Composite materials composed of an ion-leachable glass embedded in a polymeric matrix. They differ from GLASS IONOMER CEMENTS in that partially silanized glass particles are used to provide a direct bond to the resin matrix and the matrix is primarily formed by a light-activated, radical polymerization reaction.
A polymer obtained by reacting polyacrylic acid with a special anion-leachable glass (alumino-silicate). The resulting cement is more durable and tougher than others in that the materials comprising the polymer backbone do not leach out.
The degree of approximation or fit of filling material or dental prosthetic to the tooth surface. A close marginal adaptation and seal at the interface is important for successful dental restorations.
Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.

What is a "compomer"? (1/59)

"Compomers" are recently introduced products marketed as a new class of dental materials. These materials are said to provide the combined benefits of composites (the "comp" in their name) and glass ionomers ("omer"). Based on a critical review of the literature, the author argues that "compomers" do not represent a new class of dental materials but are merely a marketing name given to a dental composite.  (+info)

Resin content in cement liquids of resin-modified glass ionomers. (2/59)

Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted on four kinds of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement liquids, LC, LC II, LC III (hereinafter referred to as LCs) and VM, using HPLC and laser Raman spectroscopic methods. HPLC revealed that among the RMGI liquids LCs contain 31-32% HEMA (2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate), and VM contains 18% of the same. The composition of RMGI cement liquids varied significantly between manufacturers. In Raman spectroscopic analyses, the spectra of liquids of various ratios of polyacrylic acid and HEMA were measured, and calculations were made on the peak intensity ratios of C=C stretch vibration to C=O stretch vibration, common in both HEMA and polyacrylic acid. The composition ratio of polycarboxylic acid to HEMA of commercial glass ionomer cements was assessed by the regression curve generated by a combination of peak intensity ratios and composition ratios. In addition, Raman spectroscopy was able to identity the differences in form of the methacryloyloxy group.  (+info)

The influence of configuration factors on cavity adaptation in compomer restorations. (3/59)

The effect of configuration factor (C-factor) on cavity adaptation was investigated in three compomer and one resin composite restorations. Eighty-four cylindrical dentin cavities (C-factor: approximately 2.5, 3.0 or 4.0) prepared on flat coronal dentin surfaces were filled with the materials in combination with their proprietary adhesive systems. Cavity adaptation was microscopically examined after 15 minutes storage in water at the top surface and at other four sites along the cavity walls. Additionally, indentation testing was performed for each material at 20 minutes and 24 hours after irradiation. Regression analysis revealed no relationship between C-factor and gap dimension in compomer restorations at any of the measuring sites, while a logarithmic relation was found only at the cavity floor of the composite fillings. All materials showed maturation of mechanical properties. The elastic component of the indentation was smaller in compomers than in the composite. It was concluded that C-factor had no influence on the cavity adaptation for compomer restorations. This might be due to reduced stress generation at the bonding interface caused by relatively low mechanical properties immediately after curing, less elasticity, and water absorption in compomers.  (+info)

The effect of primers on bond strength of polyacid-modified resin composites (compomers). (4/59)

This study evaluated the effect of primer on shear bond strength and marginal gaps of six new compomers immediately after light-activation. A resin-modified glass ionomer cement, a conventional glass-ionomer cement and a microfilled composite were used for comparison. The marginal gap widths of each of the four compomers and a microfilled composite used with the primer were significantly smaller compared with those used without the primer. The bond strength values of five compomers used with the primer were significantly higher than those used without the primer. The bond strength of conventional glass-ionomer was not affected by the primer (or the conditioner).  (+info)

Release and recharge of fluoride by restorative materials. (5/59)

This study investigated the release and recharge of fluoride by restorative materials. Resin-modified glass ionomers (RGIs), polyacid-modified composite resins (PMCRs) and resin composite containing fluoride were used for comparison of fluoride release. Non-fluoride-releasing resin composite was used as a control. The amounts of fluoride release from RGIs and PMCRs remarkably increased in the citrate-phosphate acid buffer compared with distilled water. The amounts of fluoride recharged in RGIs increased with the concentration of NaF solution, but those of PMCRs exposed to all concentrations of NaF solutions were less than 1.5 ppm. Neither resin composite containing fluoride and non-fluoride-releasing resin composite gave any evidence of recharge. RGIs and PMCRs affected by acid buffer solution could not recharge much fluoride even if they were immersed in the 1000 ppmF NaF solution. The results suggested that the matrix of RGIs and PMCRs functioned as a reservoir of fluoride, but the functions were lost by acid attack.  (+info)

An ex vivo assessment of resin-modified glass ionomer bonding systems in relation to ceramic bracket debond. (6/59)

This ex vivo study assessed three new resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji ORTHO LC, Vitremer, and Dyract-Cem) in relation to ceramic bracket removal. It was hypothesized that the use of these cements would facilitate bracket removal and eliminate debond complications Eighty extracted premolar teeth were divided into four groups of 20 teeth and bonded with Intrigue brackets using each of the resin-modified cements (groups 1, 2, and 3), the control group 4 was bonded with Concise chemically-cured adhesive. The teeth were debonded by applying a shear load using an Instron universal testing machine. The mean force to debond was calculated for each group and each tooth was examined under the stereomicroscope to record the site of bond failure and the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). The results showed that the resin-modified cements were very effective at eliminating ceramic bracket debond problems. Bracket fracture was eliminated compared with a 40 per cent fracture rate with the control and the ARI scores were all reduced. The elimination of debond problems appears to be related to the significantly reduced (P < 0.001 using ANOVA and Tukey tests) mean and maximal debond forces compared with the control.  (+info)

Evaluation of the surface roughness of compomer by laser scanning microscopy. (7/59)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of alcoholic and low pH soft drinks on the surface roughness of compomer restorative materials. There were five tested materials and four immersion media. Specimens were immersed in test solutions for a 10-day period at a temperature of 37 degrees C. Measurement of the surface texture was carried out using a laser scanning microscope (a non-contact laser stylus tracing method). This was also used to produce the Laser Scanning Microscope Image (LSM Image). Specimens immersed in orange juice and whisky displayed higher values for Ra & Rz than specimens immersed in soft drinks and deionized water. LSM Image showed a difference between the control and the examined side, especially for specimens immersed in low pH soft drinks this could be due to the erosive effect of the media. Alcoholic and low pH soft drinks caused deterioration of the materials surface, which may lead to a clinically detectable rough and dull surface.  (+info)

Fatigue of restorative materials. (8/59)

Failure due to fatigue manifests itself in dental prostheses and restorations as wear, fractured margins, delaminated coatings, and bulk fracture. Mechanisms responsible for fatigue-induced failure depend on material ductility: Brittle materials are susceptible to catastrophic failure, while ductile materials utilize their plasticity to reduce stress concentrations at the crack tip. Because of the expense associated with the replacement of failed restorations, there is a strong desire on the part of basic scientists and clinicians to evaluate the resistance of materials to fatigue in laboratory tests. Test variables include fatigue-loading mode and test environment, such as soaking in water. The outcome variable is typically fracture strength, and these data typically fit the Weibull distribution. Analysis of fatigue data permits predictive inferences to be made concerning the survival of structures fabricated from restorative materials under specified loading conditions. Although many dental-restorative materials are routinely evaluated, only limited use has been made of fatigue data collected in vitro: Wear of materials and the survival of porcelain restorations has been modeled by both fracture mechanics and probabilistic approaches. A need still exists for a clinical failure database and for the development of valid test methods for the evaluation of composite materials.  (+info)

Compomers are a type of dental restorative material that contain both glass ionomer and composite resin components. They are designed to combine the advantages of both materials, such as the fluoride release and adhesion to tooth structure of glass ionomers, and the strength and esthetics of composite resins. Compomers are often used for restoring primary teeth in children due to their ease of use and reduced sensitivity compared to traditional composite resins. However, they may not be as durable or wear-resistant as other restorative materials, so their use is generally limited to small to moderate-sized cavities.

Glass Ionomer Cements (GICs) are a type of dental restorative material that have the ability to chemically bond to tooth structure. They are composed of a mixture of silicate glass powder and an organic acid, such as polyacrylic acid. GICs have several clinical applications in dentistry, including as a filling material for small to moderate sized cavities, as a liner or base under other restorative materials, and as a cement for securing crowns, bridges, and orthodontic appliances.

GICs are known for their biocompatibility, caries inhibition, and adhesion to tooth structure. They also have the ability to release fluoride ions, which can help protect against future decay. However, they are not as strong or wear-resistant as some other dental restorative materials, such as amalgam or composite resin, so they may not be suitable for use in high-load bearing restorations.

GICs can be classified into two main types: conventional and resin-modified. Conventional GICs have a longer setting time and are more prone to moisture sensitivity during placement, while resin-modified GICs contain additional methacrylate monomers that improve their handling properties and shorten their setting time. However, the addition of these monomers may also reduce their fluoride release capacity.

Overall, glass ionomer cements are a valuable dental restorative material due to their unique combination of adhesion, biocompatibility, and caries inhibition properties.

Dental marginal adaptation refers to the way in which a dental restoration, such as a filling or crown, fits precisely and accurately along the margin or edge where it meets the tooth structure. The term "marginal" describes the border between the restoration and the tooth. Ideally, this junction should be tight and smooth, without any gaps or spaces that could allow for the accumulation of bacteria, food debris, or dental plaque.

Achieving good marginal adaptation is crucial to ensure the longevity and success of a dental restoration. When the margin is well-adapted, it helps prevent microleakage, secondary tooth decay, and sensitivity. It also contributes to the overall seal and integrity of the restoration, minimizing the risk of recurrent caries or other complications.

The process of achieving optimal marginal adaptation involves careful preparation of the tooth structure, precise impression-taking techniques, and meticulous fabrication of the dental restoration. The use of high-quality materials and modern technologies, such as digital impressions and CAD/CAM systems, can further enhance the accuracy and predictability of the marginal adaptation.

Composite resins, also known as dental composites or filling materials, are a type of restorative material used in dentistry to restore the function, integrity, and morphology of missing tooth structure. They are called composite resins because they are composed of a combination of materials, including a resin matrix (usually made of bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate) and filler particles (commonly made of silica, quartz, or glass).

The composite resins are widely used in modern dentistry due to their excellent esthetic properties, ease of handling, and ability to bond directly to tooth structure. They can be used for a variety of restorative procedures, including direct and indirect fillings, veneers, inlays, onlays, and crowns.

Composite resins are available in various shades and opacities, allowing dentists to match the color and translucency of natural teeth closely. They also have good wear resistance, strength, and durability, making them a popular choice for both anterior and posterior restorations. However, composite resins may be prone to staining over time and may require more frequent replacement compared to other types of restorative materials.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Dental compomers are another type of white filling material although their use is not as widespread. Compomers were formed by ... Compomers may be used as a cavity lining material and a restorative material for non-load bearing cavities. In Paediatric ... Compomers have a lower wear resistance and a lower compressive, flexural and tensile strength than dental composites, although ... Compomers cannot adhere directly to tooth tissue like glass ionomer cements; they require a bonding agent like dental ...
Therefore, compomers are not an ideal material for load bearing restorations. In terms of wear resistance, compomers wear less ... Compomers are available in both normal and flowable forms, with the manufacturers of the flowable compomers claiming that they ... Compomers can be used as a cavity lining material to provide pulpal protection. Compomers are notable used in Paediatric ... Compomers are also available in various non-natural colours from various dental companies for use in deciduous teeth. Compomers ...
Compomers were seven times as likely to require replacement and composites were seven times as likely to require repair. There ...
Like glass ionomer cements and dental compomers, silver cermets are able to release fluoride over a sustained period of time. ...
... and compomers (or modified composites). Non-destructive neutron scattering has evidenced GIC setting reactions to be non- ...
Although compomers have better mechanical and aesthetic properties than RMGIC, they have some disadvantages which limit their ... Due to its relatively weaker mechanical properties, Compomers are unfit for stress-bearing restorations but can be used in the ... Another combination of composite resin and GIC technology, compomers are essentially made up of filler, dimethacrylate monomer ... applications: Compomers have weaker wear properties. They cannot adhere to tooth tissue due to the presence of resin, which can ...
... compomers MeSH D25.339.291.300 - dentin-bonding agents MeSH D25.339.291.402 - glass ionomer cements MeSH D25.339.291.402.120 - ... compomers MeSH D25.339.208 - dental alloys MeSH D25.339.208.224 - chromium alloys MeSH D25.339.208.224.959 - vitallium MeSH ... compomers MeSH D25.720.716.822.461 - epoxy resins MeSH D25.720.716.822.730 - resin cements MeSH D25.720.722 - ...
... compomers MeSH D05.750.716.822.461 - epoxy resins MeSH D05.750.716.822.730 - resin cements MeSH D05.750.728.700 - polydioxanone ...
... when used in the formulation of compomers, can lead to improved mechanical properties, particularly higher compressive strength ...
Dental compomers are another type of white filling material although their use is not as widespread. Compomers were formed by ... Compomers may be used as a cavity lining material and a restorative material for non-load bearing cavities. In Paediatric ... Compomers have a lower wear resistance and a lower compressive, flexural and tensile strength than dental composites, although ... Compomers cannot adhere directly to tooth tissue like glass ionomer cements; they require a bonding agent like dental ...
ELECTRONIC MICROSCOPY STUDIES ON THE ADHESION OF TOTAL ETCH ADHESIVE SYSTEMS IN GLASS-IONOMERS AND COMPOMERS. adminadmin 0 ... Numarul 3 ELECTRONIC MICROSCOPY STUDIES ON THE ADHESION OF TOTAL ETCH ADHESIVE SYSTEMS IN GLASS-IONOMERS AND COMPOMERS ...
LR: 20131121; JID: 7605679; 0 (Compomers); 0 (Composite Resins); 0 (Definite composite resin); 0 (Dental Cements); 0 (Dental ... Acid Etching, Dental, Animals, Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate/chemistry, Cattle, Compomers/chemistry, Composite Resins/ ...
Tooth-colored composite materials have been widely used for aesthetic purposes [1-5]. Compomers, defined as "polyacid-modified ... Composites and compomers must have smooth surfaces to inhibit plaque accumulation [7-11]. ...
Not more than 1 permanent filling in amalgam, composite resin, synthetic resin, glass ionomer, compomers, silicate or silico- ...
A shear bond strength, microleakage and laser microscopic study of two dental compomers.  Moodley, Desi (University of the ... Purpose: To evaluate and compare the in-vitro shear bond strength and micro leakage of two compomers with their adhesive ...
2: Compomers and Giomers. Jan 9, 2015 by mrzezo in Operative Dentistry Comments Off on 2: Compomers and Giomers ...
Propeties of Glass-Ionomer Cements, Composite Resins and Compomers Due to the increasing teeth problems, the demand for ...
COMPOMERS. COMPÔMEROS. CONDICIONES PATOLOGICAS ANATOMICAS. PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS, ANATOMICAL. CONDIÇÕES PATOLÓGICAS ...
Palavras-chave : Tooth abrasion; Glass ionomer cements; Compomers; Tooth erosion; Composite resins. ...
COMPOMERS. COMPÔMEROS. CONDICIONES PATOLOGICAS ANATOMICAS. PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS, ANATOMICAL. CONDIÇÕES PATOLÓGICAS ...
COMPOMERS. COMPÔMEROS. CONDICIONES PATOLOGICAS ANATOMICAS. PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS, ANATOMICAL. CONDIÇÕES PATOLÓGICAS ...
COMPOMERS COMPOMEROS COMPÔMEROS CONOTOXINS CONOTOXINAS CONOTOXINAS CRANIAL NERVE INJURIES TRAUMATISMOS DEL NERVIO CRANEAL ...
COMPOMERS COMPOMEROS COMPÔMEROS CONOTOXINS CONOTOXINAS CONOTOXINAS CRANIAL NERVE INJURIES TRAUMATISMOS DEL NERVIO CRANEAL ...
COMPOMERS COMPOMEROS CONDIÇÕES PATOLÓGICAS ANATÔMICAS PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS, ANATOMICAL CONDICIONES PATOLOGICAS ANATOMICAS ...
COMPOMERS. COMPÔMEROS. CONDICIONES PATOLOGICAS ANATOMICAS. PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS, ANATOMICAL. CONDIÇÕES PATOLÓGICAS ...
COMPOMERS COMPOMEROS COMPÔMEROS CONOTOXINS CONOTOXINAS CONOTOXINAS CRANIAL NERVE INJURIES TRAUMATISMOS DEL NERVIO CRANEAL ...
COMPOMERS COMPOMEROS CONDIÇÕES PATOLÓGICAS ANATÔMICAS PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS, ANATOMICAL CONDICIONES PATOLOGICAS ANATOMICAS ...
COMPOMERS COMPOMEROS COMPÔMEROS CONOTOXINS CONOTOXINAS CONOTOXINAS CRANIAL NERVE INJURIES TRAUMATISMOS DEL NERVIO CRANEAL ...
COMPOMERS COMPOMEROS COMPÔMEROS CONOTOXINS CONOTOXINAS CONOTOXINAS CRANIAL NERVE INJURIES TRAUMATISMOS DEL NERVIO CRANEAL ...
COMPOMERS COMPOMEROS CONDIÇÕES PATOLÓGICAS ANATÔMICAS PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS, ANATOMICAL CONDICIONES PATOLOGICAS ANATOMICAS ...
Compomers for the restorative treatment of dental caries in primary teeth: An umbrella review: Compomers in primary teeth: an ...
CBI Characteristic Radiation Child psychology Classification of third molar impaction Code complete dentures Compomers ...
Compomers. Composite. Bulk Fill. Composite Kits. Orthodontics. Adhesives. Self Cure Adhesive. Composite Organizers/Shade Guides ...
Options for CRC include GIC, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), composite resin (CR), or compomers (CMP). Amalgam is ...
What are compomers used for?. Compomers. Compomers or poly acid-modified composites are used for restorations in low stress- ... What is the point of compomers in dentistry?. The point of compomers is to combine the beneficial properties of glass ionomers ... Compomers are widely acceptable for revamp in the ephemeral dentition because of their opposition to moderate abrasion [44, 45 ... Compomers are packaged as single-paste formulations in compules and syringes. Setting occurs primarily by light-cured ...
Compomers. Composite. Bulk Fill. Composite Kits. Orthodontics. Adhesives. Self Cure Adhesive. Composite Organizers/Shade Guides ...
  • The point of compomers is to combine the beneficial properties of glass ionomers by using composite technology. (ufoscience.org)
  • Restorative materials such as composites, glass ionomers, and compomers are introduced. (vdos.org)
  • Composites and compomers must have smooth surfaces to inhibit plaque accumulation [ 7 - 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • For high-lustre polishing of all types of composites and compomers. (ddgroup.com)
  • Compomers, defined as "polyacid-modified resin composites," were introduced in the dental literature in the early 1990s and have commonly been used for primary and permanent tooth restorations [ 6 , 7 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Behrend B, Geurtsen W. Long-term effects of four extraction media on the fluoride release from four polyacid-modified composite resins (compomers) and one resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. (wjoud.com)
  • Compomers provide improved handling and fluoride release when compared with composites. (dentalknowledge.in)
  • Compomers or poly acid-modified composites are used for restorations in low stress-bearing areas, although a recent product is recommended by the manufacturer for class 1 and class 2 restorations in adults (see Table 9.1). (ufoscience.org)
  • Colored compomers are just as effective as glass ionomer cement and composite resin in filling dental cavities and preventing tooth decay. (panditclinic.com)
  • Compomers are widely acceptable for revamp in the ephemeral dentition because of their opposition to moderate abrasion [44, 45]. (ufoscience.org)
  • The mechanical properties of compomers are generally inferior to resin-based composite materials but superior to glass ionomer materials. (ufoscience.org)
  • Phục hồi răng trực tiếp (ví dụ: composite, glass ionmer được gia cố nhựa, tái tạo cùi bằng resin, compomers). (dentech.vn)
  • Colored compomers are a relatively new type of filling, dental fillings in different colors. (panditclinic.com)
  • At Pandit Clinic, we use 8 different colors of compomers, and the kids can choose their favorite color for their filling! (panditclinic.com)
  • Direct systems are comprised of composite resins classified according to the filler particle size, such as microfill composites, hybrid composites, glass or resin modified ionomers, compomers, and nanomers. (rdhmag.com)
  • Radiopacity of compomers, flowable and conventional resin composites for posterior restorations. (bvsalud.org)
  • For the polishing of composites, compomers, resin-modified glass ionomers and ceramics. (ddgroup.com)
  • Advanced one-step polishing system, recommended for finishing and polishing composites (resins), compomers, glass ionomer cements and amalgams. (tkplus.es)
  • In acetic acid all the test materials showed color changes, ie maximum by glass ionomers (GIs), followed by compomers (Polyacid modified composites- PMCs) & resin modified glass ionomers (RMGls). (org.in)
  • Tooth colored fillings, otherwise known as composites or compomers, consist of hard resin polymers to mimic the properties of a natural tooth. (stantangdds.com)
  • anchor® has a unique chemistry allowing its use as both a core build-up material and luting cement, while being compatible with common composites, compomers and bonding agents. (suredental.com)
  • Resin-based dental restorations such as dental composites, resin modified glass ionomers, and compomers are polymeric tooth-colored restorative materials that are widely used in many dental applications due to their good clinical performance. (jrmds.in)
  • However, the term "white fillings" may include materials like resin-modified cements, compomers and water-based glass ionomer cements (GIC). (medscape.com)
  • Three Ionomer based esthetic restorative materials were used:-Glass Ionomer(GIs), resin modified glass Ionomer(RMGIs), and compomers. (org.in)
  • To evaluate the wear resistance of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements and compomers for light loading using an in vitro wear simulation machine. (kssfp.jp)
  • Primary objectiveTo evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of all types of preformed crowns for restoring primary teeth compared with conventional filling materials (such as amalgam, composite, glass ionomer, resin modified glass ionomer and compomers), other types of crowns or methods of crown placement, non-restorative caries treatment or no treatment. (altmetric.com)
  • Giomers contain both of the essential components of glass-ionomer cements and resins but they cannot be classified as compomers, in which a variable amount of dehydrated polyalkeonic acid is incorporated in the resin matrix and the acid does not react with the glass until water uptake occurs. (org.in)