Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Social Isolation: The separation of individuals or groups resulting in the lack of or minimizing of social contact and/or communication. This separation may be accomplished by physical separation, by social barriers and by psychological mechanisms. In the latter, there may be interaction but no real communication.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Community Networks: Organizations and individuals cooperating together toward a common goal at the local or grassroots level.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Hospitals, Community: Institutions with permanent facilities and organized medical staff which provide the full range of hospital services primarily to a neighborhood area.Social Work: The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.Social Dominance: Social structure of a group as it relates to the relative social rank of dominance status of its members. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Hierarchy, Social: Social rank-order established by certain behavioral patterns.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Community Health Workers: Persons trained to assist professional health personnel in communicating with residents in the community concerning needs and availability of health services.Social Distance: The degree of closeness or acceptance an individual or group feels toward another individual or group.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Social Conditions: The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.Biota: The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Community Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Social Problems: Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Social Participation: Involvement in community activities or programs.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Social Desirability: A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.United StatesRNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Community Pharmacy Services: Total pharmaceutical services provided to the public through community pharmacies.Social Conformity: Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.Community-Based Participatory Research: Collaborative process of research involving researchers and community representatives.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Social Marketing: Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.Social Facilitation: Any enhancement of a motivated behavior in which individuals do the same thing with some degree of mutual stimulation and consequent coordination.Social Alienation: The state of estrangement individuals feel in cultural settings that they view as foreign, unpredictable, or unacceptable.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Social Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the role of socio-environmental factors in the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Microbial Consortia: A group of different species of microorganisms that act together as a community.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Community Health Nursing: General and comprehensive nursing practice directed to individuals, families, or groups as it relates to and contributes to the health of a population or community. This is not an official program of a Public Health Department.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Metagenome: A collective genome representative of the many organisms, primarily microorganisms, existing in a community.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Social Stigma: A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.Therapeutic Community: Psychotherapeutic technique which emphasizes socioenvironmental and interpersonal influences in the resocialization and rehabilitation of the patient. The setting is usually a hospital unit or ward in which professional and nonprofessional staff interact with the patients.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis: Electrophoresis in which various denaturant gradients are used to induce nucleic acids to melt at various stages resulting in separation of molecules based on small sequence differences including SNPs. The denaturants used include heat, formamide, and urea.Volunteers: Persons who donate their services.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Dominance-Subordination: Relationship between individuals when one individual threatens or becomes aggressive and the other individual remains passive or attempts to escape.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Sociology: A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.Social Work, Psychiatric: Use of all social work processes in the treatment of patients in a psychiatric or mental health setting.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Social Planning: Interactional process combining investigation, discussion, and agreement by a number of people in the preparation and carrying out of a program to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community. It usually involves the action of a formal political, legal, or recognized voluntary body.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Social Determinants of Health: The circumstances in which people are born, grow up, live, work, and age, as well as the systems put in place to deal with illness. These circumstances are in turn shaped by a wider set of forces: economics, social policies, and politics (http://www.cdc.gov/socialdeterminants/).Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Community Mental Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of psychologic and psychiatric services to people living in a neighborhood or community.Oceanic Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.BrazilPrejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.CaliforniaHealth Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Archaea: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.Community Psychiatry: Branch of psychiatry concerned with the provision and delivery of a coordinated program of mental health care to a specified population. The foci included in this concept are: all social, psychological and physical factors related to etiology, prevention, and maintaining positive mental health in the community.Reinforcement, Social: The strengthening of a response with a social reward such as a nod of approval, a parent's love or attention.Loneliness: The state of feeling sad or dejected as a result of lack of companionship or being separated from others.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Great BritainSeasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Social Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Sociology, Medical: The study of the social determinants and social effects of health and disease, and of the social structure of medical institutions or professions.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Metagenomics: The genomic analysis of assemblages of organisms.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.IndiaFamily Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Proteobacteria: A phylum of bacteria consisting of the purple bacteria and their relatives which form a branch of the eubacterial tree. This group of predominantly gram-negative bacteria is classified based on homology of equivalent nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA or by hybridization of ribosomal RNA or DNA with 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.ChicagoHispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Microbiota: The full collection of microbes (bacteria, fungi, virus, etc.) that naturally exist within a particular biological niche such as an organism, soil, a body of water, etc.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Bacterial Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Deinstitutionalization: The practice of caring for individuals in the community, rather than in an institutional environment with resultant effects on the individual, the individual's family, the community, and the health care system.Schools: Educational institutions.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Social Discrimination: Group behavior toward others by virtue of their group membership.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.
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An advocate in sustainability and social consciousness, Turbana has developed the farming communities in the banana and ... "Social Responsibility". Turbana.com. Retrieved 29 April 2015. "KEEN New York takes prize in Turbana's 'Win 25k for your Cause' ... Turbana and Uniban work alongside fair trade's governing bodies to contribute a portion of each purchase to a social premium ... "Community Infrastructure". Turbana.com. Retrieved 29 April 2015. Bellano, Anthony (24 June 2014). "Turbana, Weber and ShopRite ...
He is referred to affectionately by members of the Wake Forest community as "Mr. Wake Forest." He is a 1943 graduate of Wake ... "Happy Birthday, Ed Wilson!". Social Media @ WFU. 2015-02-02. Retrieved 2015-07-02. "Happy 90th Birthday, Dr. Wilson!". Wake ... "Community Milestones". Winston-Salem Journal. Retrieved 2016-08-16. Hunt, Hannah Kay (2012-06-05). "Class of the Finest". Wake ...
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Social systems 706..........Social structure 711-806..........Groups and organizations 756-781..........Community 786-806 ... Social deviance 826..........Social institutions 831-901..........Social change 1001-1281.......... Social psychology 1041-1101 ... Social cognition 1106-1171.......... Interpersonal relations. Social behavior 1176-1281..........Social influence. Social ... Schools of social thought 481-554.......... Theory. Method. Relations to other subjects 621-656..........Culture 661-696 ...
Natural World The Nurturing Community The Social Community The Economic Community The Political Community The World Community ... The Social Community , General Board of Church & Society". umc-gbcs.org. Retrieved 2016-05-30. "Did DC Methodist Building ... It shall seek to bring the whole of human life, activities, possessions, use of resources, and community and world ... social, and civic righteousness. There are six stated spheres of influence for the GBCS The ...
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"Case Study Four: Abriachan Forest Trust". Social Land Ownership. Caledonia Centre for Social Development. Archived from the ... Abriachan Forest Trust is a community group formed to buy and manage the forest, and they are working to encourage recreational ...
The village has a social club. The nearest pub is at Bottlesford. "Wiltshire Community History - Census". Wiltshire Council. ... "Woodborough Social Club". Retrieved 1 August 2015. Media related to Woodborough, Wiltshire at Wikimedia Commons Woodborough ... "Woodborough Church of England (VA) Primary School". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 1 August 2015. " ... Parish Council website "Woodborough". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 1 August 2015. Aerial view of ...
... suggesting that social media are beneficial to the advocacy community. People advocate for a large number and variety of topics ... "Canadian Advocacy 2.0: A Study of Social Media Use by Social Movement Groups and Activists in Canada". SSRN 2254742 . Missing ... In a social care context: Both terms (and more specific ones such as "independent advocacy") are used in the UK in the context ... "Social issues" as referred to in the United States also include topics (also known as "causes") intended by their advocates to ...
Community Building: How to grow with the power of people. Social Media Examiner. October 12, 2012. Jantsch, John. Effective ... Social Media Explorer. October 10, 2012. Clayman, Margie. Turning Hatred Into Self Improvement. Business 2 Community. October ...
Community Social Work; Health Education and Promotion; Health and Social Care; Public Health Policy and Practice; Social Work ... Areas of practice covered include primary, community and hospital care, health education and public health, and beyond health ... and Social Policy The journal is abstracted and indexed in: Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts Cambridge Scientific ... Papers introducing additional interprofessional views, for example, from a community development or environmental design ...
Consequently, large communities of Cambodians took root in cities such as Long Beach, Fresno and Stockton in California; ... "Collateral Damage: Southeast Asian Poverty in the United States". Social Text. 18 (1). ISSN 1527-1951. "Cambodian Americans : ... This book was one of the early books among the few circulating that talks about this diasporic community. It exhibits some ... A 2008 NYU study reported that 29.3% of the Cambodian American community lived under the poverty line. That was higher than the ...
The company's mission is "to create a more efficient and effective social good sector, and a world where it is commonplace to ... 5] B Corporation Community. [6] Huffington Post. [7] Bloomberg Businessweek. [8] B Corporation - What Are B Corps?. [9]. ... 3] GLG Social Impact. [4] Conscious Capitalism Venture for America New-York Historical Society - Chinese American: Exclusion/ ... "Fresh off this success, Chong founded Catchafire in 2009 with a vision to create a more efficient and effective social good ...
... social and community vitality; cultural vitality; education; living standards; good governance; and ecological vitality. The ... Many environmentalists argue that GDP is a poor measure of social progress because it does not take into account harm to the ... Although a high or rising level of GDP is often associated with increased economic and social progress within a country, a ... It includes wages and salaries, as well as employer contributions to social security and other such programs. Gross operating ...
Social skills are significantly impaired in people suffering from alcoholism due to the neurotoxic effects of alcohol on the ... Many involved recognize that the terminology has often led to confusion, both within the medical community and with the general ... In NIAAA: Social work education for the prevention and treatment of alcohol use disorders (NIH publication). Washington, D.C. ... The UK Home Office estimated that the social and economic cost of drug abuse to the UK economy in terms of crime, absenteeism ...
An academic admissions officer might review students' qualifications based on criteria like test scores, race, social class, ... Community Mental Health Journal. 13 (1): 92-99. PMID 844291. "For Science's Gatekeepers, a Credibility Gap". The New York Times ... Dani Marrero (12 February 2015). "Chinese Internet restrictions affect social media, search engines". The Suffolk Journal. ... Recruitment to Social Work". Bjsw.oxfordjournals.org. 2014-07-05. Retrieved 2014-08-14. ...
Home and Community Education; Humanities; Individual Development; Physical Development and Performance; Science; and Social ... Also in 1967, the Washington State Legislature passed the Community College Act, which created a statewide community college ... It is the only non-commercial community radio station in King County and can be heard at 91.3 FM in Bellevue, Seattle, and ... Bellevue Community College was established in 1966, originally under the auspices of the Bellevue School District, as an ...
... social and community vitality; cultural vitality; education; living standards; good governance; and ecological vitality. The ... Social, economic and environmental well-being are indivisible. Together they define gross global happiness," This UN resolution ... The Secret Society of Happy People is offering free International Happiness Day graphics that can be shared on social networks ... Economists for Peace and Security achieved notability for exceedingly distinguished and thought leading economic community. The ...
... but also showed potential ways in which how communities and health professionals can approach and eradicate these social ... Also, it suggests ways in which we, as a community, can collectively improve and get rid of these language barriers so that ... Also, immigrants can build social support network through these programs, which can be a great help when it comes to facing ... Immigrant health care in the United States is distinct from citizen health care given the context of various social and ...
... economic and social rights. Vol 4: Findings on responsibility and accountability; the community reconciliation process; victim ... called the Community Reconciliation Process, designed to reintegrate low-level offenders into their community. The ... and facilitate community reconciliation with justice for those who committed less serious offenses." The idea of a truth ... and violations of economic and social rights. It determined that the death toll during Indonesian rule had been between a low ...
"Research Community". International Organization for Migration. Retrieved May 28, 2014. "Migration Program". Social Science ... It is also listed as a partner for the migration program of the Social Science Research Council. Experts from the International ...
"Social Services and Community". Parliament NZ. Retrieved 28 October 2017. "Transport and Infrastructure". Parliament NZ. ...
"FACULTY OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE". Tirunelveli Medical College. Retrieved 4 March 2013. "Awaiting the new foot soldiers of ... community health care". The Hindu. 8 October 2012. Retrieved 4 March 2013. "Merit versus social responsibility". The Hindu. 23 ...
"Clint Acworth: Teachers Behaving Badly Online". Social Media News Australia. 2012-01-09. Retrieved 2015-01-26. Ruth McCosker ( ... 2016-03-16). "Exodus Lale wins Best Performance in Live Theatre award at Young Artists Awards". Quest Community Newspapers. ...
Social cognitive neuroscience. Interdisciplinary. fields. *Consumer neuroscience. *Cultural neuroscience. *Educational ...
Cass County Community Hospital. Sep 2002 - Dec 2004: Psychiatric Social Worker Therapist, Psychology Associates Genesis Health ... Jul 1998 - Aug 2002: Psychiatric Social Worker, Robert Young Mental Health Center. Feb 1995 - Jul 1998: Mental Health ... Psychiatric Social Worker Cass County Community Hospital Psychiatric Social Worker for the Hospital. Conducted evaluations, ... Psychiatric Social Worker Therapist Psychology Associates Genesis Health System Assisted in the development of the Moline ...
Meaning of social perception. What does social perception mean? Information and translations of social perception in the most ... Definition of social perception in the Definitions.net dictionary. ... Discuss these social perception definitions with the community:. Word of the Day. Would you like us to send you a FREE new word ... Alternative searches for social perception:. *Search for Synonyms for social perception. *Search for Anagrams for social ...
District Social Welfare Officers in 67 Local Government Authorities (LGAs) will use the equipment to improve reporting and use ... of data for the delivery of social welfare services. ... provide social welfare services at the household and community ... USAIDs Community Health and Social Welfare Systems Strengthening project, implemented by John Snow, Inc., supports the ... New computer equipment to strengthen social welfare services in Tanzania. You are here. Home » Our Stories » News & ...
"Social Psychology" at NBC.com "Social Psychology" on IMDb "Social Psychology" at TV.com "Social Psychology" at TV Tropes. ... "Social Psychology" is the fourth episode of the first season of the American comedy television series Community. It aired in ... Around 4.87 million Americans watched "Social Psychology". Todd VanDerWerff of The A.V. Club rated the episode B+, praising the ... VanDerWerff, Todd (October 9, 2009). "Social Psychology". The A.V. Club. Retrieved February 22, 2013. " ...
"History of Cass Community Social Services". Cass Community Social Services. Archived from the original on 2008-04-30. Retrieved ... "CASS COMMUNITY SOCIAL SERVICES". Tax Exempt World. 2009-01-21. Retrieved 2009-02-17. "Executive Staff". Cass Community Social ... Cass Community Social Services, Inc. (CCSS or Cass) is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) community-based organization headquartered in ... The social services of Cass started as part of Cass Community United Methodist Church during the Great Depression. In 2002, ...
... Journal of Medical Internet Resea… ... Enabling Community through Social Media * 1. Enabling Community through Social Media Anatoliy Gruzd Associate Professor, ... 2. Health Care Social Media Canada #hcsmca Twitter Community Gruzd, A. & Haythornthwaite, C. (2013). Enabling Community through ... 3. Background • #hcsmca is a vibrant community of people interested in exploring social innovation in health care. We share and ...
... * 1. SAY IT TO MY FACEBOOK EIS projects using social media for public involvement ... HOW MUCH TIME DOES SOCIAL MEDIA TAKE? * 30. WHAT ABOUT THE ADMINISTRATIVE RECORD? Not Included Included 411 on 281 I-95 More ... Community planning has traditionally been a written report with few images.. Is your organization effectively using internet to ... MORE ON SOCIAL MEDIA & ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS? @transpr @ryan_link @cubitplanning http://www.cubitplanning.com/about.html ...
... sexual orientation and gender identity through a social justice lens. Students who participate in the community will have the ... About the Audre Lorde Social Justice Community The Audre Lorde Social Justice Community (Audre Lorde SJ LLP) offers students a ... About the Audre Lorde Social Justice Community. The Audre Lorde Social Justice Community (Audre Lorde SJ LLP) offers students a ... The Audre Lorde Social Justice Living Learning Program is for first-year students who are interested in social justice advocacy ...
Community Organizing will be essential reading for advanced undergraduates and graduate students of sociology, social movements ... Importantly, Walls engages social movements literature to bring insights to our understanding of community organizing networks ... A superb comprehensive reading of the social, intellectual, and political history of community organizing in the U.S. The clear ... and to show how community organizing offers concepts and tools that are indispensable to a democratic strategy of social change ...
... a community-based organization in the Nakaseke district of Uganda, is dedicated to working with vulnerable groups to alleviate ... ACCESS (African Community CEnter for Social Sustainability), a community-based organization in the Nakaseke district of Uganda ... Do you work for African Community Center for Social Sustainability? Become an administrator ...
While there is increasing interest for social...,INSO-5-2015,LABORATORIJ ZA DRUSTVENE INOVACIJE(HR),ASSOCIATION EUROPEENNE POUR ... LINFORMATION SUR LE DEVELOPPEMENT LOCAL(BE),SOCIAL INNOVATION EXCHANGE(UK),NESTA(UK),RESEAU EUROPEEN DES VILLES ET REGIONS DE ... Developing an enabling environment for social innovation that links actions across the whole field and supports the full ... Social Innovation Community: Results of Landscape Mapping - Public Policy and Social Innovation Author(s): Sophie Reynolds ( ...
More from Community Care. * Jobs. The best social work and social care jobs ... Social skirmishes. By keith sellick on May 27, 2008 in Community Care ... Community Care Inform. *. Hoarding and mental capacity: key points for social workers ... Develop your social work career with Community Cares Careers and Training Guide ...
With Community Cloud, you can set up shop quickly & easily, create new opportunities for purchase & enable a customer to sell ... Enterprise Community Platform: Create a community of action with Salesforce Enterprise Community Platform ... Salesforce Community Cloud is powered by advanced online community software that allows businesses of all sizes to connect to ... Youll be able to build an e-commerce website into Community Cloud with drag-and-drop ease using Community Builder. Create an ...
A study to identify how community-based social innovations function across a number of rapidly ageing countries and the ... Community-based social innovations (CBSIs) are one type of innovation that may help to address the needs of older people. In ... Understanding Community-Based Social Innovations for Healthy Ageing. Published in: World Health Organization Centre for Health ... Exploring Community-based Social Innovations (CBSIs) for Healthy Ageing. Feb 4, 2019 ...
... www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/chandler/2020/05/06/community-fishing-recreational-activity-made-social-distancing/ ... www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/chandler/2020/05/06/community-fishing-recreational-activity-made-social-distancing/ ... Community fishings a popular outlet during pandemic. A visitor walks through the Veterans Oasis Park in Chandler on Feb. 25, ... To fish in Community Fishing Program waters, anyone over 10 should have a valid fishing license.. Nick Oza, Nick Oza/The ...
What is a social enterprise? A social enterprise is a business with a social and/or environmental purpose at its heart. Social ... You are here: Home > Campaigns & Programmes > Communities > Community Transformation > Supporting Social Enterprises ... In partnership with Social Enterprise UK, Business in the Communitys arc programme engages established businesses with the ... arc is also expanding and is seeking relationships with the wider business community to meet the ongoing needs of social ...
http://www.w3.org/community/socbizcg/wiki/Main_Page#Collaboration. No Comments , Leave a Comment , Category Uncategorized Leave ...
Buck, 29, a former Oakland Tribune multimedia intern, used the ubiquitous short messaging service to tap out a single word on his cellular phone: ARRESTED. The message went out to the cell phones and computers of a wide circle of friends in the United States and to the mostly leftist, anti-government bloggers in Egypt who are the subject of his graduate journalism project ...
Community Socials. Community Socials. Latinx Community Gatherings. Throughout the academic year, MSA hosts a community ... This space welcomes all community members craving releif while creating a community inclusive of all genders and sexual ... Black House Community Meetings. Throughout the academic year, MSA hosts an open meeting for students to come together in ... Throughout the academic year, MSA hosts open meetings for students to come together in community while centering queer wellness ...
Community Events. *. The Sage Student Bistro, a student-driven restaurant, is open for lunch Monday - Thursday, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m ... Women and Social Movements in the United States. Primary source documents and other publications related to the history of ... Metropolitan Community Colleges purpose is to provide high-quality programs and services to people of all ages and educational ... Learn about Metropolitan Community College, our mission and what were doing to further education. ...
How would you educate the web publishing community and maybe even the more sophisticated users that whats in Googles best ... Today Connecticut lawmakers introduced a new bill that would require MySpace.com and other social-networking sites to verify ... Social marketing shortcut - Open source community. Gilad on Mon, 2007-03-12 14:00. *Social & Community ...
The McGill Research Group on Health and Law in collaboration with the Institute for Health and Social Policy is pleased to ... Many of our partnerns and collaborators host events of interest to the wider IHSP community. Check out the opportunities posted ... In the Community Many of our partnerns and collaborators host events of interest to the wider IHSP community. Check out the ... The McGill Research Group on Health and Law in collaboration with the Institute for Health and Social Policy is pleased to ...
School of Social and Community Medicine - Dr Alice Malpass - Meta-ethnography/ Cognitive Interviewing/ Mindfulness based ... Alice has a background in social anthropology and social policy. Her doctoral work was a social anthropological study based ... Fellow who has worked as a Research Associate at the University of Bristol since 2003 and in the School of Social and Community ...
School of Social and Community Medicine - Dr Christie Cabral - Parent & Clinician views on and experiences of consulting and ... Christie is a social anthropologist with research interests in child and family health, illness beliefs, health behaviours, ... Anderson, EC, Ingle, S, Muir, P, Beck, C, Finn, A, Leeming, J, Cabral, C, Kesten, J & Hay, AD, 2016, The community paediatric ... I am a social anthropologist conducting qualitative and mixed methods research and systematic reviews of qualitative and ...
School of Social and Community Medicine - Dr Kerry Avery - Randomised controlled trials of surgical interventions ... www.bristol.ac.uk/social-community-medicine/centres/surgical-research), where she is a co-applicant on and co-leads the ...
  • One proposal to explain how social perceptions provides information needed for impression formation is by approaching the behavior with an implicit personality theory outlook. (definitions.net)
  • We plan to change the social perception on various family forms to boost the birth rate, we want to expand support for single mothers and also launch campaigns that will change people's perceptions of couples living together. (definitions.net)
  • The most important thing is to simply change the social perception of entrepreneurship from being something where the dropouts have to go, to something that you might want to do fresh out of Todai. (definitions.net)
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