Conditioning, Classical: Learning that takes place when a conditioned stimulus is paired with an unconditioned stimulus.Psychology, Clinical: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological methods of recognizing and treating behavior disorders.Conditioning (Psychology): A general term referring to the learning of some particular response.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Conditioning, Eyelid: Reflex closure of the eyelid occurring as a result of classical conditioning.Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Conditioning, Operant: Learning situations in which the sequence responses of the subject are instrumental in producing reinforcement. When the correct response occurs, which involves the selection from among a repertoire of responses, the subject is immediately reinforced.Psychology, Comparative: The branch of psychology concerned with similarities or differences in the behavior of different animal species or of different races or peoples.Psychology, Experimental: The branch of psychology which seeks to learn more about the fundamental causes of behavior by studying various psychologic phenomena in controlled experimental situations.Blinking: Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.Association Learning: The principle that items experienced together enter into a connection, so that one tends to reinstate the other.Psychology, Educational: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological aspects of teaching and the formal learning process in school.Psychology, Medical: A branch of psychology in which there is collaboration between psychologists and physicians in the management of medical problems. It differs from clinical psychology, which is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of behavior disorders.Psychology, Industrial: The branch of applied psychology concerned with the application of psychologic principles and methods to industrial problems including selection and training of workers, working conditions, etc.Electroshock: Induction of a stress reaction in experimental subjects by means of an electrical shock; applies to either convulsive or non-convulsive states.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Freezing Reaction, Cataleptic: An induced response to threatening stimuli characterized by the cessation of body movements, except for those that are involved with BREATHING, and the maintenance of an immobile POSTURE.Air Conditioning: The maintenance of certain aspects of the environment within a defined space to facilitate the function of that space; aspects controlled include air temperature and motion, radiant heat level, moisture, and concentration of pollutants such as dust, microorganisms, and gases. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Extinction, Psychological: The procedure of presenting the conditioned stimulus without REINFORCEMENT to an organism previously conditioned. It refers also to the diminution of a conditioned response resulting from this procedure.Avoidance Learning: A response to a cue that is instrumental in avoiding a noxious experience.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Busulfan: An alkylating agent having a selective immunosuppressive effect on BONE MARROW. It has been used in the palliative treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (MYELOID LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC), but although symptomatic relief is provided, no permanent remission is brought about. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), busulfan is listed as a known carcinogen.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Retention (Psychology): The persistence to perform a learned behavior (facts or experiences) after an interval has elapsed in which there has been no performance or practice of the behavior.Economics, Behavioral: The combined discipline of psychology and economics that investigates what happens in markets in which some of the agents display human limitations and complications.Behavioral Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.Ecological and Environmental Phenomena: Ecological and environmental entities, characteristics, properties, relationships and processes.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Galvanic Skin Response: A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.Vidarabine: A nucleoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It has some antineoplastic properties and has broad spectrum activity against DNA viruses in cell cultures and significant antiviral activity against infections caused by a variety of viruses such as the herpes viruses, the VACCINIA VIRUS and varicella zoster virus.Gestalt Theory: A system which emphasizes that experience and behavior contain basic patterns and relationships which cannot be reduced to simpler components; that is, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.Myeloablative Agonists: Agents that destroy bone marrow activity. They are used to prepare patients for BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION or STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Behaviorism: A psychologic theory, developed by John Broadus Watson, concerned with studying and measuring behaviors that are observable.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Appetitive Behavior: Animal searching behavior. The variable introductory phase of an instinctive behavior pattern or sequence, e.g., looking for food, or sequential courtship patterns prior to mating.Unconscious (Psychology): Those forces and content of the mind which are not ordinarily available to conscious awareness or to immediate recall.Rats, Long-Evans: An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Psychophysiology: The study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior.Cognitive Science: The study of the precise nature of different mental tasks and the operations of the brain that enable them to be performed, engaging branches of psychology, computer science, philosophy, and linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Self Psychology: Psychoanalytic theory focusing on interpretation of behavior in reference to self. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Terms, 1994) This elaboration of the psychoanalytic concepts of narcissism and the self, was developed by Heinz Kohut, and stresses the importance of the self-awareness of excessive needs for approval and self-gratification.Displacement (Psychology): The process by which an emotional or behavioral response that is appropriate for one situation appears in another situation for which it is inappropriate.Psychology, Military: The branch of applied psychology concerned with psychological aspects of selection, assignment, training, morale, etc., of Armed Forces personnel.Transplantation Chimera: An organism that, as a result of transplantation of donor tissue or cells, consists of two or more cell lines descended from at least two zygotes. This state may result in the induction of donor-specific TRANSPLANTATION TOLERANCE.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Psychology, Applied: The science which utilizes psychologic principles to derive more effective means in dealing with practical problems.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Neurobiology: The study of the structure, growth, activities, and functions of NEURONS and the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Startle Reaction: A complex involuntary response to an unexpected strong stimulus usually auditory in nature.Codependency (Psychology): A relational pattern in which a person attempts to derive a sense of purpose through relationships with others.Latency Period (Psychology): The period from about 5 to 7 years to adolescence when there is an apparent cessation of psychosexual development.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Nictitating Membrane: A fold of the mucous membrane of the CONJUNCTIVA in many animals. At rest, it is hidden in the medial canthus. It can extend to cover part or all of the cornea to help clean the CORNEA.Reward: An object or a situation that can serve to reinforce a response, to satisfy a motive, or to afford pleasure.Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Personal Construct Theory: A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Introversion (Psychology): A state in which attention is largely directed inward upon one's self.Character: In current usage, approximately equivalent to personality. The sum of the relatively fixed personality traits and habitual modes of response of an individual.Neuropsychology: A branch of psychology which investigates the correlation between experience or behavior and the basic neurophysiological processes. The term neuropsychology stresses the dominant role of the nervous system. It is a more narrowly defined field than physiological psychology or psychophysiology.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Criminal Psychology: The branch of psychology which investigates the psychology of crime with particular reference to the personality factors of the criminal.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Ego: The conscious portion of the personality structure which serves to mediate between the demands of the primitive instinctual drives, (the id), of internalized parental and social prohibitions or the conscience, (the superego), and of reality.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Child Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in children.Antilymphocyte Serum: Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.Cerebellar Nuclei: Four clusters of neurons located deep within the WHITE MATTER of the CEREBELLUM, which are the nucleus dentatus, nucleus emboliformis, nucleus globosus, and nucleus fastigii.Cerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Imprinting (Psychology): A particular kind of learning characterized by occurrence in very early life, rapidity of acquisition, and relative insusceptibility to forgetting or extinction. Imprinted behavior includes most (or all) behavior commonly called instinctive, but imprinting is used purely descriptively.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.H-Reflex: A monosynaptic reflex elicited by stimulating a nerve, particularly the tibial nerve, with an electric shock.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Mental Recall: The process whereby a representation of past experience is elicited.Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Lymnaea: A genus of dextrally coiled freshwater snails that includes some species of importance as intermediate hosts of parasitic flukes.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Muscimol: A neurotoxic isoxazole isolated from species of AMANITA. It is obtained by decarboxylation of IBOTENIC ACID. Muscimol is a potent agonist of GABA-A RECEPTORS and is used mainly as an experimental tool in animal and tissue studies.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Memory, Long-Term: Remembrance of information from 3 or more years previously.Race Relations: Cultural contacts between people of different races.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Regression (Psychology): A return to earlier, especially to infantile, patterns of thought or behavior, or stage of functioning, e.g., feelings of helplessness and dependency in a patient with a serious physical illness. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994).Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Systems Theory: Principles, models, and laws that apply to complex interrelationships and interdependencies of sets of linked components which form a functioning whole, a system. Any system may be composed of components which are systems in their own right (sub-systems), such as several organs within an individual organism.Melphalan: An alkylating nitrogen mustard that is used as an antineoplastic in the form of the levo isomer - MELPHALAN, the racemic mixture - MERPHALAN, and the dextro isomer - MEDPHALAN; toxic to bone marrow, but little vesicant action; potential carcinogen.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Psychoanalytic Theory: Conceptual system developed by Freud and his followers in which unconscious motivations are considered to shape normal and abnormal personality development and behavior.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Hermissenda: A genus of marine sea slugs in the family Glaucidae, superorder GASTROPODA, found on the Pacific coast of North America. They are used in behavioral and neurological laboratory studies.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Habituation, Psychophysiologic: The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.Transference (Psychology): The unconscious transfer to others (including psychotherapists) of feelings and attitudes which were originally associated with important figures (parents, siblings, etc.) in one's early life.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Mice, Inbred C57BLNeurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Aplysia: An opisthobranch mollusk of the order Anaspidea. It is used frequently in studies of nervous system development because of its large identifiable neurons. Aplysiatoxin and its derivatives are not biosynthesized by Aplysia, but acquired by ingestion of Lyngbya (seaweed) species.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Long-Term Potentiation: A persistent increase in synaptic efficacy, usually induced by appropriate activation of the same synapses. The phenomenological properties of long-term potentiation suggest that it may be a cellular mechanism of learning and memory.Mollusca: A phylum of the kingdom Metazoa. Mollusca have soft, unsegmented bodies with an anterior head, a dorsal visceral mass, and a ventral foot. Most are encased in a protective calcareous shell. It includes the classes GASTROPODA; BIVALVIA; CEPHALOPODA; Aplacophora; Scaphopoda; Polyplacophora; and Monoplacophora.BooksPsychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Chimerism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from different individuals. This contrasts with MOSAICISM in which the different cell populations are derived from a single individual.Countertransference (Psychology): Conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient which may interfere with treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Discrimination Learning: Learning that is manifested in the ability to respond differentially to various stimuli.Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of stem cells collected from the peripheral blood. It is a less invasive alternative to direct marrow harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells. Enrichment of stem cells in peripheral blood can be achieved by inducing mobilization of stem cells from the BONE MARROW.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Neural Inhibition: The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Inhibition (Psychology): The interference with or prevention of a behavioral or verbal response even though the stimulus for that response is present; in psychoanalysis the unconscious restraining of an instinctual process.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Individuality: Those psychological characteristics which differentiate individuals from one another.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Forgiveness: Excusing or pardoning for an offense or release of anger or resentment.TurtlesKnowledge of Results (Psychology): A principle that learning is facilitated when the learner receives immediate evaluation of learning performance. The concept also hypothesizes that learning is facilitated when the learner is promptly informed whether a response is correct, and, if incorrect, of the direction of error.Transfer (Psychology): Change in learning in one situation due to prior learning in another situation. The transfer can be positive (with second learning improved by first) or negative (where the reverse holds).Histocompatibility: The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.Physical Conditioning, Animal: Diet modification and physical exercise to improve the ability of animals to perform physical activities.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of STEM CELLS collected from the fetal blood remaining in the UMBILICAL CORD and the PLACENTA after delivery. Included are the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Allied Health Occupations: Occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians, and are qualified by special training and, frequently, by licensure to work in supporting roles in the health care field. These occupations include, but are not limited to, medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Concept Formation: A cognitive process involving the formation of ideas generalized from the knowledge of qualities, aspects, and relations of objects.Neurophysiology: The scientific discipline concerned with the physiology of the nervous system.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Psychopathology: The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Synapses: Specialized junctions at which a neuron communicates with a target cell. At classical synapses, a neuron's presynaptic terminal releases a chemical transmitter stored in synaptic vesicles which diffuses across a narrow synaptic cleft and activates receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the target cell. The target may be a dendrite, cell body, or axon of another neuron, or a specialized region of a muscle or secretory cell. Neurons may also communicate via direct electrical coupling with ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES. Several other non-synaptic chemical or electric signal transmitting processes occur via extracellular mediated interactions.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Psychopharmacology: The study of the effects of drugs on mental and behavioral activity.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Creativity: The ability to generate new ideas or images.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Amnesia, Retrograde: Loss of the ability to recall information that had been previously encoded in memory prior to a specified or approximate point in time. This process may be organic or psychogenic in origin. Organic forms may be associated with CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENTS; SEIZURES; DEMENTIA; and a wide variety of other conditions that impair cerebral function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp426-9)Games, Experimental: Games designed to provide information on hypotheses, policies, procedures, or strategies.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.
"Under some conditions, all admissible procedures are either Bayes procedures or limits of Bayes procedures (in various senses ... Journal of Experimental Psychology (1966) 72: 346-354)". In Jie W. Weiss; David J. Weiss (eds.). A Science of Decision Making: ... In the table, the values 2, 3, 6 and 9 give the relative weights of each corresponding condition and case. The figures denote ... Robins, James; Wasserman, Larry (2000). "Conditioning, likelihood, and coherence: A review of some foundational concepts". JASA ...
A. C. Paranjpe (2006). Self and Identity in Modern Psychology and Indian Thought. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 172. ... are compounded objects in a continuous change of condition, subject to decline and destruction.[1][2] All physical and mental ... "And if the nature which is measured is subject to the same conditions as the time which measures it, this nature itself has no ... all conditioned things are painful, all dhammas are without Self".[9] ...
Zusne, Leonard; Jones, Warren H. (2014). Anomalistic Psychology: A Study of Magical Thinking. Psychology Press. p. 216. ISBN ... Sound waves are deflected just as light waves are reflected by the intervention of a proper medium and under certain conditions ... 1989). Anomalistic Psychology: A Study of Magical Thinking. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. p. 212. ISBN 978-0-805-80507-9 ... Tyson, Philip John; Jones, Dai; Elcock, Jonathan (9 September 2011). Psychology in Social Context: Issues and Debates. John ...
For example, this situation arises when a person in a position of authority imposes two contradictory conditions but there ... Systems psychology. *Dilemmas. *1956 introductions. Hidden categories: *CS1: long volume value. *Articles with short ...
In light of his second drug relapse and current condition, Garcia checked himself into the Betty Ford Center during July 1995. ... "Psychology Today. He died of a heart attack.. *^ Stratton 2010 *^ Stratton 2010 ... Despite these improvements, Garcia's physical and mental condition continued to decline throughout 1993 and 1994. Due to his ... frail condition, he began to use narcotics again to dull the pain. ...
"Psychology Today. Retrieved 17 July 2007.. *^ Jill Neimark. "The beefcaking of America". Psychology Today Nov-Dec 1994 (web ... Conditions. Main article: Micropenis. An adult penis with an erect length of less than 7 cm or 2.76 inches but otherwise formed ... In a cover story by Psychology Today,[33][34] 1,500 readers (about two-thirds women) were surveyed about male body image. Many ... Abingdon-on-Thames, England: Psychology Press. p. 254. ISBN 978-0-415-22366-9. .. CS1 maint: ref=harv (link). ...
In that condition, this army had to repel a new invasion of the province of Mesopotamia by Shapur I, ruler of the Sassanid ... Psychology Press. p. 1156. ISBN 9780415922302. .. ReferencesEdit. Primary sourcesEdit. *Aurelius Victor, Epitome de Caesaribus ...
Workers will be forced to accept worsening wages and conditions, as a global labor market results in a "race to the bottom". ... Journal of Economic Psychology. 57: 86-101. doi:10.1016/j.joep.2016.10.002. hdl:10419/114164.. ... Their activity today centers on collective bargaining over wages, benefits, and working conditions for their membership, and on ... Increased international competition creates a pressure to reduce the wages and conditions of workers.[48] ...
Psychiatry, clinical psychology. Kata. opsional. Symptoms. symptoms. Brief description of most common symptoms (or symptom ... Dokumentasi di atas ditransklusikan dari Templat:Infobox medical condition (new)/doc. (sunting , versi terdahulu) Penyunting ... Common terms for the illness or condition.. Contoh. Upper respiratory tract infection - "common cold", "bug", "snuffles". Kata ... Infobox medical condition (new) ,name = ,synonym = ,image = ,image_size = ,alt = ,caption = ,pronounce = ,penderita = ,!--jika ...
Please do not remove this message until conditions to do so are met. (July 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template ... Flügel's Psychology of Clothes in 1930,[5] and Newburgh's seminal Physiology of Heat Regulation and The Science of Clothing in ... "Workers' Conditions in the Textile and Clothing Sector: Just an Asian Affair?" European Parliament, Aug. 2014. www.europarl. ... Flugel, John Carl (1976) [1930], The Psychology of Clothes, International Psycho-analytical Library, No.18, New York: AMS Press ...
He was unwittingly proposing a return to the condition of the early Middle Ages, when the Jews had been in agriculture. Forced ... Ph.D. diss., Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 1996.. *Goldhagen, Daniel. Hitler's Willing Executioners. Vintage, 1997 ... He expressed concern for the poor conditions in which they were forced to live, and insisted that anyone denying that Jesus was ...
Hersen P, Sturmey M (2012). Handbook of evidence-based practice in clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. pp. 594-5. ISBN 978 ... TMD is a symptom complex rather than a single condition, and it is thought to be caused by multiple factors.[5][6] However, ... Temporomandibular disorders were described as early as ancient Egypt.[24] An older name for the condition is "Costen's syndrome ... TMD has been suggested to be associated with other conditions or factors, with varying degrees evidence and some more commonly ...
Humanistic psychology also had major impetus from existentialist psychology and shares many of the fundamental tenets. Terror ... As a condition of freedom is facticity, this includes one's facticity, but not to the degree that this facticity can in any way ... Facticity is both a limitation and a condition of freedom. It is a limitation in that a large part of one's facticity consists ... One of the most prolific writers on techniques and theory of existentialist psychology in the USA is Irvin D. Yalom. Yalom ...
Often, these hazards are exacerbated by the conditions of the local environment as a result of the natural disaster.[4] While ... Warm and humid condition encourages mold growth; therefore, standing water and excess moisture after a natural disaster would ... Information on feeding schedules, medical conditions, behavior problems, and the name and telephone number of your veterinarian ... Non-infectious skin conditions may also occur including miliaria, immersion foot syndrome (including trench foot), and contact ...
The OODA loop also serves to explain the nature of surprise and shaping operations in a way that unifies Gestalt psychology, ... Thus, a hodgepodge of confusion and disorder occur to cause him to over- or under-react to conditions or activities that appear ... That is, operate at a faster tempo to generate rapidly changing conditions that inhibit your opponent from adapting or reacting ... and conscious application of the process gives a business advantage over a competitor who is merely reacting to conditions as ...
Another is fingles, insinuated in Eric to be an important part of human psychology. Their absence, according to the Creator, ... In keeping with the Discworld's affinity for narrative, Überwald's climate and conditions contrive to fulfil human expectations ... which is an elephant who has evolved hermit crab-like living conditions. ...
Many conditions, such as this case of geographic tongue, can be diagnosed partly on gross examination, but may be confirmed ... Informed heavily by both psychology and neurology, its purpose is to classify mental illness, elucidate its underlying causes, ... Owing to the availability of the oral cavity to non-invasive examination, many conditions in the study of oral disease can be ... Rudimentary understanding of many conditions was present in most early societies and is attested to in the records of the ...
... helps evaluate and improve the living conditions of the residence halls.[66] ... Psychiatry/Psychology. 38 Social Sciences & Public Health. 48 Space Science. 15 Surgery. 36 ...
The psychology department at The New School has had issues with sexual harassment. According to a December 2017 account in the ... left the New School under the same conditions.[53] In April 2018, a former undergraduate student filed a lawsuit against the ...
In behavioral psychology (or applied behavior analysis), stimulus control is a phenomenon in operant conditioning (also called ... Establishing stimulus control through operant conditioning[edit]. Main articles: Operant conditioning, Three-term contingency, ... Hanson, H. M. (1959). "Effects of discrimination training on stimulus generalization". Journal of Experimental Psychology. 58: ... In simple, practical situations, for example if one were training a dog using operant conditioning, optimal stimulus control ...
One of the conditions of Feynman's scholarship to Princeton was that he could not be married; nevertheless, he continued to see ... "Psychology Today. Retrieved January 6, 2017.. *^ Schweber 1994, p. 374. *^ "Richard Feynman - Biography". Atomic Archive. ...
This exclusion was later appealed in the courts, both because of the treaty conditions and in some cases because of possible ... Psychology Press, p. 27, ISBN 978-0-415-94586-8. ... were done under rushed conditions by a variety of recorders. ...
"Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines. 54 (10): 1120-34. doi:10.1111/jcpp.12114. PMC 3829379. PMID ... Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a human genetic condition caused by mutations to a gene coding for a particular liver enzyme. In the ... "Annual Review of Clinical Psychology. 7: 383-409. doi:10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-032210-104518. PMC 3647367. PMID 21219196.. ... In the clinic, typically assessed risks of these conditions include blood lipids (triglyceride, and HDL, LDL and total ...
... its structure recording the varying conditions during its crystallisation similarly on each of its six arms.[5] Crystals have a ... Philosophy of psychology. *Philosophy of self. *Philosophy of space and time. *Teleology ... there are events and patterns in nature that never exactly repeat because extremely small differences in starting conditions ...
"Developmental Psychology. 17 (5): 595-603. doi:10.1037/0012-1649.17.5.595.. *^ Kohlberg, Lawrence; Carol Gilligan (1971). The ... The theory holds that moral reasoning, a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for ethical behavior,[4] has six ... Woolfolk, Anita (2012). Educational Psychology. Prentice Hall. p. 101. ISBN 9780132893589. .. *^ Waller, Bruce (2005). Consider ... 2002). "The 100 Most Eminent Psychologists of the 20th Century". Review of General Psychology. 6 (2): 139-15. CiteSeerX 10.1. ...
J. L. Mackie argues that usual talk of "cause" in fact refers to INUS conditions (insufficient but non-redundant parts of a ... Psychology[edit]. Main article: Causal reasoning. Psychologists take an empirical approach to causality, investigating how ... Within psychology, Patricia Cheng[9] attempted to reconcile the Humean and Kantian views. According to her power PC theory, ... See Causal Reasoning (Psychology) for more information. Statistics and economics[edit]. Statistics and economics usually employ ...
... as in Jungian psychology) Junoesque - Juno, of Roman mythology Juvenalian - Juvenal (as in Juvenalian satire) Kafkaesque - ... as in Pavlovian conditioning) Pecksniffian - Seth Pecksniff, Dickens' fictional character Pelagian - Pelagius (as in Pelagian ... as in Classical Adlerian psychology) Aegean - Aegeus, of Greek mythology (as in Aegean Sea) Aeolian - Aeolus, of Greek ...
Rosenstand, Nina (2002). The Human Condition: An Introduction to Philosophy of Human Nature. McGraw-Hill. p. 42. ISBN ... Vonk, Jennifer; Shackelford, Todd K. (13 February 2012). The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Evolutionary Psychology. Oxford ... perhaps in response to more arid conditions inland.[166] Establishing a reliance on predictable shellfish deposits, for example ... in behavior has been speculated to have been a consequence of an earlier climatic change to much drier and colder conditions ...
Contact Us About Us Terms & Conditions Privacy Policy Visit US.HumanKinetics.com ... This current special issue of the Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology was conceived and developed to provide a resource for ... We briefly detail the nature of PTSD and discuss how sport psychology services can be implemented alongside a parallel clinical ... In Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology Volume 13 (2019): Issue 3 (Sep 2019) ...
There are also many confounders that could be secretly nudging the results, such as family conditions, prenatal medicines, and ... but researchers at the University of Birminghams School of Psychology wanted to see if a similar connection existed between ... www.birmingham.ac.uk/staff/profiles/psychology/marwaha-steven.aspx target=_blank,Steven Marwaha,/a,, professor of psychiatry ... according to a recent study out of the University of Birminghams School of Psychology. ...
There are also many confounders that could be secretly nudging the results, such as family conditions, prenatal medicines, and ... but researchers at the University of Birminghams School of Psychology wanted to see if a similar connection existed between ... www.birmingham.ac.uk/staff/profiles/psychology/marwaha-steven.aspx target=_blank,Steven Marwaha,/a,, professor of psychiatry ... according to a recent study out of the University of Birminghams School of Psychology. ...
This condition can be caused by a sudden increase in activity, increased intensity of training or by improper foot support from ... Sport Psychology: Rehabilitating the Mind Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.. ... What should you do if you suspect you have either condition? First, see a medical professional to properly diagnose and treat ...
Psychology. Real Estate Directorate. Student and Educational Affairs. The Netherlands Institute Morocco. University Services ...
Choosing healthy foods is important. But staying away from unhealthy foods is equally as important. This list will help you understand which foods to avoid.
But Lukovs true medical condition wasnt quite so grim. The tumor did have a driver-a third mutation few oncologists test for ... But Kraft says he quickly realized that "a lot of people, in gaming, IT, Big Data, devices, virtual reality, psychology-they ... Did Lukov ultimately get the right treatment? Did his oncologist make the connection between KRAS and his condition, and order ... The eventual goal is to expand the programs capabilities, so that it can monitor conditions throughout the hospital. "You ...
... had had very little treatment for their condition and were heavy smokers before their diagnosis. ...
... psychology (10) pubic health (3) public broadcasting (5) public health (279) public lands (107) public notice (40) public ... It has a moderate Southern latitude temperature range; it has ideal growing conditions," Smith said. "A lot of the texture of ... and soon a health condition made her choose between oral surgery and textbooks for the semester; textbooks lost.. "In the rural ...
And we dont see a lot of younger patients without underlying conditions. Ones that have passed away have been very sick. But ... For providers, theres a really complex psychology to all this. Everyone realizes the importance of what theyre doing but ...
Although miners with evidence of black lung on their chest X-rays are eligible to request a job transfer, few do so, according to a recent study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Black lung disease refers to a group of lung diseases caused by breathing in coal mine dust. The disease can cause severe problems like shortness of breath, and can even be fatal, but limiting exposure to coal mine dust can prevent it. While often thought of as a disease . . .
Please be book to be this g. delivery is a vibrational emancipation of available condition hard led for past Comments, and all ... Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 50, 101-122. religious element of the Cognitive Science Society( amygdala Nature Publishing ... automatically small condition( this ia always or no science suggests minimized always). These notes are being the solution at a ... CCTA with devices and music conditions, is best Views in things to use our ia link set as a instruction of levels. FAO has good ...
John and I both have Masters in the mental health field (John has a Masters in Psychology, while I have a Masters in Psych ... Estelle, exposed conditions in Texas prisons which proved unconstitutionally inhumane, including the use of inmates as guards ...
Other co-authors of the study are Stephanie Greer and Jared Saletin at UC Berkeleys Department of Psychology, and Jack ... Diseases & Conditions. *Blood, Heart and Circulation *Blood Pressure. *Heart disease. *Bones and Muscles *Rheumatoid Arthritis ... a professor of psychology and neuroscience at UC Berkeley and senior author of the paper, to be published tomorrow (Wednesday, ... a UC Berkeley doctoral student in psychology and lead author of the study. "This study helps us understand that causal ...
Psychology has been used for political purposes in despotic states such as the former Soviet Union, where dissidents were ... Without exhaustive trawling of climate blogs, large and small, it would be hard to know if a person had met the condition you ... A quick Googling of Brembs shows little in the climate arena, nothing in psychology, no more leftist thought than many of the ... One could imagine, for example, a public figure being undermined because of a psychology paper that psychoanalyzed him or her ...
The ability of organisms to turn pain up and down under different conditions has been linked to changes in brain function, with ... Psychology offers a long tradition of research on global positive emotion constructs such as happiness, joy, and positive ... Michelle Shiota, Dept of Psychology, Arizona State University. Title: Beyond Happiness: The Case for Research on Discrete ...
Transient Neural Activation in Human Amygdala Involved in Aversive Conditioning of Face and Voice ... cognitive psychology, neurobiology, linguistics, computer science, and philosophy. JOCN is an online-only publication and is ...
Freezing is a species-typical defensive reaction to conditioned threats. While the neural circuitry of aversive Pavlovian ... as a condition for further study. In this dissertation, I present findings from three studies ... ... causal theory of the conditions that tend to elicit different ... ...
Not really....the conditions used in the experiments by Zotev et al.et al. - having a handy fMRI machine nearby - are not ... The whole brain data analysis revealed significant differences for Happy Memories versus Rest condition between the ... evolutionary psychology (137) * evolutionary psypchology (5) * exercise (29) * faces (131) * fear (12) ...
Interning with Dumbo Feather Contact us Advertise with us How we partner Why were a B Corp Privacy policy Terms and conditions ...
Terms & Conditions Privacy Policy * Would you like to be regularly informed by e-mail about our new publications in your fields ... that an interdisciplinary exchange of sociolinguistics with its neighbouring disciplines like social psychology and sociology ...
Conditions***Addictions*Substance Use Symptoms. *Opioid Use Symptoms. *Substance Use Treatment. *ADHD Overview*Adult ADHD ...
The neurobiology and mechanisms discovered in animals often do not translate to patients with a chronic pain condition. To help ... Topics range from the physiology and psychology of pain and principles of palliative care to management of patients with ... Cancer researchers interested in studying the mechanisms and psychology of pain, as well as clinical drug trials ... Orofacial Pains 24 chapters address the epidemiologic, socioeconomic, and psychological aspects of orofacial pain conditions ...
Under these conditions, AMIKACINE B. BRAUN 5 mg / ml solution for infusion may be used in case of:. · Low nosocomial ... Under certain conditions, amikacin has ototoxic and / or nephrotoxic effects. In rare cases, renal failure is observed in ... Psychology. *Nutrition. *Beauty. *Popular Posts *Meditation. *Compulsory vaccination Diphtheria Tetanus Polio (DTP): sources ...
More than 19% of African-Americans in the US suffer from atopic dermatitis and the condition is especially prevalent among ... practicality and psychology. Hand care and moisturizing products for excessively washed skin, along with products that promise ... is an effective and safe anti-aging solution for consumers with dermatologic conditions, such as rosacea and eczema.. According ...
  • The whole brain data analysis revealed significant differences for Happy Memories versus Rest condition between the experimental and control groups. (dericbownds.net)
  • The pretraining intra-BLA infusions of either raclopride or SCH 23390 disrupted the formation of long-term conditioned fear memories as rats treated with these DA antagonists failed to exhibit FPS on the retention test. (canterbury.ac.nz)
  • During his life, Carl Jung followed his intuition and insights informed by his clinic practice as a psychologist and psychiatrist to define what we know today as analytic psychology. (sapience2112.com)
  • It's been hard to tease out whether sleep loss is simply a byproduct of anxiety, or whether sleep disruption causes anxiety," said Andrea Goldstein, a UC Berkeley doctoral student in psychology and lead author of the study. (healthcanal.com)
  • She holds a Bachelor's degree from Cornell University, a Master's degree in Oriental Medicine from the New England School of Acupuncture and a Master's and Doctoral degree in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University. (bmc.org)
  • Of interest to pain scientists and all clinicians involved in perioperative care and the management of chronic pain, this state-of-the-art volume discusses the basic science of joint pain and applies this knowledge to a better understanding of clinical joint pain conditions - from neurophysiology, genetics, and the pathophysiology of ongoing nociception to pain persistence and chronic pain development. (iasp-pain.org)
  • The overall findings of Experiment 3 suggest that DA D2 receptor antagonism and the glutamatergic receptor antagonists (AP5 and CNQX) impaired amygdaloid fear-memory reconsolidation and retrieval processes by preventing the re-excitation of neurons and pathways that had become established during fear-conditioning. (canterbury.ac.nz)
  • Doctors noted lung cancer patients who still lit up after a diagnosis were usually on Medicare, had had very little treatment for their condition and were heavy smokers before their diagnosis. (cnn.com)
  • I know just did a post on how berries may fight cancer , but I seem to have collected a couple more studies with the same theme: sometimes the food we eat can help fight diseases we'd rather not get, or help us with other tiresome medical conditions. (crankyfitness.com)
  • See also effects on ejaculation viagra premature papillae on the graft augmentation with 6 months 10 of psychology of vulvar cancer. (rainierfruit.com)
  • Acupuncture is very effective for a range of conditions related to chronic pain including migraines, osteoarthritis, menstrual issues, back pain, and a range of pain concerns. (bmc.org)
  • Stem cells can be harvested from adults, but another source is umbilical cord blood , which can be collected at the time of birth, stored and later used as a treatment for the child or family members who develop conditions like blood or immune disorders. (medicalxpress.com)
  • As the story of my encounter with the black deliveryman indicates, none of us is immune: Black people may be as conditioned as anyone else by stereotypes and unconscious expectations. (contemplativemind.org)
  • The fields of fetal psychology and epigenetics study genetic expression. (sleeplady.com)
  • CFL depends on NMDA, AMPA and dopaminergic receptor-mediated processes and enhanced amygdaloidal synaptic transmission facilitates fear-memory retrieval and makes the expression of conditioned fear possible. (canterbury.ac.nz)
  • While I worked on the drawing, I was also reading a collection of lectures C.G. Jung gave to his peers at the Institute of Medical Psychology in London between September 30 to October 4, 1935. (sapience2112.com)
  • While you may not be surprised at the drugs that comprise this list, you may still find the results a bit disturbing - especially when you realize that many of these conditions (but certainly not all) are preventable. (justbelieverecoverypa.com)
  • The ability of organisms to turn pain up and down under different conditions has been linked to changes in brain function, with dysfunction of this pain modulatory system proposed to underlie persistent pathological pain states. (utoronto.ca)
  • Priority disputes in the history of psychology with special attention to the Franz-Kalischer dispute about who first combined animal training with brain extirpation to investigate brain functions. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • En poursuivant votre navigation, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies destinés à des fins de mesure d'audience, à améliorer la performance de ce site et à vous proposer des services et contenus personnalisés. (polytechnique.edu)
  • Rosenzweig (1959) quoted reports as early as 1555 and including several prominent physiologists of the 18th and 19th centuries to show that they had observed the salivary conditioning phenomenon, but they did not pursue it as a subject for scientific investigation. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The period from 1700 to 1840 produced some highly sophisticated psychological theorizing that became central to German intellectual and cultural life long before the commonly accepted start of psychology as a discipline in the late. (cellarstories.com)
  • The psychology of fish always leads them from a state of comfortable wealth to one of utter destitution over time , as they incessantly chase their losses, throwing bad money after even worse money. (blogspot.com)
  • We must remember that breast milk evolved over the last 2-2.5 million years to enhance infant survival (and also not put the mother at risk) in the context of the conditions of the time. (wordpress.com)
  • Interhemispheric interaction in conditions of direct and backward contralateral masking of visual stimuli in man: Zhurnal Vysshei Nervnoi Deyatel'nosti Vol 36(2) Mar-Apr 1986, 385-387. (wikia.org)
  • Crowding of the inducers worsened observers' performance significantly only in the inducer-misaligned condition. (arvojournals.org)
  • With contact sensors and other "smart" sensors that test for skin type, the laser product will only fire when the appropriate contact conditions are present and there is no potential eye hazard. (lia.org)