity or sharpness of vision
* Field of vision: the extent of the visual world that is visible at any given moment
* Color vision: the ability to distinguish different colors
* Depth perception: the ability to judge the distance of objects in three-dimensional space
* Contrast sensitivity: the ability to distinguish an object from its background based on differences in contrast

Disorders of ocular vision can include refractive errors such as nearsightedness or farsightedness, as well as more serious conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, and macular degeneration. These conditions can affect one or more aspects of ocular vision and may require medical treatment to prevent further vision loss.

Retinal degeneration is a broad term that refers to the progressive loss of photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) in the retina, which are responsible for converting light into electrical signals that are sent to the brain. This process can lead to vision loss or blindness. There are many different types of retinal degeneration, including age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and Stargardt's disease, among others. These conditions can have varying causes, such as genetic mutations, environmental factors, or a combination of both. Treatment options vary depending on the specific type and progression of the condition.

High-energy radiotherapy, also known as external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), is a type of cancer treatment that uses high-energy radiation beams to destroy cancer cells and shrink tumors. The radiation beams are produced by a machine called a linear accelerator (LINAC) and are directed at the tumor site from outside the body. High-energy radiotherapy can be used to treat many different types of cancer, either alone or in combination with other treatments such as surgery or chemotherapy.

The high-energy radiation beams used in this type of radiotherapy are able to penetrate deep into the body and target large areas, making it an effective treatment for cancers that have spread or are too large to be removed surgically. The dose and duration of treatment will depend on the type and stage of cancer being treated, as well as the patient's overall health.

High-energy radiotherapy works by damaging the DNA of cancer cells, which prevents them from dividing and growing. This ultimately leads to the death of the cancer cells. While radiation therapy can also damage normal cells, they are generally better able to repair themselves compared to cancer cells. Therefore, the goal of high-energy radiotherapy is to deliver a high enough dose to destroy the cancer cells while minimizing harm to surrounding healthy tissue.

It's important to note that high-energy radiotherapy requires careful planning and delivery to ensure that the radiation beams are focused on the tumor site and avoid healthy tissues as much as possible. This is typically done using imaging techniques such as CT, MRI, or PET scans to create a treatment plan that maps out the exact location and shape of the tumor. The patient will then undergo a series of treatments, usually scheduled daily over several weeks.

A feasibility study is a preliminary investigation or analysis conducted to determine the viability of a proposed project, program, or product. In the medical field, feasibility studies are often conducted before implementing new treatments, procedures, equipment, or facilities. These studies help to assess the practicality and effectiveness of the proposed intervention, as well as its potential benefits and risks.

Feasibility studies in healthcare typically involve several steps:

1. Problem identification: Clearly define the problem that the proposed project, program, or product aims to address.
2. Objectives setting: Establish specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) objectives for the study.
3. Literature review: Conduct a thorough review of existing research and best practices related to the proposed intervention.
4. Methodology development: Design a methodology for data collection and analysis that will help answer the research questions and achieve the study's objectives.
5. Resource assessment: Evaluate the availability and adequacy of resources, including personnel, time, and finances, required to carry out the proposed intervention.
6. Risk assessment: Identify potential risks and challenges associated with the implementation of the proposed intervention and develop strategies to mitigate them.
7. Cost-benefit analysis: Estimate the costs and benefits of the proposed intervention, including direct and indirect costs, as well as short-term and long-term benefits.
8. Stakeholder engagement: Engage relevant stakeholders, such as patients, healthcare providers, administrators, and policymakers, to gather their input and support for the proposed intervention.
9. Decision-making: Based on the findings of the feasibility study, make an informed decision about whether or not to proceed with the proposed project, program, or product.

Feasibility studies are essential in healthcare as they help ensure that resources are allocated efficiently and effectively, and that interventions are evidence-based, safe, and beneficial for patients.

A synchrotron is not a medical term, but rather a type of particle accelerator used in physics and related fields. Therefore, it doesn't have a specific medical definition. However, synchrotrons do have important applications in medicine, particularly in the field of medical imaging and radiation therapy.

In brief, a synchrotron is a large circular accelerator that uses magnetic fields to bend and focus a beam of charged particles (such as electrons) into a narrow, intense beam. The particles are then accelerated to very high speeds using electric fields. As the particles pass through special devices called insertion devices, they emit light in the form of X-rays or other forms of electromagnetic radiation. These X-rays can be used for a variety of scientific and medical applications, including:

1. Medical imaging: Synchrotron X-rays can produce high-resolution images of the body's internal structures, such as bones, tissues, and organs. This is particularly useful in the study of complex anatomical structures or diseases that affect them.
2. Radiation therapy: Synchrotron radiation can be used to deliver highly targeted doses of radiation to cancer cells while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. This technique, known as synchrotron-based radiotherapy, is still in the experimental stage but shows promise for improving the effectiveness and safety of radiation therapy.
3. Biomedical research: Synchrotron X-rays can be used to study the structure and function of biological molecules, such as proteins and DNA, at a molecular level. This information can help researchers better understand the mechanisms of diseases and develop new drugs and therapies.

In summary, while synchrotrons are not medical terms themselves, they have important applications in medicine, particularly in medical imaging, radiation therapy, and biomedical research.

A Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve is a graphical representation used in medical decision-making and statistical analysis to illustrate the performance of a binary classifier system, such as a diagnostic test or a machine learning algorithm. It's a plot that shows the tradeoff between the true positive rate (sensitivity) and the false positive rate (1 - specificity) for different threshold settings.

The x-axis of an ROC curve represents the false positive rate (the proportion of negative cases incorrectly classified as positive), while the y-axis represents the true positive rate (the proportion of positive cases correctly classified as positive). Each point on the curve corresponds to a specific decision threshold, with higher points indicating better performance.

The area under the ROC curve (AUC) is a commonly used summary measure that reflects the overall performance of the classifier. An AUC value of 1 indicates perfect discrimination between positive and negative cases, while an AUC value of 0.5 suggests that the classifier performs no better than chance.

ROC curves are widely used in healthcare to evaluate diagnostic tests, predictive models, and screening tools for various medical conditions, helping clinicians make informed decisions about patient care based on the balance between sensitivity and specificity.

In the context of medical terminology, "light" doesn't have a specific or standardized definition on its own. However, it can be used in various medical terms and phrases. For example, it could refer to:

1. Visible light: The range of electromagnetic radiation that can be detected by the human eye, typically between wavelengths of 400-700 nanometers. This is relevant in fields such as ophthalmology and optometry.
2. Therapeutic use of light: In some therapies, light is used to treat certain conditions. An example is phototherapy, which uses various wavelengths of ultraviolet (UV) or visible light for conditions like newborn jaundice, skin disorders, or seasonal affective disorder.
3. Light anesthesia: A state of reduced consciousness in which the patient remains responsive to verbal commands and physical stimulation. This is different from general anesthesia where the patient is completely unconscious.
4. Pain relief using light: Certain devices like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) units have a 'light' setting, indicating lower intensity or frequency of electrical impulses used for pain management.

Without more context, it's hard to provide a precise medical definition of 'light'.

Multimodal imaging is a medical term that refers to the combination of two or more imaging techniques to obtain complementary information about the structure, function, and/or physiology of tissues, organs, or organ systems. This approach allows for a more comprehensive assessment of normal and abnormal processes in the body than can be achieved with any single imaging modality alone.

Commonly used imaging modalities in multimodal imaging include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), ultrasound, and optical imaging techniques. Each modality provides unique information that can be integrated to improve diagnostic accuracy, guide treatment planning, and monitor response to therapy.

For example, a patient with a suspected brain tumor may undergo both MRI and PET scans. The MRI provides detailed anatomical information about the size, shape, and location of the tumor, while the PET scan shows metabolic activity within the tumor, which can help distinguish between benign and malignant lesions.

Multimodal imaging is also used in research settings to study various physiological processes, such as blood flow, oxygenation, and neurotransmission, in both health and disease.

Fluorine radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes or variants of the chemical element Fluorine (F, atomic number 9). These radioisotopes have an unstable nucleus that emits radiation in the form of alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays. Examples of Fluorine radioisotopes include Fluorine-18 and Fluorine-19.

Fluorine-18 is a positron-emitting radionuclide with a half-life of approximately 110 minutes, making it useful for medical imaging techniques such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans. It is commonly used in the production of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a radiopharmaceutical that can be used to detect cancer and other metabolic disorders.

Fluorine-19, on the other hand, is a stable isotope of Fluorine and does not emit radiation. However, it can be enriched and used as a non-radioactive tracer in medical research and diagnostic applications.

Diagnostic imaging is a medical specialty that uses various technologies to produce visual representations of the internal structures and functioning of the body. These images are used to diagnose injury, disease, or other abnormalities and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. Common modalities of diagnostic imaging include:

1. Radiography (X-ray): Uses ionizing radiation to produce detailed images of bones, teeth, and some organs.
2. Computed Tomography (CT) Scan: Combines X-ray technology with computer processing to create cross-sectional images of the body.
3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to generate detailed images of soft tissues, organs, and bones.
4. Ultrasound: Employs high-frequency sound waves to produce real-time images of internal structures, often used for obstetrics and gynecology.
5. Nuclear Medicine: Involves the administration of radioactive tracers to assess organ function or detect abnormalities within the body.
6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scan: Uses a small amount of radioactive material to produce detailed images of metabolic activity in the body, often used for cancer detection and monitoring treatment response.
7. Fluoroscopy: Utilizes continuous X-ray imaging to observe moving structures or processes within the body, such as swallowing studies or angiography.

Diagnostic imaging plays a crucial role in modern medicine, allowing healthcare providers to make informed decisions about patient care and treatment plans.

An axon is a long, slender extension of a neuron (a type of nerve cell) that conducts electrical impulses (nerve impulses) away from the cell body to target cells, such as other neurons or muscle cells. Axons can vary in length from a few micrometers to over a meter long and are typically surrounded by a myelin sheath, which helps to insulate and protect the axon and allows for faster transmission of nerve impulses.

Axons play a critical role in the functioning of the nervous system, as they provide the means by which neurons communicate with one another and with other cells in the body. Damage to axons can result in serious neurological problems, such as those seen in spinal cord injuries or neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Calcinosis is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal deposit of calcium salts in various tissues of the body, commonly under the skin or in the muscles and tendons. These calcium deposits can form hard lumps or nodules that can cause pain, inflammation, and restricted mobility. Calcinosis can occur as a complication of other medical conditions, such as autoimmune disorders, kidney disease, and hypercalcemia (high levels of calcium in the blood). In some cases, the cause of calcinosis may be unknown. Treatment for calcinosis depends on the underlying cause and may include medications to manage calcium levels, physical therapy, and surgical removal of large deposits.

Color perception refers to the ability to detect, recognize, and differentiate various colors and color patterns in the visual field. This complex process involves the functioning of both the eyes and the brain.

The eye's retina contains two types of photoreceptor cells called rods and cones. Rods are more sensitive to light and dark changes and help us see in low-light conditions, but they do not contribute much to color vision. Cones, on the other hand, are responsible for color perception and function best in well-lit conditions.

There are three types of cone cells, each sensitive to a particular range of wavelengths corresponding to blue, green, and red colors. The combination of signals from these three types of cones allows us to perceive a wide spectrum of colors.

The brain then interprets these signals and translates them into the perception of different colors and hues. It is important to note that color perception can be influenced by various factors, including cultural background, personal experiences, and even language. Some individuals may also have deficiencies in color perception due to genetic or acquired conditions, such as color blindness or cataracts.

The Predictive Value of Tests, specifically the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and Negative Predictive Value (NPV), are measures used in diagnostic tests to determine the probability that a positive or negative test result is correct.

Positive Predictive Value (PPV) is the proportion of patients with a positive test result who actually have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true positives divided by the total number of positive results (true positives + false positives). A higher PPV indicates that a positive test result is more likely to be a true positive, and therefore the disease is more likely to be present.

Negative Predictive Value (NPV) is the proportion of patients with a negative test result who do not have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true negatives divided by the total number of negative results (true negatives + false negatives). A higher NPV indicates that a negative test result is more likely to be a true negative, and therefore the disease is less likely to be present.

The predictive value of tests depends on the prevalence of the disease in the population being tested, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the test. A test with high sensitivity and specificity will generally have higher predictive values than a test with low sensitivity and specificity. However, even a highly sensitive and specific test can have low predictive values if the prevalence of the disease is low in the population being tested.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Brachytherapy is a type of cancer treatment that involves placing radioactive material directly into or near the tumor site. The term "brachy" comes from the Greek word for "short," which refers to the short distance that the radiation travels. This allows for a high dose of radiation to be delivered directly to the tumor while minimizing exposure to healthy surrounding tissue.

There are two main types of brachytherapy:

1. Intracavitary brachytherapy: The radioactive material is placed inside a body cavity, such as the uterus or windpipe.
2. Interstitial brachytherapy: The radioactive material is placed directly into the tumor or surrounding tissue using needles, seeds, or catheters.

Brachytherapy can be used alone or in combination with other cancer treatments such as surgery, external beam radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. It may be recommended for a variety of cancers, including prostate, cervical, vaginal, vulvar, head and neck, and skin cancers. The specific type of brachytherapy used will depend on the size, location, and stage of the tumor.

The advantages of brachytherapy include its ability to deliver a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor while minimizing exposure to healthy tissue, which can result in fewer side effects compared to other forms of radiation therapy. Additionally, brachytherapy is often a shorter treatment course than external beam radiation therapy, with some treatments lasting only a few minutes or hours.

However, there are also potential risks and side effects associated with brachytherapy, including damage to nearby organs and tissues, bleeding, infection, and pain. Patients should discuss the benefits and risks of brachytherapy with their healthcare provider to determine if it is an appropriate treatment option for them.

I am not aware of a widely accepted medical definition for the term "software," as it is more commonly used in the context of computer science and technology. Software refers to programs, data, and instructions that are used by computers to perform various tasks. It does not have direct relevance to medical fields such as anatomy, physiology, or clinical practice. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help with those instead!

The fovea centralis, also known as the macula lutea, is a small pit or depression located in the center of the retina, an light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. It is responsible for sharp, detailed vision (central vision) and color perception. The fovea contains only cones, the photoreceptor cells that are responsible for color vision and high visual acuity. It has a higher concentration of cones than any other area in the retina, allowing it to provide the greatest detail and color discrimination. The center of the fovea is called the foveola, which contains the highest density of cones and is avascular, meaning it lacks blood vessels to avoid interfering with the light passing through to the photoreceptor cells.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Optics and Photonics" is a broad field that encompasses various scientific and engineering disciplines. It doesn't have a specific medical definition, as it's not a term typically used in a medical context.

However, I can provide a general definition:

Optics is the study of light and its interactions with matter. This includes how light is produced, controlled, transmitted, and detected. It involves phenomena such as reflection, refraction, diffraction, and interference.

Photonics, on the other hand, is a branch of optics that deals with the generation, detection, and manipulation of individual photons, the basic units of light. Photonics is often applied to technologies such as lasers, fiber optics, and optical communications.

In a medical context, these fields might be used in various diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as endoscopes, ophthalmic devices, laser surgery, and imaging technologies like MRI and CT scans. But the terms "Optics" and "Photonics" themselves are not medical conditions or treatments.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

The macula lutea, often simply referred to as the macula or fovea centralis, is a part of the eye that is responsible for central vision and color perception. It's located in the center of the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. The macula contains a high concentration of pigments called xanthophylls, which give it a yellowish color and protect the photoreceptor cells in this area from damage by blue light.

The central part of the macula is called the fovea, which is a small depression that contains only cones, the photoreceptor cells responsible for color vision and high visual acuity. The fovea is surrounded by the parafovea and the perifovea, which contain both cones and rods, the photoreceptor cells responsible for low-light vision and peripheral vision.

Damage to the macula can result in a loss of central vision and color perception, a condition known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is a leading cause of blindness in older adults. Other conditions that can affect the macula include macular edema, macular holes, and macular pucker.

Ocular adaptation is the ability of the eye to adjust and accommodate to changes in visual input and lighting conditions. This process allows the eye to maintain a clear and focused image over a range of different environments and light levels. There are several types of ocular adaptation, including:

1. Light Adaptation: This refers to the eye's ability to adjust to different levels of illumination. When moving from a dark environment to a bright one, the pupils constrict to let in less light, and the sensitivity of the retina decreases. Conversely, when moving from a bright environment to a dark one, the pupils dilate to let in more light, and the sensitivity of the retina increases.
2. Dark Adaptation: This is the process by which the eye adjusts to low light conditions. It involves the dilation of the pupils and an increase in the sensitivity of the rods (specialised cells in the retina that are responsible for vision in low light conditions). Dark adaptation can take several minutes to occur fully.
3. Color Adaptation: This refers to the eye's ability to adjust to changes in the color temperature of light sources. For example, when moving from a room lit by incandescent light to one lit by fluorescent light, the eye may need to adjust its perception of colors to maintain accurate color vision.
4. Accommodation: This is the process by which the eye changes focus from distant to near objects. The lens of the eye changes shape to bend the light rays entering the eye and bring them into sharp focus on the retina.

Overall, ocular adaptation is an essential function that allows us to see clearly and accurately in a wide range of environments and lighting conditions.

A computer simulation is a process that involves creating a model of a real-world system or phenomenon on a computer and then using that model to run experiments and make predictions about how the system will behave under different conditions. In the medical field, computer simulations are used for a variety of purposes, including:

1. Training and education: Computer simulations can be used to create realistic virtual environments where medical students and professionals can practice their skills and learn new procedures without risk to actual patients. For example, surgeons may use simulation software to practice complex surgical techniques before performing them on real patients.
2. Research and development: Computer simulations can help medical researchers study the behavior of biological systems at a level of detail that would be difficult or impossible to achieve through experimental methods alone. By creating detailed models of cells, tissues, organs, or even entire organisms, researchers can use simulation software to explore how these systems function and how they respond to different stimuli.
3. Drug discovery and development: Computer simulations are an essential tool in modern drug discovery and development. By modeling the behavior of drugs at a molecular level, researchers can predict how they will interact with their targets in the body and identify potential side effects or toxicities. This information can help guide the design of new drugs and reduce the need for expensive and time-consuming clinical trials.
4. Personalized medicine: Computer simulations can be used to create personalized models of individual patients based on their unique genetic, physiological, and environmental characteristics. These models can then be used to predict how a patient will respond to different treatments and identify the most effective therapy for their specific condition.

Overall, computer simulations are a powerful tool in modern medicine, enabling researchers and clinicians to study complex systems and make predictions about how they will behave under a wide range of conditions. By providing insights into the behavior of biological systems at a level of detail that would be difficult or impossible to achieve through experimental methods alone, computer simulations are helping to advance our understanding of human health and disease.

Linear Energy Transfer (LET) is a concept in radiation physics that describes the amount of energy that is transferred from an ionizing particle to a medium per unit length along its path. It is usually expressed in units of keV/μm (kiloelectron volts per micrometer). High-LET radiations, such as alpha particles and heavy ions, transfer more energy to the medium per unit length than low-LET radiations, such as X-rays and gamma rays. This results in a higher probability of producing dense ionizations and causing biological damage along the particle's path. Therefore, LET is an important factor in determining the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of different types of radiation.

Heavy Ion Radiotherapy is a type of external beam radiation therapy used in the treatment of cancer. It uses beams of heavy, charged particles such as carbon or lead ions to deliver high doses of radiation directly to tumor cells while minimizing exposure and damage to surrounding healthy tissues. This is achieved by taking advantage of the unique physical properties of these particles, which can deposit their energy more densely in tissue and stop closer to the tumor site compared to conventional photon or electron beams.

The process involves accelerating the heavy ions to near-light speeds using a particle accelerator, then directing them at the tumor with precision. Upon interaction with the tumor cells, these high-energy particles cause ionization and DNA damage, leading to cell death and shrinkage or eradication of the tumor. Heavy Ion Radiotherapy has been shown to be effective in treating certain types of cancer, including some radioresistant tumors, due to its increased biological effectiveness compared to conventional radiotherapy techniques.

Computer-Aided Design (CAD) is the use of computer systems to aid in the creation, modification, analysis, or optimization of a design. CAD software is used to create and manage designs in a variety of fields, such as architecture, engineering, and manufacturing. It allows designers to visualize their ideas in 2D or 3D, simulate how the design will function, and make changes quickly and easily. This can help to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the design process, and can also facilitate collaboration and communication among team members.

A transducer is a device that converts one form of energy into another. In the context of medicine and biology, transducers often refer to devices that convert a physiological parameter (such as blood pressure, temperature, or sound waves) into an electrical signal that can be measured and analyzed. Examples of medical transducers include:

1. Blood pressure transducer: Converts the mechanical force exerted by blood on the walls of an artery into an electrical signal.
2. Temperature transducer: Converts temperature changes into electrical signals.
3. ECG transducer (electrocardiogram): Converts the electrical activity of the heart into a visual representation called an electrocardiogram.
4. Ultrasound transducer: Uses sound waves to create images of internal organs and structures.
5. Piezoelectric transducer: Generates an electric charge when subjected to pressure or vibration, used in various medical devices such as hearing aids, accelerometers, and pressure sensors.

In the context of medical terminology, "motion" generally refers to the act or process of moving or changing position. It can also refer to the range of movement of a body part or joint. However, there is no single specific medical definition for the term "motion." The meaning may vary depending on the context in which it is used.

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of rare, genetic disorders that involve a breakdown and loss of cells in the retina - a light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. The retina converts light into electrical signals which are then sent to the brain and interpreted as visual images.

In RP, the cells that detect light (rods and cones) degenerate more slowly than other cells in the retina, leading to a progressive loss of vision. Symptoms typically begin in childhood with night blindness (difficulty seeing in low light), followed by a gradual narrowing of the visual field (tunnel vision). Over time, this can lead to significant vision loss and even blindness.

The condition is usually inherited and there are several different genes that have been associated with RP. The diagnosis is typically made based on a combination of genetic testing, family history, and clinical examination. Currently, there is no cure for RP, but researchers are actively working to develop new treatments that may help slow or stop the progression of the disease.

Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs) are a type of neuron located in the innermost layer of the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. These cells receive visual information from photoreceptors (rods and cones) via intermediate cells called bipolar cells. RGCs then send this visual information through their long axons to form the optic nerve, which transmits the signals to the brain for processing and interpretation as vision.

There are several types of RGCs, each with distinct morphological and functional characteristics. Some RGCs are specialized in detecting specific features of the visual scene, such as motion, contrast, color, or brightness. The diversity of RGCs allows for a rich and complex representation of the visual world in the brain.

Damage to RGCs can lead to various visual impairments, including loss of vision, reduced visual acuity, and altered visual fields. Conditions associated with RGC damage or degeneration include glaucoma, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy, and some inherited retinal diseases.

Contrast media are substances that are administered to a patient in order to improve the visibility of internal body structures or processes in medical imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, MRI scans, and ultrasounds. These media can be introduced into the body through various routes, including oral, rectal, or intravenous administration.

Contrast media work by altering the appearance of bodily structures in imaging studies. For example, when a patient undergoes an X-ray examination, contrast media can be used to highlight specific organs, tissues, or blood vessels, making them more visible on the resulting images. In CT and MRI scans, contrast media can help to enhance the differences between normal and abnormal tissues, allowing for more accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

There are several types of contrast media available, each with its own specific properties and uses. Some common examples include barium sulfate, which is used as a contrast medium in X-ray studies of the gastrointestinal tract, and iodinated contrast media, which are commonly used in CT scans to highlight blood vessels and other structures.

While contrast media are generally considered safe, they can sometimes cause adverse reactions, ranging from mild symptoms such as nausea or hives to more serious complications such as anaphylaxis or kidney damage. As a result, it is important for healthcare providers to carefully evaluate each patient's medical history and individual risk factors before administering contrast media.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the "Monte Carlo method" is actually a term from the field of mathematics and computer science, not medicine. It refers to a statistical technique that allows for the modeling of complex systems by running multiple simulations with random inputs. This method is widely used in various fields such as physics, engineering, and finance, but it is not a medical concept or term.

X-rays, also known as radiographs, are a type of electromagnetic radiation with higher energy and shorter wavelength than visible light. In medical imaging, X-rays are used to produce images of the body's internal structures, such as bones and organs, by passing the X-rays through the body and capturing the resulting shadows or patterns on a specialized film or digital detector.

The amount of X-ray radiation used is carefully controlled to minimize exposure and ensure patient safety. Different parts of the body absorb X-rays at different rates, allowing for contrast between soft tissues and denser structures like bone. This property makes X-rays an essential tool in diagnosing and monitoring a wide range of medical conditions, including fractures, tumors, infections, and foreign objects within the body.

In the context of medicine, particularly in anatomy and physiology, "rotation" refers to the movement of a body part around its own axis or the long axis of another structure. This type of motion is three-dimensional and can occur in various planes. A common example of rotation is the movement of the forearm bones (radius and ulna) around each other during pronation and supination, which allows the hand to be turned palm up or down. Another example is the rotation of the head during mastication (chewing), where the mandible moves in a circular motion around the temporomandibular joint.

Eye proteins, also known as ocular proteins, are specific proteins that are found within the eye and play crucial roles in maintaining proper eye function and health. These proteins can be found in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, retina, and other structures. They perform a wide range of functions, such as:

1. Structural support: Proteins like collagen and elastin provide strength and flexibility to the eye's tissues, enabling them to maintain their shape and withstand mechanical stress.
2. Light absorption and transmission: Proteins like opsins and crystallins are involved in capturing and transmitting light signals within the eye, which is essential for vision.
3. Protection against damage: Some eye proteins, such as antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins, help protect the eye from oxidative stress, UV radiation, and other environmental factors that can cause damage.
4. Regulation of eye growth and development: Various growth factors and signaling molecules, which are protein-based, contribute to the proper growth, differentiation, and maintenance of eye tissues during embryonic development and throughout adulthood.
5. Immune defense: Proteins involved in the immune response, such as complement components and immunoglobulins, help protect the eye from infection and inflammation.
6. Maintenance of transparency: Crystallin proteins in the lens maintain its transparency, allowing light to pass through unobstructed for clear vision.
7. Neuroprotection: Certain eye proteins, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), support the survival and function of neurons within the retina, helping to preserve vision.

Dysfunction or damage to these eye proteins can contribute to various eye disorders and diseases, such as cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and others.

Ophthalmoscopy is a medical examination technique used by healthcare professionals to observe the interior structures of the eye, including the retina, optic disc, and vitreous humor. This procedure typically involves using an ophthalmoscope, a handheld device that consists of a light and magnifying lenses. The healthcare provider looks through the ophthalmoscope and directly observes the internal structures of the eye by illuminating them.

There are several types of ophthalmoscopy, including direct ophthalmoscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, and slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages, and they may be used in different situations depending on the specific clinical situation and the information needed.

Ophthalmoscopy is an important diagnostic tool for detecting and monitoring a wide range of eye conditions, including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and other retinal disorders. It can also provide valuable information about the overall health of the individual, as changes in the appearance of the retina or optic nerve may indicate the presence of systemic diseases such as hypertension or diabetes.

Image enhancement in the medical context refers to the process of improving the quality and clarity of medical images, such as X-rays, CT scans, MRI scans, or ultrasound images, to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. Image enhancement techniques may include adjusting contrast, brightness, or sharpness; removing noise or artifacts; or applying specialized algorithms to highlight specific features or structures within the image.

The goal of image enhancement is to provide clinicians with more accurate and detailed information about a patient's anatomy or physiology, which can help inform medical decision-making and improve patient outcomes.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Semaphorin-3A is a protein that belongs to the larger family of semaphorins, which are signaling molecules involved in various biological processes including axon guidance during neural development. Specifically, Semaphorin-3A is known as a chemorepellent, meaning it repels growing nerve cells (neurons) and regulates their migration, growth, and pathfinding. It plays crucial roles in the formation of the nervous system by controlling the navigation and fasciculation (the clustering together) of axons during development. Additionally, Semaphorin-3A has been implicated in immune responses and cancer progression, acting as a tumor suppressor or promoter depending on the context.

Visual acuity is a measure of the sharpness or clarity of vision. It is usually tested by reading an eye chart from a specific distance, such as 20 feet (6 meters). The standard eye chart used for this purpose is called the Snellen chart, which contains rows of letters that decrease in size as you read down the chart.

Visual acuity is typically expressed as a fraction, with the numerator representing the testing distance and the denominator indicating the smallest line of type that can be read clearly. For example, if a person can read the line on the eye chart that corresponds to a visual acuity of 20/20, it means they have normal vision at 20 feet. If their visual acuity is 20/40, it means they must be as close as 20 feet to see what someone with normal vision can see at 40 feet.

It's important to note that visual acuity is just one aspect of overall vision and does not necessarily reflect other important factors such as peripheral vision, depth perception, color vision, or contrast sensitivity.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, "movement" refers to the act or process of changing physical location or position. It involves the contraction and relaxation of muscles, which allows for the joints to move and the body to be in motion. Movement can also refer to the ability of a patient to move a specific body part or limb, which is assessed during physical examinations. Additionally, "movement" can describe the progression or spread of a disease within the body.

The cervical vertebrae are the seven vertebrae that make up the upper part of the spine, also known as the neck region. They are labeled C1 to C7, with C1 being closest to the skull and C7 connecting to the thoracic vertebrae in the chest region. The cervical vertebrae have unique structures to allow for a wide range of motion in the neck while also protecting the spinal cord and providing attachment points for muscles and ligaments.

A dose-response relationship in radiation refers to the correlation between the amount of radiation exposure (dose) and the biological response or adverse health effects observed in exposed individuals. As the level of radiation dose increases, the severity and frequency of the adverse health effects also tend to increase. This relationship is crucial in understanding the risks associated with various levels of radiation exposure and helps inform radiation protection standards and guidelines.

The effects of ionizing radiation can be categorized into two types: deterministic and stochastic. Deterministic effects have a threshold dose below which no effect is observed, and above this threshold, the severity of the effect increases with higher doses. Examples include radiation-induced cataracts or radiation dermatitis. Stochastic effects, on the other hand, do not have a clear threshold and are based on probability; as the dose increases, so does the likelihood of the adverse health effect occurring, such as an increased risk of cancer.

Understanding the dose-response relationship in radiation exposure is essential for setting limits on occupational and public exposure to ionizing radiation, optimizing radiation protection practices, and developing effective medical countermeasures in case of radiation emergencies.

Scintillation counting is a method used in medical physics and nuclear medicine to detect and quantify radioactivity. It relies on the principle that certain materials, known as scintillators, emit light flashes (scintillations) when they absorb ionizing radiation. This light can then be detected and measured to determine the amount of radiation present.

In a scintillation counting system, the sample containing radioisotopes is placed in close proximity to the scintillator. When radiation is emitted from the sample, it interacts with the scintillator material, causing it to emit light. This light is then detected by a photomultiplier tube (PMT), which converts the light into an electrical signal that can be processed and counted by electronic circuits.

The number of counts recorded over a specific period of time is proportional to the amount of radiation emitted by the sample, allowing for the quantification of radioactivity. Scintillation counting is widely used in various applications such as measuring radioactive decay rates, monitoring environmental radiation levels, and analyzing radioisotopes in biological samples.

Microspectrophotometry (MSP) is a microanalytical technique that combines microspectroscopy and photometry to measure the absorption, reflection, or fluorescence spectra of extremely small samples, typically in the range of micrometers to sub-micrometers. This technique is often used in biomedical research and clinical settings for the analysis of cellular and subcellular structures, such as organelles, inclusion bodies, and single molecules.

MSP can provide detailed information about the chemical composition, molecular structure, and spatial distribution of biological samples, making it a valuable tool for studying various physiological and pathological processes, including gene expression, protein function, and cell-cell interactions. Additionally, MSP has been used in diagnostic applications to identify abnormalities in tissues and cells, such as cancerous or precancerous lesions, and to monitor the efficacy of therapeutic interventions.

The technique involves using a microscope equipped with a high-resolution objective lens and a spectrophotometer to measure the intensity of light transmitted through or reflected from a sample at different wavelengths. The resulting spectra can be used to identify specific chemical components or molecular structures based on their characteristic absorption, reflection, or fluorescence patterns.

MSP is a powerful tool for studying biological systems at the microscopic level and has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular and molecular biology. However, it requires specialized equipment and expertise to perform and interpret the data, making it a relatively complex and sophisticated technique.

Thoracic radiography is a type of diagnostic imaging that involves using X-rays to produce images of the chest, including the lungs, heart, bronchi, great vessels, and the bones of the spine and chest wall. It is a commonly used tool in the diagnosis and management of various respiratory, cardiovascular, and thoracic disorders such as pneumonia, lung cancer, heart failure, and rib fractures.

During the procedure, the patient is positioned between an X-ray machine and a cassette containing a film or digital detector. The X-ray beam is directed at the chest, and the resulting image is captured on the film or detector. The images produced can help identify any abnormalities in the structure or function of the organs within the chest.

Thoracic radiography may be performed as a routine screening test for certain conditions, such as lung cancer, or it may be ordered when a patient presents with symptoms suggestive of a respiratory or cardiovascular disorder. It is a safe and non-invasive procedure that can provide valuable information to help guide clinical decision making and improve patient outcomes.

Radiotherapy, also known as radiation therapy, is a medical treatment that uses ionizing radiation to kill cancer cells, shrink tumors, and prevent the growth and spread of cancer. The radiation can be delivered externally using machines or internally via radioactive substances placed in or near the tumor. Radiotherapy works by damaging the DNA of cancer cells, which prevents them from dividing and growing. Normal cells are also affected by radiation, but they have a greater ability to repair themselves compared to cancer cells. The goal of radiotherapy is to destroy as many cancer cells as possible while minimizing damage to healthy tissue.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Abdominal radiography, also known as a KUB (kidneys, ureters, bladder) X-ray, is a medical imaging technique used to examine the abdominal cavity. It involves using ionizing radiation to produce images of the internal structures of the abdomen, including the bones, organs, and soft tissues.

The procedure typically involves the patient lying down on a table while a specialized X-ray machine captures images of the abdomen from different angles. The images produced can help doctors diagnose and monitor a variety of conditions, such as kidney stones, intestinal obstructions, and abnormalities in the spine or other bones.

Abdominal radiography is a quick, painless, and non-invasive procedure that requires little preparation on the part of the patient. However, it does involve exposure to radiation, so it is typically only used when necessary and when other imaging techniques are not appropriate.

Optical phenomena refer to the various observable patterns and effects that occur due to the interaction of light with the environment or with structures in our eye. These can include natural phenomena such as rainbows, mirages, and halos around the sun or moon, as well as visual artifacts created by the eye itself, such as afterimages, floaters, and flashes of light. Some optical phenomena are caused by the refraction, reflection, or interference of light waves, while others may result from abnormalities in the eye's structure or function. Understanding these phenomena can provide insight into the properties of light and the functioning of the visual system.

Coronary angiography is a medical procedure that uses X-ray imaging to visualize the coronary arteries, which supply blood to the heart muscle. During the procedure, a thin, flexible catheter is inserted into an artery in the arm or groin and threaded through the blood vessels to the heart. A contrast dye is then injected through the catheter, and X-ray images are taken as the dye flows through the coronary arteries. These images can help doctors diagnose and treat various heart conditions, such as blockages or narrowing of the arteries, that can lead to chest pain or heart attacks. It is also known as coronary arteriography or cardiac catheterization.

In the context of medical terminology, "lenses" generally refers to optical lenses used in various medical devices and instruments. These lenses are typically made of glass or plastic and are designed to refract (bend) light in specific ways to help magnify, focus, or redirect images. Here are some examples:

1. In ophthalmology and optometry, lenses are used in eyeglasses, contact lenses, and ophthalmic instruments to correct vision problems like myopia (nearsightedness), hypermetropia (farsightedness), astigmatism, or presbyopia.
2. In surgical microscopes, lenses are used to provide a magnified and clear view of the operating field during microsurgical procedures like ophthalmic, neurosurgical, or ENT (Ear, Nose, Throat) surgeries.
3. In endoscopes and laparoscopes, lenses are used to transmit light and images from inside the body during minimally invasive surgical procedures.
4. In ophthalmic diagnostic instruments like slit lamps, lenses are used to examine various structures of the eye in detail.

In summary, "lenses" in medical terminology refer to optical components that help manipulate light to aid in diagnosis, treatment, or visual correction.

Color vision is the ability to perceive and differentiate colors, which is a result of the way that our eyes and brain process different wavelengths of light. In the eye, there are two types of photoreceptor cells called rods and cones. While rods are more sensitive to low levels of light and help us see in dim conditions, cones are responsible for color vision.

There are three types of cone cells in the human eye, each containing a different type of pigment that is sensitive to specific wavelengths of light. One type of cone cell is most sensitive to short wavelengths (blue light), another is most sensitive to medium wavelengths (green light), and the third is most sensitive to long wavelengths (red light). When light enters the eye, it is absorbed by these pigments in the cones, which then send signals to the brain. The brain interprets these signals and translates them into the perception of color.

People with normal color vision can distinguish between millions of different colors based on the specific combinations of wavelengths that are present in a given scene. However, some people have deficiencies or abnormalities in their color vision, which can make it difficult or impossible to distinguish between certain colors. These conditions are known as color vision deficiencies or color blindness.

Neurites are extensions of a neuron (a type of cell in the nervous system) that can be either an axon or a dendrite. An axon is a thin, cable-like extension that carries signals away from the cell body, while a dendrite is a branching extension that receives signals from other neurons. Neurites play a crucial role in the communication between neurons and the formation of neural networks. They are involved in the transmission of electrical and chemical signals, as well as in the growth and development of the nervous system.

In the context of medical terminology, 'color' is not defined specifically with a unique meaning. Instead, it generally refers to the characteristic or appearance of something, particularly in relation to the color that a person may observe visually. For instance, doctors may describe the color of a patient's skin, eyes, hair, or bodily fluids to help diagnose medical conditions or monitor their progression.

For example, jaundice is a yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes that can indicate liver problems, while cyanosis refers to a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes due to insufficient oxygen in the blood. Similarly, doctors may describe the color of stool or urine to help diagnose digestive or kidney issues.

Therefore, 'color' is not a medical term with a specific definition but rather a general term used to describe various visual characteristics of the body and bodily fluids that can provide important diagnostic clues for healthcare professionals.

Diagnostic techniques in ophthalmology refer to the various methods and tests used by eye specialists (ophthalmologists) to examine, evaluate, and diagnose conditions related to the eyes and visual system. Here are some commonly used diagnostic techniques:

1. Visual Acuity Testing: This is a basic test to measure the sharpness of a person's vision. It typically involves reading letters or numbers from an eye chart at a specific distance.
2. Refraction Test: This test helps determine the correct lens prescription for glasses or contact lenses by measuring how light is bent as it passes through the cornea and lens.
3. Slit Lamp Examination: A slit lamp is a microscope that allows an ophthalmologist to examine the structures of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, and retina, in great detail.
4. Tonometry: This test measures the pressure inside the eye (intraocular pressure) to detect conditions like glaucoma. Common methods include applanation tonometry and non-contact tonometry.
5. Retinal Imaging: Several techniques are used to capture images of the retina, including fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These tests help diagnose conditions like macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal detachments.
6. Color Vision Testing: This test evaluates a person's ability to distinguish between different colors, which can help detect color vision deficiencies or neurological disorders affecting the visual pathway.
7. Visual Field Testing: This test measures a person's peripheral (or side) vision and can help diagnose conditions like glaucoma, optic nerve damage, or brain injuries.
8. Pupillary Reactions Tests: These tests evaluate how the pupils respond to light and near objects, which can provide information about the condition of the eye's internal structures and the nervous system.
9. Ocular Motility Testing: This test assesses eye movements and alignment, helping diagnose conditions like strabismus (crossed eyes) or nystagmus (involuntary eye movement).
10. Corneal Topography: This non-invasive imaging technique maps the curvature of the cornea, which can help detect irregularities, assess the fit of contact lenses, and plan refractive surgery procedures.

Carbon radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of carbon, which is an naturally occurring chemical element with the atomic number 6. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^12C), but there are also several radioactive isotopes, including carbon-11 (^11C), carbon-14 (^14C), and carbon-13 (^13C). These radioisotopes have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei, which makes them unstable and causes them to emit radiation.

Carbon-11 has a half-life of about 20 minutes and is used in medical imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It is produced by bombarding nitrogen-14 with protons in a cyclotron.

Carbon-14, also known as radiocarbon, has a half-life of about 5730 years and is used in archaeology and geology to date organic materials. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere by cosmic rays.

Carbon-13 is stable and has a natural abundance of about 1.1% in carbon. It is not radioactive, but it can be used as a tracer in medical research and in the study of metabolic processes.

Bone density refers to the amount of bone mineral content (usually measured in grams) in a given volume of bone (usually measured in cubic centimeters). It is often used as an indicator of bone strength and fracture risk. Bone density is typically measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, which provide a T-score that compares the patient's bone density to that of a young adult reference population. A T-score of -1 or above is considered normal, while a T-score between -1 and -2.5 indicates osteopenia (low bone mass), and a T-score below -2.5 indicates osteoporosis (porous bones). Regular exercise, adequate calcium and vitamin D intake, and medication (if necessary) can help maintain or improve bone density and prevent fractures.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Color perception tests are a type of examination used to evaluate an individual's ability to perceive and distinguish different colors. These tests typically consist of a series of plates or images that contain various patterns or shapes displayed in different colors. The person being tested is then asked to identify or match the colors based on specific instructions.

There are several types of color perception tests, including:

1. Ishihara Test: This is a commonly used test for red-green color deficiency. It consists of a series of plates with circles made up of dots in different sizes and colors. Within these circles, there may be a number or symbol visible only to those with normal color vision or to those with specific types of color blindness.
2. Farnsworth D-15 Test: This test measures an individual's ability to arrange colored caps in a specific order based on their hue. It is often used to diagnose and monitor the progression of color vision deficiencies.
3. Hardy-Rand-Rittler (HRR) Test: This is another type of color arrangement test that measures an individual's ability to distinguish between different colors based on their hue, saturation, and brightness.
4. Color Discrimination Tests: These tests measure an individual's ability to distinguish between two similar colors that are presented side by side or in close proximity.
5. Anomaloscope Test: This is a more sophisticated test that measures the degree of color vision deficiency by asking the person to match the brightness and hue of two lights.

Color perception tests are often used in occupational settings, such as aviation, military, and manufacturing, where color discrimination is critical for safety and performance. They may also be used in educational and clinical settings to diagnose and monitor color vision deficiencies.

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a medical condition in which the coronary arteries, which supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle, become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of cholesterol, fatty deposits, and other substances, known as plaque. Over time, this buildup can cause the arteries to harden and narrow (a process called atherosclerosis), reducing blood flow to the heart muscle.

The reduction in blood flow can lead to various symptoms and complications, including:

1. Angina (chest pain or discomfort) - This occurs when the heart muscle doesn't receive enough oxygen-rich blood, causing pain, pressure, or discomfort in the chest, arms, neck, jaw, or back.
2. Shortness of breath - When the heart isn't receiving adequate blood flow, it can't pump blood efficiently to meet the body's demands, leading to shortness of breath during physical activities or at rest.
3. Heart attack - If a piece of plaque ruptures or breaks off in a coronary artery, a blood clot can form and block the artery, causing a heart attack (myocardial infarction). This can damage or destroy part of the heart muscle.
4. Heart failure - Chronic reduced blood flow to the heart muscle can weaken it over time, leading to heart failure, a condition in which the heart can't pump blood efficiently to meet the body's needs.
5. Arrhythmias - Reduced blood flow and damage to the heart muscle can lead to abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly.

Coronary artery disease is typically diagnosed through a combination of medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests such as electrocardiograms (ECGs), stress testing, cardiac catheterization, and imaging studies like coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Treatment options for CAD include lifestyle modifications, medications, medical procedures, and surgery.

"Organs at Risk" (OARs) is a term commonly used in the field of radiation oncology. It refers to normal, vital organs and tissues that are located near a tumor or within the path of a radiation beam during cancer treatment. These structures are at risk of being damaged or injured by the radiation therapy, which can lead to side effects and complications. Examples of OARs include the heart, lungs, spinal cord, brain, kidneys, liver, and intestines. The goal of radiation therapy planning is to maximize the dose delivered to the tumor while minimizing the dose to the surrounding OARs.

"Ambystoma" is a genus of salamanders, also known as the mole salamanders. These amphibians are characterized by their fossorial (burrowing) habits and typically have four limbs, a tail, and moist skin. They are found primarily in North America, with a few species in Asia and Europe. Some well-known members of this genus include the axolotl (A. mexicanum), which is famous for its ability to regenerate lost body parts, and the spotted salamander (A. maculatum). The name "Ambystoma" comes from the Greek words "amblys," meaning blunt, and "stoma," meaning mouth, in reference to the wide, blunt snout of these animals.

Interferometry is not specifically a medical term, but it is used in certain medical fields such as ophthalmology and optics research. Here is a general definition:

Interferometry is a physical method that uses the interference of waves to measure the differences in phase between two or more waves. In other words, it's a technique that combines two or more light waves to create an interference pattern, which can then be analyzed to extract information about the properties of the light waves, such as their wavelength, amplitude, and phase.

In ophthalmology, interferometry is used in devices like wavefront sensors to measure the aberrations in the eye's optical system. By analyzing the interference pattern created by the light passing through the eye, these devices can provide detailed information about the shape and curvature of the cornea and lens, helping doctors to diagnose and treat various vision disorders.

In optics research, interferometry is used to study the properties of light waves and materials that interact with them. By analyzing the interference patterns created by light passing through different materials or devices, researchers can gain insights into their optical properties, such as their refractive index, thickness, and surface roughness.

Photic stimulation is a medical term that refers to the exposure of the eyes to light, specifically repetitive pulses of light, which is used as a method in various research and clinical settings. In neuroscience, it's often used in studies related to vision, circadian rhythms, and brain function.

In a clinical context, photic stimulation is sometimes used in the diagnosis of certain medical conditions such as seizure disorders (like epilepsy). By observing the response of the brain to this light stimulus, doctors can gain valuable insights into the functioning of the brain and the presence of any neurological disorders.

However, it's important to note that photic stimulation should be conducted under the supervision of a trained healthcare professional, as improper use can potentially trigger seizures in individuals who are susceptible to them.

In the context of medicine, particularly in relation to cancer treatment, protons refer to positively charged subatomic particles found in the nucleus of an atom. Proton therapy, a type of radiation therapy, uses a beam of protons to target and destroy cancer cells with high precision, minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The concentrated dose of radiation is delivered directly to the tumor site, reducing side effects and improving quality of life during treatment.

Cis-trans isomeres are molecules that have the same molecular formula and skeletal structure, but differ in the arrangement of their atoms around a double bond. In a cis isomer, the two larger groups or atoms are on the same side of the double bond, while in a trans isomer, they are on opposite sides.

Cis-trans isomerases are enzymes that catalyze the interconversion between cis and trans isomers of various molecules, such as fatty acids, steroids, and retinals. These enzymes play important roles in various biological processes, including membrane fluidity, vision, and the biosynthesis of hormones and other signaling molecules.

Examples of cis-trans isomerases include:

* Fatty acid desaturases, which introduce double bonds into fatty acids and can convert trans isomers to cis isomers
* Retinal isomerases, which interconvert the cis and trans isomers of retinal, a molecule involved in vision
* Steroid isomerases, which catalyze the interconversion of various steroids, including cholesterol and its derivatives.

"Fundus Oculi" is a medical term that refers to the back part of the interior of the eye, including the optic disc, macula, fovea, retinal vasculature, and peripheral retina. It is the area where light is focused and then transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve, forming visual images. Examinations of the fundus oculi are crucial for detecting various eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, glaucoma, and other retinal diseases. The examination is typically performed using an ophthalmoscope or a specialized camera called a retinal camera.

Nerve fibers are specialized structures that constitute the long, slender processes (axons) of neurons (nerve cells). They are responsible for conducting electrical impulses, known as action potentials, away from the cell body and transmitting them to other neurons or effector organs such as muscles and glands. Nerve fibers are often surrounded by supportive cells called glial cells and are grouped together to form nerve bundles or nerves. These fibers can be myelinated (covered with a fatty insulating sheath called myelin) or unmyelinated, which influences the speed of impulse transmission.

Oxygen radioisotopes are unstable isotopes of the element oxygen that emit radiation as they decay to a more stable form. These isotopes can be used in medical imaging and treatment, such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Common oxygen radioisotopes used in medicine include oxygen-15 and oxygen-18. Oxygen-15 has a very short half-life of about 2 minutes, while oxygen-18 has a longer half-life of about 2 hours. These isotopes can be incorporated into molecules such as water or carbon dioxide, which can then be used to study blood flow, metabolism and other physiological processes in the body.

Retinal bipolar cells are a type of neuron located in the inner nuclear layer of the retina, an light-sensitive tissue that lines the interior of the eye. These cells play a crucial role in the visual system by transmitting visual signals from photoreceptors (rods and cones) to ganglion cells, which then relay this information to the brain via the optic nerve.

Bipolar cells have two processes or "arms" that connect to either photoreceptors or ganglion cells: one process receives input from photoreceptors and the other transmits output to ganglion cells. They are called "bipolar" because of this dual connection. These cells can be classified into different types based on their morphology, neurotransmitter usage, and synaptic connections with photoreceptors and ganglion cells.

There are two primary types of retinal bipolar cells: rod bipolar cells and cone bipolar cells. Rod bipolar cells mainly transmit signals from rod photoreceptors, which are responsible for low-light vision, while cone bipolar cells connect to cone photoreceptors that handle color vision and high visual acuity in bright light conditions.

Retinal bipolar cells help process and encode visual information based on contrast, spatial patterns, and temporal changes in light intensity. Their output contributes significantly to the formation of visual perceptions such as brightness, contrast, and motion detection. Dysfunction or damage to retinal bipolar cells can lead to various visual impairments and diseases, including some forms of vision loss.

Fluorescein angiography is a medical diagnostic procedure used in ophthalmology to examine the blood flow in the retina and choroid, which are the inner layers of the eye. This test involves injecting a fluorescent dye, Fluorescein, into a patient's arm vein. As the dye reaches the blood vessels in the eye, a specialized camera takes rapid sequences of photographs to capture the dye's circulation through the retina and choroid.

The images produced by fluorescein angiography can help doctors identify any damage to the blood vessels, leakage, or abnormal growth of new blood vessels. This information is crucial in diagnosing and managing various eye conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, and inflammatory eye diseases.

It's important to note that while fluorescein angiography is a valuable diagnostic tool, it does carry some risks, including temporary side effects like nausea, vomiting, or allergic reactions to the dye. In rare cases, severe adverse reactions can occur, so patients should discuss these potential risks with their healthcare provider before undergoing the procedure.

Retinal horizontal cells are a type of neuron located in the outer retina of the eye, specifically in the inner nuclear layer. These cells receive input from photoreceptors (rods and cones) and provide feedback to them through their extensive lateral connections, forming a neural network that helps in processing visual information.

Horizontal cells have dendrites that branch out and connect with multiple photoreceptor cells. They respond to light by hyperpolarizing, which means they become less excitable when exposed to light. This response is the opposite of photoreceptors, which depolarize (become more excitable) in response to light.

The primary function of retinal horizontal cells is to mediate lateral inhibition, a process that helps sharpen the contrast between adjacent areas of the visual scene. By comparing the signals from neighboring photoreceptors, horizontal cells can enhance the differences in light intensity and help create a more detailed and precise image. This information is then sent to bipolar cells, which relay it further to ganglion cells and ultimately to the brain for visual perception.

Retinal diseases refer to a group of conditions that affect the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. The retina is responsible for converting light into electrical signals that are sent to the brain and interpreted as visual images. Retinal diseases can cause vision loss or even blindness, depending on their severity and location in the retina.

Some common retinal diseases include:

1. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): A progressive disease that affects the central part of the retina called the macula, causing blurred or distorted vision.
2. Diabetic retinopathy: A complication of diabetes that can damage the blood vessels in the retina, leading to vision loss.
3. Retinal detachment: A serious condition where the retina becomes separated from its underlying tissue, requiring immediate medical attention.
4. Macular edema: Swelling or thickening of the macula due to fluid accumulation, which can cause blurred vision.
5. Retinitis pigmentosa: A group of inherited eye disorders that affect the retina's ability to respond to light, causing progressive vision loss.
6. Macular hole: A small break in the macula that can cause distorted or blurry vision.
7. Retinal vein occlusion: Blockage of the retinal veins that can lead to bleeding, swelling, and potential vision loss.

Treatment for retinal diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity. Some treatments include medication, laser therapy, surgery, or a combination of these options. Regular eye exams are essential for early detection and treatment of retinal diseases.

Radiation injuries refer to the damages that occur to living tissues as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. These injuries can be acute, occurring soon after exposure to high levels of radiation, or chronic, developing over a longer period after exposure to lower levels of radiation. The severity and type of injury depend on the dose and duration of exposure, as well as the specific tissues affected.

Acute radiation syndrome (ARS), also known as radiation sickness, is the most severe form of acute radiation injury. It can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, fever, and skin burns. In more severe cases, it can lead to neurological damage, hemorrhage, infection, and death.

Chronic radiation injuries, on the other hand, may not appear until months or even years after exposure. They can cause a range of symptoms, including fatigue, weakness, skin changes, cataracts, reduced fertility, and an increased risk of cancer.

Radiation injuries can be treated with supportive care, such as fluids and electrolytes replacement, antibiotics, wound care, and blood transfusions. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove damaged tissue or control bleeding. Prevention is the best approach to radiation injuries, which includes limiting exposure through proper protective measures and monitoring radiation levels in the environment.

The optic disk, also known as the optic nerve head, is the point where the optic nerve fibers exit the eye and transmit visual information to the brain. It appears as a pale, circular area in the back of the eye, near the center of the retina. The optic disk has no photoreceptor cells (rods and cones), so it is insensitive to light. It is an important structure to observe during eye examinations because changes in its appearance can indicate various ocular diseases or conditions, such as glaucoma, optic neuritis, or papilledema.

Transducin is a G protein found in the rod cells of the retina and plays a crucial role in the visual signal transduction pathway. It is responsible for converting the light-induced isomerization of rhodopsin into a biochemical signal, which ultimately leads to the activation of downstream effectors and the generation of a neural response.

Transducin has three subunits: alpha (Tα), beta (Tβ), and gamma (Tγ). When light activates rhodopsin, it interacts with the Tα subunit, causing it to exchange GDP for GTP and dissociate from the Tβγ complex. The activated Tα then interacts with a downstream effector called phosphodiesterase (PDE), which leads to the hydrolysis of cGMP and the closure of cGMP-gated ion channels in the plasma membrane. This results in the hyperpolarization of the rod cell, which is the initial step in the visual signal transduction pathway.

Overall, transducin is a key player in the conversion of light energy into neural signals, allowing us to see and perceive our visual world.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Cerebrovascular circulation refers to the network of blood vessels that supply oxygenated blood and nutrients to the brain tissue, and remove waste products. It includes the internal carotid arteries, vertebral arteries, circle of Willis, and the intracranial arteries that branch off from them.

The internal carotid arteries and vertebral arteries merge to form the circle of Willis, a polygonal network of vessels located at the base of the brain. The anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery, posterior cerebral artery, and communicating arteries are the major vessels that branch off from the circle of Willis and supply blood to different regions of the brain.

Interruptions or abnormalities in the cerebrovascular circulation can lead to various neurological conditions such as stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), and vascular dementia.

Bronchography is a medical imaging technique that involves the injection of a contrast material into the airways (bronchi) of the lungs, followed by X-ray imaging to produce detailed pictures of the bronchial tree. This diagnostic procedure was commonly used in the past to identify abnormalities such as narrowing, blockages, or inflammation in the airways, but it has largely been replaced by newer, less invasive techniques like computed tomography (CT) scans and bronchoscopy.

The process of bronchography involves the following steps:

1. The patient is sedated or given a local anesthetic to minimize discomfort during the procedure.
2. A radiopaque contrast material is introduced into the bronchi through a catheter that is inserted into the trachea, either via a nostril or through a small incision in the neck.
3. Once the contrast material has been distributed throughout the bronchial tree, X-ray images are taken from various angles to capture detailed views of the airways.
4. The images are then analyzed by a radiologist to identify any abnormalities or irregularities in the structure and function of the bronchi.

Although bronchography is considered a relatively safe procedure, it does carry some risks, including allergic reactions to the contrast material, infection, and bleeding. Additionally, the use of ionizing radiation during X-ray imaging should be carefully weighed against the potential benefits of the procedure.

Lung neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the lung tissue. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant lung neoplasms are further classified into two main types: small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung neoplasms can cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and weight loss. They are often caused by smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, but can also occur due to genetic factors, radiation exposure, and other environmental carcinogens. Early detection and treatment of lung neoplasms is crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

Dose fractionation is a medical term that refers to the practice of dividing the total dose of radiation therapy or chemotherapy into smaller doses, which are given over a longer period. This approach allows for the delivery of a higher total dose of treatment while minimizing damage to healthy tissues and reducing side effects.

In radiation therapy, fractionation is used to target cancer cells while sparing surrounding normal tissues. By delivering smaller doses of radiation over several treatments, healthy tissue has time to recover between treatments, reducing the risk of complications. The number and size of fractions can vary depending on the type and location of the tumor, as well as other factors such as the patient's overall health.

Similarly, in chemotherapy, dose fractionation is used to maximize the effectiveness of the treatment while minimizing toxicity. By administering smaller doses of chemotherapy over time, the body has a chance to recover between treatments, reducing side effects and allowing for higher total doses to be given. The schedule and duration of chemotherapy fractionation may vary depending on the type of drug used, the type and stage of cancer, and other factors.

Overall, dose fractionation is an important technique in both radiation therapy and chemotherapy that allows for more effective treatment while minimizing harm to healthy tissues.

Rhodopsin, also known as visual purple, is a light-sensitive pigment found in the rods of the vertebrate retina. It is a complex protein molecule made up of two major components: an opsin protein and retinal, a form of vitamin A. When light hits the retinal in rhodopsin, it changes shape, which initiates a series of chemical reactions leading to the activation of the visual pathway and ultimately results in vision. This process is known as phototransduction. Rhodopsin plays a crucial role in low-light vision or scotopic vision.

Acoustics is a branch of physics that deals with the study of sound, its production, transmission, and effects. In a medical context, acoustics may refer to the use of sound waves in medical procedures such as:

1. Diagnostic ultrasound: This technique uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of internal organs and tissues. It is commonly used during pregnancy to monitor fetal development, but it can also be used to diagnose a variety of medical conditions, including heart disease, cancer, and musculoskeletal injuries.
2. Therapeutic ultrasound: This technique uses low-frequency sound waves to promote healing and reduce pain and inflammation in muscles, tendons, and ligaments. It is often used to treat soft tissue injuries, arthritis, and other musculoskeletal conditions.
3. Otology: Acoustics also plays a crucial role in the field of otology, which deals with the study and treatment of hearing and balance disorders. The shape, size, and movement of the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear all affect how sound waves are transmitted and perceived. Abnormalities in any of these structures can lead to hearing loss, tinnitus, or balance problems.

In summary, acoustics is an important field of study in medicine that has applications in diagnosis, therapy, and the understanding of various medical conditions related to sound and hearing.

An electron is a subatomic particle, symbol e-, with a negative electric charge. Electrons are fundamental components of atoms and are responsible for the chemical bonding between atoms to form molecules. They are located in an atom's electron cloud, which is the outermost region of an atom and contains negatively charged electrons that surround the positively charged nucleus.

Electrons have a mass that is much smaller than that of protons or neutrons, making them virtually weightless on the atomic scale. They are also known to exhibit both particle-like and wave-like properties, which is a fundamental concept in quantum mechanics. Electrons play a crucial role in various physical phenomena, such as electricity, magnetism, and chemical reactions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Goldfish" is not a term used in medical definitions. Goldfish are small domesticated fish that are often kept as pets. They belong to the family Cyprinidae and the genus Carassius. The most common species of goldfish is Carassius auratus. If you have any questions about goldfish or their care, I might be able to help with some general information, but for specific medical concerns, it would be best to consult a veterinarian.

Refractometry is a medical laboratory technique used to measure the refractive index of a substance, typically a liquid. The refractive index is the ratio of the speed of light in a vacuum to its speed in the substance being measured. In a clinical setting, refractometry is often used to determine the concentration of total solids in a fluid, such as urine or serum, by measuring the angle at which light passes through the sample. This information can be useful in the diagnosis and monitoring of various medical conditions, including dehydration, kidney disease, and diabetes. Refractometry is also used in the field of optometry to measure the refractive error of the eye, or the amount and type of correction needed to provide clear vision.

Film dosimetry is a method used in radiation therapy to measure the distribution and amount of radiation absorbed by a material or tissue. This is achieved through the use of special photographic films that undergo physical and chemical changes when exposed to ionizing radiation. The changes in the film's optical density, which can be quantified using a densitometer or a film scanner, are directly proportional to the absorbed dose.

The films used in film dosimetry have a sensitive layer composed of silver halide crystals suspended in a gelatin matrix. When exposed to radiation, these crystals undergo a process called "fogging," where some of the silver ions are reduced to silver atoms, creating microscopic specks of metallic silver that scatter light and cause the film to darken. By comparing the optical density of an irradiated film to that of a calibration curve, which relates optical density to absorbed dose for a specific film type and energy, the absorbed dose can be accurately determined.

Film dosimetry has several advantages, including its high spatial resolution, wide dynamic range, and ability to provide 2D or even 3D dose distributions. However, it also has some limitations, such as its energy dependence, non-negligible inherent noise, and the need for careful handling and processing. Despite these challenges, film dosimetry remains a valuable tool in radiation therapy for applications like quality assurance, treatment planning, and dosimeter calibration.

Light signal transduction is a biological process that refers to the way in which cells convert light signals into chemical or electrical responses. This process typically involves several components, including a light-sensitive receptor (such as a photopigment), a signaling molecule (like a G-protein or calcium ion), and an effector protein that triggers a downstream response.

In the visual system, for example, light enters the eye and activates photoreceptor cells in the retina. These cells contain a light-sensitive pigment called rhodopsin, which undergoes a chemical change when struck by a photon of light. This change triggers a cascade of signaling events that ultimately lead to the transmission of visual information to the brain.

Light signal transduction is also involved in other biological processes, such as the regulation of circadian rhythms and the synthesis of vitamin D. In these cases, specialized cells contain light-sensitive receptors that allow them to detect changes in ambient light levels and adjust their physiology accordingly.

Overall, light signal transduction is a critical mechanism by which organisms are able to sense and respond to their environment.

Arrestin is a type of protein that plays a crucial role in regulating the signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells. These receptors are involved in various cellular responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and other signaling molecules.

When a signaling molecule binds to a GPCR, it activates the receptor and triggers a cascade of intracellular events, including the activation of G proteins. Arrestin binds to the activated GPCR and prevents further interaction with G proteins, effectively turning off the signal.

There are two main types of arrestins: visual arrestin (or rod arrestin) and non-visual arrestins (which include β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2). Visual arrestin is primarily found in the retina and plays a role in regulating the light-sensitive proteins rhodopsin and cone opsin. Non-visual arrestins, on the other hand, are expressed throughout the body and regulate various GPCRs involved in diverse physiological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and migration.

By modulating GPCR signaling, arrestins help maintain proper cellular function and prevent overactivation of signaling pathways that could lead to disease. Dysregulation of arrestin function has been implicated in various pathologies, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological disorders.

Urodela is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in the field of biology. It refers to a group of amphibians commonly known as newts and salamanders. These creatures are characterized by their slender bodies, moist skin, and four legs. They undergo a process of metamorphosis during their development, transitioning from an aquatic larval stage to a terrestrial adult stage.

While not a medical term itself, understanding the biology and ecology of Urodela can be relevant in fields such as environmental health and toxicology, where these animals may serve as indicators of ecosystem health or potential subjects for studying the effects of pollutants on living organisms.

Visual fields refer to the total area in which objects can be seen while keeping the eyes focused on a central point. It is the entire area that can be observed using peripheral (side) vision while the eye gazes at a fixed point. A visual field test is used to detect blind spots or gaps (scotomas) in a person's vision, which could indicate various medical conditions such as glaucoma, retinal damage, optic nerve disease, brain tumors, or strokes. The test measures both the central and peripheral vision and maps the entire area that can be seen when focusing on a single point.

Prognosis is a medical term that refers to the prediction of the likely outcome or course of a disease, including the chances of recovery or recurrence, based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. It is an important aspect of clinical decision-making and patient communication, as it helps doctors and patients make informed decisions about treatment options, set realistic expectations, and plan for future care.

Prognosis can be expressed in various ways, such as percentages, categories (e.g., good, fair, poor), or survival rates, depending on the nature of the disease and the available evidence. However, it is important to note that prognosis is not an exact science and may vary depending on individual factors, such as age, overall health status, and response to treatment. Therefore, it should be used as a guide rather than a definitive forecast.

Incidental findings are diagnoses or conditions that are discovered unintentionally while evaluating a patient for a different condition or symptom. These findings are not related to the primary reason for the medical examination, investigation, or procedure. They can occur in various contexts such as radiology studies, laboratory tests, or physical examinations.

Incidental findings can sometimes lead to further evaluation and management, depending on their nature and potential clinical significance. However, they also pose challenges related to communication, informed consent, and potential patient anxiety or harm. Therefore, it is essential to have clear guidelines for managing incidental findings in clinical practice.

The term "Theoretical Models" is used in various scientific fields, including medicine, to describe a representation of a complex system or phenomenon. It is a simplified framework that explains how different components of the system interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall behavior of the system. Theoretical models are often used in medical research to understand and predict the outcomes of diseases, treatments, or public health interventions.

A theoretical model can take many forms, such as mathematical equations, computer simulations, or conceptual diagrams. It is based on a set of assumptions and hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms that drive the system. By manipulating these variables and observing the effects on the model's output, researchers can test their assumptions and generate new insights into the system's behavior.

Theoretical models are useful for medical research because they allow scientists to explore complex systems in a controlled and systematic way. They can help identify key drivers of disease or treatment outcomes, inform the design of clinical trials, and guide the development of new interventions. However, it is important to recognize that theoretical models are simplifications of reality and may not capture all the nuances and complexities of real-world systems. Therefore, they should be used in conjunction with other forms of evidence, such as experimental data and observational studies, to inform medical decision-making.

Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) is a type of electron microscopy where the sample is studied at cryogenic temperatures, typically liquid nitrogen temperatures. This technique is used to investigate the structure and shape of biological molecules and complexes, viruses, and other nanoscale particles.

In Cryo-EM, the sample is rapidly frozen to preserve its natural structure and then imaged using a beam of electrons. The images are collected at different angles and then computationally combined to generate a 3D reconstruction of the sample. This technique allows researchers to visualize biological structures in their native environment with near-atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their function and behavior.

Cryo-EM has become an increasingly popular tool in structural biology due to its ability to image large and complex structures that are difficult or impossible to crystallize for X-ray crystallography. It has been used to determine the structures of many important biological molecules, including membrane proteins, ribosomes, viruses, and protein complexes involved in various cellular processes.

Coronary vessels refer to the network of blood vessels that supply oxygenated blood and nutrients to the heart muscle, also known as the myocardium. The two main coronary arteries are the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery.

The left main coronary artery branches off into the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and the left circumflex artery (LCx). The LAD supplies blood to the front of the heart, while the LCx supplies blood to the side and back of the heart.

The right coronary artery supplies blood to the right lower part of the heart, including the right atrium and ventricle, as well as the back of the heart.

Coronary vessel disease (CVD) occurs when these vessels become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of plaque, leading to reduced blood flow to the heart muscle. This can result in chest pain, shortness of breath, or a heart attack.

Neoplasm staging is a systematic process used in medicine to describe the extent of spread of a cancer, including the size and location of the original (primary) tumor and whether it has metastasized (spread) to other parts of the body. The most widely accepted system for this purpose is the TNM classification system developed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC).

In this system, T stands for tumor, and it describes the size and extent of the primary tumor. N stands for nodes, and it indicates whether the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes. M stands for metastasis, and it shows whether the cancer has spread to distant parts of the body.

Each letter is followed by a number that provides more details about the extent of the disease. For example, a T1N0M0 cancer means that the primary tumor is small and has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or distant sites. The higher the numbers, the more advanced the cancer.

Staging helps doctors determine the most appropriate treatment for each patient and estimate the patient's prognosis. It is an essential tool for communication among members of the healthcare team and for comparing outcomes of treatments in clinical trials.

Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotides, which are important second messengers in various cellular signaling pathways. Among the different types of PDEs, type 6 (PDE6) is specifically expressed in the photoreceptor cells of the retina and is involved in the visual signal transduction cascade.

PDE6 is composed of two catalytic subunits, PDE6α and PDE6β, which are arranged in a heterodimeric complex. These subunits have distinct roles in the enzyme's activity: PDE6α contains the catalytic site that hydrolyzes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) to GMP, while PDE6β regulates the activity of PDE6α through its inhibitory γ subunit.

In the visual signal transduction pathway, light stimulation leads to the activation of rhodopsin, which triggers a cascade of events that ultimately results in the hydrolysis of cGMP by PDE6. This reduction in cGMP levels causes the closure of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the plasma membrane, leading to hyperpolarization of the photoreceptor cells and the transmission of visual signals to the brain.

Defects in PDE6 have been implicated in various retinal disorders, including congenital stationary night blindness, retinitis pigmentosa, and age-related macular degeneration. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of PDE6 is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these vision-threatening diseases.

Ultrasonics is a branch of physics and acoustics that deals with the study and application of sound waves with frequencies higher than the upper limit of human hearing, typically 20 kilohertz or above. In the field of medicine, ultrasonics is commonly used in diagnostic and therapeutic applications through the use of medical ultrasound.

Diagnostic medical ultrasound, also known as sonography, uses high-frequency sound waves to produce images of internal organs, tissues, and bodily structures. A transducer probe emits and receives sound waves that bounce off body structures and reflect back to the probe, creating echoes that are then processed into an image. This technology is widely used in various medical specialties, such as obstetrics and gynecology, cardiology, radiology, and vascular medicine, to diagnose a range of conditions and monitor the health of organs and tissues.

Therapeutic ultrasound, on the other hand, uses lower-frequency sound waves to generate heat within body tissues, promoting healing, increasing local blood flow, and reducing pain and inflammation. This modality is often used in physical therapy and rehabilitation settings to treat soft tissue injuries, joint pain, and musculoskeletal disorders.

In summary, ultrasonics in medicine refers to the use of high-frequency sound waves for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, providing valuable information about internal body structures and facilitating healing processes.

Radiologic technology is a medical term that refers to the use of imaging technologies to diagnose and treat diseases. It involves the application of various forms of radiation, such as X-rays, magnetic fields, sound waves, and radioactive substances, to create detailed images of the internal structures of the body.

Radiologic technologists are healthcare professionals who operate the imaging equipment and work closely with radiologists, who are medical doctors specializing in interpreting medical images. Radiologic technology includes various imaging modalities such as:

1. X-ray radiography: produces images of internal structures by passing X-rays through the body onto a detector.
2. Computed tomography (CT): uses X-rays to create detailed cross-sectional images of the body.
3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of internal structures without using radiation.
4. Ultrasound: uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of internal structures, such as fetuses during pregnancy or organs like the heart and liver.
5. Nuclear medicine: uses small amounts of radioactive substances to diagnose and treat diseases by creating detailed images of the body's internal structures and functions.

Radiologic technology plays a crucial role in modern medicine, enabling healthcare providers to make accurate diagnoses, plan treatments, and monitor patient progress.

Anatomic models are three-dimensional representations of body structures used for educational, training, or demonstration purposes. They can be made from various materials such as plastic, wax, or rubber and may depict the entire body or specific regions, organs, or systems. These models can be used to provide a visual aid for understanding anatomy, physiology, and pathology, and can be particularly useful in situations where actual human specimens are not available or practical to use. They may also be used for surgical planning and rehearsal, as well as in medical research and product development.

A chick embryo refers to the developing organism that arises from a fertilized chicken egg. It is often used as a model system in biological research, particularly during the stages of development when many of its organs and systems are forming and can be easily observed and manipulated. The study of chick embryos has contributed significantly to our understanding of various aspects of developmental biology, including gastrulation, neurulation, organogenesis, and pattern formation. Researchers may use various techniques to observe and manipulate the chick embryo, such as surgical alterations, cell labeling, and exposure to drugs or other agents.

Radiobiology is the scientific study of the effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms, including both normal tissue and tumors. It encompasses the investigation of the biological responses to various types and doses of radiation, as well as the mechanisms behind these reactions at molecular, cellular, tissue, and systemic levels. The knowledge gained from radiobiology is crucial for optimizing radiation therapy in cancer treatment, setting radiation safety standards, and understanding the biological consequences of radiation exposure in diagnostic and occupational settings.

Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are a type of ion channel found in the membranes of certain cells, particularly in the sensory neurons of the visual and olfactory systems. They are called cyclic nucleotide-gated because they can be activated or regulated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), to the intracellular domain of the channel.

CNG channels are permeable to cations, including sodium (Na+) and calcium (Ca2+) ions, and their activation allows these ions to flow into the cell. This influx of cations can trigger a variety of cellular responses, such as the initiation of visual or olfactory signaling pathways.

CNG channels are composed of four subunits that form a functional channel. Each subunit has a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) in its intracellular region, which can bind to cyclic nucleotides and regulate the opening and closing of the channel. The CNBD is connected to the pore-forming region of the channel by a flexible linker, allowing for conformational changes in the CNBD to be transmitted to the pore and modulate ion conductance.

CNG channels play important roles in various physiological processes, including sensory perception, neurotransmission, and cellular signaling. Dysfunction of CNG channels has been implicated in several human diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa, congenital stationary night blindness, and cystic fibrosis.

The retinal photoreceptor cells, namely rods and cones, are specialized neurons in the retina responsible for converting light into electrical signals that can be processed by the brain. The outer segment of a retinal photoreceptor cell is the portion of the cell where phototransduction primarily occurs. It contains stacks of disc-like structures filled with the visual pigment rhodopsin, which absorbs light and initiates the conversion process.

The outer segment is continuously renewed through a process called shedding and phagocytosis, in which the oldest discs at the base of the outer segment are shed, engulfed by the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, and degraded. This turnover helps maintain the sensitivity and functionality of the photoreceptor cells.

In summary, the retinal photoreceptor cell outer segment is a highly specialized compartment where light absorption and initial signal transduction occur in rods and cones, supported by continuous renewal through shedding and phagocytosis.

Angiography is a medical procedure in which an x-ray image is taken to visualize the internal structure of blood vessels, arteries, or veins. This is done by injecting a radiopaque contrast agent (dye) into the blood vessel using a thin, flexible catheter. The dye makes the blood vessels visible on an x-ray image, allowing doctors to diagnose and treat various medical conditions such as blockages, narrowing, or malformations of the blood vessels.

There are several types of angiography, including:

* Cardiac angiography (also called coronary angiography) - used to examine the blood vessels of the heart
* Cerebral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels of the brain
* Peripheral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels in the limbs or other parts of the body.

Angiography is typically performed by a radiologist, cardiologist, or vascular surgeon in a hospital setting. It can help diagnose conditions such as coronary artery disease, aneurysms, and peripheral arterial disease, among others.

Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) is a group of inherited retinal degenerative disorders that affect the development and function of the retina, a light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. It is characterized by severe visual impairment or blindness from birth or early infancy.

The condition is caused by mutations in various genes involved in the normal functioning of photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) in the retina, which are responsible for capturing light and transmitting visual signals to the brain. As a result, the photoreceptors fail to develop properly or degenerate over time, leading to vision loss.

Symptoms of LCA may include roving eye movements (nystagmus), lack of fixation, decreased or absent response to light, and abnormal pupillary reflexes. Some individuals with LCA may also have other ocular abnormalities such as keratoconus, cataracts, or glaucoma.

LCA is typically inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) to develop the condition. Currently, there is no cure for LCA, but various treatments such as gene therapy and assistive devices may help improve visual function and quality of life for affected individuals.

Pseudopodia are temporary projections or extensions of the cytoplasm in certain types of cells, such as white blood cells (leukocytes) and some amoebas. They are used for locomotion and engulfing particles or other cells through a process called phagocytosis.

In simpler terms, pseudopodia are like "false feet" that some cells use to move around and interact with their environment. The term comes from the Greek words "pseudes," meaning false, and "podos," meaning foot.

A Solitary Pulmonary Nodule (SPN) is a single, round or oval-shaped lung shadow that measures up to 3 cm in diameter on a chest radiograph. It is also known as a "coin lesion" due to its appearance. SPNs are usually discovered incidentally during routine chest X-rays or CT scans. They can be benign or malignant, and their nature is determined through further diagnostic tests such as PET scans, biopsies, or follow-up imaging studies.

Combined modality therapy (CMT) is a medical treatment approach that utilizes more than one method or type of therapy simultaneously or in close succession, with the goal of enhancing the overall effectiveness of the treatment. In the context of cancer care, CMT often refers to the combination of two or more primary treatment modalities, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and systemic therapies (chemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, etc.).

The rationale behind using combined modality therapy is that each treatment method can target cancer cells in different ways, potentially increasing the likelihood of eliminating all cancer cells and reducing the risk of recurrence. The specific combination and sequence of treatments will depend on various factors, including the type and stage of cancer, patient's overall health, and individual preferences.

For example, a common CMT approach for locally advanced rectal cancer may involve preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemoradiation therapy, followed by surgery to remove the tumor, and then postoperative (adjuvant) chemotherapy. This combined approach allows for the reduction of the tumor size before surgery, increases the likelihood of complete tumor removal, and targets any remaining microscopic cancer cells with systemic chemotherapy.

It is essential to consult with a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals to determine the most appropriate CMT plan for each individual patient, considering both the potential benefits and risks associated with each treatment method.

Organotechnetium compounds are chemical substances that contain carbon-technetium bonds, where technetium is an element with the symbol Tc and atomic number 43. These types of compounds are primarily used in medical imaging as radioactive tracers due to the ability of technetium-99m to emit gamma rays. The organotechnetium compounds help in localizing specific organs, tissues, or functions within the body, making them useful for diagnostic purposes in nuclear medicine.

It is important to note that most organotechnetium compounds are synthesized from technetium-99m, which is generated from the decay of molybdenum-99. The use of these compounds requires proper handling and administration by trained medical professionals due to their radioactive nature.

Thallium radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes or variants of the element thallium (Tl), which decays and emits radiation. Thallium has several radioisotopes, with the most commonly used being thallium-201 (^201Tl). This radioisotope is used in medical imaging, specifically in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, to evaluate blood flow to the heart muscle. It decays by electron capture and emits gamma radiation with a half-life of 73 hours, making it suitable for diagnostic procedures.

It's important to note that handling and using radioisotopes require proper training and safety measures due to their ionizing radiation properties.

Retinaldehyde, also known as retinal, is a form of vitamin A that is essential for vision. It is the aldehyde form of retinol (vitamin A alcohol) and is involved in the visual cycle, where it plays a crucial role in the process of converting light into electrical signals that are sent to the brain.

When light hits the retina, it activates a protein called rhodopsin, which contains retinaldehyde as one of its components. This activation causes a chemical change in retinaldehyde, leading to the generation of an electrical signal that is transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve.

Retinaldehyde is also involved in other physiological processes, including the regulation of gene expression and cell growth and differentiation. It can be synthesized in the body from beta-carotene, a pigment found in fruits and vegetables, or obtained directly from animal sources such as liver, fish liver oil, and dairy products.

... (or CBCT, also referred to as C-arm CT, cone beam volume CT, flat panel CT or Digital Volume ... due to the computationally demanding cone beam reconstruction algorithms. Computed tomography Cone beam reconstruction ... "Cone Beam-Computed Tomography in Endodontics" (PDF). www.aae.org. Summer 2011. Retrieved October 21, 2019. New AAOMR Guidelines ... Siewerdsen, Jeffrey (2019). "Cone-Beam CT Systems". In Samei, Ehsan; Pelc, Norbert (eds.). Computed Tomography: Approaches, ...
Computed tomography Industrial CT scanning Tomographic reconstruction Chris C. Shaw (14 February 2014). Cone Beam Computed ... cone beam reconstruction is one of two common scanning methods, the other being Fan beam reconstruction. Cone beam ... The method is referred to as cone-beam reconstruction because the X-rays are emitted from the source as a cone-shaped beam. In ... Instead of utilizing a single row of detectors, as fan beam methods do, a cone beam systems uses a standard charge-coupled ...
Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Semin Orthod 2009;15:1-84. Lemke HU, Vannier MW, Inamura K, Farman AG, Doi K (editors). Computer ... Farman is founder and chair of the International Congress on Computed Maxillofacial Imaging (CMI) that has its 17th Annual ...
Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is useful in diagnosing DI. It provides clinicians a detailed 3D image and could aid ... "Diagnosis and endodontic treatment of type II dens invaginatus by using cone-beam computed tomography and splint guides for ...
2017). "Comparison of gray values of cone-beam computed tomography with hounsfield units of multislice computed tomography: An ... Cone beam computed tomography: Bone density and the Hounsfield scale. Diagnostic radiology physics: a handbook for teachers and ... HU-based differentiation of material applies to medical-grade dual-energy CT scans but not to cone beam computed tomography ( ... De Vos, W.; Casselman, J.; Swennen, G.R.J. (June 2009). "Cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) imaging of the oral and ...
"Incidental Soft Tissue Calcifications in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Images". Turkiye Klinikleri Journal of Dental Sciences. ...
"The measurement of proton stopping power using proton-cone-beam computed tomography". Physics in Medicine and Biology. IOP ... Proton computed tomography (pCT), or proton CT, is an imaging modality first proposed by Cormack in 1963 and initial experiment ... Proton computed tomography (pCT) uses measurements of a proton's position/trajectory and energy before and after traversing an ... 1981-11-01). "Computed tomography using proton energy loss". Physics in Medicine and Biology. IOP Publishing. 26 (6): 965-983. ...
Radiation Oncology: Medical imaging, 4D Cone beam computed tomography, 4D MRI. Radiology: Computer-Aided Diagnosis, Distributed ... and Ubiquitous computing. Motai has two children, Yamato and Yurika. Robotics Machine Learning Data Science Medical Imaging " ... Fundamentals of robotic vision and data-intensive computing. Adaptive Prediction: Kalman filter bank, Optimized prediction, ...
Patel, S.; Brown, J.; Pimentel, T.; Kelly, R. D.; Abella, F.; Durack, C. (2019). "Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics ...
Mah, P.; Reeves, T. E.; McDavid, W. D. (2010). "Deriving Hounsfield units using grey levels in cone beam computed tomography". ... Cybermed has become the first in the world to introduce cone beam CT image processing software as well as first in Korea to ... "Anthropometric analysis of maxillary anterior buccal bone of Korean adults using cone-beam CT". The Journal of Advanced ...
... cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computed tomography (CT) data sets. The purpose of the tool is to make it easy for ... "Image analysis and superimposition of 3-dimensional cone beam computed tomography models". American Journal of Orthodontics and ...
Allison, J.R.; Carr, A. (November 2017). "A prevalence study of bifid mandibular canals using cone beam computed tomography". ... "Assessment of bifid and trifid mandibular canals using cone-beam computed tomography". Imaging Science in Dentistry. 44 (3): ... "Prevalence and characteristics of accessory mandibular canals in an eastern Chinese population by cone beam computed tomography ...
"Cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel imager: Initial performance characterization". Medical Physics. American ...
CT scan Industrial radiography Cone beam computed tomography, applications in quality control and metrology. PCB reverse ... Industrial computed tomography (CT) scanning is any computer-aided tomographic process, usually X-ray computed tomography, that ... computed tomography). Line beam scanning is the traditional process of industrial CT scanning. X-rays are produced and the beam ... In cone beam scanning, the part to be scanned is placed on a rotary table. As the part rotates, the cone of X-rays produce a ...
For diagnosis of the TMJ, Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can also be useful. Treatment is frequently by means of removal ...
Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), also known as digital volume tomography (DVT), is a special type of X-ray technology that ... Estrela C, Bueno MR, Leles CR, Azevedo B, Azevedo JR (March 2008). "Accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic and ... Jacobs R, Salmon B, Codari M, Hassan B, Bornstein MM (May 2018). "Cone beam computed tomography in implant dentistry: ... Pelekos G, Acharya A, Tonetti MS, Bornstein MM (May 2018). "Diagnostic performance of cone beam computed tomography in ...
"Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner". Physics in Medicine and Biology ... The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is a commonly used radiation exposure index in X-ray computed tomography (CT), first ... "A method for describing the doses delivered by transmission x-ray computed tomography". Medical Physics. 8 (4): 488-495. ... Because CT scanners typically acquire multiple slices during a single rotation with a single beam, the CTDI is calculated by ...
Shukla, S; Chug, A; Afrashtehfar, K. I (2017). "Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis and Treatment Planning in ... Newer technologies are available (e.g. cone-beam CT scanning) that allow more efficient, scientific measurements to be taken of ... The standard endodontic technique involves inserting a gutta-percha cone (a "point") into the cleaned-out root canal along with ...
Using cone beam computed tomography, the patient and the existing prosthesis are being scanned. Furthermore, the prosthesis ... Image-guided surgery and CAS in ENT commonly consists of navigating preoperative image data such as CT or cone beam CT to ... Intraoperative navigation in the maxillofacial area based on 3D imaging obtained by a cone-beam device. Int J Oral Maxillofac ... Where necessary, the transition of the gold cone caps to the mucosa can be isolated with rubber dam rings. The new prosthesis ...
"Designing a novel dental root analogue implant using cone beam computed tomography and CAD/CAM technology". Clinical Oral ... "Anatomic Customization of Root-Analog Dental Implants With Cone-Beam CT and CAD/CAM Fabrication: A Cadaver-Based Pilot ...
The most ideal way to evaluate the bone is by a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. The All-on-4 protocol is for at ...
In special instances, Cone beam computed tomography is preferable to measure the sinus's height and width, and to rule out any ... and postoperative assessment of sinus grafting procedures using cone-beam computed tomography compared with panoramic ...
Now, with the introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), it is possible to view root fractures three-dimensionally. ...
A Cone-beam Computed Tomography Study". Journal of Endodontics. 42 (4): 538-41. doi:10.1016/j.joen.2015.12.026. PMID 26873567. ... Recent studies have shown that use of cone-down CT scans can detect accessory canals that would have been missed in 23% of ...
An example of IGRT would include comparison of a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) dataset, acquired on the treatment ... Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) based image guided systems have been integrated with medical linear accelerators to great ... Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) is a medical imaging technique that uses the Megavoltage range of X-rays to create an ... Cone beam CT acquires many projections over the entire volume of interest in each projection. Using reconstruction strategies ...
2017). Isolated tympanic plate fracture detected by cone-beam computed tomography: report of four cases with review of ... "The identification of mandible fractures by helical computed tomography and panorex tomography". The Journal of Craniofacial ... Computed tomography is the most sensitive and specific of the imaging techniques. The facial bones can be visualized as slices ... Research has shown that panoramic radiography is similar to computed tomography in its diagnostic accuracy for mandible ...
... of root anatomy of permanent mandibular premolars and molars in a Korean population with cone-beam computed tomography." ...
Industrial CT Scanning Radiology Computed Tomography Medical Imaging Cone beam reconstruction Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental ... The x-ray beam used in volume CT is cone shaped, in contrast to the fan shaped beam of the regular CT scanner. This cone shape ... Flat-panel Volume CT is a technique under development to make computed tomography images with improved performance (in ... allows the beam to cover the two-dimensional detector panel. ... Tomography, All stub articles, Medical imaging stubs). ...
A cone-beam computed tomography study in a northern Taiwanese population". Journal of Dental Sciences. 13 (2): 138-144. doi: ...
Intraoperative acquisition of a cone beam computed tomography image can also be used to reconstruct three dimensional CT-like ... Among the former is beam hardening. Among the latter are frame rate settings, pulsed fluoroscopy and collimation. Beam ... X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. These imaging devices enable minimally- ... It is not possible to perform surgery in a regular magnetic resonance tomography room. Thus for step 2, there are two ways to ...
Cone beam computed tomography (or CBCT, also referred to as C-arm CT, cone beam volume CT, flat panel CT or Digital Volume ... due to the computationally demanding cone beam reconstruction algorithms. Computed tomography Cone beam reconstruction ... "Cone Beam-Computed Tomography in Endodontics" (PDF). www.aae.org. Summer 2011. Retrieved October 21, 2019. New AAOMR Guidelines ... Siewerdsen, Jeffrey (2019). "Cone-Beam CT Systems". In Samei, Ehsan; Pelc, Norbert (eds.). Computed Tomography: Approaches, ...
Learn about Image Acquisition and Reconstruction from Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Applications in Dentistry dental CE ... and the cone-shaped x-ray beam is directed through the center of the area of interest. The beam and the receptor rotate ...
1503 Measurement of Bone Volume Changes Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Saturday, March 24, 2012: 9:45 a.m. - 11 a.m. ... We hypothesized that three-dimensional models created from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans could be used to ... Keywords: Bone, Computers, Cone-beam CT, Digital image analysis and Periodontics See more of: Periodontal Disease Diagnosis and ...
Cone beam computed tomography in periodontics Clinical images provided by Dr. Bruno Azevedo, Assistant Professor, images taken ... Cone beam computed tomography in oral surgery. *Cone beam computed tomography in implantology ... A small volume cone beam CT of the left posterior maxilla was acquired with the Veraviewepocs 3D R100. The sagittal and coronal ...
... age and gender using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: A retrospective study using CBCT images was performed to ... Cone beam computed tomography is an effective imaging modality in the detection of lingual foramina and canals. Further studies ... age and gender using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).. Methods: A retrospective study using CBCT images was performed to ... of Anatomical Characteristics of Mandibular Incisive Canal in a Turkish Subpopulation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography ...
Lorenzoni et al., 2012: 1-10). Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) was introduced to the dental profession in early 2000s and ... represented a convenient alternative to the higher radiation dose Medical Computed Tomography (CT) to be used as a dental ... The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) by dentists for diagnostic purposes in South Africa. Ethical and legal issues. ... Lorenzoni et al., 2012: 1-10). Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) was introduced to the dental profession in early 2000s and ...
Explain how cone beam computed tomography works.. *Outline the basic principles of cone beam computed tomography, including ... Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new technology recently introduced and evolved into dentistry. The need for 3- ... Describe what cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is and what its role is in dentistry. ... They can be used in treatment planning, but it is essential to know cone beam computed tomography indications and ...
Distinctive Dentistry offers Cone Beam Computed Tomography to access the precise, analytical information, enhanced diagnoses ... Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Get the Most Precise Diagnosis with CAT (CT) Scans. ... The Cone Beam CT Scan (CBCT scan) is the latest type of CT scan, requiring even lower doses of radiation than conventional ... A CAT scan (Computerized Axial Tomography), also commonly referred to as a CT scan, produces enhanced, three-dimensional, cross ...
Looking for a Dental Clinic in Ghatkopar East who can provide Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)? look no further than Bombay ... Cone-beam computed tomography systems (CBCT) are a variant of conventional computed tomography (CT) systems. Cone-beam CT is ... including cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Hence, book an appointment today so that you can take advantage of the best ... "cone-beam computed tomography." These aid in reconstructing a three-dimensional image of the patients anatomy, particularly ...
Palavras-chave : Tomography; Diagnostic Imaging; Cone-Beam Computed Tomography. · resumo em Português · texto em Espanhol · pdf ... SANTOS, Thiago de Santana et al. The use of cone beam computed tomography in dentistry. Odontol. Clín.-Cient. (Online) [online ... "Beam Computed Tomography Volumetric, bringing many advantages over conventional tomography and medical, resulting in changes in ... Therefore, the objective of this work is to inform the reader about the computed tomography beam volume, emphasizing the ...
Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Market Past Data, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Market Share, Cone Beam Computed ... Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Market Facts, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Market Forecast, Cone Beam Computed ... Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Market Future Scope, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Market Growth Rate, Cone Beam ... Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Market Insights, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Market Leading Players, Cone Beam ...
Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a way for medical professionals to learn more about the anatomy of your face. The ... When Do I Need Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)? - ... Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a way for medical ... When Do I Need Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)? November 21, 2022. /0 Comments/in CBCT /by Dr. John Harmeyer. ... John Harmeyer2022-11-21 18:04:492022-11-21 18:04:49When Do I Need Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)?. ...
title = "Clinical guidelines for dental cone-beam computed tomography",. abstract = "Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT ... Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) received regulatory approval in Japan in 2000 and has been widely used since being ... N2 - Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) received regulatory approval in Japan in 2000 and has been widely used since ... AB - Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) received regulatory approval in Japan in 2000 and has been widely used since ...
CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) in Lincoln, NE. Technological advancement in dentistry has brought so much to the table in ... 3D digital imaging is done using a device called the CBCT or Cone Beam Computed Tomography. It gets its name from the conical ... CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography). CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) Lincoln, NE. ... beam of light that it projects on the patients oral cavity to map out the oral features. It is, by far, one of the most ...
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) was introduced to dentistry in 1998 and has rapidly become a vital resource for precise ... The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Orthodontics: A Review. Huang Anderson T and Huang D*. Department of Orthodontics, ... Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) was introduced to dentistry in 1998 and has rapidly become a vital resource for precise ... How to cite this article: Huang A T ,Huang D. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Orthodontics: A Review. Adv Dent & ...
Introduction to Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Introduction. Conventional Computed Tomography (CT). Cone Beam Computed ... Interpretation Basics of Cone Beam Computed Tomography is an easy-to-use guide to Cone Beam CT technology for general dental ... Conventional CT Versus Cone Beam CT. Viewing CBCT Data. Artifacts. Common Uses. Legal Issues Concering Cone Beam Computed ... Sé el primero en valorar "Interpretation Basics of Cone Beam Computed Tomography - Gonzalez" Cancelar la respuesta. Debes ...
Keywords: apical periodontitis, cone-beam computed tomography, endodontically treated teeth, Periapical and Endodontic Status ... in a Turkish population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCT images obtained between January 2018 and April ... Retrospective cone-beam computed tomography study ...
Diagnostic Accuracy Of Cone Beam Computed Tomography In Visualizing Mandibular Retromolar Canal: A Retrospective Study. Author ...
... Lucas S. Stepanko and Manuel O ... Merrett SJ, Drage NA, Durning P. Cone beam computed tomography: a useful tool in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. ... Sphenoid bone changes in rapid maxillary expansion assessed with cone-beam computed tomography. Lucas S. Stepanko and Manuel O ... Merrett SJ, Drage NA, Durning P. Cone beam computed tomography: a useful tool in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. ...
METHODS: Four sets of digital volumetric data were established by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) (Accuitomo, J. Morita, ... Generation of three-dimensional prototype models based on cone beam computed tomography. International journal of computer ... Generation of three-dimensional prototype models based on cone beam computed tomography ...
Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) including endodontics has become widely available and utilised in all aspects of dentistry ... Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics. By Dr. Zainab April 8, 2019. 04779 views ... Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) including endodontics has become widely available and utilised in all aspects of dentistry ... Scarfe WC, Levin MD, Gane D, Farman AG.:Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics. Int J Dent 2009:. Scarfe WC, ...
Keywords: Cone-beam computed tomography, Lateral lingual canal, Lateral lingual foramen, Mandible ... using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images of 741 patients were examined retrospectively. The prevalence and ... Assessment of lateral lingual foramen using cone-beam computed tomography. ...
Anatomical Evaluation of Mandibular Premolars in Saudi Population: An In Vivo Cone-beam Computed Tomography Study Mohammed ... Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers a three-dimensional (3D) image of the anatomical structures in the maxillofacial ... canal morphology of mandibular premolars in a Saudi sub-population by showing the importance of cone-beam computed tomography ...
Texture analysis of cone beam computed tomography images reveals dental implant stability. / Costa, A. L.F.; de Souza Carreira ... Texture analysis of cone beam computed tomography images reveals dental implant stability. In: International Journal of Oral ... Texture analysis of cone beam computed tomography images reveals dental implant stability. International Journal of Oral and ... Dive into the research topics of Texture analysis of cone beam computed tomography images reveals dental implant stability. ...
The most recent method, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) neuroimaging is able to provide specific details regarding the ... The most recent method, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) neuroimaging is able to provide specific details regarding the ... title = {Collateral Circulation Classification Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images using ResNet18 Convolutional ... "
A cone-beam computed tomography triple scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model appropriate ... 32 Yepes JF, Al-Sabbagh M. Use of cone-beam computed tomography in early detection of implant failure. Dent Clin North Am 2015 ... Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Virtual Cloning: A Review. Anand Shankar Sarkar ... 14 Conejo J, Dayo AF, Syed AZ, Mupparapu M. The digital clone: intraoral scanning, face scans and cone beam computed tomography ...
Home /Stručni radovi/Cone beam computed tomography: An innovative tool in pediatric dentistry ...
Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scans (CBCT). Cone beam computed tomography is a medical imaging technique that provides ... During a CBCT scan, the machine rotates around the patient, capturing images using a cone-shaped X-ray beam. These images are ...
  • Cone beam computed tomography (or CBCT, also referred to as C-arm CT, cone beam volume CT, flat panel CT or Digital Volume Tomography (DVT)) is a medical imaging technique consisting of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. (wikipedia.org)
  • CBCT shares many similarities with traditional (fan beam) CT however there are important differences, particularly for reconstruction. (wikipedia.org)
  • We hypothesized that three-dimensional models created from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans could be used to calculate bone volume changes following maxillary sinus lift procedures. (umich.edu)
  • To assess the anatomical characteristics of mandibular incisive canal and to describe the occurrence of anatomical variations according to side, age and gender using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). (uwi.edu)
  • Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new technology recently introduced and evolved into dentistry. (statpearls.com)
  • Describe what cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is and what its role is in dentistry. (statpearls.com)
  • The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) by dentists for diagnostic purposes in South Africa. (wits.ac.za)
  • Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) was introduced to the dental profession in early 2000's and represented a convenient alternative to the higher radiation dose Medical Computed Tomography (CT) to be used as a dental radiological diagnostic tool (Friedland, 2009: 58). (wits.ac.za)
  • The Cone Beam CT Scan (CBCT scan) is the latest type of CT scan, requiring even lower doses of radiation than conventional medical CT scanners. (distinctive-dentistry.com)
  • Cone-beam computed tomography systems (CBCT) are a variant of conventional computed tomography (CT) systems. (bombaydentalsp.com)
  • If these are the services you are looking for, your search is over because Bombay Dental Specialities , which is located in Ghatkopar East, offers a wide variety of dental care services, including cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). (bombaydentalsp.com)
  • The impact of Covid-19 on the worldwide Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) market was also discussed in the paper. (amhyco.com)
  • When Do I Need Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)? (bellbrookfamilydentistry.com)
  • Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a way for medical professionals to learn more about the anatomy of your face. (bellbrookfamilydentistry.com)
  • CBCT uses a special beam to create a 3D view of the interior of your face. (bellbrookfamilydentistry.com)
  • Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) received regulatory approval in Japan in 2000 and has been widely used since being approved for coverage by the National Health Insurance system in 2012. (elsevierpure.com)
  • 3D digital imaging is done using a device called the CBCT or Cone Beam Computed Tomography. (kortefamilydentistry.net)
  • Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) was introduced to dentistry in 1998 and has rapidly become a vital resource for precise diagnosis and treatment planning [1]. (juniperpublishers.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical treatment quality and the status of apical pathology of endodontically treated teeth, as well as apical periodontitis (AP) prevalence, in a Turkish population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). (yildiz.edu.tr)
  • With cone-beam computed topography (CBCT), it is possible to visualize sphenoid bone changes. (e-kjo.org)
  • METHODS: Four sets of digital volumetric data were established by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) (Accuitomo, J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan). (unibas.ch)
  • The aim of this study is to determine the localization and prevalence of the lateral lingual foramen (LLF) and to evaluate the lateral lingual canal (LLC) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). (eurjanat.com)
  • Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers a three-dimensional (3D) image of the anatomical structures in the maxillofacial region. (opendentistryjournal.com)
  • Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) including endodontics has become widely available and utilised in all aspects of dentistry in recent years. (dentalreach.today)
  • The most recent method, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) neuroimaging is able to provide specific details regarding the extent and adequacy of collaterals. (thesai.org)
  • The aim of this study was to characterize the alveolar bone of edentulous maxillary sites using texture analysis (TA) of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and to correlate the results to the insertion torque, thus verifying whether TA is a predictive tool of final implant treatment. (uky.edu)
  • The aim was to investigate the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on implant planning and on prediction of final implant size. (uitm.edu.my)
  • Recent trends in minimally invasive conservative treatment of teeth with inexact endodontic treatment or periapical lesions eliminate this invasive diagnostic method and replace it with the non-invasive reconstructive cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). (researchbib.com)
  • Following initial examination, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) investigation demonstrated multiple smooth homogenous calcifications (Figure 1) collectively measuring 12mm x 9mm x 8mm within the region of the right submandibular gland (Figure 2). (assaf.org.za)
  • The very expensive cone-beam computed tomography or CBCT created a 3D image of the entire skull as seen from all sides, including the whole jaw and all the teeth on it. (cdhp.org)
  • During a CBCT scan, the machine rotates around the patient, capturing images using a cone-shaped X-ray beam. (stuartendo.com)
  • This study aimed to assess the ability of three Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) systems including Cranex 3D, NewTom 3G and 3D Promax for Three-Dimensional (3D) image reconstruction of the cortical plate with variable thicknesses. (opendentistryjournal.com)
  • Objectives: To assess the anatomical variations of Canalis sinuosus (CS) by using Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to emphasize CBCT is necessary before invasive procedures to preserve important anatomical structures. (journalcra.com)
  • Objectives/Hypothesis: To determine whether incorporation of intraoperative imaging via a new cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image-guidance system improves accuracy and facilitates resection in sinus and skull-base surgery through quantification of surgical performance. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • Study Design: Landmark identification and skull base ablation tasks were performed with a CBCT intraoperative image-guidance system in the experimental group and with image-guided surgery (IGS) alone based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) in the control group. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • The report highlights the adoption of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Systems globally.Based on Application, the market is segmented into Dental Applications and Other Applications. (marketresearchandstatistics.com)
  • Additionally, increasing application areas for CBCT scans, increasing dental problems in geriatric population and rising demand for digital dental imaging has positively impacted the growth of Cone Beam Computed Tomography. (marketresearchandstatistics.com)
  • The report highlights the adoption of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Systems globally.Based on Application, the market is segmented into Dental Applications and Other Applications.Dental Applications is further divided into Implantology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Orthodontics, Endodontics, General Dentistry, Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Disorders, Periodontics, and Forensic Dentistry. (marketresearchandstatistics.com)
  • Based on End-user, the market is segmented into Hospitals, PrivatePractices, and Academic & Research Institutes.The report also covers geographical segmentation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Systems market.The geographies included in the report are North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa. (marketresearchandstatistics.com)
  • Purpose: This article considers the problem of reconstructing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from a set of undersampled and potentially noisy projection measurements. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The research questions for this study were as follows 1) Is panoramic radiography (PR) equivalent to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in determining the degree of mandibular third molar impaction? (bvsalud.org)
  • Objectives: We aimed to map the correlation between thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic film for measuring absorbed doses and to compare minimum, maximum, and mean absorbed doses over larger regions of interest and at various craniofacial organs and tissues during cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) exposure of the mandibular third molar region. (lu.se)
  • Purpose: To examine the dosimetric impact of margin reduction and quantify residual error after three-dimensional (3D) image registration using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for prostate cancer patients. (elsevierpure.com)
  • To determine the prevalence of pneumatization of the articular eminence (PAT) and roof of the glenoid fossa (PRGF) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). (balkanmedicaljournal.org)
  • Background/Aim: To analyze the internal morphology of mandibular incisors with two root canals using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). (balkandentaljournal.com)
  • The study analyses the location of impacted maxillary canines and factors influencing root resorptions of adjacent teeth using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). (birmingham.ac.uk)
  • For each patient, we contoured the tumor volume (TV) on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images obtained before each treatment fraction. (researchwithrutgers.com)
  • On cone-beam computed with nests and cords of odontogenic epithelium tomography (CBCT), a hyperdense area delimi- in an ectomesenchyme as in the dental papilla. (bvsalud.org)
  • 3. A Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) done to verify the accurate position and success of the inserted implant. (who.int)
  • Therefore, the objective of this work is to inform the reader about the computed tomography beam volume, emphasizing the development of this type of additional imaging examination in Dentistry today. (bvsalud.org)
  • Comparison of panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for qualitative and quantitative measurements regarding localization of permanent impacted maxillary canines by: Çiğdem Sarıkır, et al. (uitm.edu.my)
  • Detection of various anatomic patterns of root canals in mandibular incisors using digital periapical radiography, 3 cone-beam computed tomographic scanners, and micro-computed tomographic imaging. (balkandentaljournal.com)
  • This study aimed to evaluate the root canal morphology of mandibular premolars in a Saudi sub-population by showing the importance of cone-beam computed tomography radiographic analysis in detecting varieties of the root canal system. (opendentistryjournal.com)
  • Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of this type of Computed Tomography to increase the capacity of diagnosis by imaging, with a power greater resolution and less artifacts in the image generated. (bvsalud.org)
  • 14 Conejo J, Dayo AF, Syed AZ, Mupparapu M. The digital clone: intraoral scanning, face scans and cone beam computed tomography integration for diagnosis and treatment planning. (thieme-connect.de)
  • 15 Bueno MR, Estrela C, Azevedo BC, Diogenes A. Development of a new cone-beam computed tomography software for endodontic diagnosis. (thieme-connect.de)
  • A few years ago, has developed a new technology in Dental Radiology, called "Beam Computed Tomography Volumetric, bringing many advantages over conventional tomography and medical, resulting in changes in relation to current diagnostic methods, helping in the correct determination of the topography structures of the jaw bone and avoid the distortions found in panoramic radiographic examination. (bvsalud.org)
  • The X-ray Tomography Data Bank, tomoBank, provides a repository of experimental and simulated datasets with the aim to foster collaboration among computational scientists, beamline scientists, and experimentalists and to accelerate the development and implementation of tomographic reconstruction methods for synchrotron facility production software by providing easy access to challenging dataset and their descriptors. (osti.gov)
  • Due to this, the dataset can not only be used for high cone-angle artefact reduction but also for algorithm development and evaluation for other tasks, such as image reconstruction from limited or sparse-angle (low-dose) scanning, super resolution, or segmentation. (tue.nl)
  • Cone-beam computed tomography revealed expanded buccal and lingual cortical bones, perforation of the lingual cortical bone, and displacement of the mandibular canal. (bvsalud.org)
  • Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Assessment of Quality of Endodontic Treatment and Prevalence of Procedural Errors in Mandibular Molars. (medscape.com)
  • Unlike previous works, this open data collection consists of X-ray cone-beam (CB) computed tomography (CT) datasets specifically designed for machine learning applications and high cone-angle artefact reduction. (tue.nl)
  • Image-guided radiation therapy is a form of external beam radiotherapy where the patient is positioned with the organs to be treated accurately matched in position to the treatment field, to reduce the dose to nearby organs which are not being treated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Is Panoramic Imaging Equivalent to Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Classifying Impacted Lower Third Molars? (bvsalud.org)
  • The device is named for its cone shape, and it's excellent for rendering crisp, clean images of your bone structure, soft tissue, and teeth positions. (bellbrookfamilydentistry.com)
  • Nur Hasanah Ali, Abdul Rahim Abdullah, Norhashimah Mohd Saad and Ahmad Sobri Muda, "Collateral Circulation Classification Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images using ResNet18 Convolutional Neural Network" International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications(IJACSA), 14(8), 2023. (thesai.org)
  • For each walnut, CB projections on three different source orbits were acquired to provide CB data with different cone angles as well as being able to compute artefact-free, high-quality ground truth images from the combined data that can be used for supervised learning. (tue.nl)
  • Cone beam computed tomography is a medical imaging technique that provides endodontists with a three-dimensional, digital image of the teeth and surrounding structures. (stuartendo.com)
  • 2. Zhengyan Y, Keke L, Fei W, Yueheng L, Zhi Z. Cone-beam computed tomography study of the root and canal morphology of mandibular permanent anterior teeth in a Chongqing population. (balkandentaljournal.com)
  • Evaluation of the Root and Canal Morphology of Mandibular Permanent Anterior Teeth in an Iranian Population by Cone-Beam Computed Tomography. (balkandentaljournal.com)
  • Innovation and introduction of cone beam computed tomography, proface (facial three-dimensional [3D] soft-tissue capture), intraoral scan, planning software, and 3D printers has changed the dental profession. (thieme-connect.de)
  • Conclusion: Cone-beam CT dosimetrically validated a 10/6 margin when soft-tissue localization is not used. (elsevierpure.com)
  • 15. Leoni GB, Versiani MA, Pécora JD, Damião De Sousa-Neto M. Micro-computed tomographic analysis of the root canal morphology of mandibular incisors. (balkandentaljournal.com)
  • The aim of this study was to verify the presence, spatial location, and calibre of the accessory canals (AC) of the canalis sinuosus by cone beam computed tomography, and their relationship to the anterior maxilla. (pocketdentistry.com)
  • For interventional radiology, the patient is positioned offset to the table so that the region of interest is centered in the field of view for the cone beam. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the late 1990s, Dr Yoshinoro Arai in Japan and Dr Piero Mozzo in Italy independently developed Cone Beam Computed Technology for oral and maxillofacial radiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • The American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (AAOMR) suggests cone-beam CT as the preferred method for presurgical assessment of dental implant sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Committee on Clinical Practice Guidelines & Japanese Society for Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology 2018, ' Clinical guidelines for dental cone-beam computed tomography ', Oral Radiology , vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 89-104. (elsevierpure.com)
  • A dental cone beam scan offers useful information when it comes to the assessment and planning of surgical implants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once the clinician has assessed the scout image and approved it, the scan begins with rotation around the patient's head, either 180 or 360 degrees, and the cone-shaped x-ray beam is directed through the center of the area of interest. (dentalcare.com)
  • A CAT scan (Computerized Axial Tomography) , also commonly referred to as a CT scan, produces enhanced, three-dimensional, cross-sectional imaging for accurate medical and dental diagnoses. (distinctive-dentistry.com)
  • A small volume cone beam CT of the left posterior maxilla was acquired with the Veraviewepocs 3D R100. (jmoritaeurope.de)
  • Weight-bearing computed tomography (WBCT) allows evaluation of the distal syndesmosis under physiologic load. (nih.gov)
  • Cone beam computed tomography is an effective imaging modality in the detection of lingual foramina and canals. (uwi.edu)
  • Outline the basic principles of cone beam computed tomography, including patient positioning, exposure dose, and scanning time. (statpearls.com)
  • Healthcare companies are playing an important role in the expansion of Cone Beam Imaging Systems market with the innovation of new technologies. (marketresearchandstatistics.com)
  • A divergent pyramidal or cone shaped source of ionizing radiation is directed through the middle of the area of interest onto an area X-ray detector on the opposite side of patient. (dentalreach.today)
  • The evolution of the source material as well as of the crystal growth interface was carried out using in situ 3D X-ray computed tomography (75 mm crystals) and in situ 2D X-ray visualization (100 mm crystals). (researchgate.net)
  • The factors driving the growth of Cone Beam Computed Tomography market are increasing incidences of dental diseases and rise in the demand for cosmetic surgeries. (marketresearchandstatistics.com)
  • Interpretation Basics of Cone Beam Computed Tomography is an easy-to-use guide to Cone Beam CT technology for general dental practitioners and dental students. (o-orthodontics.academy)
  • The beam and the receptor rotate simultaneously around the patient's head during the acquisition. (dentalcare.com)
  • It gets its name from the conical beam of light that it projects on the patient's oral cavity to map out the oral features. (kortefamilydentistry.net)
  • They can be used in treatment planning, but it is essential to know cone beam computed tomography indications and contraindications. (statpearls.com)
  • Tassoker M, Ozcan S. Two cases of Submandibular Sialolithiasis detected by Cone Beam Computed Tomography. (assaf.org.za)
  • Multiple cases of submandibular sialolithiasis detected by cone beam computed tomography. (assaf.org.za)