Distemper Virus, Canine: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing distemper in dogs, wolves, foxes, raccoons, and ferrets. Pinnipeds have also been known to contract Canine distemper virus from contact with domestic dogs.Distemper: A name for several highly contagious viral diseases of animals, especially canine distemper. In dogs, it is caused by the canine distemper virus (DISTEMPER VIRUS, CANINE). It is characterized by a diphasic fever, leukopenia, gastrointestinal and respiratory inflammation and sometimes, neurologic complications. In cats it is known as FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA.Distemper Virus, Phocine: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing distemper in seals.Adenoviruses, Canine: Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS that causes fever, edema, vomiting, and diarrhea in dogs and encephalitis in foxes. Epizootics have also been caused in bears, wolves, coyotes, and skunks. The official species name is Canine adenovirus and it contains two serotypes.Paramyxoviridae: A family of spherical viruses, of the order MONONEGAVIRALES, somewhat larger than the orthomyxoviruses, and containing single-stranded RNA. Subfamilies include PARAMYXOVIRINAE and PNEUMOVIRINAE.Phoca: A genus in the family of EARLESS SEALS (Phocidae) and collectively the most abundant PINNIPEDS in the Northern Hemisphere.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Seals, Earless: The family Phocidae, suborder PINNIPEDIA, order CARNIVORA, comprising the true seals. They lack external ears and are unable to use their hind flippers to walk. It includes over 18 species including the harp seal, probably the best known seal species in the world.Lions: Large, chiefly nocturnal mammals of the cat family FELIDAE, species Panthera leo. They are found in Africa and southern Asia.Morbillivirus: A genus of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE (subfamily PARAMYXOVIRINAE) where the virions of most members have hemagglutinin but not neuraminidase activity. All members produce both cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies. MEASLES VIRUS is the type species.Measles virus: The type species of MORBILLIVIRUS and the cause of the highly infectious human disease MEASLES, which affects mostly children.Raccoons: Carnivores of the genus Procyon of the family PROCYONIDAE. Two subgenera and seven species are currently recognized. They range from southern Canada to Panama and are found in several of the Caribbean Islands.Vero Cells: A CELL LINE derived from the kidney of the African green (vervet) monkey, (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS) used primarily in virus replication studies and plaque assays.Tigers: The species Panthera tigris, a large feline inhabiting Asia. Several subspecies exist including the Siberian tiger and Sumatran tiger.Ferrets: Semidomesticated variety of European polecat much used for hunting RODENTS and/or RABBITS and as a laboratory animal. It is in the subfamily Mustelinae, family MUSTELIDAE.Morbillivirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus MORBILLIVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. Infections mainly cause acute disease in their hosts, although in some cases infection is persistent and leads to degenerative conditions.Hemagglutinins, Viral: Specific hemagglutinin subtypes encoded by VIRUSES.Rinderpest virus: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing cattle plague, a disease with high mortality. Sheep, goats, pigs, and other animals of the order Artiodactyla can also be infected.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Cercopithecus aethiops: A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.Viral Fusion Proteins: Proteins, usually glycoproteins, found in the viral envelopes of a variety of viruses. They promote cell membrane fusion and thereby may function in the uptake of the virus by cells.Carnivora: An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.Receptors, Virus: Specific molecular components of the cell capable of recognizing and interacting with a virus, and which, after binding it, are capable of generating some signal that initiates the chain of events leading to the biological response.Viral Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.Parvovirus, Canine: A species of the genus PARVOVIRUS and a host range variant of FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS. It causes a highly infectious fulminating ENTERITIS in dogs producing high mortality. It is distinct from CANINE MINUTE VIRUS, a species in the genus BOCAVIRUS. This virus can also infect cats and mink.Raccoon Dogs: The lone species in the genus Nyctereutes, family CANIDAE. It is found in the woodland zone from southeastern Siberia to Vietnam and on the main islands of Japan.Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.Mink: Carnivores of genus Mustela of the family MUSTELIDAE. The European mink, which has white upper and lower lips, was widely trapped for commercial purposes and is classified as endangered. The American mink, lacking a white upper lip, is farmed commercially.SSPE Virus: A defective variant of MEASLES VIRUS that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.Feline Panleukopenia: A highly contagious DNA virus infection of the cat family, characterized by fever, enteritis and bone marrow changes. It is also called feline ataxia, feline agranulocytosis, feline infectious enteritis, cat fever, cat plague, and show fever. It is caused by FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS or the closely related MINK ENTERITIS VIRUS or CANINE PARVOVIRUS.Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral: Visible morphologic changes in cells infected with viruses. It includes shutdown of cellular RNA and protein synthesis, cell fusion, release of lysosomal enzymes, changes in cell membrane permeability, diffuse changes in intracellular structures, presence of viral inclusion bodies, and chromosomal aberrations. It excludes malignant transformation, which is CELL TRANSFORMATION, VIRAL. Viral cytopathogenic effects provide a valuable method for identifying and classifying the infecting viruses.Virus Cultivation: Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Avipoxvirus: A genus of the family POXVIRIDAE, subfamily CHORDOPOXVIRINAE, comprising bird poxviruses. The type species is FOWLPOX VIRUS. Transmission is mechanical by ARTHROPODS.Antigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.RNA Viruses: Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Inclusion Bodies, Viral: An area showing altered staining behavior in the nucleus or cytoplasm of a virus-infected cell. Some inclusion bodies represent "virus factories" in which viral nucleic acid or protein is being synthesized; others are merely artifacts of fixation and staining. One example, Negri bodies, are found in the cytoplasm or processes of nerve cells in animals that have died from rabies.Genes, Viral: The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.Vaccinia virus: The type species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS, related to COWPOX VIRUS, but whose true origin is unknown. It has been used as a live vaccine against SMALLPOX. It is also used as a vector for inserting foreign DNA into animals. Rabbitpox virus is a subspecies of VACCINIA VIRUS.Encephalitis: Inflammation of the BRAIN due to infection, autoimmune processes, toxins, and other conditions. Viral infections (see ENCEPHALITIS, VIRAL) are a relatively frequent cause of this condition.Neutralization Tests: The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Germ-Free Life: Animals not contaminated by or associated with any foreign organisms.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Cell Fusion: Fusion of somatic cells in vitro or in vivo, which results in somatic cell hybridization.Rabies: Acute VIRAL CNS INFECTION affecting mammals, including humans. It is caused by RABIES VIRUS and usually spread by contamination with virus-laden saliva of bites inflicted by rabid animals. Important animal vectors include the dog, cat, bat, fox, raccoon, skunk, and wolf.Illinois
The sequences were also identical to that of canine distemper virus found in the brain tissue of a seal that died in 1997 and ... This suggests these elements are causative agents in compromising the Caspian seal's immune system. A century ago, their ... Several recent cases of large numbers of Caspian seals dying due to canine distemper virus have been reported, in 1997, 2000, ... This suggests persistence of canine distemper virus in the Caspian seal population over a span of several years or repeated ...
... virus (FPV), also known as feline infectious enteritis, feline parvoviral enteritis, feline distemper, ... It causes a decrease in the cat's white blood cells, thus compromising its immune system. Typically, it also causes a decrease ... The virus primarily attacks the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, causing internal ulceration and, ultimately, total ... This is because the virus affects the infected cat's immune system, leaving it vulnerable to secondary infection. If a cat is ...
A common cause of death is canine distemper, which develops following vaccination with a modified live distemper virus vaccine ... The degree to which the various components of the immune system are compromised varies according to what other mutations the ... V(D)J recombination is necessary for recognition of a diverse range of antigens from bacteria, viruses, and parasites. It is ...
Canine distemper virus (CDV) is known to cause apoptosis in central nervous system and lymphoid tissue of infected dogs in vivo ... leading to a compromised immune system. One of the mechanisms by which T-helper cells are depleted is apoptosis, which results ... April 2010). "Apoptosis induced by Oropouche virus infection in HeLa cells is dependent on virus protein expression". Virus Res ... CDV (Canine Distemper Virus) is able to induce apoptosis despite the presence of these inhibitory proteins. This is an ...
Canine distemper virus (CDV) is known to cause apoptosis in central nervous system and lymphoid tissue of infected dogs in vivo ... leading to a compromised immune system. One of the mechanisms by which T-helper cells are depleted is apoptosis, which results ... April 2010). "Apoptosis induced by Oropouche virus infection in HeLa cells is dependent on virus protein expression". Virus Res ... Many viruses encode proteins that can inhibit apoptosis.[94] Several viruses encode viral homologs of Bcl-2. These homologs can ...
... virus Uganda S virus Usutu virus Wesselsbron virus West Nile virus Yaounde virus Yellow fever virus Yokose virus Zika virus ... On p. 188, Mitchell mentions "… the distemper was what is generally called the yellow fever in America." However, on pages 191- ... Overall, sfRNA is implied in multiple pathways that compromise host defenses and promote infection by flaviviruses. The ... Assam virus Bamaga virus Cuacua virus Donggang virus' Karumba virus (KRBV) Hanko virus Haslams Creek virus Mac Peak virus (McPV ...
CPV2 is a non-enveloped single-stranded DNA virus. The name comes from the Latin parvus, meaning small, as the virus is only 20 ... Because the normal intestinal lining is also compromised, blood and protein leak into the intestines leading to anemia and loss ... ISBN 0-8151-6351-7. Lobetti, Remo (2003). "Canine Parvovirus and Distemper". Proceedings of the 28th World Congress of the ... and the dog may remain an asymptomatic carrier and shed the virus periodically. The virus is usually more deadly if the host is ...
There is hardly a sound sample in Covent Garden market ... As for cure for this distemper, there is none." These reports were ... One was called "dry rot" or "taint", and the other was a virus known popularly as "curl". Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete ... The Crime and Outrage Act was passed in December 1847 as a compromise, and additional troops were sent to Ireland. The "Gregory ...
There is hardly a sound sample in Covent Garden market ... As for cure for this distemper, there is none."[60] These reports ... and the other was a virus known popularly as "curl".[47][48] Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete (a variety of parasitic, non ... The Crime and Outrage Act was passed in December 1847 as a compromise, and additional troops were sent to Ireland.[143] ...
The only known substances that Werecoyotes are not immune to is Wolfsbane and the modified canine distemper virus that was ... If the failures were to be resurrected after death, the paranormal process wouldn't be compromised. To revive the Beast, the ...
Canine distemper virus (CDV) is known to cause apoptosis in central nervous system and lymphoid tissue of infected dogs in vivo and in vitro.[90] Apoptosis caused by CDV is typically induced via the extrinsic pathway, which activates caspases that disrupt cellular function and eventually leads to the cells death.[74] In normal cells, CDV activates caspase-8 first, which works as the initiator protein followed by the executioner protein caspase-3.[74] However, apoptosis induced by CDV in HeLa cells does not involve the initiator protein caspase-8. HeLa cell apoptosis caused by CDV follows a different mechanism than that in vero cell lines.[74] This change in the caspase cascade suggests CDV induces apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway, excluding the need for the initiator caspase-8. The executioner protein is instead activated by the internal stimuli caused by viral infection not a caspase cascade.[74]. The Oropouche virus (OROV) is found in ...
... (GME) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and, rarely, cats. It is a form of meningoencephalitis. GME is likely second only to encephalitis caused by canine distemper virus as the most common cause of inflammatory disease of the canine CNS. The disease is more common in female toy dogs of young and middle age. It has a rapid onset. The lesions of GME exist mainly in the white matter of the cerebrum, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The cause is only known to be noninfectious and is considered at this time to be idiopathic. Because lesions resemble those seen in allergic meningoencephalitis, GME is thought to have an immune-mediated cause, but it is also thought that the disease may be based on an abnormal response to an infectious agent. One study searched for viral DNA from canine herpesvirus, canine adenovirus, and canine parvovirus in brain tissue from dogs ...
... , formerly Phocine distemper virus (PDV), is a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus that is pathogenic for pinniped species, particularly seals.[2] Clinical signs include laboured breathing, fever and nervous symptoms. PDV was first identified in 1988 as the cause of death of 18,000 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and 300 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) along the northern European coast.[3] In 2002, an epidemic of PDV along the North Sea coast resulted in the deaths of 21,700 seals, estimated to be 51% of the population. Antibodies to PDV have been found in a number of carnivorous mammal species in the Western North Atlantic, including polar bears, and the Atlantic walrus.[3] The suddenness of the emergence of PDV and related viruses in aquatic mammals has implicated environmental changes as the cause. Pollutants have been posited as contributors by interfering with the ability of animals to mount a ...
... , formerly Phocine distemper virus (PDV), is a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus that is pathogenic for pinniped species, particularly seals.[2] Clinical signs include laboured breathing, fever and nervous symptoms. PDV was first identified in 1988 as the cause of death of 18,000 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and 300 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) along the northern European coast.[3] In 2002, an epidemic of PDV along the North Sea coast resulted in the deaths of 21,700 seals, estimated to be 51% of the population. Antibodies to PDV have been found in a number of carnivorous mammal species in the Western North Atlantic, including polar bears, and the Atlantic walrus.[3] The suddenness of the emergence of PDV and related viruses in aquatic mammals has implicated environmental changes as the cause. Pollutants have been posited as contributors by interfering with the ability of animals to mount a ...
Canine distemper virus (CDV) is known to cause apoptosis in central nervous system and lymphoid tissue of infected dogs in vivo and in vitro.[90] Apoptosis caused by CDV is typically induced via the extrinsic pathway, which activates caspases that disrupt cellular function and eventually leads to the cells death.[74] In normal cells, CDV activates caspase-8 first, which works as the initiator protein followed by the executioner protein caspase-3.[74] However, apoptosis induced by CDV in HeLa cells does not involve the initiator protein caspase-8. HeLa cell apoptosis caused by CDV follows a different mechanism than that in vero cell lines.[74] This change in the caspase cascade suggests CDV induces apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway, excluding the need for the initiator caspase-8. The executioner protein is instead activated by the internal stimuli caused by viral infection not a caspase cascade.[74]. The Oropouche virus (OROV) is found in ...
... (GME) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and, rarely, cats. It is a form of meningoencephalitis. GME is likely second only to encephalitis caused by canine distemper virus as the most common cause of inflammatory disease of the canine CNS. The disease is more common in female toy dogs of young and middle age. It has a rapid onset. The lesions of GME exist mainly in the white matter of the cerebrum, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The cause is only known to be noninfectious and is considered at this time to be idiopathic. Because lesions resemble those seen in allergic meningoencephalitis, GME is thought to have an immune-mediated cause, but it is also thought that the disease may be based on an abnormal response to an infectious agent. One study searched for viral DNA from canine herpesvirus, canine adenovirus, and canine parvovirus in brain tissue from dogs ...
... (equine distemper) is a contagious upper respiratory tract infection of horses and other equines caused by a gram-positive bacterium, Streptococcus equi. As a result, the lymph nodes swell, compressing the pharynx, larynx and trachea and can cause airway obstruction leading to death, hence the name Strangles. Strangles is enzootic in domesticated horses worldwide. The contagious nature of the infection has at times led to limitations on sporting events. The disease is spread by an infected horse when nasal discharge or pus from the draining lymph nodes contaminate pastures, feed troughs, brushes, bedding, tack etc. Equines of any age may contract the disease, although younger and elderly equines are more susceptible. Young equines may lack immunity to the disease because they have not had prior exposure. Geriatric equines may have a weaker immune system. A horse with strangles will typically develop abscesses in the lymph nodes of the head and neck causing coughing fits ...
... , formerly Phocine distemper virus (PDV), is a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus that is pathogenic for pinniped species, particularly seals.[2] Clinical signs include laboured breathing, fever and nervous symptoms. PDV was first identified in 1988 as the cause of death of 18,000 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and 300 grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) along the northern European coast.[3] In 2002, an epidemic of PDV along the North Sea coast resulted in the deaths of 21,700 seals, estimated to be 51% of the population. Antibodies to PDV have been found in a number of carnivorous mammal species in the Western North Atlantic, including polar bears, and the Atlantic walrus.[3] The suddenness of the emergence of PDV and related viruses in aquatic mammals has implicated environmental changes as the cause. Pollutants have been posited as contributors by interfering with the ability of animals to mount a ...
... s are solitary, but are gregarious when hauled out and during the breeding season, though they do not form groups as large as some other seals. When not actively feeding, they haul to rest. They tend to be coastal, not venturing more than 20 km offshore. The mating system is not known, but thought to be polygamous. Females give birth once per year, with a gestation period around nine months. Females have a mean age at sexual maturity of 3.72 years and a mean age at first parturition of 4.64.[9] Both courtship and mating occur under water.[10][9] Pregnancy rate of females was 92% from age 3 to age 36, with lowered reproductive success after the age of 25 years.[9]. Birthing of pups occurs annually on shore. The timing of the pupping season varies with location,[11] occurring in February for populations in lower latitudes, and as late as July in the subarctic zone. The mothers are the sole providers of care, with lactation lasting 24 days.[12] Researchers have found males gather under ...
... s are solitary, but are gregarious when hauled out and during the breeding season, though they do not form groups as large as some other seals. When not actively feeding, they haul to rest. They tend to be coastal, not venturing more than 20 km offshore. Both courtship and mating occur under water. The mating system is not known, but thought to be polygamous. Females give birth once per year, with a gestation period around nine months. Females have a mean age at sexual maturity of 3.72 years and a mean age at first parturition of 4.64.[9] Pregnancy rate of females was 92% from age 3 to age 36, with lowered reproductive success after the age of 25 years.[9]. Birthing of pups occurs annually on shore. The timing of the pupping season varies with location,[10] occurring in February for populations in lower latitudes, and as late as July in the subarctic zone. The mothers are the sole providers of care, with lactation lasting 24 days.[11] Researchers have found males gather under water, ...
... is a genus of viruses, in the family Adenoviridae. Human, mammals, and vertebrates serve as natural hosts. There are currently 25 species in this genus, including the type species Human mastadenovirus C. Diseases associated with this genus include: very common human infection, estimated to be responsible for between 2% and 5% of all respiratory infections. usually mild respiratory, gastrointestinal and eye infections. serotypes 3, 5 and 7: lower respiratory tract infections. serotypes 8, 19, and 37: epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. serotypes 4 and 7: acute respiratory disease. serotypes 40 and 41: gastroenteritis. serotype 14: can cause potentially fatal adenovirus infections. Canine adenovirus 1 (CAdV-1) can lead to death in puppies, or encephalitis in other carnivore species. Group: dsDNA Order: Unassigned Family: Adenoviridae Genus: Mastadenovirus Bat mastadenovirus A Bat ...
... (GME) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and, rarely, cats. It is a form of meningoencephalitis. GME is likely second only to encephalitis caused by canine distemper virus as the most common cause of inflammatory disease of the canine CNS. The disease is more common in female toy dogs of young and middle age. It has a rapid onset. The lesions of GME exist mainly in the white matter of the cerebrum, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The cause is only known to be noninfectious and is considered at this time to be idiopathic. Because lesions resemble those seen in allergic meningoencephalitis, GME is thought to have an immune-mediated cause, but it is also thought that the disease may be based on an abnormal response to an infectious agent. One study searched for viral DNA from canine herpesvirus, canine adenovirus, and canine parvovirus in brain tissue from dogs ...
... (from Greek pneumo-, lung, -viridae, virus from Latin, poison, slimy liquid) is a new virus family in the order Mononegavirales. It was created in 2016 by elevating the now dissolved paramyxoviral subfamily Pneumovirinae. Natural hosts include humans, cattle, and rodents. There are currently 5 species in the Pneumoviridae family, divided between 2 genera (Metapneumovirus and Orthopneumovirus). Pneumoviruses are pleomorphic, capable of producing spherical and filamentous enveloped virions (virus particles) that vary in size from 150 to 200 nm in diameter. The nucleocapsid consisting of a protein shell and viral nucleic acids has a helical symmetry. Nucleocapsids have a diameter of 13.5 nm and a helical pitch of 6.5 nm. The genome is composed of negative-sense single-stranded RNA that is non-segmented. It is about 15kb in size, and encodes 11 proteins. A unique feature of the genome is the M2 gene, which ...
The primary diseases of concern to monk seals include distemper viruses (morbillivirus), West Nile virus, leptospirosis, and ... Other activities include critical response for compromised seals (e.g., hooked, entangled, sick, and/or injured). ...
... in raccoons has Cook County Animal and Rabies Control warning pet owners to protect their pets from the distemper virus, as ... An increase in confirmed cases of canine distemper ... to the viruses are those that are immune-compromised by age or ... The distemper virus affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal and nervous system of dogs. Symptoms include discharge from the ... "This year, 56 percent of raccoons that have been necropsied have been positive for the canine distemper virus," Alexander said ...
The sequences were also identical to that of canine distemper virus found in the brain tissue of a seal that died in 1997 and ... This suggests these elements are causative agents in compromising the Caspian seals immune system. A century ago, their ... Several recent cases of large numbers of Caspian seals dying due to canine distemper virus have been reported, in 1997, 2000, ... This suggests persistence of canine distemper virus in the Caspian seal population over a span of several years or repeated ...
I only do the distemper series and rabies now. I am considering discontinuing all vaccinations for my immune compromised cats ( ... Granted, hes isolated in a separate area, Id still just feel better, considering his close proximity to the virus, having him ...
Distemper is one of the most serious diseases your dog can get. It is also one of the most preventable. Here are the facts, ... in dogs is a secondary bacterial infection that attacks when a dogs immune system is compromised by the distemper virus. ... Preventing Canine Distemper. Canine distemper is entirely preventable. There are several things you can do to prevent distemper ... How to Treat Canine Distemper. There is no cure for canine distemper. Veterinarians diagnose distemper through a combination of ...
Distemper Canine distemper is a serious viral infection that has a very high mortality rate among puppies. The virus that ... Compromise to the intestinal wall leads to loss of protein and anemia. Endotoxins can also escape into the dogs bloodstream. ... Parainfluenza virus shots follow the schedule of distemper, adenovirus, and parvovirus. This means that the shots start by the ... More than 80 percent of puppies with distemper die because of the infection. The virus spreads by direct contact with infected ...
The mysterious epidemic that is killing the lions of the Serengeti turns out to be distemper, scientists announced last week. ... Munson was the first to identify what she suspected were proteins from the distemper virus in cells from lions that had died in ... The large number of lions in the park may have somehow compromised their immunity, or it may have simply made it easier for the ... Researchers say it is possible that the feline distemper virus was always present in big cats, but that it has recently mutated ...
Explains the Cause and Treatment of Distemper in Dogs ... How Does This Virus Spread ?. The distemper virus is fragile ... and frequently thereafter because exposure to the virus is so likely and the stressed animals immune defenses so compromised. ... What Will Kill Distemper Virus In The Environment ?. Unlike parvovirus, the canine distemper virus does not survive long when ... The virus is not related to the "distemper" of cats (panleukopenia). Dog distemper is an RNA virus (single strand) ; cat ...
... that began in the late 1980s may stem from toxic algae that weaken the animals and enable a virus related to canine distemper ... In other cases, they kill slowly by promoting tumor growth or compromising immune systems, leaving marine mammals vulnerable to ... Scientists say the growths are the result of a papilloma virus and an ancient microorganism called Lyngbya majuscula, which ... The virus spells trouble for one of L.A.s most iconic blocks. ... viruses and protozoans, all in concentrations that keep each ...
... a highly contagious virus, can lay hidden in your pet for several months after infection without them showing any clinical ... In dogs with weak or compromised immune systems, death can result in two to five weeks after initial infection, and sadly, this ... Canine Distemper Symptoms. The canine distemper virus typically attacks a dogs tonsils and lymph nodes first, and then after ... Canine distemper, which is also known as Carres disease and was once called hard pad disease, is a highly contagious virus ...
Canine Distemper. A serious viral illness with no known cure, canine distemper is a relative of the measles virus and may be ... If his immune system is otherwise compromised, the disease may progress-resulting in death. ... Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV). Also known as feline distemper, this highly contagious disease is usually deadly. Its ... Feline leukemia virus (FeLV). This highly contagious disease is easily spread from cat to cat through the sharing of food and ...
Types of Canine Flu Viruses. The canine influenza virus (CIV) is a relatively new virus and is part of the canine infectious ... Too many vaccines, in particular noncore vaccines (any canine vaccine other than distemper, parvo, adenovirus or rabies) like ... the one for CIV, can seriously compromise your pets immune system, affecting its ability to protect your dog naturally from ... Strain H3N8 was initially an influenza virus occurring in horses. The equine virus mutated and can now be transmitted among ...
Understanding the signs and symptoms of diseases and viruses common in felines will help you take proactive steps to keep your ... Though feline immunodeficiency virus or FIV may not show symptoms for years, it compromises a cats immune system. It develops ... Panleukopenia, or Feline Distemper, is incurable and highly contagious and is often fatal within days of the first symptoms. ... Viruses in Cats. Viruses in cats can be deadly. Though some take years to result in death, others can kill felines with weeks ...
... also known as feline distemper. The virus, which is one of the most contagious viral diseases in the cat population, attacks ... Recognizing Signs of a Compromised Immune System. It can be incredibly challenging to determine whether your pets immune ... Once his or her immune system becomes compromised, your pet is at risk of various infections and some lifelong health problems ... Cats, for instance, are at a significant risk for contracting the Feline Panleukopenia Virus (FPV), ...
In addition, nasal inflammation, like that caused by canine distemper or parainfluenza viruses lead to vascular congestion in ... There is a myriad of factors that can improve or compromise the performance of working canines. Frequency, intensity, and ... Although there is limited canine research available, viral infection with canine distemper (64) and canine parainfluenza virus ... Canine parainfluenza virus increased nasal inflammation and mucous secretions, causing a conductive hyposmia by reducing the ...
Canine Distemper. Tag: canine. What is Canine Distemper?. Also known as CDV, Canine Distemper is a highly contagious viral ... The virus can also live in the ground for up to a year where it can be brought into contact with a dog by way of shoes.. ​. ... Kittens aged between 2 and 6 months are the most vulnerable to the disease, followed by pregnant and immune-compromised cats. ... Feline Distemper. Tag: feline. What is Feline Distemper?. Also known as FPV and Feline Panleukopenia, Feline Distemper is a ...
Canine herpes virus Canine herpesvirus.. *Canine parvovirus Canine parvovirus.. *Canine distemper virus Canine distemper ... Some infectious agents are specific pathogens, whilst others are opportunistic organisms which colonize a compromised neonate. ... Earlier demise of the pups does not normally occur and on this ground alone herpes virus infection can be differentiated from ... Exposure of an immunologically naive bitch to canine herpes virus Canine herpesvirus during late pregnancy can result in ...
Association between cancer chemo- therapy and canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, and rabies virus antibody titers in ... Prior immunity not compromised by chemotherapy. View article (PDF, 271 KB). Carolyn J. Henry, Dudley L. McCaw, Kenny V. Brock, ... Epidemiologic characteristics of rabies virus variants in dogs and cats in the United States, 1999. Highlights:. • Rabies virus ... Incidence of adverse events in ferrets vaccinated with distemper or rabies vaccine: 143 cases (1995-2001). Highlights:. • ...
This strain is closely related to the virus that causes equine influenza, and it is thought that the equine influenza virus ... compromised immune system, etc.). The veterinarian might prescribe medications, such as an antibiotic (to fight secondary ... such as distemper, parvo and rabies - that are required for all dogs, regardless of lifestyle. ... lack immunity to it and are susceptible to infection if exposed to the active virus. Virtually all dogs exposed to the virus ...
Veterinarian reviewed information that explains the causes of dog Canine Distemper, including how it may be prevented. ... and it now is referred to as the Canine Distemper Virus, or CDV. Most dogs are exposed to this virus either by inhaling ... may still contract distemper under circumstances of extreme stress or when their immune systems are especially compromised, ... Canine distemper is caused by a Morbillivirus from the family Paramyxoviridae. It is closely related to the measles virus and ...
All of this pain and trauma is easily avoided with a canine distemper vaccine and ... ... If canine distemper doesnt kill a dog, its aftermath causes continuous problems for the affected animal. ... Its frequently fatal, especially in puppies and dogs with compromised immune systems. The virus attacks the entire dog, ... Feline distemper results from a different virus, but the canine distemper virus can affect any ferrets living in the household ...
Rabies: a serious illness caused by a virus that enters the body through a bite or wound contaminated by the saliva from an ... Theyre of greatest concern to young children, infants, pregnant women, and people whose immune systems have been compromised ... Illnesses common among housepets - such as distemper, canine parvovirus, and heartworms - cant spread to humans. ... Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV): People can get LCMV by inhaling particles that come from urine, feces, or saliva ...
Canine distemper virus is one of the most contagious diseases a dog may contract. Canine distemper virus, also known as Carres ... From there, your dogs gastrointestinal system will become compromised. This may cause vomiting and diarrhea. If that werent ... Welcome to Canine Distemper Help. Canine distemper virus, also known as Carres disease or hard pad disease (because of the ... Canine distemper is known as a multi-systemic virus, which means it attacks multiple areas of the body. The virus that causes ...
For dogs: Distemper virus, adenovirus-2 (hepatitis, canine respiratory virus) and parvovirus are all MLV canine vaccines, as ... When MLV vaccines are given to pets with compromised immune systems, the animal is actually at risk of contracting a weakened ... Note: a recombinant canine distemper virus vaccine is also available.). MLV vaccines have been associated with the development ... Vaccines for feline panleukopenia virus (a parvovirus, often incorrectly called feline distemper), feline viral respiratory ...
... anti-virus vaccinations (e.g. Parvo, Distemper), flea control, food supplements and general monitoring of the animal. ... All donations go towards the care for animals, which is never compromised. ... such as anti-rabies and 1-in-7 anti-virus), plus ongoing support to their local care-givers. This includes financial assistance ... families and checking on their adopted animals to monitor their health and give them their anti-rabies and All-in-1 anti-virus ...
  • Symptoms of distemper include a high fever and other general signs of illness in the early stages. (mercola.com)
  • During this short window of time, dogs are infected and shedding the virus in their nasal secretions, but are not yet showing signs of illness. (mercola.com)
  • Understanding the signs and symptoms of diseases and viruses common in felines will help you take proactive steps to keep your cat healthy. (thenest.com)
  • Infected dogs can shed the virus for several months after they become infected, whether they show clinical signs or not. (petwave.com)
  • Dogs diagnosed with distemper should be separated from all other dogs, especially healthy puppies, for several weeks even after the sick dog's signs have resolved, because infected dogs can shed the distemper virus for several weeks after they appear to be well. (petwave.com)
  • Signs of neurological issues related to the canine distemper virus might appear within a few weeks of the initial illness, or many months later. (dailypuppy.com)
  • Signs of distemper-related neurological issues include head tilting, constant circling, seizures, muscle twitching and tremors, paralysis, frequent chewing motions -- the "chewing gum fit" -- and excessive salivation. (dailypuppy.com)
  • Virtually all dogs exposed to the virus become infected, and nearly 80% show clinical signs of disease, though most exhibit the mild form described above. (avma.org)
  • If you spot any odd changes in your dog such as discharge from the eyes and nose or strange coughing sounds, these could be signs of canine distemper virus. (crittersitca.com)
  • This means that an outbreak of distemper in the local wildlife population can put dogs at risk for catching the disease even if they do not come into contact with other dogs. (akc.org)
  • An outbreak of distemper in your local wildlife makes it easier for your dog to potentially contract the virus without ever even coming into contact with another dog. (canna-pet.com)
  • Any cat can catch distemper, however, kittens between two and six months old, pregnant cats and cats with compromised immune systems are at greatest risk of contracting the disease. (cuteness.com)
  • In the later stages of disease, the virus begins to attack other body systems, particularly the nervous system, which can trigger seizures and paralysis. (mercola.com)
  • Once the virus reaches the central nervous system (CNS), it can cause twitching, seizures, and partial or total paralysis. (cobbevc.com)
  • If that weren't enough, distemper in dogs can even affect the nervous system, resulting in seizures and paralysis. (crittersitca.com)
  • Even if a dog doesn't die, canine distemper can cause irreparable damage to the nervous system, leaving the dog with partial or total paralysis, seizures or persistent tics. (hofah.com)
  • If a dog infected with distemper survives the acute stage of the illness, he may also develop hyperkeratosis of the paw pads and nose, which gives distemper the nickname "hard pad disease. (akc.org)
  • Certain strains of CDV can cause an abnormal enlargement or thickening of the pads of the feet, which is why distemper was sometimes called hard pad disease. (mercola.com)