Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Music: Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Mice, Inbred C57BLCell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Protein Transport: The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Transcriptional Activation: Processes that stimulate the GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of a gene or set of genes.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Auditory Fatigue: Loss of sensitivity to sounds as a result of auditory stimulation, manifesting as a temporary shift in auditory threshold. The temporary threshold shift, TTS, is expressed in decibels.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Asterina: A genus of STARFISH in the family Asterinidae. They externally hold developing embryos (EMBRYO, NON-MAMMALIAN) among the spines below the oral surface.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Nerve Tissue ProteinsReceptor, EphB6: An eph family receptor found primarily in BRAIN and THYMUS. The EphB6 receptor is unusual in that its tyrosine kinase domain shares little homology with other members of this class. The unusual tyrosine kinase domain of this receptor appears to result in its lack of tyrosine kinase activity.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Immunoblotting: Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Microbial Interactions: The inter- and intra-relationships between various microorganisms. This can include both positive (like SYMBIOSIS) and negative (like ANTIBIOSIS) interactions. Examples include virus - bacteria and bacteria - bacteria.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Drug Synergism: The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Molecular Chaperones: A family of cellular proteins that mediate the correct assembly or disassembly of polypeptides and their associated ligands. Although they take part in the assembly process, molecular chaperones are not components of the final structures.Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Dimerization: The process by which two molecules of the same chemical composition form a condensation product or polymer.Immunoprecipitation: The aggregation of soluble ANTIGENS with ANTIBODIES, alone or with antibody binding factors such as ANTI-ANTIBODIES or STAPHYLOCOCCAL PROTEIN A, into complexes large enough to fall out of solution.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Chromatin: The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Adenosine Triphosphatases: A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Escherichia coli Proteins: Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Amino Acid Motifs: Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.Down-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins: A broad category of nuclear proteins that are components of or participate in the formation of the NUCLEAR MATRIX.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Receptors, Cell Surface: Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.RNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins that bind to RNA molecules. Included here are RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS and other proteins whose function is to bind specifically to RNA.COS Cells: CELL LINES derived from the CV-1 cell line by transformation with a replication origin defective mutant of SV40 VIRUS, which codes for wild type large T antigen (ANTIGENS, POLYOMAVIRUS TRANSFORMING). They are used for transfection and cloning. (The CV-1 cell line was derived from the kidney of an adult male African green monkey (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS).)Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Mitochondria: Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins: Proteins and peptides that are involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION within the cell. Included here are peptides and proteins that regulate the activity of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and cellular processes in response to signals from CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. Intracellular signaling peptide and proteins may be part of an enzymatic signaling cascade or act through binding to and modifying the action of other signaling factors.Two-Hybrid System Techniques: Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Histones: Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.Protein Kinases: A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.Tinnitus: A nonspecific symptom of hearing disorder characterized by the sensation of buzzing, ringing, clicking, pulsations, and other noises in the ear. Objective tinnitus refers to noises generated from within the ear or adjacent structures that can be heard by other individuals. The term subjective tinnitus is used when the sound is audible only to the affected individual. Tinnitus may occur as a manifestation of COCHLEAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and other conditions.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Enhancer Elements, Genetic: Cis-acting DNA sequences which can increase transcription of genes. Enhancers can usually function in either orientation and at various distances from a promoter.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.DNA Helicases: Proteins that catalyze the unwinding of duplex DNA during replication by binding cooperatively to single-stranded regions of DNA or to short regions of duplex DNA that are undergoing transient opening. In addition DNA helicases are DNA-dependent ATPases that harness the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate DNA strands.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Animals, Genetically Modified: ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Microfilament Proteins: Monomeric subunits of primarily globular ACTIN and found in the cytoplasmic matrix of almost all cells. They are often associated with microtubules and may play a role in cytoskeletal function and/or mediate movement of the cell or the organelles within the cell.Chromatin Immunoprecipitation: A technique for identifying specific DNA sequences that are bound, in vivo, to proteins of interest. It involves formaldehyde fixation of CHROMATIN to crosslink the DNA-BINDING PROTEINS to the DNA. After shearing the DNA into small fragments, specific DNA-protein complexes are isolated by immunoprecipitation with protein-specific ANTIBODIES. Then, the DNA isolated from the complex can be identified by PCR amplification and sequencing.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Cell Lineage: The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.Cell Communication: Any of several ways in which living cells of an organism communicate with one another, whether by direct contact between cells or by means of chemical signals carried by neurotransmitter substances, hormones, and cyclic AMP.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Cercopithecus aethiops: A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced: Hearing loss due to exposure to explosive loud noise or chronic exposure to sound level greater than 85 dB. The hearing loss is often in the frequency range 4000-6000 hertz.Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Multiprotein Complexes: Macromolecular complexes formed from the association of defined protein subunits.Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing: A broad category of carrier proteins that play a role in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They generally contain several modular domains, each of which having its own binding activity, and act by forming complexes with other intracellular-signaling molecules. Signal-transducing adaptor proteins lack enzyme activity, however their activity can be modulated by other signal-transducing enzymesCytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Cell Polarity: Orientation of intracellular structures especially with respect to the apical and basolateral domains of the plasma membrane. Polarized cells must direct proteins from the Golgi apparatus to the appropriate domain since tight junctions prevent proteins from diffusing between the two domains.Protein Subunits: Single chains of amino acids that are the units of multimeric PROTEINS. Multimeric proteins can be composed of identical or non-identical subunits. One or more monomeric subunits may compose a protomer which itself is a subunit structure of a larger assembly.Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay: An electrophoretic technique for assaying the binding of one compound to another. Typically one compound is labeled to follow its mobility during electrophoresis. If the labeled compound is bound by the other compound, then the mobility of the labeled compound through the electrophoretic medium will be retarded.Feedback, Physiological: A mechanism of communication with a physiological system for homeostasis, adaptation, etc. Physiological feedback is mediated through extensive feedback mechanisms that use physiological cues as feedback loop signals to control other systems.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs: Protein modules with conserved ligand-binding surfaces which mediate specific interaction functions in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS and the specific BINDING SITES of their cognate protein LIGANDS.Mice, Inbred BALB CAcetylation: Formation of an acetyl derivative. (Stedman, 25th ed)Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Chick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors: A family of DNA-binding transcription factors that contain a basic HELIX-LOOP-HELIX MOTIF.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Gene Knockdown Techniques: The artificial induction of GENE SILENCING by the use of RNA INTERFERENCE to reduce the expression of a specific gene. It includes the use of DOUBLE-STRANDED RNA, such as SMALL INTERFERING RNA and RNA containing HAIRPIN LOOP SEQUENCE, and ANTI-SENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.PhosphoproteinsStem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Body Patterning: The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Protein-Tyrosine Kinases: Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.3T3 Cells: Cell lines whose original growing procedure consisted being transferred (T) every 3 days and plated at 300,000 cells per plate (J Cell Biol 17:299-313, 1963). Lines have been developed using several different strains of mice. Tissues are usually fibroblasts derived from mouse embryos but other types and sources have been developed as well. The 3T3 lines are valuable in vitro host systems for oncogenic virus transformation studies, since 3T3 cells possess a high sensitivity to CONTACT INHIBITION.Precipitin Tests: Serologic tests in which a positive reaction manifested by visible CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION occurs when a soluble ANTIGEN reacts with its precipitins, i.e., ANTIBODIES that can form a precipitate.Genes, Reporter: Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.Caenorhabditis elegans: A species of nematode that is widely used in biological, biochemical, and genetic studies.Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins: Proteins from the nematode species CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS. The proteins from this species are the subject of scientific interest in the area of multicellular organism MORPHOGENESIS.Transforming Growth Factor beta: A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Protein Isoforms: Different forms of a protein that may be produced from different GENES, or from the same gene by ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone: Nucleoproteins, which in contrast to HISTONES, are acid insoluble. They are involved in chromosomal functions; e.g. they bind selectively to DNA, stimulate transcription resulting in tissue-specific RNA synthesis and undergo specific changes in response to various hormones or phytomitogens.Mesoderm: The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Ubiquitin: A highly conserved 76-amino acid peptide universally found in eukaryotic cells that functions as a marker for intracellular PROTEIN TRANSPORT and degradation. Ubiquitin becomes activated through a series of complicated steps and forms an isopeptide bond to lysine residues of specific proteins within the cell. These "ubiquitinated" proteins can be recognized and degraded by proteosomes or be transported to specific compartments within the cell.Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Cell Death: The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Cytoskeletal Proteins: Major constituent of the cytoskeleton found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They form a flexible framework for the cell, provide attachment points for organelles and formed bodies, and make communication between parts of the cell possible.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).
Young Concert Artist Trust auditions in London (1997) Concert Artists Guild Competition, New York (1998) Borletti-Buitoni prize ... Their concert schedule for 2007 included venues in Japan, France, Germany, and the United States. First Prize, "Concours ... "Concert cycles". Hermana Brauna Fonds. November 2005. Retrieved 2007-03-30. "Katona Guitar Duo 14 - 28 Feb 2002". The Music ... "YCAT Artists Past & Present". Young Concert Artist Trust. Archived from the original on 13 August 2007. Retrieved 2007-03-30. " ...
"1997 - 19/12/97 - The Capitol, Brisbane". Concert Chronology. Powderfinger Central. Archived from the original on 26 June 2002 ... Archived from the original on 28 June 2002. Retrieved 25 December 2007. Eliezer, Christie (Spring 1999). "Powderfinger". ...
... concert tour. Within the same year of leaving Hello! Project, Sandbo was awarded the Miss Congeniality award for the Miss ... On February 17, 2002, Sandbo graduated from Coconuts Musume and Hello! Project at the end of the Hello! Project 2002 ~Kotoshi ...
In the same year, the band performed in Toronto at Ska Ska Oi!, a punk/ska concert organized by the Toronto chapter of Anti ... The band performed what was to be a final concert on September 2, 2006 at the Cafe Campus in Montréal after a brief farewell ... General Rudie was founded in February 1997 and their first concert was in March 1997, as the opening act at a Flashlight Brown ... concert. They also played the same ARA benefit in 2003, sharing the stage with Closet Monster and Nightshift. The release of ...
... in a concert designed to raise awareness of issues relating to Woomera Detention Centre. "Weekend of Mystery" - 3:26 "Weekend ... "Weekend of Mystery" was first performed live by Fanning in 2002 in Melbourne, ...
... is a Puerto Rican- born soprano active in the opera houses and concert halls of Europe. Since 1989 her operatic ... "Concert review: Metzingen". Raff.org Sinkovicz, Wilhelm (22 February 2011). "Melba Ramos: In Wien zur Primadonna geworden". Die ... In 2002, she created the role of Faustina in the posthumous premiere of Joachim Raff's Benedetto Marcello. Ramos was born in ... She was then engaged by Wuppertal Opera and in 2002 by the Vienna Volksoper. Some of the roles she has portrayed at the ...
324 "Community Band of Columbia, Maryland". Columbia Concert Band. Archived from the original on June 3, 2006. Retrieved March ... Schaaf, Elizabeth (August 20, 2002). "Interview No. SAS8.20.02: Reppard Stone and Henry Baker". Sounds and Stories: The Musical ... McClure, Brittany (August 20, 2002). "Interview No. SAS4.0.02: Ruth Binsky". Sounds and Stories: The Musical Life of Maryland's ...
"Historic Cast Concert". Song Kick. Retrieved 28 June 2010. "New Cross , London , Tickets for Concerts, gigs and shows live at ... with Transparency Band and Cast concert". Songkick. Retrieved 26 July 2010. "Gig List". Songkick. 1992. Retrieved 26 June 2010 ... In 2002 he released a solo album via The Viper Label under the guise of Aviator with help from O'Neill, Paul Ellison and former ... Castmatt (5 February 2002). "The Official Cast Website". Web.archive.org. Archived from the original on 5 February 2002. ...
The Concert Event. In November 2006 Dan Landrum became the owner and editor of "Dulcimer Players News" after purchasing the ... Turning Point (2002) Questions in the Calm Hammer On! (with Hammer On!) (2004) For the Beauty (with Hannah Carson) Winter Mix ( ...
". "Concert Artists Guild Website". Concert Artist Guild. Retrieved October 31, 2015. Caudell, Robin (February 28, 2002). " ... success at the Concert Artists Guild competition led to the ensemble's first management contract. Since then, the ensemble has ...
"Concert Schedule" (PDF). Electronic Music Midwest. 2002. Retrieved 7 April 2013. "Electronic Music Midwest" (PDF). 2004. ... His works have been performed around the world festivals and concerts including the Spark Festival, the Electronic Music ... 2002-05-01. Retrieved 2012-11-24. "60x60 (2004) - 60 audio works 60 seconds long". Voxnovus.com. Retrieved 2012-11-24. "60x60 ( ...
"UCPO Concert History". Retrieved 2017-02-26. "Minutes of the WCSO AGM 2002". Retrieved 2010-01-17. "UCPO History". Retrieved ... The orchestra usually performs five concerts in each year. Three of these feature the full orchestra. A further two are ... and some concert venues. Since October 2007, the main orchestra has rehearsed at St Giles' Church. UCPO web site "Joining UCPO ... Gala Concert'), Strauss' Fledermaus Overture, Elgar's 'Cello Concerto in E minor, Beethoven's Symphony No. 4 and Dvorak's ...
One, Two, Three, Four, Live!/ In Concert 1996. 1982. Elephant Records. Mainly Mother Goose. 1984. Elephant Records. / 1984. ... 2002. Casablanca Kids Inc. Mother Goose & More. 2002. Fisher-Price Inc. Name Games. 2002. Casablanca Kids Inc. School Days. ... 2002. Casablanca Kids Inc. Smorgasbord. 1979. Elephant Records. / 2006. Casablanca Kids Inc. Singing 'n' Swinging. 1980. ...
The arena also plays host to many large concerts, sporting events, and trade shows. It can seat more than 21,000 people at one ... "The Cher Concert". Dakota Student. October 4, 2002. Archived from the original on June 11, 2008. Retrieved September 17, 2005. ... "The Cher concert: you're kidding…Right?". Dakota Student. University of North Dakota. October 4, 2002. Retrieved October 26, ... The convention center is used for conferences, seminars, banquets, parties, and smaller concerts. Directly adjacent to the ...
For the jazz album, see European Concert.. The Concert of Europe, also known as the Congress System or the Vienna System after ... The Concert of Europe was founded by the powers of Austria, Prussia, Russia and the United Kingdom, which were the members of ... The Concert of Europe, as it began to be called at the time, had ... a reality in international law, which derived from the ... The Concert of Europe had no written rules or permanent institutions, but at times of crisis any of the member countries could ...
ISBN 0-7119-6316-9. The Who Online Concert Guide (1962) The Who Online Concert Guide (1963). ... ISBN 1-58663-133-0. McMichael, Joe; 'Irish Jack' Lyons (1997). The Who Concert File. Omnibus Press. ... 2002). Anyway Anyhow Anywhere: The Complete Chronicles of The Who 1958-1978. Barnes & Noble. ...
The concert on 18 July 1998 at Float Rite Park was merged with Warped Tour 1998. Some 39,000 fans were at the 12-hour, six- ... During the concert, Bruce Dickinson can be heard accusing the festival's organizers of deliberately cutting off the band's ... Cunningham, John (September 1998). "Concert Review: Ozzfest '98". Juris Publici. University of Richmond School of Law. Archived ... Two compilation albums of the Ozzfest tour were released, one covering select 2001 performances and another for 2002. On-stage ...
"W & A Concert Reviews". www.WARR.org. Retrieved 4 January 2018. "Thomas Dolby Extras: Live Performance Technical Details, Logic ... "Pink Floyd news :: Brain Damage - Norbert Stachel - August 2002 - with Brain Damage". www.Brain-Damage.co.uk. Retrieved 4 ...
The concert lasted over three house and featured an eight-piece band which included her sons Donto and Sametto. Matriarch is ... Van Hagen, John Demma (October 31, 2000). "Etta James, Lou Rawls Give Old-School Concert In San Francisco". VH1. Retrieved ... Goddard, Lisa (April 7, 2006). "Concert Features Grammy Winner". South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Fort Lauderdale, Florida: Tribune ...
In the beginning of 2013, after a successful Buddhist Mantra Concert in South Korea, Dechen was contacted by one of the ... "Concert announcement" (in German). Staatsschauspiel Dresden. 2011. Retrieved 16 October 2011. Biography Archived 2012-04-06 at ... In 2002, Dechen was signed to PolyglobeMusic Austria and signed an additional contract with the US-based label New Earth ... at New Earth Records Dagsay Tulku Rinpoche (2002). The practice of Tibetan meditation: exercises, visualizations, and mantras ...
Tom Hubbard, opera and also a concert suite of excerpts for trio) commissioned by the Baron of Ardgowan The Ballad of Annie ... "concert W ŚWIECIE INSTRUMENTÓW". Filharmonia Krakowska. Retrieved 11 March 2015. "Polish Music Newsletter, vol. 8 no. 4, April ... "Ballada Pasterska youtube video in concert". Retrieved 3 September August 2017. Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) " ... Lindsay performs on Highland Bagpipes, Scottish smallpipes, Border pipes, Gaita and medieval bagpipes during his concerts. ...
There were further concerts in January 2009 in Europe, and the band played several concerts in Canada and the United States in ... The Festival Hall concert was followed by several European dates in the summer and autumn. The concert in Leverkusen, Germany ... Live concerts were played in Europe in March and April, and in Japan in June, among them, one at the Gouveia Art Rock Festival ... A concert on 14 April 2007 in the Paradiso in Amsterdam was recorded and streamed on the FabChannel website until March 2009, ...
Resist in Concert!. Special issue of CounterAttack: The Newsletter of Refuse & Resist! New York: Refuse & Resist!, 1988. ... The first awards were presented at Resist in Concert! 1988, by Susan Sarandon, Robbie Conal, and Philip Agee. R&R! organized ... In 1988, R&R! organized Resist in Concert! at the New York Palladium, with performances by Sinéad O'Connor, Afrika Bambaataa, ... In addition to the Resist in Concert! initiative, Refuse & Resist! involved and supported progressive art and artists, ...
The mansion now features performance space for Concert Artists of Baltimore and the Baltimore Concert Opera Company. It is also ... Several organ concerts have since delighted lovers of organ music and beautiful mansions since its reinstallation. Baltimore ... "The Inaugural Organ Concert." Acquisition of historic organ enable simulation of Garrett-Jacobs' entertaining. Summer 2012. " ... "Our New Kitchen Can Stand the Heat." Winter 2001/2002. "The Friends of the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion." Sumer 2003. "The ...
ISBN 1-58663-133-0. McMichael, Joe; 'Irish Jack' Lyons (1997). The Who Concert File. Omnibus Press. ISBN 0-7119-6316-9. The Who ... 2002). Anyway Anyhow Anywhere: The Complete Chronicles of The Who 1958-1978. Barnes & Noble. ...
... (Inverse PCR) is a variant of the polymerase chain reaction that is used to amplify DNA with only one known sequence. One limitation of conventional PCR is that it requires primers complementary to both termini of the target DNA, but this method allows PCR to be carried out even if only one sequence is available from which primers may be designed. Inverse PCR is especially useful for the determination of insert locations. For example, various retroviruses and transposons randomly integrate into genomic DNA. To identify the sites where they have entered, the known, "internal" viral or transposon sequences can be used to design primers that will amplify a small portion of the flanking, "external" genomic DNA. The amplified product can then be sequenced and compared with DNA databases to locate the sequence which has been disrupted. The inverse PCR method involves a series of restriction digests and ligation, resulting in a looped fragment that can be primed for ...
Proteins (/ˈproʊˌtiːnz/ or /ˈproʊti.ɪnz/) are large biomolecules, or macromolecules, consisting of one or more long chains of amino acid residues. Proteins perform a vast array of functions within organisms, including catalysing metabolic reactions, DNA replication, responding to stimuli, and transporting molecules from one location to another. Proteins differ from one another primarily in their sequence of amino acids, which is dictated by the nucleotide sequence of their genes, and which usually results in protein folding into a specific three-dimensional structure that determines its activity.. A linear chain of amino acid residues is called a polypeptide. A protein contains at least one long polypeptide. Short polypeptides, containing less than 20-30 residues, are rarely considered to be proteins and are commonly called peptides, or sometimes oligopeptides. The individual amino acid residues are bonded together by peptide bonds and adjacent amino acid residues. The sequence of amino ...
In bioinformatics, a sequence alignment is a way of arranging the sequences of DNA, RNA, or protein to identify regions of similarity that may be due to functional, structural, or evolutionary relationships between the sequences.[9] If two sequences in an alignment share a common ancestor, mismatches can be interpreted as point mutations and gaps as insertion or deletion mutations (indels) introduced in one or both lineages in the time since they diverged from one another. In sequence alignments of proteins, the degree of similarity between amino acids occupying a particular position in the sequence can be interpreted as a rough measure of how conserved a particular region or sequence motif is among lineages. The absence of substitutions, or the presence of only very conservative substitutions (that is, the substitution of amino acids whose side chains have similar biochemical properties) in a particular region of the sequence, suggest[10] that this region has structural or functional ...
The PDE2 (phosphodiesterase 2) enzyme is one of 21 different phosphodiesterases (PDE) found in mammals. These different PDEs can be subdivided to 11 families (PDE1 - PDE11). The different PDEs of the same family are functionally related despite the fact that their amino acid sequences show considerable divergence. The PDEs have different substrate specificities. Some are cAMP (figure 1) selective hydrolases (PDE 4, -7 and -8), others are cGMP (figure 1) selective hydrolases (PDE 5, -6 and -9) and the rest can hydrolyse both cAMP and cGMP (PDE1, -2, -3, -10 and -11). There is only one gene family coding for the PDE2, which is the PDE2A. Three splice variants have been found, the PDE2A1, PDE2A2 and PDE2A3 (PDE2A2 has only been found in rats). PDE2A1 is cytosolic whereas -A2 and -A3 are membrane bound. It has been suggested that different localization of PDE2A2 and -A3 is due to a unique N-terminal sequence, which is absent in PDE2A1. Despite the PDE2A splice variants being different, there is no ...
A genomic library is a collection of the total genomic DNA from a single organism. The DNA is stored in a population of identical vectors, each containing a different insert of DNA. In order to construct a genomic library, the organism's DNA is extracted from cells and then digested with a restriction enzyme to cut the DNA into fragments of a specific size. The fragments are then inserted into the vector using DNA ligase. Next, the vector DNA can be taken up by a host organism - commonly a population of Escherichia coli or yeast - with each cell containing only one vector molecule. Using a host cell to carry the vector allows for easy amplification and retrieval of specific clones from the library for analysis. There are several kinds of vectors available with various insert capacities. Generally, libraries made from organisms with larger genomes require vectors featuring larger inserts, thereby fewer vector molecules are needed to make the library. Researchers can choose a vector also ...
... belong to the polymorphic toxin category of bacterial exotoxins. Rhs proteins are widespread and can be produced by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Rhs toxins are very large proteins of usually more than 1,500 aminoacids with variable C-terminal toxic domains. Their toxic activity can either target eukaryotes or other bacteria. In their large N-terminal region, Rhs toxins comprise RHS/YD repeats in various number (PF05593) (RHS meaning Rearrangement Hot Spot) and another "RHS-repeats associated core" domain (PF03527). In contrast, their C-terminal regions are shorter and harbor highly variable C-terminal domains including many domains with a predicted nuclease activity. These toxins encompass Rhs toxins of insect pathogens with an activity against insects. This group also include Rhs toxins with an activity against human phagocytic cells that contribute to pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A role in inter-bacterial competition has been demonstrated for the plant ...
Chorion-specific transcription factor GCMa is a protein that, in humans, is encoded by the GCM1 gene. This gene encodes a DNA-binding protein with a gcm-motif (glial cell missing motif). The encoded protein is a homolog of the Drosophila glial cells missing gene (gcm). This protein binds to the GCM-motif (A/G)CCCGCAT, a novel sequence among known targets of DNA-binding proteins. The N-terminal DNA-binding domain confers the unique DNA-binding activity of this protein. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000137270 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000023333 - Ensembl, May 2017 "Human PubMed Reference:". "Mouse PubMed Reference:". Akiyama Y, Hosoya T, Poole AM, Hotta Y (Jan 1997). "The gcm-motif: a novel DNA-binding motif conserved in Drosophila and mammals". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 93 (25): 14912-6. doi:10.1073/pnas.93.25.14912. PMC 26236 . PMID 8962155. "Entrez Gene: GCM1 glial cells missing homolog 1 (Drosophila)". Yamada K, Ogawa H, Honda S, et al. (1999). "A GCM motif ...
In molecular biology, the BURP domain is a ~230-amino acid protein domain, which has been named for the four members of the group initially identified, BNM2, USP, RD22, and PG1beta. It is found in the C-terminal part of a number of plant cell wall proteins, which are defined not only by the BURP domain, but also by the overall similarity in their modular construction. The BURP domain proteins consists of either three or four modules: (i) an N-terminal hydrophobic domain - a presumptive transit peptide, joined to (ii) a short conserved segment or other short segment, (iii) an optional segment consisting of repeated units which is unique to each member, and (iv) the C-terminal BURP domain. Although the BURP domain proteins share primary structural features, their expression patterns and the conditions under which they are expressed differ. The presence of the conserved BURP domain in diverse plant proteins suggests an important and fundamental functional role for this domain. It is possible that ...
The TCR is a disulfide-linked membrane-anchored heterodimeric protein normally consisting of the highly variable alpha (α) and beta (β) chains expressed as part of a complex with the invariant CD3 chain molecules. T cells expressing this receptor are referred to as α:β (or αβ) T cells, though a minority of T cells express an alternate receptor, formed by variable gamma (γ) and delta (δ) chains, referred as γδ T cells.[7] Each chain is composed of two extracellular domains: Variable (V) region and a Constant (C) region, both of Immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) domain forming antiparallel β-sheets. The Constant region is proximal to the cell membrane, followed by a transmembrane region and a short cytoplasmic tail, while the Variable region binds to the peptide/MHC complex. The variable domain of both the TCR α-chain and β-chain each have three hypervariable or complementarity determining regions (CDRs). There is also an additional area of hypervariability on the β-chain (HV4) that ...
Interleukin 5 receptor, alpha (IL5RA) also known as CD125 (Cluster of Differentiation 125) is a subunit of the Interleukin-5 receptor. IL5RA also denotes its human gene. The protein encoded by this gene is an interleukin 5 specific subunit of a heterodimeric cytokine receptor. The receptor is composed of a ligand specific alpha subunit and a signal transducing beta subunit shared by the receptors for interleukin 3 (IL3), colony stimulating factor 2 (CSF2/GM-CSF), and interleukin 5 (IL5). The binding of this protein to IL5 depends on the beta subunit. The beta subunit is activated by the ligand binding, and is required for the biological activities of IL5. This protein has been found to interact with syndecan binding protein (syntenin), which is required for IL5 mediated activation of the transcription factor SOX4. Six alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding three distinct isoforms have been reported. Interleukin 5 receptor alpha subunit has been shown to interact with: Interleukin 5, ...
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2.] Morata TC, Campo P. Ototoxic effects of styrene alone or in concert with other agents: A review. Noise Health. 2002;4(14): ...
This concert is the first solo classical event by Yoshiki. On the concert were performed Yoshikis classical compositions, ... Symphonic Concert 2002 is a live concert DVD by Japanese music composer Yoshiki Hayashi, released on March 30, 2005. The ... concert took place on December 3 and 4, 2002 at the Tokyo International Forum. ...
Get the Garbage Setlist of the concert at Palladium, Cologne, Germany on April 10, 2002 from the BeautifulGarbage Tour and ... You are here: setlist.fm , Artists , G , Garbage , April 10, 2002 Setlist ... url=https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/garbage/2002/palladium-cologne-germany-63d7ea73.html][img]https://www.setlist.fm/widgets/ ... div style=text-align: center; class=setlistImage,,a href=https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/garbage/2002/palladium-cologne- ...
Get the Savatage Setlist of the concert at Poppodium 013, Tilburg, Netherlands on February 11, 2002 from the Poets and Madmen ... You are here: setlist.fm , Artists , S , Savatage , February 11, 2002 Setlist ... url=https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/savatage/2002/poppodium-013-tilburg-netherlands-43d64717.html][img]https://www.setlist.fm/ ... div style=text-align: center; class=setlistImage,,a href=https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/savatage/2002/poppodium-013- ...
Rise Above Benefit Concert live at Amoeba Records (2002). live show. Reviewer. Brandon Sideleau December 6th 2002. Reviewer ...
Shahrukh Khan y Hrithik Roshan en Concert - [Bollywood Superstar] y0sett * 93 Shahrukh Khan concierto alex2007man ... Yeh Hai Jalwa (2002) HD Hindi Song - Salman Khan Amisha Patel Rosewood ...
Minogues first live concert performance was in 1988 at Canton, a nightclub in Hong Kong. The following year she embarked on ... This is a list of concert tours by Australian pop music singer, Kylie Minogue. Since 1989, Kylie has embarked on ten worldwide ... 2002. Parlophone. "Winners - 28th Mo Awards 2003" Archived 29 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine.. Mo Awards. Retrieved 23 June ... concert tours including performances in Australia, Europe, Asia, Africa, South America and North America. ...
For the jazz album, see European Concert.. The Concert of Europe, also known as the Congress System or the Vienna System after ... The Concert of Europe was founded by the powers of Austria, Prussia, Russia and the United Kingdom, which were the members of ... The Concert of Europe, as it began to be called at the time, had ... a reality in international law, which derived from the ... The Concert of Europe had no written rules or permanent institutions, but at times of crisis any of the member countries could ...
2002 In The tribunedigital-orlandosentinel news archives, including an extensive archive and timeline that can be browsed by ... Upcoming Concerts *. Reading Program Soars With Rich `Rocket Boys By Nancy Pate, Sentinel Book Critic. ...
KLOS Rainbow Decal/Sticker -THE WHO- The First Concert Decal!. $14.99. $1.50 shipping ...
2002 in the Los Angeles Times news archives, including an extensive archive and timeline that can be browsed by date, keyword ... Exuberant Choral Concert Closes Baroque Festival DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER. *. Morning Report Lorenza Munoz. ... What happened on July 02, 2002. CALIFORNIA , LOCAL. *. Jury Awards Victim of Bar Shooting $521,000 JESSICA BLANCHARD, TIMES ...
May-2002, Sony Music Distribution (USA)) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products! ... In Concert [Digipak] by Dead Can Dance (CD, Apr-2013, Relativity (Label)). ... Vertigo by Fey (Singer) (CD, May-2002, Sony Music Distribution (USA)). Be the first to write a review ... Greatest Hits: I II & III: The Platinum Collection [Box] by Queen (CD, Sep-2002, 3 Discs, Hollywood). (159) ...
One of Wongs comeback concerts in Beijing Wukesong Arena in November 2010. The concert was directed by Wong Kar-Wai.[1] ... However, this was not done for the first 5 concerts held in Beijing. In fact it was only started since the Shanghai concert, ... "Faye Wong Concert Crashes Taiwan Ticket System". Agence France-Presse. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 12 November 2010.. .mw-parser- ... The Comeback Tour was a concert tour in Asia by Chinese diva Faye Wong, marking her return to public performance after several ...
The wild-type variant (F44W) of GroEL and the F44W/D155A mutant undergo ATP-induced concerted (t7→r7) and sequential (e.g., t7→ ... A concerted t7→r7 allosteric switch provides a mechanism for ensuring that the entire protein chain is released. Such a ... Concerted ATP-induced allosteric transitions in GroEL facilitate release of protein substrate domains in an all-or-none manner ... Concerted ATP-induced allosteric transitions in GroEL facilitate release of protein substrate domains in an all-or-none manner ...
U of WI-Milwaukee FMLA Raises Money and Awareness with Rock for Choice Concert. November 8, 2002 ... the FMLA Affiliate at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN AT MILWAUKEE organized the citys first Rock for Choice benefit concert with ...
Free Shuttle Service Available To Balloon Glow, Concert Site. Aug. 28, 2002 by Lori Scott Fogleman. Because of limited parking ... who are planning to attend the balloon glow and free concert Friday, Aug. 30, in the parking lot of the Ferrell Center. The ...
Sh-K-Boom Room concerts are held at The Cutting Room, which is located in New York City at 19 W. 24th Street (between Fifth and ... He is currently developing Shakespeare and Our Planet, a concert of Stanley Silvermans original works for Lincoln Center. ...
Plans to demolish a former popular concert venue in Cornwall and build a multi-million pound tourist complex have been unveiled ... Wednesday, 6 November, 2002, 06:57 GMT Tourism plans for concert venue revealed. ...
2002 In The tribunedigital-baltimoresun news archives, including an extensive archive and timeline that can be browsed by date ... Concert Watch By Nathan M. Pitts. *. Wild and wet amusements for all ages By Karen Nitkin , Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN. ...
The concert is on Friday, June 29, and will feature 33 songs, including one dedicated to Team Fox. While ticket sales from the ... At the end of June, she will be collecting donations during a concert with Tramps Like Us, a Bruce Springsteen tribute band, at ... Support Team Fox During a Bruce Springsteen Tribute Concert in New Jersey ... Support Team Fox During a Bruce Springsteen Tribute Concert in New Jersey ...
2002 in the Los Angeles Times news archives, including an extensive archive and timeline that can be browsed by date, keyword ... Tribute Concert DVDs Go Beyond Being Footnotes ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC. ...
311 11-2-2002 "Voodoo Music Festival" Cox Communications Stage New Orleans, La ...
U2 performed at the concert. The photographer was John Rowe. © RTÉ Stills Library 2464/095. ... concert at the RDS, Dublin on 17 May 1986. Self Aid was at that time the largest live music event ever staged in Ireland; ...
Richard Pryor: Live in Concert (1979) Not Rated , 1h 18min , Documentary, Comedy , January 1979 (USA) ... First full length concert feature film of Richard Pryor as Richard Pryor: Live and Smokin (1971) had been a 48 minute short- ... This concert was recorded live at the Terrace Theatre in Long Beach, California See more » ...
2002 In The tribunedigital-baltimoresun news archives, including an extensive archive and timeline that can be browsed by date ... Teddy Bears Picnic Concert By Lori Sears. *. Holiday lights: looking on the bright side By Lori Sears , Lori Sears,SUN STAFF. ... DATE INDEX , WHAT HAPPENED ON NOVEMBER 14, 2002. NEWS. *. Arthur Ward Jr., 91, surgeon and asphalt chemist By Jacques Kelly , ...
  • As of this writing, the last concert performance of the band will be at the Sleep Train Amphitheatre in Chula Vista, California on 27th of October, 2013. (bio-medicine.org)
  • To promote its parent album, Post (1995), Björk started the eponymous concert tour , which saw her performing in different festivals and arenas throughout Europe , North America , Oceania , Asia and South America . (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a list of concert tours by Australian pop music singer, Kylie Minogue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Icelandic singer-songwriter Björk has embarked on ten concert tours and has performed live at various events and television shows. (wikipedia.org)
  • While there was no tour performances for the singer's fifth studio album, Medúlla (2004), Björk performed " Oceania " at the 2004 Summer Olympics opening ceremony , for which the song was commissioned, while in 2005, the singer performed at the Live 8 concert in Chiba , Japan . (wikipedia.org)
  • The tour was documented by the 2013 documentary When Björk Met Attenborough and the 2014 concert film Björk: Biophilia Live , and featured her first performance in Africa , but was hindered by a series of vocal cords issues, for which the singer underwent surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since 1989, Kylie has embarked on ten worldwide concert tours including performances in Australia, Europe, Asia, Africa, South America and North America. (wikipedia.org)
  • The band's debut album, 30 Seconds to Mars (2002), was produced by Bob Ezrin and released to positive reviews but only to limited commercial success. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Who concert disaster took place at the Riverfront Coliseum in Cincinnati, Ohio on 3 December 1979, as part of the band's U.S. tour, the first in three years and their first performance in Cincinnati since 1975. (fark.com)
  • Educating their campus and raising awareness about the threats to abortion access and reproductive rights, the FMLA Affiliate at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN AT MILWAUKEE organized the city's first Rock for Choice benefit concert with much success. (feminist.org)
  • Because of limited parking, a free shuttle service will be available for Baylor University students, faculty and staff and those in the Central Texas community, who are planning to attend the balloon glow and free concert Friday, Aug. 30, in the parking lot of the Ferrell Center. (baylor.edu)
  • The musicians performed for free and the concert proceeds are being donated to the Finnish organization Victim Support Finland , which offers practical advice and psychological support to victims of crimes or attempted crimes and those closest to them and witnesses of crime. (metal-rules.com)
  • This past April, we were thrilled to have the Grammy-award winning band They Might Be Giants help us celebrate by performing a free concert in the nearby Princeton Public Library courtyard. (prex.com)
  • Crash Ensemble and The National Concert Hall present Free State 10 , the most vibrant music from Ireland's up and coming composing talent, performed by the county's leading new music group. (crashensemble.com)
  • This incident was the subject of a book and of a second season episode of WKRP in Cincinnati called "In Concert" and inspired scenes in the film Pink Floyd-The Wall, whose 1982 premiere was attended by The Who's Pete Townshend. (fark.com)
  • Washington Concert Opera will expand its next season from two to three performances: Donizetti's Maria Padilla (November 9), a recital with Stephanie Blythe and Nathalie Paulin (May 3), and Mercadante's Il Giuramento (May 31). (blogspot.com)
  • The Zac Brown Band has a series of concert tours this spring season as well several shows lined up for the summer. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Today's world concert hall Steinway is generally pitched at an A of 440-442 cps (cycles per second) in contrast to a "Beethoven A" equal to 430.5-432cps. (llrx.com)
  • The theme of the concert tour was Four Seasons and Reborn . (wikipedia.org)
  • The intro music of this concert tour was partly extracted from a song called "Vainly Like Dreams (浮华若梦)", which is performed by Kubert Leung, who is also the music director of the tour. (wikipedia.org)
  • The symbol * serves as the key to note the first appearance of the said song in this concert tour. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most recently, in late April and early May 2013, Mr. Jiang finished a highly successful concert tour in East and Mid Asia, performed at the City Hall of Nagasaki, the Cultural Center of Shanghai, and a high profile private concert for the Royalty of United Arab Emirates in Dubai. (llrx.com)
  • IRON MAIDEN- Powerslave Tour 1985 and all the RUSH concerts Ive witnessed in the past. (nwnprod.com)
  • Romanian folk metallers Dirty Shirt would likely had celebrated their 25th anniversary with something more bombastic, but considering current events, one open air concert will have to suffice. (metalstorm.net)
  • Over three weeks in September (7th - 25th), Composing the Island will present 29 concerts of orchestral, choral, instrumental, song and chamber music by Irish composers written between 1916 and 2016. (crashensemble.com)
  • Our results show that release of a protein substrate from GroEL in a domain-by-domain fashion is favored when the intraring allosteric transitions of GroEL are sequential and not concerted. (pnas.org)
  • To satisfy huge overseas market demand, she declared to have more concerts in other cities of Mainland China, Taipei in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Malaysia and also Singapore. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eight years before at Dance in the Park 2002, this picture, of the same moment with choreographer/dancer DeeAnna Hiett and Winston Dynamite Brown. (kcdance.com)
  • Later in July 2010, she first announced a series of comeback concerts starting from 29 October 2010 onwards, namely 5 in Beijing and another 5 in Shanghai. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact it was only started since the Shanghai concert, with the original intention of giving condolences to the casualties in the fire accident on 15 November 2010. (wikipedia.org)
  • The work described here was undertaken to establish whether the concerted intraring ATP-induced allosteric transitions of GroEL facilitate simultaneous release of different parts of a bound protein substrate, as previously speculated ( 13 ). (pnas.org)
  • In the months prior to the concert, LIFEbeat will facilitate celebrity visits to schools, clinics, hospitals and other community facilities around the country to speak with young people about HIV prevention and self-esteem issues. (celebrityaccess.com)
  • For the past thirty or so years, concerts have been performed at various pitches-that is nothing new. (llrx.com)
  • Now, more than 50 years after the legendary 'Cole Español's release, saxophonist David Murray, a contemporary jazz great, reprises it as Cole En Español , in the company of a Cuban string band, giving the original repertoire a lush sonic canvas full of shimmering, sensual hues. (sonicbids.com)
  • For 30 years, BEMF has presented an annual concert series featuring the very best Early Music artists in the world. (bemf.org)
  • General comments include adding data on landings and stock assessments, as well as noting that defining Concerted Actions would benefit the proposal. (cms.int)
  • Sting, Elton John, James Taylor and Ravi Shankar have been confirmed to perform at the 10th annual Rainforest Foundation benefit concert at Carnegie Hall April 13 in New York. (celebrityaccess.com)
  • When the lights went out in the first few moments of Washington Concert Opera 's performance at Lisner Auditorium on Sunday night, one assumed that it was another chance for music director Antony Walker to come to the rescue. (blogspot.com)
  • Back then, if the band was not my ultimate favorite band, I was not even considering going to see them play live and paying the outrageous concert prices - in my view at that time. (sleazeroxx.com)
  • But back to the Judas Priest concert. (sleazeroxx.com)
  • Durante los años siguientes grabó una serie de álbumes que se convertirían en algunos de los más influyentes de la música popular, entre ellos Bringing It All Back Home y Highway 61 Revisited , los dos de 1965, Blonde On Blonde de 1966 y más tarde Blood On The Tracks de 1975. (nobelprize.org)
  • Durante un período fue seguido por el cineasta D.A. Pennebaker, que documentó la vida alrededor de la escena en lo que se convertiría en el innovador film Dont Look Back de 1967. (nobelprize.org)
  • Therefore, we chose to organize a special event at the Roman Arenas in Bucharest, the only Dirty Shirt open air concert this year and probably the last in 2020. (metalstorm.net)
  • Sh-K-Boom Room concerts are held at The Cutting Room, which is located in New York City at 19 W. 24th Street (between Fifth and Sixth avenues). (playbill.com)
  • Although Eady's musicals Running Man and You Don't Miss Water have played in the city, Brutal Imagination , which premiered at the Vineyard Theatre in the winter of 2002, is the first play he has written. (playbill.com)
  • He is the recipient of the 2002 Oppenheimer Award for most impressive New York debut for his play Brutal Imagination . (playbill.com)
  • Dylan se mudó a Nueva York en 1961 y empezó a actuar en clubes y cafés en Greenwich Village. (nobelprize.org)
  • Crónicas 2005), que recoge memorias de sus primeros años en Nueva York y destellos de una vida en el corazón de la cultura popular. (nobelprize.org)
  • Despite her lengthy absence, interest in the concert tickets was overwhelming: in Mainland China tickets worth nearly 200 million yuan (US$29 million) were taken up in just 10 days while in Taiwan the computerized ticketing system crashed due to excessive traffic, and 90 percent of the tickets were sold within two hours after it was restored. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zac Brown Band Tickets Hollywood Bowl:Cheap Concert Tickets Announces that Discount Tickets for the Zac Brown Band in Los Angeles at the Hollywood Bowl Go on. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Phillip Snyder, 20) were killed by compressive asphyxia and 26[citation needed] others injured in the rush for seating at the opening of a sold-out concert. (fark.com)
  • As they waited outside in bitter cold conditions, the crowd heard the band performing a late sound check and thought that the concert was beginning, and a rush into the still-closed doors began. (fark.com)
  • But I feel it is more significant to point out - as this was my first time in a long time at the Stodola Club - and I can say it very clearly: an unprepared club can really wreck your concert experience. (sleazeroxx.com)
  • It almost seems like Williams wrote a concert piece for Minority Report using the main themes and motifs from the score. (jwfan.com)