Wound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Sternotomy: Making an incision in the STERNUM.Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy: The application of a vacuum across the surface of a wound through a foam dressing cut to fit the wound. This removes wound exudates, reduces build-up of inflammatory mediators, and increases the flow of nutrients to the wound thus promoting healing.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Mediastinitis: Inflammation of the mediastinum, the area between the pleural sacs.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Antibiotic Prophylaxis: Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.Surgical Sponges: Gauze material used to absorb body fluids during surgery. Referred to as GOSSYPIBOMA if accidentally retained in the body following surgery.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Premedication: Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Bites and StingsTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bandages: Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Vibrio Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus VIBRIO.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Abdominal Abscess: An abscess located in the abdominal cavity, i.e., the cavity between the diaphragm above and the pelvis below. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Suppuration: A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.Vibrio vulnificus: A species of halophilic bacteria in the genus VIBRIO, which lives in warm SEAWATER. It can cause infections in those who eat raw contaminated seafood or have open wounds exposed to seawater.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Wound Closure Techniques: Methods to repair breaks in tissue caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions.Cefazolin: A semisynthetic cephalosporin analog with broad-spectrum antibiotic action due to inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It attains high serum levels and is excreted quickly via the urine.Therapeutic Irrigation: The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.Appendicitis: Acute inflammation of the APPENDIX. Acute appendicitis is classified as simple, gangrenous, or perforated.Skin Care: Maintenance of the hygienic state of the skin under optimal conditions of cleanliness and comfort. Effective in skin care are proper washing, bathing, cleansing, and the use of soaps, detergents, oils, etc. In various disease states, therapeutic and protective solutions and ointments are useful. The care of the skin is particularly important in various occupations, in exposure to sunlight, in neonates, and in PRESSURE ULCER.Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Occlusive Dressings: Material, usually gauze or absorbent cotton, used to cover and protect wounds, to seal them from contact with air or bacteria. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Dermatologic Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures performed on the SKIN.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Anti-Infective Agents, Local: Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.Omentum: A double-layered fold of peritoneum that attaches the STOMACH to other organs in the ABDOMINAL CAVITY.Granulation Tissue: A vascular connective tissue formed on the surface of a healing wound, ulcer, or inflamed tissue. It consists of new capillaries and an infiltrate containing lymphoid cells, macrophages, and plasma cells.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Antisepsis: The destruction of germs causing disease.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Gastrostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening into the stomach for nutritional support or gastrointestinal compression.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Cyanoacrylates: A group of compounds having the general formula CH2=C(CN)-COOR; it polymerizes on contact with moisture; used as tissue adhesive; higher homologs have hemostatic and antibacterial properties.Pectoralis Muscles: The pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles that make up the upper and fore part of the chest in front of the AXILLA.Povidone-Iodine: An iodinated polyvinyl polymer used as topical antiseptic in surgery and for skin and mucous membrane infections, also as aerosol. The iodine may be radiolabeled for research purposes.Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Polydioxanone: An absorbable suture material used also as ligating clips, as pins for internal fixation of broken bones, and as ligament reinforcement for surgically managed ligament injuries. Its promising characteristics are elasticity, complete biodegradability, and lack of side effects such as infections.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Gangrene: Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Hospital Design and Construction: The architecture, functional design, and construction of hospitals.Suction: The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.Pseudomonas Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Anastomotic Leak: Breakdown of the connection and subsequent leakage of effluent (fluids, secretions, air) from a SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS of the digestive, respiratory, genitourinary, and cardiovascular systems. Most common leakages are from the breakdown of suture lines in gastrointestinal or bowel anastomosis.Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.Skin Diseases, Infectious: Skin diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites, or viruses.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Cholecystectomy: Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Appendix: A worm-like blind tube extension from the CECUM.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Urinary Fistula: An abnormal passage in any part of the URINARY TRACT between itself or with other organs.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Biological Therapy: Treatment of diseases with biological materials or biological response modifiers, such as the use of GENES; CELLS; TISSUES; organs; SERUM; VACCINES; and humoral agents.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Cellulitis: An acute, diffuse, and suppurative inflammation of loose connective tissue, particularly the deep subcutaneous tissues, and sometimes muscle, which is most commonly seen as a result of infection of a wound, ulcer, or other skin lesions.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Cefuroxime: Broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic resistant to beta-lactamase. It has been proposed for infections with gram-negative and gram-positive organisms, GONORRHEA, and HAEMOPHILUS.Hair Removal: Methods used to remove unwanted facial and body hair.Perineum: The body region lying between the genital area and the ANUS on the surface of the trunk, and to the shallow compartment lying deep to this area that is inferior to the PELVIC DIAPHRAGM. The surface area is between the VULVA and the anus in the female, and between the SCROTUM and the anus in the male.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Hernia: Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Skin Diseases, Bacterial: Skin diseases caused by bacteria.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Polypropylenes: Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Floxacillin: Antibiotic analog of CLOXACILLIN.Triclosan: A diphenyl ether derivative used in cosmetics and toilet soaps as an antiseptic. It has some bacteriostatic and fungistatic action.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Abdominal Wall: The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.Operative Time: The duration of a surgical procedure in hours and minutes.Bacteria, AerobicBlood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Intestinal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).Surgical Staplers: Fastening devices composed of steel-tantalum alloys used to close operative wounds, especially of the skin, which minimizes infection by not introducing a foreign body that would connect external and internal regions of the body. (From Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995)Amputation, Traumatic: Loss of a limb or other bodily appendage by accidental injury.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Honey: A sweet viscous liquid food, produced in the honey sacs of various bees from nectar collected from flowers. The nectar is ripened into honey by inversion of its sucrose sugar into fructose and glucose. It is somewhat acidic and has mild antiseptic properties, being sometimes used in the treatment of burns and lacerations.Exudates and Transudates: Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Amputation: The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male: Surgery performed on the male genitalia.Ileostomy: Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.OsteomyelitisStaphylococcal Skin Infections: Infections to the skin caused by bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Peritonitis: INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Thoracic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.Cicatrix: The fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue during the process of WOUND HEALING.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Gentamicins: A complex of closely related aminoglycosides obtained from MICROMONOSPORA purpurea and related species. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, but may cause ear and kidney damage. They act to inhibit PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS.Inguinal Canal: The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Biliary Tract Surgical Procedures: Any surgical procedure performed on the biliary tract.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Surgical Stomas: Artificial openings created by a surgeon for therapeutic reasons. Most often this refers to openings from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the ABDOMINAL WALL to the outside of the body. It can also refer to the two ends of a surgical anastomosis.Puerperal Infection: An infection occurring in PUERPERIUM, the period of 6-8 weeks after giving birth.Bone Wires: Steel wires, often threaded through the skin, soft tissues, and bone, used to fix broken bones. Kirschner wires or apparatus also includes the application of traction to the healing bones through the wires.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Soft Tissue Infections: Infections of non-skeletal tissue, i.e., exclusive of bone, ligaments, cartilage, and fibrous tissue. The concept is usually referred to as skin and soft tissue infections and usually subcutaneous and muscle tissue are involved. The predisposing factors in anaerobic infections are trauma, ischemia, and surgery. The organisms often derive from the fecal or oral flora, particularly in wounds associated with intestinal surgery, decubitus ulcer, and human bites. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1688)Enteral Nutrition: Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.Intestinal Volvulus: A twisting in the intestine (INTESTINES) that can cause INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Skin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Hydrotherapy: External application of water for therapeutic purposes.Togo: A republic in western Africa, lying between GHANA on its west and BENIN on its east. Its capital is Lome.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Internal Mammary-Coronary Artery Anastomosis: Direct myocardial revascularization in which the internal mammary artery is anastomosed to the right coronary artery, circumflex artery, or anterior descending coronary artery. The internal mammary artery is the most frequent choice, especially for a single graft, for coronary artery bypass surgery.Hysterectomy: Excision of the uterus.Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Sigmoid Diseases: Pathological processes in the SIGMOID COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is non-susceptible to the action of METHICILLIN. The mechanism of resistance usually involves modification of normal or the presence of acquired PENICILLIN BINDING PROTEINS.Natural Childbirth: Labor and delivery without medical intervention, usually involving RELAXATION THERAPY.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Vibrio: A genus of VIBRIONACEAE, made up of short, slightly curved, motile, gram-negative rods. Various species produce cholera and other gastrointestinal disorders as well as abortion in sheep and cattle.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Helichrysum: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain CHALCONE, helichrysetin, arenarin, and flamin.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.
Wound infection. Penetration of the endolaryngeal mucosa. Incomplete glottal closure in 10-15% of patients. The most important ... Airway obstruction is the most common complication. Implant migration or extrusion in cases where proper stitches are not taken ... the piece of the thyroid cartilage is cut and removed to avoid complications. Currently, there are four types of implant ...
... avoidance of the potential complications of transabdominal wound infections (e.g. hernias); less immunosuppression; better ... With fewer potential complications, the procedure has a disadvantage of being possible only in women. Proponents and ... As NOTES is associated with equally profound changes, specific complications are likely to occur. To detect possible problems ... These areas included development of a reliable closure technique for the internal incision, prevention of infection, and ...
Donor-site complications include wound infection, hematoma, and seroma. Recipient-site complications are (total or partial) ... as infection can cause bacteraemia and has a negative effect on wound healing. The five layers of the scalp, from superficial ... wound infection, dehiscence, hematoma or skin graft failure. To avoid major bleedings or sensibility disorders, the anatomy of ... reducing postoperative wound infections and CSF leakages. Disadvantages are the complexity of the operation, leading to ...
The lesions may persist for years with complications like ulceration, bleeding and infection. List of cutaneous conditions Skin ... Management includes compression therapy, wound care and surgical correction of AVM. Dapsone combined with leg elevation and ...
Other general complications include radial nerve damage and postoperative wound infection. After arthrodesis, non-union, in ... The most common complication after surgery is pain persisting in the thumb. Over long term, there is pain relief, but on short ... Possible complications are non-union of the bone, persistent pain related to unrecognized CMC or pantrapezial disease and ... It is a simpler procedure then the trapeziectomy with TI or LR and it tends to have fewer complications than the trapeziectomy ...
Other complications include leakage of spinal fluid and wound infection (1%). Most patients will have transient neck pain and ... Serious complications from an MVD include death (0.1%), stroke (1%), hearing loss (3%) and facial weakness (0.5%). Dr. Jannetta ... After the decompression is complete, the wound is flushed clean with saline solution. The dura is sewn closed. The skull is ... has called facial paralysis (as opposed to weakness) a "major and common complication of the MVD." (2 separate depositions ...
Initial post-operative complications include wound infection and excessive pain or bleeding. These can be controlled commonly ... The most common long term complication associated with this surgery is an increased incidence of urinary tract infections. ... A more concerning, though not common, complication is stricture, or narrowing, of the surgery site. The formation of a ...
The potential for infection and other complications increases with late presentation. Management may involve cutting away ... If tendons or bone are visible through the wound, the urgent referral to a specialist hand surgeon is mandatory, even if no ... These injuries should be managed as other human bites: wound irrigation and antibiotics are essential as human saliva can ... The proximity of the wound is often located over the metacarpophalangeal joint resulting in tendon injury. The medical ...
Infection is another potential complication, for example when debris is ground into an abrasion and remains there. Injuries ... Incising wounds of the face may involve the parotid duct. This is more likely if the wound crosses a line drawn between the ... and antibiotics may be used in cases where infection is likely. People with contaminated wounds who have not been immunized ... In facial wounds, tear ducts and nerves of the face may be damaged. Fractures of the frontal bone can interfere with the ...
... previous infection, rheumatoid arthritis, and immunodeficiency. Previous wound infection should be considered as a ... A small minority of lumbar surgical patients will develop a post operative infection. In most cases, this is a bad complication ... infection was noted, with a single dose antibiotic group having 0.4% infection rate and multiple dosage antibiotic infection ... 2000). "Deep wound infections after neuromuscular scoliosis surgery: a multicenter study of risk factors and treatment outcomes ...
Infection: this is the most common complication of fractures and predominantly occurs in open fractures. Post-traumatic wound ... Infection. Diverts the inflammatory response away from healing towards fighting off the infection. Age. Young bone unites more ... The fracture pieces remain separated and can be caused by infection and/or lack of blood supply (Ischaemia) to the bone. There ... Rowbotham, Emma; Barron, Dominic (2009). "Radiology of fracture complications". Orthopaedics and Trauma. 23 (1): 52-60. doi: ...
Later on in the hospital course, common complications include wound infections, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and graft ... Several complications can arise after vascular bypass. Risks of the bypass: Acute graft occlusion is the occlusion (blockage) ... Provided that recovery is normal and without complications, they can move to a less intensively monitored unit such as a step- ... General risks of surgery: Hemorrhage (bleeding) Infection Embolism Immediately following coronary artery or neurosurgical ...
Minor wounds or blisters may then lead to deep foot ulcerations. Once infection occurs, complications such as inflammation and ... Early treatment of foot infections may avoid serious complications. Nevertheless, the complications are manageable, thus ... Once infection occurs, these ulcerations can result in severe complications that lead to foot deformity, such as inflammation ... Once infection occurs, the complications such as inflammation and progressive destruction of the underlying bones may follow ...
Infection can occur in around 8% of women who have caesareans, largely endometritis, urinary tract infections and wound ... It results in less blood loss and has fewer early and late complications for the mother, as well as allowing her to consider a ... Wound infections occur after caesarean sections at a rate of 3-15%. Women who had caesarean sections are more likely to have ... Wound infections occur after cesarean sections at a rate of 3-15%. Some women are at greater risk for developing a surgical ...
Other possible risks include infections and reactions and complications due to being under anesthesia for longer than six hours ... Rare complications include lymphatic injury and major wound dehiscence. The hospital stay for the procedure can require from ... Reputable plastic surgeons will explain all the risks and complications in full to their patients and even encourage a second ... The patient may also experience seroma, a buildup of fluid; dehiscence (wound separation) and deep vein thrombosis (blood clots ...
The complications include deep vein thrombosis (5.3%), pulmonary embolism (0.06%), and wound complications including infection ... post-operative infections, and haematomas, appears to be greater after ligation and stripping than after EVLT". Complications ... Although life-threatening complications are uncommon, varicose veins may be confused with deep vein thrombosis, which may be ... Complications for ERA include burns, paraesthesia, clinical phlebitis and slightly higher rates of deep vein thrombosis (0.57 ...
... and healing problems/wound infection. A 2015 systematic review of 56 studies that recorded immediate complications suggested ... Other short-term complications include fatal bleeding, anaemia, urinary infection, septicaemia, tetanus, gangrene, necrotizing ... The wound is now ready to be stitched or for thorns to be applied. If a needle and thread are being used, close tight sutures ... Late complications vary depending on the type of FGM. They include the formation of scars and keloids that lead to strictures ...
In clinical studies, EVH has shown important benefits, including a reduced risk of infection and wound complications; less ... The study compared more than 8,500 propensity-adjusted patients and revealed that EVH significantly reduced wound complications ... doi:10.1016/s0003-4975(98)00392-0. Kan CD (1999). "Endoscopic saphenous vein harvest decreases leg wound complications in ... Crouch JD (1999). "Open versus endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting: wound complications and vein quality". Annals of Thoracic ...
Other complications which may occur include hemothorax, pleural effusion, pericarditis, wound infection and pneumonia and ... Air in the chest (pneumothorax) is one of the more frequent complications. A chest tube may be required or aggressive breathing ... co-morbidities and post-operative complications (if any), followed by time at home to overcome the pain and to let the bar ...
This structure is prone to infection, hematoma and other postoperative complications. Factors that are thought to affect wound ... A further complication that can accompany the dehiscence of the vaginal cuff is evisceration or the movement of intestines into ... The risk of vaginal cuff complications is related to the approach to hysterectomy: robotic-assisted total laparoscopic ...
FGM can have both immediate and late complications. These include excessive bleeding, urinary tract infections, wound infection ... Psychological complications are related to cultural context. Women who undergo FGM might be emotionally affected when they move ... The case is especially true for Sub-Saharan Africa, where women account for 60% of all adult HIV infections. Women tend to have ... Many of these deaths result from maternal mortality and HIV/AIDS infection. Although only 1,900 maternal deaths were recorded ...
Wound infection and meningitis - usually controlled with antibiotics. *Leakage of the spinal fluid through the wound, also ... Complications[edit]. There is always abnormal sensitivity and tingling of the skin on the feet and legs after SDR because of ... These situations include those who have suffered meningitis, a congenital (birth-originating) brain infection, congenital ... After a rhizotomy, assuming no complications, the person's spasticity is usually completely eliminated, revealing the "real" ...
... but did observe minor complications (6 patients presented with seroma and 4 patients with local wound infections). A more ... The degree of infection can be examined as major rim enhancement has occurred, located inferior to the hyoid bone. Soft tissue ... With infections, there can be rare cases where an expression of fluid is projected into the pharynx causing other problems ... Infection can sometimes cause the transient appearance of a mass or enlargement of the cyst, at times with periodic recurrences ...
Some complications include autonomic dysreflexia, bladder distension, bone infection, pyarthroses, sepsis, amyloidosis, anemia ... Evolution may include a thin blister over a dark wound bed. The wound may further evolve and become covered by thin eschar. ... Infection prevents healing of pressure ulcers. Signs of pressure ulcer infection include slow or delayed healing and pale ... Biofilm occurs rapidly in wounds and stalls healing by keeping the wound inflamed. Frequent debridement and antimicrobial ...
Data from the US Wound Registry. Adv Skin Wound Care. 2014 Jul;27(7):310-6. Snyder, R.J., et al., The management of diabetic ... Greenhagen, R., Complications of total contact casting: the benefits of using TCC still far outweigh any risks. Podiatry ... Total contact casting is contraindicated in the presence of untreated infection or osteomyelitis and in patients with severe ... Snyder, R.J. and K.K. Lanier, Offloading difficult wounds and conditions in diabetic patient. Ostomy Wound Manage, 2002. 48(1 ...
Peters, C. J. (December 1998). Infection Control for Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers in the African Health Care Setting (PDF). ... "Neuro complications cited in UK nurse's Ebola case". Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 19 October 2015. ... open wounds, cuts and abrasions.[41] Ebola may be spread through large droplets; however, this is believed to occur only when a ... Simpson DI (1977). Marburg and Ebola virus infections: a guide for their diagnosis, management, and control. World Health ...
... to the operating room within 90 days after primary total hip arthroplasty had a significantly higher risk for subsequent wound- ... "Infections and wound complications were 3.5 [times] more likely to occur if reoperation happened within 90 days and this level ... "Infections and wound complications were 3.5 [times] more likely to occur if reoperation happened within 90 days and this level ... However, patients who underwent a mechanical reoperation of more than 90 days had rates of infection and wound complications of ...
... those who received the antibiotic endured roughly one-third as many infections or other wound-healing complications two weeks ... "If you add an infection, or a breakdown of the surrounding tissues, its a huge burden on the emotional and physical well-being ... Infection Control Today is part of the Global Exhibitions Division of Informa PLC ... The tears are surgically repaired immediately after delivery but subsequent infections and poor healing that sometimes occur ...
Other complications can include infection, wound separation and fluid collections (hematoma and seromas). ... Swelling is just one of the possible complications following a tummy tuck. ... INFECTION AFTER A TUMMY TUCK. Most surgeons give patients pre-operative antibiotics so wound infection is not as big a problem ... Other post-op abdominoplasty complications can be subdivided into a few major classifications: Infection, Wound Separation, and ...
Risk of Respiratory Complications and Wound Infection in Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Surgery: Smokers versusNonsmokers. ... Risk of Respiratory Complications and Wound Infection in Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Surgery: Smokers versusNonsmokers ... Risk of Respiratory Complications and Wound Infection in Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Surgery: Smokers versusNonsmokers ... It is noteworthy that we also identified obesity as a risk factor for respiratory complications and wound infection. We ...
INFECTION AFTER TUMMY TUCK SURGERY. The majority of cosmetic surgeons prescribe pre-operative antibiotics so wound infection is ... Treatment: Small wound separations are quickly taken care of with medicated gauze. A little bit bigger wound separations, or ... Wounds may separate under the following circumstances:. 1. If too much skin was taken out throughout the treatment you may ... WOUND SEPARATION AFTER ABDOMINOPLASTY SURGERY. This looks significant to the patient, due to the fact that the patient believes ...
Of the 796 patients in the PA group, there were 6 wound complications leading to reoperation and 6 infections; 4 early and 2 ... at our institution with a minimum of 2 years follow up regarding all wound complications and all infections. ... there is concern whether this advantage come with increased wound complication and infection leading to reoperation or ...
According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, complications are rare, but they do sometimes occur. ... Infection. Wound infections after a Cesarean section develop when bacteria on the skin gain entry and then multiply inside the ... Wound complications are among the most common and least severe complications of the procedure. ... Dehiscence, or separation of the wound margins, is the least common complication of Cesarean wounds, occurring in about 0.02 ...
Wound infection. Only one study explored the effect of smoking cessation on wound infection; it was stated that current smokers ... but also other complications including pulmonary, respiratory, wound infections, delayed wound healing and reduced bone fusion. ... Myles PS, Iacono GA, Hunt JO, et al. Risk of respiratory complications and wound infection in patients undergoing ambulatory ... wound infection, mortality, and duration of hospital stay. The term "complications" was defined in this instance as a secondary ...
It is a liquid that doctors apply on small wounds and skin surfaces to securely hold the edges together. Once applied, this ... Dermabond is a skin adhesive used to close wounds, according to FamilyDoctor.org. ... Skin Infection. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, skin infection can occur as a complication for using ... Wound Dehiscence. Wound dehiscence, a condition in which a wound, usually from a surgical site, breaks open, is one of the ...
Debridement is the removal of unhealthy tissue from a wound to promote healing. Types include: surgical, chemical, mechanical ... Possible Complications. Your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:. *Pain ... Home , Services , Orthopedics , Orthopedic Conditions , Debridement of a Wound, Infection or Burn ... Home , Services , Orthopedics , Orthopedic Conditions , Debridement of a Wound, Infection or Burn ...
... wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary complications, urinary retention, and reaction to anesthesia ... Detailed information on postoperative discomforts and potential complications, including shock, hemorrhage, ... Wound infection. When bacteria enter the site of surgery, an infection can happen. Infections can delay healing. Wound ... infections can spread to nearby organs or tissue, or to distant areas through the bloodstream. Treatment of wound infections ...
Debridement is the removal of unhealthy tissue from a wound to promote healing. It can be done by surgical, chemical, ... Contact your doctor if your recovery is not progressing as expected or you develop complications, such as:. *Signs of infection ... Debridement of a Wound, Infection, or Burn. Definition. Debridement is the removal of unhealthy tissue from a wound to promote ... or if your wound is especially painful. It may also be done if debriding your wound is urgent. The skin surrounding the wound ...
... and Wound Infections?. Video of MEDICAL ALERT: Xarelto Drug Use: Blood Clots, Bleeding Complications, and Wound Infections?. ... MEDICAL ALERT: Xarelto Drug Use: Blood Clots, Bleeding Complications, ...
The primary cause of complications is that higher levels of blood sugar cause your blood to become more acidic. Over time, this ... Most importantly, even a few years of better blood sugars can pay off with fewer complications even decades later. Increasingly ... High and low blood sugars can cause a variety of complications in the short term or the long-term. ... causes a variety of complications related to your small blood vessels (microvascular) and your large blood vessels ( ...
Infection, or Burn at St. Davids HealthCare DefinitionReasons for ProcedurePossible ComplicationsWhat to ExpectCall Your... ... Contact your doctor if your recovery is not progressing as expected or you develop complications, such as:. *Signs of infection ... or if your wound is especially painful. It may also be done if debriding your wound is urgent. The skin surrounding the wound ... The wound will be covered with a dressing. The enzymes in the medication will dissolve the dead tissue in the wound. ...
Infection. Communicable Diseases. Surgical Wound Infection. Wound Infection. Postoperative Complications. Pathologic Processes ... Surgical Site Infection Colon Surgery Abdominal Surgery Post-Op Infection Drug: D-PLEX Other: Standard of Care (SoC) Phase 3 ... Infection rate as measured by the proportion of subjects with at least one abdominal incisional infection event, as determined ... Infection rate as measured by the proportion of subjects with at least one abdominal incisional infection event only, occurred ...
Infection. Ulcer. Diabetic Foot. Foot Ulcer. Bacteremia. Leg Ulcer. Wound Infection. Pathologic Processes. Diabetic ... Diabetes Complications. Diabetes Mellitus. Endocrine System Diseases. Diabetic Neuropathies. Foot Diseases. Bacterial ... a group of patients with bacteremia due to a chronic wound (cases) and (2) a group of patients with localized chronic wound ... Diabetic Foot Foot Ulcer Leg Ulcer Bacteremia Infection Biological: Antibody assays for S. aureus Biological: Basic blood work ...
Surgical Wound Infection. Infection. Wound Infection. Postoperative Complications. Pathologic Processes. To Top ... Traditional wound therapy (sterile bandages and dressing). Device: Conventional wound therapy Sterile bandages and wound ... Negative Pressure Wound Therapy to Reduce Surgical Site Infection. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of surgical site infection between traditional wound care and negative ...
Pain Infection Pocket hematoma Wound dehiscence Lead dislodgment Deep venous thrombosis Upper extremity edema Degradation of ... What are subacute complications of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy?. Updated: Oct 11, 2019 ... Pavia S, Wilkoff B. The management of surgical complications of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Curr ... encoded search term (What are subacute complications of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy?) and What are ...
This severe condition often occurs after surgery and can cause complications such as malnutrition and severe pain. Learn about ... infection. *malnutrition. *electrolyte imbalances. *poor wound healing. Around 25 percent of fistulae will heal within 30-40 ... An infection may cause an intestinal fistula.. Around 85-90 percent of all gastrointestinal fistulae occur as a complication of ... Complications. A gastrointestinal fistula can lead to various complications, which include:. * ...
Aggressively incorporate Invasive Systemic Infection [ISI]. *Allogenic acellular dermal matrix treatment can accelerate wound ... Diabetes is associated with varied skin complications, such as itchiness and infections. Control of high blood sugar levels ... In the UT system within each wound grade there are four stages: clean wounds (stage A), nonischemic infected wounds (stage B), ... ischemic noninfected wounds (stage C), and ischemic infected wounds (stage D).. Grade. Wagner ulcer classification system [ ...
Possible complications include:. *wound infection *bile leaking into the tummy *damage to one of the openings (ducts) carrying ... Gallbladder removal surgery is considered to be a safe procedure, but like any type of surgery there is a risk of complications ...
The complications include:. *Lead dislodgement or breakage. *Wound infection. *Wound erosion (skin deterioration at the ... Common Eye Problems and Infections. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. All. Quizzes Diet and Nutrition Quiz. Heart Disease Quiz. ... Complications *What are the risks and side effects of occipital nerve stimulation? ... Complications *What are the risks and side effects of occipital nerve stimulation? ...
Three common incision-related complications - wound burns, leaks and infections - cont ... Three common incision-related complications - wound burns, leaks and infections - continue to occur and can have devastating ... Indeed, "Whether its a microleak or a gross leak, a leaky wound the day after surgery raised the risk of infection by 44 times ... Problem #3: Wound Infections. Although the estimate varies according to the study cited, the overall incidence of ...
Complications: LAGB-two staple-line oozing, two wound infections; LSG-one hemorrhage, two staple-line oozing, two leaks; GBSR- ... Objective comparison of complications resulting from laparoscopic bariatric procedures. J Am Coll Surg. 2006;202(2):252-61. ...
  • Puncture wounds are penetrating injuries caused by a pointed object. (uptodate.com)
  • Infections associated with puncture wounds that occur in specialized settings such as with animal or human bites and water exposure are discussed in further detail elsewhere. (uptodate.com)
  • Mechanism of injury - Puncture wounds can occur in a broad array of circumstances. (uptodate.com)
  • Puncture wounds to the sole of the foot from stepping on an object are the most common. (uptodate.com)
  • Puncture wounds around the area of the metatarsal-phalangeal joints often penetrate deeper because this is a weight-bearing area [ 1 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Cat teeth are longer and sharper, which can cause deeper puncture wounds. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The major long-term studies of diabetes, particularly the DCCT and EDIC , have found that people with diabetes who can keep their HbA1c below 7% experience significantly fewer complications. (diabetesdaily.com)
  • Most importantly, even a few years of better blood sugars can pay off with fewer complications even decades later. (diabetesdaily.com)
  • There is some evidence and many suspect that time spent in this range may be more important than your HbA1c in determining risk for complications. (diabetesdaily.com)