Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Atrioventricular Node: A small nodular mass of specialized muscle fibers located in the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus. It gives rise to the atrioventricular bundle of the conduction system of the heart.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Bone Conduction: Transmission of sound waves through vibration of bones in the SKULL to the inner ear (COCHLEA). By using bone conduction stimulation and by bypassing any OUTER EAR or MIDDLE EAR abnormalities, hearing thresholds of the cochlea can be determined. Bone conduction hearing differs from normal hearing which is based on air conduction stimulation via the EAR CANAL and the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Refractory Period, Electrophysiological: The period of time following the triggering of an ACTION POTENTIAL when the CELL MEMBRANE has changed to an unexcitable state and is gradually restored to the resting (excitable) state. During the absolute refractory period no other stimulus can trigger a response. This is followed by the relative refractory period during which the cell gradually becomes more excitable and the stronger impulse that is required to illicit a response gradually lessens to that required during the resting state.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Ulnar Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Electrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac: Methods to induce and measure electrical activities at specific sites in the heart to diagnose and treat problems with the heart's electrical system.Atrioventricular Block: Impaired impulse conduction from HEART ATRIA to HEART VENTRICLES. AV block can mean delayed or completely blocked impulse conduction.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Tibial Nerve: The medial terminal branch of the sciatic nerve. The tibial nerve fibers originate in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (L4 to S2). They supply motor and sensory innervation to parts of the calf and foot.Electrodiagnosis: Diagnosis of disease states by recording the spontaneous electrical activity of tissues or organs or by the response to stimulation of electrically excitable tissue.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Aphasia, Conduction: A type of fluent aphasia characterized by an impaired ability to repeat one and two word phrases, despite retained comprehension. This condition is associated with dominant hemisphere lesions involving the arcuate fasciculus (a white matter projection between Broca's and Wernicke's areas) and adjacent structures. Like patients with Wernicke aphasia (APHASIA, WERNICKE), patients with conduction aphasia are fluent but commit paraphasic errors during attempts at written and oral forms of communication. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p482; Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p142; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p848)Atrial Flutter: Rapid, irregular atrial contractions caused by a block of electrical impulse conduction in the right atrium and a reentrant wave front traveling up the inter-atrial septum and down the right atrial free wall or vice versa. Unlike ATRIAL FIBRILLATION which is caused by abnormal impulse generation, typical atrial flutter is caused by abnormal impulse conduction. As in atrial fibrillation, patients with atrial flutter cannot effectively pump blood into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES).Sural Nerve: A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Peripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Purkinje Fibers: Modified cardiac muscle fibers composing the terminal portion of the heart conduction system.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: A form of ventricular pre-excitation characterized by a short PR interval and a long QRS interval with a delta wave. In this syndrome, atrial impulses are abnormally conducted to the HEART VENTRICLES via an ACCESSORY CONDUCTING PATHWAY that is located between the wall of the right or left atria and the ventricles, also known as a BUNDLE OF KENT. The inherited form can be caused by mutation of PRKAG2 gene encoding a gamma-2 regulatory subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Diabetic Neuropathies: Peripheral, autonomic, and cranial nerve disorders that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS. These conditions usually result from diabetic microvascular injury involving small blood vessels that supply nerves (VASA NERVORUM). Relatively common conditions which may be associated with diabetic neuropathy include third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES); MONONEUROPATHY; mononeuropathy multiplex; diabetic amyotrophy; a painful POLYNEUROPATHY; autonomic neuropathy; and thoracoabdominal neuropathy. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1325)NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel: A voltage-gated sodium channel subtype that mediates the sodium ion PERMEABILITY of CARDIOMYOCYTES. Defects in the SCN5A gene, which codes for the alpha subunit of this sodium channel, are associated with a variety of CARDIAC DISEASES that result from loss of sodium channel function.Atrial Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART ATRIA.Ranvier's Nodes: Regularly spaced gaps in the myelin sheaths of peripheral axons. Ranvier's nodes allow saltatory conduction, that is, jumping of impulses from node to node, which is faster and more energetically favorable than continuous conduction.Connexin 43: A 43-kDa peptide which is a member of the connexin family of gap junction proteins. Connexin 43 is a product of a gene in the alpha class of connexin genes (the alpha-1 gene). It was first isolated from mammalian heart, but is widespread in the body including the brain.Peroneal Nerve: The lateral of the two terminal branches of the sciatic nerve. The peroneal (or fibular) nerve provides motor and sensory innervation to parts of the leg and foot.Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Entrapment of the MEDIAN NERVE in the carpal tunnel, which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the CARPAL BONES. This syndrome may be associated with repetitive occupational trauma (CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS); wrist injuries; AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES; rheumatoid arthritis (see ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOID); ACROMEGALY; PREGNANCY; and other conditions. Symptoms include burning pain and paresthesias involving the ventral surface of the hand and fingers which may radiate proximally. Impairment of sensation in the distribution of the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy may occur. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p45)Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Sodium Channels: Ion channels that specifically allow the passage of SODIUM ions. A variety of specific sodium channel subtypes are involved in serving specialized functions such as neuronal signaling, CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, and KIDNEY function.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry: Abnormally rapid heartbeats caused by reentry of atrial impulse into the dual (fast and slow) pathways of ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE. The common type involves a blocked atrial impulse in the slow pathway which reenters the fast pathway in a retrograde direction and simultaneously conducts to the atria and the ventricles leading to rapid HEART RATE of 150-250 beats per minute.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Nerve Fibers, Myelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.Tic Disorders: Disorders characterized by recurrent TICS that may interfere with speech and other activities. Tics are sudden, rapid, nonrhythmic, stereotyped motor movements or vocalizations which may be exacerbated by stress and are generally attenuated during absorbing activities. Tic disorders are distinguished from conditions which feature other types of abnormal movements that may accompany another another condition. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Bundle-Branch Block: A form of heart block in which the electrical stimulation of HEART VENTRICLES is interrupted at either one of the branches of BUNDLE OF HIS thus preventing the simultaneous depolarization of the two ventricles.Body Surface Potential Mapping: Recording of regional electrophysiological information by analysis of surface potentials to give a complete picture of the effects of the currents from the heart on the body surface. It has been applied to the diagnosis of old inferior myocardial infarction, localization of the bypass pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, recognition of ventricular hypertrophy, estimation of the size of a myocardial infarct, and the effects of different interventions designed to reduce infarct size. The limiting factor at present is the complexity of the recording and analysis, which requires 100 or more electrodes, sophisticated instrumentation, and dedicated personnel. (Braunwald, Heart Disease, 4th ed)Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Connexins: A group of homologous proteins which form the intermembrane channels of GAP JUNCTIONS. The connexins are the products of an identified gene family which has both highly conserved and highly divergent regions. The variety contributes to the wide range of functional properties of gap junctions.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Polyneuropathies: Diseases of multiple peripheral nerves simultaneously. Polyneuropathies usually are characterized by symmetrical, bilateral distal motor and sensory impairment with a graded increase in severity distally. The pathological processes affecting peripheral nerves include degeneration of the axon, myelin or both. The various forms of polyneuropathy are categorized by the type of nerve affected (e.g., sensory, motor, or autonomic), by the distribution of nerve injury (e.g., distal vs. proximal), by nerve component primarily affected (e.g., demyelinating vs. axonal), by etiology, or by pattern of inheritance.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Borderline Personality Disorder: A personality disorder marked by a pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (DSM-IV)Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Electric Conductivity: The ability of a substrate to allow the passage of ELECTRONS.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Somatoform Disorders: Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)Tachycardia, Supraventricular: A generic expression for any tachycardia that originates above the BUNDLE OF HIS.Gap Junctions: Connections between cells which allow passage of small molecules and electric current. Gap junctions were first described anatomically as regions of close apposition between cells with a narrow (1-2 nm) gap between cell membranes. The variety in the properties of gap junctions is reflected in the number of CONNEXINS, the family of proteins which form the junctions.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Neurons, Afferent: Neurons which conduct NERVE IMPULSES to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Myelin Sheath: The lipid-rich sheath surrounding AXONS in both the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEMS and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The myelin sheath is an electrical insulator and allows faster and more energetically efficient conduction of impulses. The sheath is formed by the cell membranes of glial cells (SCHWANN CELLS in the peripheral and OLIGODENDROGLIA in the central nervous system). Deterioration of the sheath in DEMYELINATING DISEASES is a serious clinical problem.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by stimulation along AFFERENT PATHWAYS from PERIPHERAL NERVES to CEREBRUM.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Tachycardia, Paroxysmal: Abnormally rapid heartbeats with sudden onset and cessation.Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Flecainide: A potent anti-arrhythmia agent, effective in a wide range of ventricular and atrial ARRHYTHMIAS and TACHYCARDIAS.Demyelinating Diseases: Diseases characterized by loss or dysfunction of myelin in the central or peripheral nervous system.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Ventricular Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Lidocaine: A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Alcohol-Related Disorders: Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Procainamide: A class Ia antiarrhythmic drug that is structurally-related to PROCAINE.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Combat Disorders: Neurotic reactions to unusual, severe, or overwhelming military stress.Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging: Optical imaging techniques used for recording patterns of electrical activity in tissues by monitoring transmembrane potentials via FLUORESCENCE imaging with voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Impulse Control Disorders: Disorders whose essential features are the failure to resist an impulse, drive, or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to the individual or to others. Individuals experience an increased sense of tension prior to the act and pleasure, gratification or release of tension at the time of committing the act.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Electrophysiological Phenomena: The electrical properties, characteristics of living organisms, and the processes of organisms or their parts that are involved in generating and responding to electrical charges.Sick Sinus Syndrome: A condition caused by dysfunctions related to the SINOATRIAL NODE including impulse generation (CARDIAC SINUS ARREST) and impulse conduction (SINOATRIAL EXIT BLOCK). It is characterized by persistent BRADYCARDIA, chronic ATRIAL FIBRILLATION, and failure to resume sinus rhythm following CARDIOVERSION. This syndrome can be congenital or acquired, particularly after surgical correction for heart defects.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Cardiac Electrophysiology: The study of the electrical activity and characteristics of the HEART; MYOCARDIUM; and CARDIOMYOCYTES.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Cardiac Complexes, Premature: A group of cardiac arrhythmias in which the cardiac contractions are not initiated at the SINOATRIAL NODE. They include both atrial and ventricular premature beats, and are also known as extra or ectopic heartbeats. Their frequency is increased in heart diseases.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Brugada Syndrome: An autosomal dominant defect of cardiac conduction that is characterized by an abnormal ST-segment in leads V1-V3 on the ELECTROCARDIOGRAM resembling a right BUNDLE-BRANCH BLOCK; high risk of VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA; or VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION; SYNCOPAL EPISODE; and possible sudden death. This syndrome is linked to mutations of gene encoding the cardiac SODIUM CHANNEL alpha subunit.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Neuromuscular Diseases: A general term encompassing lower MOTOR NEURON DISEASE; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and certain MUSCULAR DISEASES. Manifestations include MUSCLE WEAKNESS; FASCICULATION; muscle ATROPHY; SPASM; MYOKYMIA; MUSCLE HYPERTONIA, myalgias, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Binge-Eating Disorder: A disorder associated with three or more of the following: eating until feeling uncomfortably full; eating large amounts of food when not physically hungry; eating much more rapidly than normal; eating alone due to embarrassment; feeling of disgust, DEPRESSION, or guilt after overeating. Criteria includes occurrence on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months. The binge eating is not associated with the regular use of inappropriate compensatory behavior (i.e. purging, excessive exercise, etc.) and does not co-occur exclusively with BULIMIA NERVOSA or ANOREXIA NERVOSA. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Disopyramide: A class I anti-arrhythmic agent (one that interferes directly with the depolarization of the cardiac membrane and thus serves as a membrane-stabilizing agent) with a depressant action on the heart similar to that of guanidine. It also possesses some anticholinergic and local anesthetic properties.Dysthymic Disorder: Chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day more days than not for at least 2 years. The required minimum duration in children to make this diagnosis is 1 year. During periods of depressed mood, at least 2 of the following additional symptoms are present: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self esteem, poor concentration or difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. (DSM-IV)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Tricuspid Valve: The valve consisting of three cusps situated between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart.Pre-Excitation Syndromes: A group of conditions in which HEART VENTRICLE activation by the atrial impulse is faster than the normal impulse conduction from the SINOATRIAL NODE. In these pre-excitation syndromes, atrial impulses often bypass the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE delay and travel via ACCESSORY CONDUCTING PATHWAYS connecting the atrium directly to the BUNDLE OF HIS.Myeloproliferative Disorders: Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: A hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy transmitted most often as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized by progressive distal wasting and loss of reflexes in the muscles of the legs (and occasionally involving the arms). Onset is usually in the second to fourth decade of life. This condition has been divided into two subtypes, hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) types I and II. HMSN I is associated with abnormal nerve conduction velocities and nerve hypertrophy, features not seen in HMSN II. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1343)Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Atrial Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the RIGHT ATRIUM.Dissociative Disorders: Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.Nerve Fibers, Unmyelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the unmyelinated nerve fibers are small in diameter and usually several are surrounded by a single MYELIN SHEATH. They conduct low-velocity impulses, and represent the majority of peripheral sensory and autonomic fibers, but are also found in the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)
"Arrhythmias and Conduction Disorders". The merck Manuals: Online Medical Library. Merck Sharp and Dohme Corp. January 2008. ... In general, two types of problems result in bradycardias: disorders of the sinoatrial node (SA node), and disorders of the ... there may be disordered automaticity or impaired conduction of the impulse from the sinus node into the surrounding atrial ... Atrioventricular conduction disturbances (AV block; primary AV block, secondary type I AV block, secondary type II AV block, ...
... , or Mott variable-range hopping, is a model describing low-temperature conduction in strongly disordered ... "Temperature-and field-dependence of hopping conduction in disordered systems". Phil. Mag. 30: 963. ... Physics portal Coulomb gap Mobility edge Mott, N.F. (1969). "Conduction in non-crystalline materials". Phil. Mag. 19: 835. P.V. ... Conduction is the result of many series of hops through this four-dimensional array and as short-range hops are favoured, it is ...
... (LEMS) is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by muscle weakness of the limbs. It is the ... Lambert-Eaton-Rooke syndrome at Who Named It? Lambert EH, Eaton LM, Rooke ED (1956). "Defect of neuromuscular conduction ... Gutmann L, Crosby TW, Takamori M, Martin JD (September 1972). "The Eaton-Lambert syndrome and autoimmune disorders". Am. J. Med ... CMAPs show small amplitudes but normal latency and conduction velocities. If repeated impulses are administered (2 per second ...
"Introduction: Arrhythmias and Conduction Disorders: Merck Manual Professional". Judge SI, Bever CT (July 2006). "Potassium ... Since these agents do not affect the sodium channel, conduction velocity is not decreased. The prolongation of the action ... Potassium channel blockers are agents which interfere with conduction through potassium channels. Potassium channel blockers ... potential duration and refractory period, combined with the maintenance of normal conduction velocity, prevent re-entrant ...
... (HNPP) is a peripheral neuropathy, a disorder of the nerves. HNPP is a ... In terms of diagnosis of HNPP measuring nerve conduction velocity may give an indication of the presence of the disease.Other ... Inherited PNS disorders were first described by Charcot, Marie and Tooth (1886). De Jong (1947) first described HNPP in a Dutch ... HNPP is part of the group of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) disorders and is linked to Charcot-Marie-Tooth ...
The disorder is named for Joseph Jules Dejerine and Jules Sottas, French neurologists who first described it.[3][4] ... Peripheral (and possibly cranial) nerve excitability and conduction speed are reduced. Treatment[edit]. Management is ... The disorder is inherited in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner.[2] ... Cell membrane protein disorders (other than Cell surface receptor, enzymes, and cytoskeleton) ...
Conduction abnormalities are more common in DM1 than DM2, but all people are advised to have an annual ECG. Both types are also ... The disorder generally worsens in each generation. A type of DM1 may be apparent at birth. DM2 is generally milder. They are ... As it involves the repeat of four nucleotides, it is not a trinucleotide repeat disorder, but rather a tetranucleotide repeat ... Potentially serious anesthetic risks are important to note, so the presence of this disorder should be brought to the attention ...
Krarup, C., & Mihai, M. (2009). "Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders". Current Opinion in ... Measurement of sensory conduction in distal nerve segments have shown salient defects in diabetic patients, suggesting that the ... Even though the diameters and conduction velocities of the most excitable motor and sensory fibers are similar, sensory fibers ... Axonal degeneration and regeneration are common processes in many nerve disorders. As a consequence of myelin remodeling, the ...
Mechanical bowel disorders such as bowel obstruction, gastrointestinal haemorrhage or bowel perforation ... "Prescription of drugs with potential adverse effects on cardiac conduction in Parkinson's disease". Parkinsonism & Related ... "Domperidone - heart rate and rhythm disorders." Canadian adverse reactions newsletter. Government of Canada. January 2007 17(1) ... the drug is indicated in upper gastrointestinal motility disorders and to prevent gastrointestinal symptoms associated with the ...
... genetic/hereditary disorders and some forms of the collagen disorder Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, exposure to environmental ... and nerve conduction studies. In neuromuscular disease evaluation, it is important to perform musculoskeletal and neurologic ... List of neuromuscular disorders Muscle Motor neuron diseases ICD-10 Chapter XIII: Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and ... "Neuromuscular Disorders: MedlinePlus". www.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-24. Swash, Michael; Schwartz, Martin S. (2013-03-14 ...
Disorders[edit]. *Auditory neuropathy a disorder of poor speech perception even though the tympanic membrane, middle ear ... This test can be used to identify delay in the conduction of neural impulses due to tumours or inflammation but can also be an ... An auditory processing disorders is sometimes linked to language disorders in persons of all ages. ... "BMC Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders. 14 (1): 7. doi:10.1186/1472-6815-14-7. PMC 4141989. PMID 25152694.. ...
Myelin is a lipid covering that speeds the conduction of action potentials. When Schwann cells proliferate out of control in an ... It is a rare disorder, affecting only around 1 in 40,000 individuals. Schwannomas are mostly benign tumors that commonly occur ... Schwannomatosis is one form of a genetic disorder called neurofibromatosis (NF) that has only recently been recognized. ... Schwannomatosis is known to be a genetic disorder. However, familial occurrence is inexplicably rare. Schwannomatosis can not ...
... has a slow conduction velocity but shorter refractory period the second "pathway" has a faster conduction velocity but longer ... It can result from an injury or be a genetically inherited disorder. Atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia. Cystic tumour ... The cardiac conduction system (and AV node part of it) coordinates myocyte mechanical activity. A wave of excitation spreads ... This is the property of the AV node that prevents rapid conduction to the ventricle in cases of rapid atrial rhythms, such as ...
The mildest grade is referred to as neurapraxia and is characterized by a reduction or complete blockage of conduction across a ... These help to distinguish upper from lower motor neuron disorder as well as diagnose primary muscle disease. The first line of ... Other tests involved with diagnosis of nerve injury are electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS). ... segment of nerve while axonal continuity is maintained and nerve conduction is preserved. These injuries are almost always ...
Jerauld, G. R.; L. E. Scriven; H. T. Davis (1984). "Percolation and conduction on the 3D Voronoi and regular networks: a second ... Schliecker, G.; C. Kaiser (1999). "Percolation on disordered mosaics". Physica A. 269: 189-200. Bibcode:1999PhyA..269..189S. ... Yi, Y. B. (2006). "Void percolation and conduction of overlapping ellipsoids". Physical Review E. 74 (3): 031112. Bibcode: ... Ziff, R. M.; Salvatore Torquato (2016). "Percolation of disordered jammed sphere packings". preprint. arXiv:1611.00279 . ...
It is contraindicated if there has been a past history of angioedema; heart conduction disorders (e.g. sick sinus syndrome, ...
Conduction aphasia is another speech disorder that is similar to, but not the same as, apraxia of speech. Although patients who ... Although disorders such as expressive aphasia, conduction aphasia, and dysarthria involve similar symptoms as apraxia of speech ... Other disorders and injuries of the brain that can lead to AOS include (traumatic) dementia, progressive neurological disorders ... there are differences between the two disorders.[18] Patients with conduction aphasia are typically able to speak fluently, but ...
In Europe, nerve conduction studies and electromyography training may be part of neurology, physical medicine and ... Common muscle and nerve disorders seen by these type of specialists include pinched nerves in the neck or back (radiculopathy ... A more complete listing of disorders and testing can be found under neuromuscular medicine. Clinical neurophysiology, is a ... Electromyography and Neuromuscular Disorders: Clinical-Electrophysiologic Correlations (Expert Consult - Online and Print), 3e ...
ISBN 0-19-850352-0. http://www.teknik.uu.se/ftf/education/Disordered_materials/Ion_conduction.pdf J Chem Phys. ... However, ionic conduction can occur, especially as the temperature increases Ionic conduction in solids has been a subject of ... Ionic conduction (denoted by λ-lambda) is the movement of an ion from one site to another through defects in the crystal ... Ionic conduction is one mechanism of current. In solids, ions typically occupy fixed positions in the crystal lattice and do ...
The use of EMG to identify nervous systems disorders is known as a nerve conduction study (NCS). Nerve conduction studies can ... In most disorders of the muscle, nerve, or neuromuscular junction, the latency time is increased. This is a result of decreased ... Latency is used as a means to diagnose disorders of the nervous system such as a herniated disc, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ... These kinds of studies are used in neuromechanics to identify motor disorders and their effects on a cellular and electrical ...
... s are often used to measure nerve conduction velocity, and are particularly useful for evaluating conduction problems in ... Electromyography and Neuromuscular disorders, Elsevier, 2005.. ... Weber, G.A. Nerve conduction studies and their clinical ...
Common neurological side effects of cisplatin include visual perception and hearing disorder, which can occur soon after ... Neurotoxicity (nerve damage) can be anticipated by performing nerve conduction studies before and after treatment. ...
Like many acquired language disorders, Wernicke's aphasia can be experienced in many different ways and to many different ... Aphasia Expressive aphasia Conduction aphasia Logorrhea Agraphia Paragrammatism Transcortical sensory aphasia Wernicke- ... LaPointe, L. (2005). Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Language Disorders (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Thieme Medical Publishers Inc. ... Thomson, C.K. (2000). "Neuroplasticity: Evidence from aphasia". Journal of Communication Disorders. 33 (4): 357-366. Raymer, A. ...
The conduction of nerve impulses is an example of an all-or-none response. In other words, if a neuron responds at all, then it ... As the disorder progresses, cognitive (intellectual) impairment extends to the domains of language (aphasia), skilled movements ... When myelin degrades, conduction of signals along the nerve can be impaired or lost, and the nerve eventually withers. This ... Parkinson's disease (PD), also known as Parkinson disease, is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that often ...
People with conduction aphasia are typically aware of their errors.[32] Two forms of conduction aphasia have been described: ... Contemporary Issues In Communication Science and Disorders." 35, 85-92. *^ Maddy, K.M.; Capilouto, G.J.; McComas, K.L. "The ... Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders. Jones and Bartlett Learning. p. 7.. *^ "What is Aphasia". Atlanta Aphasia ... "The Aphasias". Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders. p. 93.. *^ Davis & Stanton, 2005. Semantic Feature Analysis ...
"A quantitative description of membrane current and its application to conduction and excitation in nerve". J. Physiol. 117 (4 ...
This discrepancy may well be a result of the physiologic or anatomic disorder (e.g., fibrosis of conductive tissue) leading to ... Heart conduction disturbances: sick sinus syndrome. In: Papadakis MA, Tierney LM, McPhee SJ. Current medical diagnosis & ... Patients with no signs of atrioventricular conduction abnormalities should be treated with an atrial-based pacemaker.18 Pacing ... Update on sick sinus syndrome, a cardiac disorder of aging. Geriatrics. 1990;45:26-30. ...
Cumulative Trauma Disorders And Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Sorting Out The Confusio Abstract about cumulative trauma disorders and ... Erica Nerve conduction study in the legs/update/ramble Michelle Dont know if this will help, but Linda hi, Anne * ... Of all these disorders, carpal tunnel syndrome is the condition most frequently reported. What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS ... Come on, try them now! RSI Yoga: Repetitive Stress Injury and Carpal tunnel syndrome and repetitive stress disorders are ...
You can have a conduction disorder without having an arrhythmia, but some arrhythmias arise from conduction disorders. ... Conduction Disorders. Rhythm versus conduction. Your heart rhythm is the way your heart beats. Conduction is how electrical ... Three common conduction disorders are:. Bundle branch block. Explaining the problem. Normally, electrical impulses travel down ... Some conduction disorders can cause arrhythmias, or irregular heartbeats.. ...
Conduction Disorders in the Canine Proximal His-Purkinje System Following Acute Myocardial Ischemia. II. The Pathophysiology of ... Conduction Disorders in the Canine Proximal His-Purkinje System Following Acute Myocardial Ischemia ... Conduction Disorders in the Canine Proximal His-Purkinje System Following Acute Myocardial Ischemia ... Conduction Disorders in the Canine Proximal His-Purkinje System Following Acute Myocardial Ischemia ...
Purpose Nocturnal cardiac conduction abnormalities are commonly observed in patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). ... Nocturnal cardiac conduction abnormalities are commonly observed in patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). However, ... Sleep-disordered breathing and daytime cardiac conduction abnormalities on 12-lead electrocardiogram in community-dwelling ... a preliminary report from the Sleep Disorders Atlas Task Force of the American Sleep Disorders Association. Sleep 15:173-184 ...
The contribution of epigenetics to heart rhythm disorders... ... Progress of Genomics in Cardiac Conduction and Rhythm Disorders ... Baruteau AE, Probst V, Abriel H. Inherited progressive cardiac conduction disorders. Curr Opin Cardiol. 2015;30(1):33-9.PubMed ... Xu Z., Xiong Q., Shen Y., Hu J., Hong K. (2018) Progress of Genomics in Cardiac Conduction and Rhythm Disorders. In: Jiang H., ... This chapter provides an overview to recent progress of genomics in cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders, including long QT ...
2013). Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders. Nature ... Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders. ... Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders.. ...
Arrhythmia and Conduction Disorders in Acute Inferior Myocardial Infarction with Right Ventricular Involvement. ... Intra ventricular conduction disturbance (IVCD) also were more. frequent in RVMI (29.4% VS 13.1%, p=0.021), especially the RBBB ...
Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders.. Title. ... Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders.. ... Animals, Arrhythmias, Cardiac, Gene Frequency, Genetic Loci, Genome-Wide Association Study, Heart Conduction System, Heart Rate ... In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of ...
If Ventricular Conduction and Rhythm Disorders Are Caused by Bupivacaine, It Is Doubtful That Intraoperative Hyponatremia and ... If Ventricular Conduction and Rhythm Disorders Are Caused by Bupivacaine, It Is Doubtful That Intraoperative Hyponatremia and ... If Ventricular Conduction and Rhythm Disorders Are Caused by Bupivacaine, It Is Doubtful That Intraoperative Hyponatremia and ... Daniel C. Moore; If Ventricular Conduction and Rhythm Disorders Are Caused by Bupivacaine, It Is Doubtful That Intraoperative ...
Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders.. Elevated resting ... In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of ...
Cardiac Conduction Disorders. *In Saxenda clinical trials, 11 (0.3%) of 3384 Saxenda-treated patients compared with none of the ... Metabolism And Nutrition Disorders. Dehydration resulting from nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Renal And Urinary Disorders. ... General Disorders And Administration Site Conditions. Allergic reactions: rash and pruritus. Immune System Disorders. ... Gastrointestinal Disorders. Acute pancreatitis, hemorrhagic and necrotizing pancreatitis, sometimes resulting in death ...
It is difficult to determine from ECG whether this pattern represents true bifascicular block and impending failure of the remaining fascicle, or whether coexistant bifascicular block and first degree AV block are two distinct pathologies ...
Cardiac Conduction Disorders. In Saxenda clinical trials, 11 (0.3%) of 3384 Saxenda-treated patients compared with none of the ... Immune System Disorders. Angioedema and anaphylactic reactions [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. Hepatobiliary Disorders. ... Metabolism And Nutrition Disorders. Dehydration resulting from nausea, vomiting and diarrhea [see ADVERSE REACTIONS] ... Renal And Urinary Disorders. Increased serum creatinine, acute renal failure or worsening of chronic renal failure, sometimes ...
... Bundle Branch Block. Normally, electrical impulses travel down the right and left branches of the ...
... and treatments for conduction disorders, which are problems with the electrical signals that make your heart beat. ... Types - Conduction Disorders. There are many types of conduction disorders that can occur anywhere along the cardiac conduction ... Conduction Disorders Different conduction disorders have different triggers. Depending on your disorder, your doctor may ask ... Living With - Conduction Disorders. If you have been diagnosed with a conduction disorder, it is important that you continue ...
Short Description: Other specified conduction disorders Long Description: Other specified conduction disorders This is the 2018 ... 310 - CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA AND CONDUCTION DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC. Convert to ICD-9 General Equivalence Map. The ICD-10 and ICD- ... 309 - CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA AND CONDUCTION DISORDERS WITH CC. * ... Other conduction disorders (I45). *I45.89 - Other specified ... 308 - CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA AND CONDUCTION DISORDERS WITH MCC. * ...
Duke Childrens treats and cares for children with neuromuscular disorders. We help maintain your childs level of motor ... Nerve Conduction Test Measures the ability of nerves to send electrical impulses to the muscle, which can identify nerve damage ... NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS Ongoing Care There is currently no cure for neuromuscular diseases; treatment targets your childs ... NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS Tests Evaluating your child for neuromuscular disease includes a complete medical and family history ...
Type I second degree AV block occurs when there is progressively delayed AV transmission eventually resulting in a missed QRS complex.
Unique page for ECG Identification of Conduction Disorders ... Learn ECG Identification of Conduction Disorders and more ECG ... ECG Identification of Conduction Disorders. Authored by Dr Gurvinder Rull, Reviewed by Dr Anjum Gandhi , Last edited 26 May ... ECG Identification of Conduction Disorders. In this article. * The hearts pacemaker and conducting systems - electrocardiogram ... Endocrine and metabolic disorders such as hyperkalaemia, hypermagnesaemia and Addisons disease.. *Disorders of the myocardium ...
Targeted next-generation sequencing provides novel clues for associated epilepsy and cardiac conduction disorder/SUDEP. PLoS ... Targeted next-generation sequencing provides novel clues for associated epilepsy and cardiac conduction disorder/SUDEP. In: ... Targeted next-generation sequencing provides novel clues for associated epilepsy and cardiac conduction disorder/SUDEP. / Coll ... title = "Targeted next-generation sequencing provides novel clues for associated epilepsy and cardiac conduction disorder/SUDEP ...
7. Conduction Blocks. 8. Congestive Heart Failure, Pulmonary Edema, and Hypertensive Crisis. 9. Cardiogenic Shock. 10. ... 2. Diagnosis and Treatment of Cardiovascular Disorders. 3. The Normal. ECG. 4. The 12-Lead ECG. 5. Hemodynamic Monitoring. 6. ... Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Disorders. 16. Alternative Methods of Ventilatory Support. 17. Acute Respiratory ...
Lyme carditis should be considered in younger patients with atrioventricular conduction disorders, even without a history of ... arthralgia in combination with conduction disorders), signs of Lyme disease (tick bite, erythema migrans) and laboratory ... The most common finding in Lyme carditis is an atrioventricular block related to dysfunction of the conduction system; in some ... The total atrioventricular block usually disappears within a week and the other conduction abnormalities within a period of six ...
... see here the disorder-specific approach to screening from detecting conduction and structural disorders through to arrhythmias ... I - Conduction disorders 1) Bundle branch block (BBB). Partial right BBB (RBBB pattern but QRS,120ms) is commonly found in ... ECG and prolonged ECG monitoring can detect conduction disorders, arrhythmias and channelopathies although we need to be ... Disorder-specific approaches to screening for inherited cardiac diseases, described. An article from the e-journal of the ESC ...
Cardiac Disorders Essay. CARDIAC DISORDERS DISORDER WHAT IT IS S & S TREATMENT/NURSING INTERVENTIONS MEDS EXTRA NOTES CORONARY ... The main symptoms for Kss are degeneration of the retina, abnormalities of cardiac electrical conduction. The other disorder ... As for treatment there really isnt a cure for the disorder. The treatment that are… Show More ... Also the most common disorder in mitochondrial disease is growth retardation, short stature. Theses symptoms will occur for KSS ...
  • and, substantially free from howling produced between the bone conduction speaker (1) and the. (google.com.au)
  • and, substantially free from howling produced between the bone conduction speaker ( 1 ) and the microphone ( 2 ), and has its headband ( 3 ) run round the back part and the top part of the head. (google.com.au)
  • At least one of the head pads ( 5 ) carries both the bone conduction speaker ( 1 ) and the microphone ( 2 ). (google.com.au)
  • wherein said speaker mounting arm is rotatably mounted on said head pad in a plane through the speaker mounting arm the head pad and the bone conduction speaker. (google.com.au)
  • 5. The headset as set forth in claim 1 , wherein said bone conduction speaker is held in abutting contact with an area in front of the ear of said user when said headset is worn by said user. (google.com.au)
  • 8. The headset as set forth in claim 1 , wherein said microphone is constructed of a bone conduction microphone. (google.com.au)
  • The present invention relates to a headset, and more particularly to a headset provided with both a bone conduction speaker and a microphone to provide a two-way speech means and is capable of being worn on a wearer's head through a headband in use. (google.com.au)
  • https://jshd.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=1783199 Physical and Physiological Constraints on the Use of Bone-Conduction Speech Audiometry Several authors have recommended the use of bone-conduction speech audiometry, and the literature supports the clinical value of this procedure. (asha.org)
  • Several authors have recommended the use of bone-conduction speech audiometry, and the literature supports the clinical value of this procedure. (asha.org)
  • They are percuteaneous osseointegrated bone anchored hearing aid, Vibrant Soundbridge middle ear implant, Bonebridge bone conduction system, and Carina fully implantable hearing device. (hindawi.com)
  • In addition, the cosmetic concerns of a conventional bone conduction hearing aid often lead to a relatively low compliance rate. (hindawi.com)
  • It represented a major milestone in the evolution of bone conduction hearing amplification [ 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Forty to 140 min after ligation conduction was impaired in either the Rb or Lb showing complete BBB both at rapid heart rates (tachycardia-dependent) and slow rates (bradycardia-dependent) with normal QRS or incomplete BBB at control rates. (ahajournals.org)
  • 2017). Conduction disorders & cardiac pacing. (mhmedical.com)
  • Ben-Zvi, R., H. Scher and B. Berkowitz (2017) Two-dimensional Finite Element Method solution of a class of integro-differential equations: Application to non-Fickian transport in disordered media, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering , doi:10.1002/nme.5524. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • CTS is a common disorder affecting approximately 3.8% of the population and results in a significant number of lost days of work and productivity (Durham & VanRavenstein, 2017). (nursingcenter.com)
  • First-degree heart block is a relative contra-indication to the use of drugs that may delay AV nodal conduction (such as those listed above) and they must be used with caution in this scenario and preferably under specialised supervision. (51digg.info)
  • Gorza L, Saggin L, Sartore S, Ausoni S. An embryonic-like myosin heavy chain is transiently expressed in nodal conduction tissue of the rat heart. (springer.com)
  • Ben-Zvi, R., H. Scher, S. Jiang and B. Berkowitz (2016) One-dimensional finite element method solution of a class of integro-differential equations: Application to non-Fickian transport in disordered media, Transport in Porous Media , 239-263, doi:10.1007/s11242-016-0712-0. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • This book is a review of basic physiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and diagnostic methods with emphasis on electrophysiology in disorders of muscle and neuromuscular junction, including fatigue. (elsevier.com)
  • The evolution of bilateral bundle branch block (BBB) was studied in ten anesthetized dogs by recording electrical activity from the bundle of His (Hb), right (Rb) and left bundles (Lb) for precise localization and characterization of the conduction disorder. (ahajournals.org)
  • Unequal delay in both bundles (unequal 1° bilateral BBB) gave rise to prolonged H-V interval and a QRS pattern of incomplete or complete bundle branch block corresponding to the branch in which the conduction delay was greater. (ahajournals.org)
  • as many as 25-30% of patients with sinus node dysfunction have evidence of AV and bundle branch conduction delay or block. (mhmedical.com)
  • METHODS: For a group of 49 children undergoing assessment for potential Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery, CMCT was derived from the latency of MEPs invoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex and from peripheral conduction times. (foundationdystoniaresearch.org)
  • Exemplary methods for affecting conduction and/or operation of the AV node and/or AV bundle. (google.com)
  • Various exemplary methods include delivery of one or more stimulation pulses to affect conduction and/or operation of an AV node and/or AV bundle. (google.com)
  • Conduction aphasia, also called associative aphasia, is a relatively rare form of aphasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • These authors suggested an exclusive deficit of auditory-verbal short-term memory in repetition conduction aphasia whereas the other variant was assumed to reflect disrupted phonological encoding mechanism, afflicting confrontation tasks such as repetition, reading and naming in a similar manner. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies have suggested that conduction aphasia is a result of damage specifically to the left superior temporal gyrus and/or the left supra marginal gyrus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The classical explanation for conduction aphasia is that of a disconnection between the brain areas responsible for speech comprehension (Wernicke's area) and speech production (Broca's area), due specifically to damage to the arcuate fasciculus, a deep white matter tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conduction aphasia is a relatively mild language impairment, and most patients return to day-to-day life. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms of conduction aphasia, as with other aphasias, can be transient, lasting only several hours or a few days. (wikipedia.org)