Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.United StatesLength of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.Diabetic Angiopathies: VASCULAR DISEASES that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Biliary Tract Diseases: Diseases in any part of the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Fistula: Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Diabetic Retinopathy: Disease of the RETINA as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the progressive microvascular complications, such as ANEURYSM, interretinal EDEMA, and intraocular PATHOLOGIC NEOVASCULARIZATION.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Thromboembolism: Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.Diabetic Neuropathies: Peripheral, autonomic, and cranial nerve disorders that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS. These conditions usually result from diabetic microvascular injury involving small blood vessels that supply nerves (VASA NERVORUM). Relatively common conditions which may be associated with diabetic neuropathy include third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES); MONONEUROPATHY; mononeuropathy multiplex; diabetic amyotrophy; a painful POLYNEUROPATHY; autonomic neuropathy; and thoracoabdominal neuropathy. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1325)Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Intestinal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Hemostatic Techniques: Techniques for controlling bleeding.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Anastomotic Leak: Breakdown of the connection and subsequent leakage of effluent (fluids, secretions, air) from a SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS of the digestive, respiratory, genitourinary, and cardiovascular systems. Most common leakages are from the breakdown of suture lines in gastrointestinal or bowel anastomosis.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Infection: Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Diabetic Nephropathies: KIDNEY injuries associated with diabetes mellitus and affecting KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; ARTERIOLES; KIDNEY TUBULES; and the interstitium. Clinical signs include persistent PROTEINURIA, from microalbuminuria progressing to ALBUMINURIA of greater than 300 mg/24 h, leading to reduced GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE and END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Tracheostomy: Surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck, or the opening so created.Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Gastrostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening into the stomach for nutritional support or gastrointestinal compression.Punctures: Incision of tissues for injection of medication or for other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Punctures of the skin, for example may be used for diagnostic drainage; of blood vessels for diagnostic imaging procedures.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic: Excision of the gallbladder through an abdominal incision using a laparoscope.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Operative Time: The duration of a surgical procedure in hours and minutes.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated: Minor hemoglobin components of human erythrocytes designated A1a, A1b, and A1c. Hemoglobin A1c is most important since its sugar moiety is glucose covalently bound to the terminal amino acid of the beta chain. Since normal glycohemoglobin concentrations exclude marked blood glucose fluctuations over the preceding three to four weeks, the concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin A is a more reliable index of the blood sugar average over a long period of time.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Hemostasis, Surgical: Control of bleeding during or after surgery.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.GermanyProsthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Enteral Nutrition: Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Cutaneous Fistula: An abnormal passage or communication leading from an internal organ to the surface of the body.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Obesity, Morbid: The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Electrocoagulation: Procedures using an electrically heated wire or scalpel to treat hemorrhage (e.g., bleeding ulcers) and to ablate tumors, mucosal lesions, and refractory arrhythmias. It is different from ELECTROSURGERY which is used more for cutting tissue than destroying and in which the patient is part of the electric circuit.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Radiation Injuries: Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Catheters: A flexible, tubular device that is used to carry fluids into or from a blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity.
When in need of glucose the body of a person with a fatty-acid metabolism disorder will still send fats to the liver. The fats ... In addition to the fetal complications, they can also cause complications for the mother during pregnancy. Examples include: ... It is essential that the blood-glucose levels remain at adequate levels to prevent the body from moving fat to the liver for ... June 1999). "A fetal fatty-acid oxidation disorder as a cause of liver disease in pregnant women". N. Engl. J. Med. 340 (22): ...
Thus, in people with advanced liver disease the shunting of portal blood away from hepatocytes is usually well tolerated. ... Severe procedural complications during a TIPS procedure, including catastrophic bleeding or direct liver injury, are relatively ... In the hands of an experienced physician, operative mortality is less than 1%[medical citation needed]. On the other hand, up ... A less common, but more serious complication, is hepatic ischemia causing acute liver failure. While healthy livers are ...
underwent a liver transplant in 1976 after developing cirrhosis. He died in 1981, at the age of 33, from alcoholism and liver ... Many people, notably Allen Ginsberg, tried to encourage him to quit, but Burroughs' self-destructive behavior continued.[ ... Although Burroughs spent months in and out of the hospital, and there were many serious complications, the operation was ... clarification needed]. Billy was sent to a mental hospital in St. Louis for help, but threats to run away caused Mortimer and ...
People who live with someone whose immune system is compromised (for example, people with cancer or HIV/AIDS). People aged 65 ... Data are needed from large clinical trials of paediatric, adult, and elderly people to find the appropriate antigen dose and ... Persons aged 25 through 64 years who have health conditions associated with higher risk of medical complications from influenza ... since the world would soon need a new vaccine against a new virus. "What's 16,000 sick people? During any flu season, some ...
Though media and advertising do play a large role in influencing many people's lives, such as by making people believe plastic ... "The 10 Most Common Plastic Surgery Complications". Choices, NHS. "Plastic surgery - Complications - NHS Choices". www.nhs.uk. " ... McIndoe kept referring to them as "his boys" and the staff called him "The Boss" or "The Maestro."[citation needed] His other ... then the person's concern is markedly excessive. While 2% of people suffer from body dysmorphic disorder in the United States, ...
He died in his sleep, most likely due to complications of diabetes.[citation needed] Clement has been honored several times for ... when Clement and Frederik Pohl were the fifth and sixth living persons honored, and the 1999 SFWA Grand Master Award. For the ... Speculative fiction portal Biography portal As living inductees Clement and Frederik Pohl were preceded in the Hall of Fame by ... Intuition: The Guide Who Needs Steering (1987). Published in Intuit. The Magic Picture (1989). Published in L. Ron Hubbard ...
Meet the unique needs of young adults aged 18 to 40 diagnosed with cancer. Over 20 groups with people with a similar diagnosis ... Hong Kong Cancer Fund was established in 1987 to provide support, information and care to those living with cancer, and to ... with medical nutritional therapy to help patients to cope with complications. Helps children aged 5 to 15 whose family member ... Recognising the need for a centralised meeting point to be shared amongst the various self-help groups, the concept of creating ...
... citation needed] In many countries however, overall alcohol consumption is increasing, and consequently the number of people ... Gastrointestinal bleeding from portal hypertension related to liver damage Abnormal blood test suggesting liver disease Enzyme ... Diseases and complications related to viral hepatitis and alcohol are the main reason for seeking specialist advice. More than ... commonly due to liver disease but can be from other diseases like heart failure All patients with advanced liver disease e.g. ...
The recipient still needs to take immunosuppressants to avoid rejection, but no surgery is required. Most people need two or ... Operative time and complications decreased significantly after a surgeon performed 150 cases. Live donor kidney grafts have ... Living-donor renal transplants are further characterized as genetically related (living-related) or non-related (living- ... People generally have more energy, a less restricted diet, and fewer complications with a kidney transplant than if they stay ...
People at risk of developing severe complications who have had significant exposure to the virus may be given intra-muscular ... Aspirin use by someone with chickenpox may cause the serious, sometimes fatal disease of the liver and brain, Reye syndrome. ... but large-scale clinical trials are still needed to demonstrate its efficacy.[81]There has also been speculation that ... Testing for antibodies may be done to determine if a person is or is not immune.[7] People usually only get chickenpox once.[2] ...
To have a caregiver a person may have to decide on changes on where they live and with whom they live.[16] When someone needs a ... Complications[edit]. Discontinuing unnecessary treatment[edit]. For some diseases, such as advanced cancer, there may be no ... Persons who need care are also frequently people who need homes that are accessible in a way that matches their needs.[17] If ... this could mean that a person moves to live with the caregiver, or the caregiver moves to live with the person.[16] It is also ...
... and reduce complications. Symptomatic treatment is often needed for the complication of postherpetic neuralgia. However, a ... Physicians began to report that cases of shingles were often followed by chickenpox in the younger people who lived with the ... They include a live-virus vaccine and a non-live subunit vaccine. A review by Cochrane concluded that the live vaccine was ... Complications in immunocompromised individuals with shingles may be reduced with intravenous aciclovir. In people who are at a ...
Live albums Live in Dijon '79 (2009) Singles "Heartbreaker"/"Look at the People" (1979) "Shiny Blue Orb" (1992) "Millions" ( ... The band disbanded in 1995 after founding member and guitarist Bruce Witsiepe died from HIV complications.[citation needed] A ...
... liver complications including jaundice and abnormal liver function tests; reproductive effects including reduction in sperm ... It is not recommended in people with severe liver or kidney problems. Use in pregnancy is known to harm the baby. Procarbazine ... It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health ... Dose should be adjusted for kidney disease or liver disease. Very common (greater than 10% of people experience them) adverse ...
... some CPAM patients live a full life without any complication or incident. It is hypothesized that there are thousands of people ... If the infant is asymptomatic, the need for resection is a subject of debate, though it is usually recommended. Development of ... Most babies with a CPAM are born without complication and are monitored during the first few months. Many patients have surgery ... Through ultrasound testing employed in recent years, many more patients are aware that they live with this condition. Rarely, ...
Most people with talon cusp will live their normal lives unless the case is severe and causes a cascade of other dental issues ... Small talon cusps that produce no symptoms or complication for a person can remain untreated. However large talon cusps should ... citation needed] Type II - Semi Talon: The semi talon cusp measures about 1mm or more in length but extends less than half of ... A person belonging to one of these particular demographics or one who has any of these deformities or syndromes may have a ...
Complications of gallstones include inflammation of the gallbladder, inflammation of the pancreas, and liver inflammation. ... Most people with gallstones (about 80%) never have symptoms. In 1-4% of those with gallstones, a crampy pain in the right upper ... If there are no symptoms, treatment is usually not needed. In those who are having gallbladder attacks, surgery to remove the ... Complications may be detected on blood tests. Prevention is by maintaining a healthy weight and eating a diet high in fiber and ...
... citation needed] Often, people don't have enough money when they face a need, so they borrow. A poor family might borrow from ... Limitations Complications specific to Canada include the need for loans of a substantial size in comparison to the ones ... In this context the main features of microfinance are: Loan given without security Loans to those people who live below the ... and that in any case it should not be up to rich people to determine how poor people use their money[citation needed]. There ...
Complications. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatorenal syndrome, low blood sodium[2][3]. Causes. Liver cirrhosis, cancer ... 50% of people (with cirrhosis)[3]. Ascites is the abnormal buildup of fluid in the abdomen.[1] Technically, it is more than 25 ... An abdominal CT scan is a more accurate alternate to reveal abdominal organ structure and morphology.[citation needed] ... When a liver cirrhosis patient is suffering from thrombosis, it is not possible to perform a liver transplant, unless the ...
... died at his home in Juneau, Alaska, on May 22, 2011, at the age of 102, of complications from bone cancer and ... Hundreds of people, including Governor Parnell, attended Soboleff's memorial service at Centennial Hall in Juneau. The service ... Soboleff traveled to remote Alaskan settlements, fishing villages, and even lighthouses as needed by the Presbyterian ministry ... "Soboleff's memorial to be televised live statewide". Juneau Empire. 2011-05-27. Retrieved 2011-06-19. Forgey, Pay (2015-05-15 ...
ACT runs a range of community programs including education forums and events targeting the different needs of people living ... and carer training as well as broad based community education to raise public awareness of the condition and its complications ... Diabetes NSW & ACT is a member based charity dedicated to helping people living with or at risk of diabetes, their families and ... The organisation provides support and services to people living with and at risk of diabetes, their families, carers, friends ...
For many living in rural poverty, financial difficulties impede a person from being able to own a vehicle. The need for ... recovery length and complications, and lack of social and nursing supports.[citation needed] Canadians living in rural poverty ... For many, this is not enough to meet their daily living needs, let alone health care expenses and additional cost of living ... People living with a disability may find it challenging to work, depending on their condition. Among the rural jobs, many of ...
Citizens who live in such places-especially young children, the elderly, or people of any age with autoimmune deficiencies-may ... suffer serious health complications as a long-term result of drinking water from their own taps.[citation needed] Some state ... or serve an average of at least 25 people for at least 60 days a year. The SDWA authorized the EPA to promulgate regulations ... have more requirements than smaller water systems or those serving different people each day (e.g., a shopping mall). In 2009, ...
... "something from which people of every background can benefit: an art of living." This essentially treats Buddhism as an applied ... In particular, the need to include women on an equal footing produced organizational innovations, which disrupted older ... "without the complications of rituals, robes, chanting and the whole religious tradition." S. N. Goenka, a popular teacher of ... while demonstrating their value and relevance to people living in our own time. Both aspects of this interpretation are ...
... but people are mostly concerned with its effects on living tissue: it causes chemical burns on contact and can lead to ... The template below (More citations needed) is being considered for deletion. See templates for discussion to help reach a ... complications when ingested. The word corrosive is derived from the Latin verb corrodere, which means to gnaw, indicating how ... Their action on living tissue (e.g. skin, flesh and cornea) is mainly based on acid-base reactions of amide hydrolysis, ester ...
Injections of insulin may either be added to oral medication or used alone.[25] Most people do not initially need insulin.[13] ... Complications. Main article: Complications of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is typically a chronic disease associated with a ten- ... "A Roadmap on the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Among People Living With Diabetes". Global Heart. 14 (3): 215-240. doi: ... many people - for example people with a life expectancy of less than nine years who will not benefit, are over-treated.[90] ...
While people with SCI are living longer, complications can hurt quality of life. ... Common spinal cord injury-related complications include local and systemic types of disorders. ... Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Prognosis: What You Need to Know. The first 48 hours following traumatic spinal cord injury are ... people are living longer, more active lives after traumatic neck and/or back injury. But, it may come at a cost: Complications ...
In extreme cases of pancytopenia, a person can have infections, the signs of severe anemia, including fatigue and difficulty ... a condition that occurs when a person has low counts for all three types of blood cells: red blood cells, white blood cells, ... Complications. Ultimately, a person needs their blood cells to live. If a person does not produce enough blood cells and ... If a persons platelets are low, they may bleed more easily.. White blood cells help to fight infection. Therefore, if a person ...
It occurs when immune cells mistake the livers normal cells for harmful invaders and attack them. ... You may need prednisone or other corticosteroid medicines to help reduce the inflammation. Azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine ... Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family members of people with autoimmune diseases. There may be a genetic cause. ... Complications may include:. *Cirrhosis. *Side effects from steroids and other medicines. *Hepatocellular carcinoma ...
Kylie Jenner Faces Complications During Pregnancy And May Need Surgery. January 17, 2018 ... Mom Shares Video Of Twins Kissing And People Freak Out Calling It Inappropriate. January 17, 2018 ... Kylie Jenner Faces Complications During Pregnancy And May Need Surgery. January 17, 2018 ... Home/ Beauty/This Video Exposes the Realities of Living With Trichotillomania. This Video Exposes the Realities of Living With ...
"We need to make sure that all children get the best possible start in life in order to reduce health inequalities." Cystic ... Metabolic syndrome increases risk of pregnancy complications 12/06/2018 Pregnancy and Childbirth ... who live in deprived areas have worse growth and lung function than people living in more advantaged areas. Researchers at the ... They found that children and adults with CF who lived in the most disadvantaged areas in the UK had lower weight, height and ...
It changes the way you look and can cause serious complications. Its called acquired lipodystrophy when you arent born with ... productive lives.. Youll need to work closely with your doctor to prevent complications. For example, people with AGL are ... Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Diet, Food & Fitness. * Diet & Weight Management ... People with APL who have extra fat deposits can use liposuction to get rid of some, but fat may build up again. Talk to your ...
We all deserve access to the medicines we need to live.. I know this issue affects people up and down the country. If it ... Because people are less likely to suffer from health complications later down the line. ... It means that in order to stay living a healthy, normal life, I need to take the following medications everyday; Flecainide and ... I thought the NHS was supposed to be there to help people like me. So, I am calling on the NHS Business authority to update the ...
... the consequences of blood disorders by contributing to a better understanding of blood disorders and their complications. ... COVID-19 has directly or indirectly impacted those living with blood disorders. We will continue to monitor and assess the ... Helping consumers and healthcare providers get the information they need; and. *Encouraging action on behalf of individuals ... Protecting People and Preventing Complications of Blood Disorders. ...
Diabetes Caregiver Central® is expected to go live in the fall of 2010. ... managing complications and coexisting illnesses; and handling patient and caregiver stress and mental health," said Matsumoto. ... Landmark survey highlights needs of unpaid caregivers of people with diabetes. August 18, 2009. ScienceBlog.com ... aimed at better understanding the daily needs and struggles of unpaid caregivers of people with diabetes. ...
The total number of expressed needs was higher in non-Swiss nationals, persons with complete para- or tetraplegia and lower ... Increased expressed and unmet service needs were associated with lower life satisfaction. Service needs with a high prevalence ... Predictors and consequences of service needs were examined with multiple regression analyses. High-prevalence needs (e.g., ... Participants were 490 people who took part in the health services module of the Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Cohort Study (SwiSCI) ...
... leading to a range of complications. Neurofibromas are usually non-cancerous and grow on the nerves of the skin, and sometimes ... Complications may shorten the lifespan, but a person with Nf1 can often expect to live for the same amount of time as someone ... What you need to know about tinnitus. Tinnitus is a ringing, whistling, or another sound in a persons ears that only they can ... Complications of Nf2. People with Nf2 can develop benign skin tumors, similar to those characteristic of NF1. These should be ...
Some people will have to live with chronic (long-term) pain.. Possible Complications. ... These symptoms improve with non-surgical treatment and do not need surgery. ... By age 60, most people show signs of cervical spondylosis on x-ray. Other factors that can make someone more likely to develop ... People who are very active at work or in sports may be more likely to have them. ...
Without it, cells are starved for energy and must seek an alternate source, leading to serious complications. ... People with Type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy to live. Some people with Type 2 diabetes must also take insulin therapy to ... Complications of diabetes include kidney disease, nerve damage, eye problems, and stomach problems. ... Insulin helps the liver, muscle, and fat cells to store the glucose you dont need right away, so it can be used for energy ...
Read these inspirational stories from people with COPD, then share your own. Well donate $10 to the COPD Foundation for every ... I usually dont need it indoors. I only have 18% lung capacity but I dont let that stop me (most of the time). ... How Doctors Treat COPD Patients with Pneumonia, See how this potentially serious complication of COPD is treated. ... Since being diagnosed with COPD, I only hope to make a difference in other peoples lives, so that they do not give up hope. My ...
You may need surgery to treat these problems. For some people, surgery wont help. They would need a feeding tube in the ... Living with dysphagia. Dysphagia can lead to complications. These include:. *Malnutrition, weight loss, and dehydration. When ... Nerve and muscle disorders. People who have had a stroke, or people who have Parkinsons disease, multiple sclerosis, muscular ... You may also need an endoscopy. For this test, the doctor uses a flexible tube with a light at the end of it. He or she will ...
Of 49 patients for whom clinical data were available, 37 (75%) had leprosy reaction, neuropathy, or other complications; 17 (37 ... Increased case finding and management, and avoidance of leprosy-labeled stigma, is needed for this population. ... Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting ... Hansen Disease among Micronesian and Marshallese Persons Living in the United States On This Page ...
Heres how to avoid complications and take care of your liver. ... Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living ... Who needs to know you have it? And how will it impact your love life? ... Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life. ... Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMDs Communities. Its a safe forum where you can create or participate ...
During a standard whole-liver orthotopic liver transplantation (OLTX), the following 4 donor structures must be reconnected ... Do patients need more frequent colonoscopic surveillance after liver transplantation?. Transplant Proc. 2008 Jun. 40(5):1522-4 ... News Guideline Recommends Direct-acting Antivirals for HCV in People With Kidney Disease ... Imaging of Liver Transplantation Complications Q&A What are the possible complications of whole-liver orthotopic liver ...
Hepatitis A is a liver disease that is easily spread from person to person (highly contagious). It is caused by the hepatitis A ... In some cases bed rest and some medicines may be needed.. What are the complications of hepatitis A?. In rare cases hepatitis A ... Hepatitis A is a liver disease that is easily spread from person to person (highly contagious). It is caused by the hepatitis A ... This may happen through person to person contact such as:. *When an infected person doesnt wash their hands well after going ...
Many people with ankylosing spondylitis also experience a condition called uveitis. What you need to know. ... Complications. Ankylosing Spondylitis, Uveitis and Eye Health. ... Bridging the Gap: Living with Ankylosing Spondylitis. This is ...
This person will have mild anemia and can pass his gene to his offspring.. Complications may be shock from loss of blood and ... There may be liver and spleen damage from frequent blood transfusions. The result of complications is a shorter life span. ... A person with thalassemia major will need blood transfusions throughout life.. At present a successful bone marrow transplant ... c. Splenectomy (removal of the spleen) may be needed for patients with Hemoglobin H disease whose need for transfusions is ...
Acute liver failure is when your liver suddenly begins to lose its ability to function. This often happens right after an ... People with the most urgent need are placed at the top of the list. ... What are the complications of acute liver failure?. If you have acute liver failure, common complications include bacterial and ... Acute Liver Failure. Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Print. What is acute liver failure?. Acute liver failure is a rare ...
Zydelig can cause serious harm to your liver, lungs, or intestines. Some of these conditions may lead to fatal complications. ... In clinical studies, some people responded to this medicine, but further studies are needed. ... You may need frequent medical tests to be sure this medicine is not causing harmful effects. Your cancer treatments may be ... liver problems - upper stomach pain, loss of appetite, dark urine, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or ...
Acute liver failure is when your liver suddenly begins to lose its ability to function. This often happens right after an ... People with the most urgent need are placed at the top of the list. ... What are the complications of acute liver failure?. If you have acute liver failure, common complications include bacterial and ... However, people with controlled HIV can get a liver transplant. If you are approved for a liver transplant, your name will be ...
Living Transplant Donors Need Long-Term Monitoring, Too 04/04/2019 Surgery and Rehabilitation ... More people die after surgery worldwide than from HIV, TB, and malaria combined ... Makary says he hopes more research will be done on the role of obesity in surgical complications covering a wider variety of ... Not only are these findings relevant to physicians who need to pay special heed to issues such as potential surgical site ...
  • People who have hydrocephalus usually need a shunt system for the rest of their lives, and regular monitoring is required. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS or TIPSS) is an artificial channel within the liver that establishes communication between the inflow portal vein and the outflow hepatic vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Potential complications of traumatic spinal cord injury can be classified as either local or systemic. (spineuniverse.com)
  • This presentation will look at the features of systemic lupus erythematosus and those of people whose diagnosis overlaps with other autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis or polymyositis, scleroderma, and Sjogren syndrome. (lupus.org)
  • Makary says he hopes more research will be done on the role of obesity in surgical complications covering a wider variety of surgeries and that new metrics can be developed to account for any differences due to obesity. (healthcanal.com)
  • Most people who consume alcohol do not suffer damage to the liver. (medhelp.org)
  • PBC is a progressive condition, which means the damage to the liver can steadily get worse over time. (www.nhs.uk)
  • I am a young person who sufferers with several long term medical conditions, called Wolff Parkinson White Syndrome and Vasovagal Syncope. (change.org)
  • The "Bleeding Disorders Burden" tab displays information about an individual's experience living with a bleeding disorder, including location of care, emergency department and hospital visits, school and work absenteeism, long-term pain and its relationship to opioid use, and other medical conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • Liver failure is a serious condition that requires immediate medical attention. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • You will need frequent medical tests to be sure idelalisib is not causing harmful effects. (drugs.com)
  • They're nonmedical, and yet the people who are in these facilities today have acute medical needs. (pbs.org)
  • And that causes a big problem because we have, as I said, people in residential care today who have very high medical needs and very high social needs. (pbs.org)
  • In June 2002, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 15 experts selected to make recommendations at CDC on all immunizations, initially advised vaccinating only medical teams at select sites, or about 15,000 people. (sptimes.com)
  • President Bush was quite courageous in making this decision despite people telling him to wait," said Dr. David McKalip, a St. Petersburg neurosurgeon who lobbied for the plan and serves on the St. Petersburg Metropolitan Medical Response System. (sptimes.com)
  • All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Most people with the flu do not need medical care or antiviral drugs. (tn.gov)
  • However, groups including infants, the elderly and people with certain medical conditions are at highest risk of getting severe complications from the flu. (tn.gov)
  • If they continue to go untreated, these behaviors can result in future severe medical complications that can be life-threatening. (psychcentral.com)
  • In the hands of an experienced physician, operative mortality is less than 1%[medical citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)