The non-profit, non-governmental organization which collects, processes, and distributes data on hospital use. Two programs of the Commission are the Professional Activity Study and the Medical Audit Program.
A private, voluntary, not-for-profit organization which establishes standards for the operation of health facilities and services, conducts surveys, and awards accreditation.
Areawide planning for hospitals or planning of a particular hospital unit on the basis of projected consumer need. This does not include hospital design and construction or architectural plans.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
Hospital department responsible for the creating, care, storage and retrieval of medical records. It also provides statistical information for the medical and administrative staff.
Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.
Individuals professionally qualified in the management of patients' records. Duties may include planning, designing, and managing systems for patient administrative and clinical data, as well as patient medical records. The concept includes medical record technicians.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'England' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, cultural heritage, and contributions to medical science. However, in a medical context, it may refer to the location of a patient, healthcare provider, or research study, but it is not a term with a specific medical meaning.
A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.
The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.
A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.
The use of a device composed of thermoluminescent material for measuring exposure to IONIZING RADIATION. The thermoluminescent material emits light when heated. The amount of light emitted is proportional to the amount of ionizing radiation to which the material has been exposed.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.
Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.
Radiation protection, also known as radiation safety, is the science and practice of protecting people and the environment from harmful ionizing radiation exposure while allowing for the safe medical, industrial, and research uses of such radiation.
Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.
The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.

Comparison of clinical and administrative data sources for hospital coronary artery bypass graft surgery report cards. (1/20)

BACKGROUND: Regardless of statistical methodology, public performance report cards must use the highest-quality validated data, preferably from a prospectively maintained clinical database. Using logistic regression and hierarchical models, we compared hospital cardiac surgery profiling results based on clinical data with those derived from contemporaneous administrative data. METHODS AND RESULTS: Fiscal year 2003 isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery results based on an audited and validated Massachusetts clinical registry were compared with those derived from a contemporaneous state administrative database, the latter using the inclusion/exclusion criteria and risk model of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. There was a 27.4% disparity in isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery volume (4440 clinical, 5657 administrative), a 0.83% difference in observed in-hospital mortality (2.05% versus 2.88%), corresponding differences in risk-adjusted mortality calculated by various statistical methodologies, and 1 hospital classified as an outlier only with the administrative data-based approach. The discrepancies in volumes and risk-adjusted mortality were most notable for higher-volume programs that presumably perform a higher proportion of combined procedures that were misclassified as isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the administrative cohort. Subsequent analyses of a patient cohort common to both databases revealed the smoothing effect of hierarchical models, a 9% relative difference in mortality (2.21% versus 2.03%) resulting from nonstandardized mortality end points, and 1 hospital classified as an outlier using logistic regression but not using hierarchical regression. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac surgery report cards using administrative data are problematic compared with those derived from audited and validated clinical data, primarily because of case misclassification and nonstandardized end points.  (+info)

Bridging the gap between evidence and practice in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: the quality improvement process. (2/20)

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is considered to be the most common preventable cause of hospital-related death. Hospitalized patients undergoing major Surgery and hospitalized patients with acute medical illness have an increased risk of VTE. Although there is overwhelming evidence for the need and efficacy of VTE prophylaxis in patients at risk, only about a third of those who are at risk of VTE receive appropriate prophylaxis. To address the shortfall in VTE prophylaxis, the US Joint Commission and the National Quality Forum (NQF) endorse standardized VTE prophylaxis practices, and are identifying and testing measures to monitor these standards. Hospitals in the USA accredited by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to receive medicare patients will need VTE prophylaxis programs in place to conform to these national consensus standards. This review aims to give background information on initiatives to improve the prevention of VTE and to identify key features of a successful quality improvement strategy for prevention of VTE in the hospital. A literature review shows that the key features of effective quality improvement strategies includes an active strategy, a multifaceted approach, and a continuous iterative process of audit and feedback. Risk assessment models may be helpful for deciding which patients should receive prophylaxis and for matching VTE risk with the appropriate intensity of prophylaxis. This approach should assist in implementing the NQF/Joint Commission-endorsed standards, as well as increase the use of appropriate VTE prophylaxis.  (+info)

The impact of a citywide audit with educational intervention on the care of patients with epilepsy. (3/20)

The care of patients with epilepsy historically has been well documented to be poor. Previous attempts to improve care through education have been unsuccessful. The New GP Contract in the UK introduced epilepsy as a core quality indicator from April 2004. This prospective audit assesses the impact of an audit with educational intervention on the process of care of patients with epilepsy. The case notes of 610 patients, of all ages, with epilepsy on treatment, in 13 general practices serving Chester and surrounding area were reviewed before and 2 years after an intervention, comprising (a) the provision of a comprehensive template, (b) individualised categorisation for each patient and (c) an educational session led by a Neurologist. The overall review rate increased in the first year from 41 to 49% (p<0.0001) and by 2 years to 63% (p<0.0001). Documented remission rate increased from 29 to 43% (p<0.0001). Admissions to accident and emergency fell significantly (p=0.0026). There was no fall in the non-compliance rate. Forty five percent of patients with documented poor control were not under shared care. Issues highlighted in the audit generated 77 referrals. There were clear health gains in 62 (13%) individuals from referrals and practice interventions related to the audit. This original audit identified significant improvements in review rate, documented remission rate and beneficial outcomes in individual patients. The changes were attributable to both the educational intervention and the coincidental acceptance of the New GP Contract. Remaining problems include lack of shared care for patients with active epilepsy.  (+info)

Use of a registry-generated audit, feedback, and patient reminder intervention in an internal medicine resident clinic--a randomized trial. (4/20)

BACKGROUND: Disease registries, audit and feedback, and clinical reminders have been reported to improve care processes. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a registry-generated audit, feedback, and patient reminder intervention on diabetes care. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial conducted in a resident continuity clinic during the 2003-2004 academic year. PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-eight categorical Internal Medicine residents caring for 483 diabetic patients participated. Residents randomized to the intervention (n = 39) received instruction on diabetes registry use; quarterly performance audit, feedback, and written reports identifying patients needing care; and had letters sent quarterly to patients needing hemoglobin A1c or cholesterol testing. Residents randomized to the control group (n = 39) received usual clinic education. MEASUREMENTS: Hemoglobin A1c and lipid monitoring, and the achievement of intermediate clinical outcomes (hemoglobin A1c <7.0%, LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dL, and blood pressure <130/85 mmHg) were assessed. RESULTS: Patients cared for by residents in the intervention group had higher adherence to guideline recommendations for hemoglobin A1c testing (61.5% vs 48.1%, p = .01) and LDL testing (75.8% vs 64.1%, p = .02). Intermediate clinical outcomes were not different between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Use of a registry-generated audit, feedback, and patient reminder intervention in a resident continuity clinic modestly improved diabetes care processes, but did not influence intermediate clinical outcomes.  (+info)

Quantifying data quality for clinical trials using electronic data capture. (5/20)

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Will the NHHRC recommendations drive quality performance? (6/20)

General practice is the heart of the Australian health care system, addressing the health needs of people, in their communities and in diverse locations and contexts across Australia. With over 100 million items of service claimed by general practitioners each year, even small but incremental improvements in quality have the potential to translate into population level gains in the outcomes and safety of general practice care. In recent years, Australian general practice has undertaken significant work in quality improvement, with practice accreditation to The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners standards and the Australian Primary Care Collaboratives Program being examples. Will the recommendations of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission (NHRC) enhance this work?  (+info)

Improving GP diabetes management - A PDSA audit cycle in Western Australia. (7/20)

BACKGROUND: Tight glucose, blood pressure and lipid control in patients with diabetes can reduce morbidity and mortality from macro- and micro-vascular complications. However, treatment targets are not being met in a large proportion of patients. Clinical audit involves cycles of evaluation of current activity against standards. It allows problems to be identified and action to be taken to address them. METHODS: Annual retrospective audits over 3 years of random samples of up to 20 patient medical records from 13 general practitioners in the midwest region of Western Australia (n=807). Statistical tests compared the second and third audits with the first in regard to completeness of screening, health indicators, and the proportion of patients within The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners and Diabetes Australia guidelines targets. RESULTS: While there was a significant improvement in lipid monitoring over the study period (p<0.001), monitoring of HbA1c and blood pressure (BP) remained unchanged. Between the first and third audits, a reduction in mean HbA1c (p<0.001), mean total cholesterol (p=0.017), mean LDL cholesterol (p=0.014) and mean systolic BP (p=0.002) was seen. There was an improvement in the proportion of patients achieving cholesterol goals (measured by LDL and reaching a target of HbA1c <7%) between the first and third audits; however the proportion with BP within target declined. In the third audit, 11% of patients on diet alone, 36% on an oral hypoglycaemic agent, 90% on three oral hypoglycaemic agents and 84% of those on insulin were outside the target HbA1c. In the same audit, of those outside target BP, 53% were on no treatment and 65% were only on one type of medication. Eighty-seven percent of patients outside target cholesterol levels had not been prescribed a statin. DISCUSSION: Many of the audited GPs in our study undertreated BP, HbA1c and cholesterol. Improvement in some areas was seen over the study period, which may have been due to the quality assurance activities undertaken. These results reveal a therapeutic opportunity for reducing cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes. More aggressive management of BP and lipids by GPs may see rewards in terms of reducing cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes.  (+info)

The Stroke Practice Improvement Network: a quasiexperimental trial of a multifaceted intervention to improve quality. (8/20)

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The Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities (CPHA) was a non-profit organization that was established in the United States to collect, process, and analyze data related to healthcare services provided by hospitals and professionals. The CPHA developed a system for measuring and comparing the quality and efficiency of medical care delivered by hospitals and physicians.

The Commission's main product was the Professional Activity Study (PAS), which was a comprehensive database of hospital discharge summaries that contained information about patient diagnoses, treatments, and outcomes. The PAS was used to evaluate physician performance, identify best practices, and develop quality improvement initiatives.

In 1995, the CPHA merged with the American Medical Association (AMA) to form the AMA-CPHA, which continued to collect and analyze healthcare data until 2003 when it was discontinued due to financial difficulties. The work of the CPHA has since been taken up by other organizations, such as The Joint Commission and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), which continue to monitor and regulate the quality of healthcare in the United States.

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) is a non-profit organization in the United States that evaluates and accredits healthcare services and organizations. It was originally established in 1951 as the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAH), and changed its name to JCAHO in 1987 to reflect its expansion beyond hospital accreditation to include other types of healthcare organizations. In 2007, the organization became known simply as "The Joint Commission."

The Joint Commission's mission is to continuously improve the safety and quality of care provided by healthcare organizations through evaluation, accreditation, and education. It accomplishes this by setting standards for healthcare services and facilities, and then conducting unannounced surveys to assess whether these standards are being met. The survey process includes an on-site review of the organization's policies, procedures, and practices, as well as interviews with staff, patients, and their families.

Healthcare organizations that meet or exceed The Joint Commission's standards can earn accreditation, which is recognized as a mark of quality by consumers, insurers, and regulatory bodies. Accreditation is voluntary, but many healthcare organizations choose to participate because it demonstrates their commitment to excellence and helps them identify areas for improvement.

In addition to hospital accreditation, The Joint Commission also offers accreditation programs for ambulatory care facilities, behavioral health care organizations, home health agencies, laboratories, long-term care facilities, and office-based surgery practices.

Hospital planning, in the medical context, refers to the process of designing, developing, and managing healthcare facilities to ensure they meet the current and future needs of the population they serve. It involves strategic planning, financial forecasting, architectural design, infrastructure development, and operational management. The goal is to create an efficient, safe, and patient-centered environment that supports high-quality care, complies with regulatory standards, and optimizes resource utilization. This process may also include considerations for emergency preparedness, technological integration, and sustainable practices.

The "attitude of health personnel" refers to the overall disposition, behavior, and approach that healthcare professionals exhibit towards their patients or clients. This encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Interpersonal skills: The ability to communicate effectively, listen actively, and build rapport with patients.
2. Professionalism: Adherence to ethical principles, confidentiality, and maintaining a non-judgmental attitude.
3. Compassion and empathy: Showing genuine concern for the patient's well-being and understanding their feelings and experiences.
4. Cultural sensitivity: Respecting and acknowledging the cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and values of patients.
5. Competence: Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and expertise in providing healthcare services.
6. Collaboration: Working together with other healthcare professionals to ensure comprehensive care for the patient.
7. Patient-centeredness: Focusing on the individual needs, preferences, and goals of the patient in the decision-making process.
8. Commitment to continuous learning and improvement: Staying updated with the latest developments in the field and seeking opportunities to enhance one's skills and knowledge.

A positive attitude of health personnel contributes significantly to patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and overall healthcare outcomes.

A Medical Records Department (MRD) in a hospital is responsible for collecting, maintaining, and storing patient health information generated during the course of providing healthcare services. The MRD ensures that these records are accurate, confidential, accessible, and retained according to legal and institutional requirements. These records typically include medical history, treatment plans, medication information, laboratory test results, imaging studies, progress notes, and discharge summaries.

The department is usually staffed by health information management professionals who follow established policies and procedures for managing these records in compliance with relevant laws, regulations, and accreditation standards. The MRD plays a critical role in supporting quality patient care, clinical decision-making, research, and continuous healthcare improvement.

A physician is a healthcare professional who practices medicine, providing medical care and treatment to patients. Physicians may specialize in various fields of medicine, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, or radiology, among others. They are responsible for diagnosing and treating illnesses, injuries, and disorders; prescribing medications; ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests; providing counseling and education to patients; and collaborating with other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care. Physicians may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, and academic medical centers. To become a physician, one must complete a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree program and pass licensing exams to practice medicine in their state.

Hospital records are a type of medical record that is created and maintained by healthcare professionals during a patient's hospitalization. These records typically include detailed information about the patient's medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory and diagnostic test results, treatment plans, progress notes, medications, and other relevant data. The purpose of hospital records is to provide a comprehensive documentation of the patient's care while in the hospital, which can be used for clinical decision-making, communication among healthcare providers, quality improvement, research, and legal purposes. Hospital records are considered confidential and protected health information under federal and state laws, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Medical Record Administrators, also known as Health Information Managers, are professionals responsible for managing and maintaining the comprehensive, accurate, confidential, and secure documentation of patients' medical records in healthcare facilities. They play a crucial role in ensuring that all patient data is stored and retrieved efficiently to support effective patient care, reimbursement, and healthcare research.

Their primary responsibilities include:

1. Overseeing the organization, maintenance, and storage of medical records, both in paper and electronic formats.
2. Implementing policies and procedures that comply with federal and state regulations regarding patient data privacy, confidentiality, and security.
3. Supervising and coordinating the work of health information technicians, medical transcriptionists, and other support staff involved in managing medical records.
4. Collaborating with healthcare providers to ensure complete and accurate documentation in patients' medical records.
5. Utilizing classification systems, such as ICD-10-CM and CPT codes, for reimbursement and statistical purposes.
6. Analyzing and abstracting data from medical records for use in patient care assessments, quality improvement initiatives, and research studies.
7. Serving as a resource for healthcare professionals, patients, and external agencies seeking access to medical record information while ensuring compliance with legal requirements and ethical standards.
8. Participating in the development and implementation of health information technology systems, such as electronic health records (EHRs) and other data management tools.
9. Staying abreast of current trends, advancements, and regulatory changes impacting medical record administration and health information management practices.
10. Providing leadership, guidance, and education to healthcare staff regarding best practices for managing medical records and protecting patient data.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "England" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom, along with Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. England is located in the southern part of Great Britain, which is the largest island of the British Isles.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs) are a system of classifying hospital patients based on their severity of illness, resource utilization, and other factors. DRGs were developed by the US federal government to determine the relative cost of providing inpatient care for various types of diagnoses and procedures.

The DRG system categorizes patients into one of several hundred groups based on their diagnosis, treatment, and other clinical characteristics. Each DRG has a corresponding payment weight that reflects the average resource utilization and costs associated with caring for patients in that group. Hospitals are then reimbursed for inpatient services based on the DRG payment weights, providing an incentive to provide more efficient and cost-effective care.

DRGs have been widely adopted as a tool for managing healthcare costs and improving quality of care. They are used by Medicare, Medicaid, and many private insurers to determine payments for inpatient hospital services. DRGs can also be used to compare the performance of hospitals and healthcare providers, identify best practices, and support quality improvement initiatives.

Patient admission in a medical context refers to the process by which a patient is formally accepted and registered into a hospital or healthcare facility for treatment or further medical care. This procedure typically includes the following steps:

1. Patient registration: The patient's personal information, such as name, address, contact details, and insurance coverage, are recorded in the hospital's system.
2. Clinical assessment: A healthcare professional evaluates the patient's medical condition to determine the appropriate level of care required and develop a plan for treatment. This may involve consulting with other healthcare providers, reviewing medical records, and performing necessary tests or examinations.
3. Bed assignment: Based on the clinical assessment, the hospital staff assigns an appropriate bed in a suitable unit (e.g., intensive care unit, step-down unit, general ward) for the patient's care.
4. Informed consent: The healthcare team explains the proposed treatment plan and associated risks to the patient or their legal representative, obtaining informed consent before proceeding with any invasive procedures or significant interventions.
5. Admission orders: The attending physician documents the admission orders in the medical chart, specifying the diagnostic tests, medications, treatments, and care plans for the patient during their hospital stay.
6. Notification of family members or caregivers: Hospital staff informs the patient's emergency contact or next of kin about their admission and provides relevant information regarding their condition, treatment plan, and any necessary follow-up instructions.
7. Patient education: The healthcare team educates the patient on what to expect during their hospital stay, including potential side effects, self-care strategies, and discharge planning.

The goal of patient admission is to ensure a smooth transition into the healthcare facility, providing timely and appropriate care while maintaining open communication with patients, families, and caregivers throughout the process.

"State Medicine" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it can refer to the organization, financing, and delivery of healthcare services and resources at the national or regional level, overseen and managed by the government or state. This can include public health initiatives, regulation of healthcare professionals and institutions, and the provision of healthcare services through publicly funded programs.

In some contexts, "State Medicine" may also refer to the practice of using medical treatments or interventions as a means of achieving political or social objectives, such as reducing crime rates or improving economic productivity. However, this usage is less common and more controversial.

Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) is a passive dosimetry technique used to measure ionizing radiation exposure. It utilizes the property of certain materials, known as thermoluminescent materials or TLDs, to emit light when they are heated after being exposed to radiation.

The process involves exposing a TLD material, such as lithium fluoride (LiF) or calcium sulfate (CaSO4), to ionizing radiation. The radiation causes electrons in the material to become trapped in metastable energy levels. When the TLD material is subsequently heated, these trapped electrons are released and return to their ground state, emitting light in the process. The intensity of this thermoluminescent glow is proportional to the amount of radiation exposure the material has received.

TLDs offer several advantages over other dosimetry techniques. They can be used to measure both acute and chronic radiation exposures, are relatively insensitive to environmental factors such as temperature and humidity, and can be read out multiple times for comparison or calibration purposes. Additionally, TLD materials can be made into small, lightweight badges that can be worn by individuals to monitor their personal radiation exposure.

Overall, thermoluminescent dosimetry is a valuable tool in radiation protection, providing an accurate and reliable means of measuring ionizing radiation exposure for medical, industrial, and research applications.

Hospitalization is the process of admitting a patient to a hospital for the purpose of receiving medical treatment, surgery, or other health care services. It involves staying in the hospital as an inpatient, typically under the care of doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. The length of stay can vary depending on the individual's medical condition and the type of treatment required. Hospitalization may be necessary for a variety of reasons, such as to receive intensive care, to undergo diagnostic tests or procedures, to recover from surgery, or to manage chronic illnesses or injuries.

Radiation monitoring is the systematic and continuous measurement, assessment, and tracking of ionizing radiation levels in the environment or within the body to ensure safety and to take appropriate actions when limits are exceeded. It involves the use of specialized instruments and techniques to detect and quantify different types of radiation, such as alpha, beta, gamma, neutron, and x-rays. The data collected from radiation monitoring is used to evaluate radiation exposure, contamination levels, and potential health risks for individuals or communities. This process is crucial in various fields, including nuclear energy production, medical imaging and treatment, radiation therapy, and environmental protection.

Accreditation is a process in which a healthcare organization, facility, or program is evaluated and certified as meeting certain standards and criteria established by a recognized accrediting body. The purpose of accreditation is to ensure that the organization, facility, or program provides safe, high-quality care and services to its patients or clients.

Accreditation typically involves a thorough review of an organization's policies, procedures, practices, and outcomes, as well as an on-site survey by a team of experts from the accrediting body. The evaluation focuses on various aspects of the organization's operations, such as leadership and management, patient safety, infection control, clinical services, quality improvement, and staff competence.

Accreditation is voluntary, but many healthcare organizations seek it as a way to demonstrate their commitment to excellence and continuous improvement. Accreditation can also be a requirement for licensure, reimbursement, or participation in certain programs or initiatives.

Examples of accrediting bodies in the healthcare field include The Joint Commission, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), and the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA).

Radiation protection, also known as radiation safety, is a field of study and practice that aims to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. It involves various measures and techniques used to minimize or eliminate exposure to ionizing radiation, such as:

1. Time: Reducing the amount of time spent near a radiation source.
2. Distance: Increasing the distance between oneself and a radiation source.
3. Shielding: Using materials that can absorb or block radiation to reduce exposure.
4. Containment: Preventing the release of radiation into the environment.
5. Training and education: Providing information and training to individuals who work with radiation sources.
6. Dosimetry and monitoring: Measuring and monitoring radiation doses received by individuals and populations.
7. Emergency planning and response: Developing plans and procedures for responding to radiation emergencies or accidents.

Radiation protection is an important consideration in various fields, including medicine, nuclear energy, research, and manufacturing, where ionizing radiation sources are used or produced.

A hospital library, also known as a health sciences library or medical library, is a type of specialized library that serves the information needs of healthcare professionals, patients, students, and researchers in a hospital or healthcare facility. These libraries typically contain a wide range of resources related to medicine, nursing, allied health professions, and healthcare administration.

The resources available in a hospital library may include:

1. Print materials such as medical textbooks, journals, reference books, and patient education materials.
2. Electronic resources such as e-books, electronic journals, databases, and multimedia resources.
3. Audiovisual materials such as DVDs, CDs, and streaming media related to medical education and patient care.
4. Clinical decision support tools that help healthcare professionals make informed clinical decisions at the point of care.
5. Access to online learning platforms and continuing education resources for healthcare professionals.
6. Services such as literature searching, document delivery, interlibrary loan, and reference assistance.

Hospital libraries play a critical role in supporting patient care, medical education, research, and evidence-based practice in healthcare facilities. They provide access to high-quality, reliable information that helps healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care, stay up-to-date with the latest research and best practices, and improve their knowledge and skills. Hospital libraries also provide resources and services that help patients and their families make informed decisions about their health and treatment options.

Radiation dosage, in the context of medical physics, refers to the amount of radiation energy that is absorbed by a material or tissue, usually measured in units of Gray (Gy), where 1 Gy equals an absorption of 1 Joule of radiation energy per kilogram of matter. In the clinical setting, radiation dosage is used to plan and assess the amount of radiation delivered to a patient during treatments such as radiotherapy. It's important to note that the biological impact of radiation also depends on other factors, including the type and energy level of the radiation, as well as the sensitivity of the irradiated tissues or organs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term "war crimes" is a legal concept and does not fall under the category of medical definitions. War crimes are serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in armed conflicts. They include acts such as deliberate attacks on civilians or civilian infrastructure, torture, hostage-taking, and the use of weapons that cause unnecessary suffering or superfluous injury.

If you have any questions related to medical definitions or health-related topics, I would be happy to try to help answer them!

Bartemeier's professional life was filled with teaching and professional activities. He actively worked with the American ... He was Chairman of the Joint Commission of Mental Health in the 1950s. The U.S. Congress authorized the Joint Commission to ... and director of professional education at the Pontiac State Hospital (1949-1954). In 1952, when the American Medical ... Bartemeier moved to Baltimore to head Seton Hospital, a private mental hospital, where he practiced until 1980. ...
The Joint Commission (on Accreditation of Hospitals) followed the ACS in this role from 1952. Medicare legislation, enacted in ... In US hospital settings, clinical peer review encompasses a wide variety of activities, whose scope varies across institutions ... In contrast, professional peer review is conducted within the professional practice model and is not a managerial ... A Study in Hospital Efficiency. Boston, MA: T Todd Company; 1917. Ponton TR, "Gauging efficiency of hospital and its staff. ...
Hospital pharmacies can often be found within the premises of the hospital. Hospital pharmacies usually stock a larger range of ... The professional practice is becoming more clinically oriented as most of the drugs are now manufactured by pharmaceutical ... The Commission for Certification in Geriatric Pharmacy certifies pharmacists in geriatric pharmacy practice. The American Board ... Legislation requires the supervision of certain pharmacy technician's activities by a pharmacist. The majority of pharmacy ...
Sports and physical activities are led by the Sports Cadet Captain. Whole body is led by the Chief Cadet Captain. Each division ... As per the revised regulations of Higher Education Commission Pakistan, the two years BSc degree program was replaced by two ... He must be declared medically fit by the military hospital and Mercantile Marine Department of the Ministry of Ports and ... Pakistan Navy assists in professional/physical training. The entire student body is referred to as the Cadets of Pakistan ...
She has developed her professional activity in the city of Minatitlán, both privately and in public hospitals in the area. In ... she served as secretary of the Health Commission and a member of the Livestock and Social Security Commissions. On November 8, ...
Blain was involved in numerous professional activities. He was a consultant to the Alaska Health Department, which was ... The Mental Hospital Institute Proceedings were published and led to the journal Mental Hospitals. After ten years as the APA ... With the start of World War II, Blain was commissioned into the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), and was the medical ... He was appalled at the inhumane conditions he found at some state hospitals, which led to calling a meeting of hospital ...
... and research laboratories have been strategically commissioned to support the LEI's core activities. In 1983, under Professor ... Its ophthalmologists also consult at Perth's main teaching public hospitals including Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Royal ... Its current Managing Director Bill Morgan leads a team of clinicians, medical professionals, researchers and support staff. In ... Perth Hospital and Fremantle Hospital. The LEI teams investigate all major causes of blindness including cataracts, diabetes ...
He took on a variety of professional, sporting and community activities, revealing a capacity for leadership. Later, he and his ... p. 3. "Hospital Board Election Postal Ballot Closes on June 30". The Canberra Times. 23 June 1938. p. 3. "Canberra Hospital: ... The administration of the Australian Capital Territory was the responsibility of the Federal Capital Commission until it was ... Probably, it was his WW1 field hospital experience that led him to become prominent in the movement for a new Canberra hospital ...
Tennessee's highest level of certification for pediatric hospital care. The hospital is accredited by the Joint Commission for ... Children's Hospital sponsors the Healthy Kids Community Education Program to provide classes for non-health care professionals ... Ways to Enhance Children's Activity and Nutrition) program. In the summer of 2008, Children's Hospital became the lead ... East Tennessee Children's Hospital. "Fantasy of Trees - East Tennessee Children's Hospital". East Tennessee Children's Hospital ...
... the president of the Board of Managers was named to the Federal Commission for Consideration of Government Activities Dealing ... The hospital, along with Marion National Cemetery were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999 as a national ... and professional staff. By 1928, the Board concluded that it was not capable of managing the National Home as a national ... The main hospital building, Building 19, was completed and patients began to be treated in the facility. Female nurses arrived ...
Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities MeSH N05.700.520 - nursing audit MeSH N05.700.675 - professional review ... hospital records MeSH N05.715.360.300.715.500 - medical records MeSH N05.715.360.300.715.500.500 - medical record linkage MeSH ... professional ethics MeSH N05.350.340.080 - codes of ethics MeSH N05.350.340.080.249 - helsinki declaration MeSH N05.350.340.080 ... hospital costs MeSH N05.300.380 - health care reform MeSH N05.300.385 - health expenditures MeSH N05.300.400 - health ...
... build field hospitals staffed with volunteer nurses (mostly women), and raise funds to support the commission's programs. As ... the president of the Board of Managers was appointed to the Federal Commission for Consideration of Government Activities ... and it required large capital investments in hospitals, medical equipment, and professional staff. By 1928, the Board concluded ... The burden on PHS government hospitals was so great that the Service began to contract with private hospitals to provide health ...
Doctors, nurses and other professionals working in government-run public hospitals have long been accused of demanding bribes ... The Anti-Corruption Commission of Bangladesh is crippled by the 2013 amendment of the Anti Corruption Commission Act introduced ... HSBC was also involved in tax evasion activities. In 2020, it was found that Prashanta Kumar Halder had stolen 15 billion taka ... "Bangladesh: Chains of Corruption Strangle Nation - Asian Human Rights Commission". Asian Human Rights Commission. Retrieved 24 ...
William Eden Pool, lately a Head of Division, EC Commission, Brussels. Peter Poon Wing-cheung, MBE, JP. For public service in ... Stanley Horsley, Senior Professional and Technology Officer, Department of the Environment. Robert Howard, Civilian Operating ... Monica, Elizabeth Beck, For services to the Northern General Hospital League of Friends. Margaret Ann Beeston, For services to ... James Craig McFadzean, Chairman, Lapwing Lodge Scout Training and Activity Centre, Paisley. Denis McGrath, Nursing Officer, ...
It is now known as the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service. The scope of activities of the Marine Hospital ... and other types of health professionals. ... The Marine Hospitals, as their name suggests, were hospitals ... Louis hospital, 1858 Portland, Maine hospital, 1859* First Cincinnati hospital, 1860 Second New Orleans hospital, never ... Alabama hospital, 1843* Lahaina, Hawaii hospital, 1844* Key West, Florida hospital, 1845* First New Orleans hospital at Algiers ...
... our professional activities dictated and controlled, our policies subject to the approval of an unfriendly, prejudiced, self- ... The schools were not approved by the Flexner Report (1910), which was commissioned by a council within the American Medical ... Council on Medical Education and Hospitals (1918). Medical Colleges of the United States and of foreign countries 1918. ... "professionals." Alexander Holmes Baldridge (1795-1874) suggested that because of its American roots the tradition of Eclectic ...
The Saudi German Hospitals Group focuses on education for medical professionals, students, communities and patients by ... acting as an accredited hub for Saudi Commission for Health Specialties (SCFHS) post graduate training and Health Academy ... providing educational programmes and activities to improve the knowledge of the workforce, training students of medicine and ... "Saudi German Hospitals Group Opens Hospital in Dammam". Al Bawaba. Retrieved 2020-09-21. "Saudi German Hospital names new CEO ...
The department now[when?] includes three major programs: Master of Health Administration Professional Master of Science in ... Both master's programs are fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME) and ... CEO of Hospital Corporation of America Marilyn Tavenner, acting administrator for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [1 ... of Health Administration also has a major research program and is involved in a wide range of public service activities, ...
This is the number of hospital beds with fixed locations; at any given time, some beds may be out of commission. General ... identified by their official certification or professional qualification, undertake basic health care activities with the ... hospital complexes are each counted here as a single hospital: 40 percent of stays in private hospitals are arranged and paid ... A hospital can be a single structure or a hospital complex, even including branch buildings off of its main campus; it can also ...
Lynch was involved in many professional activities. He was the co-founder of the Society of Forensic Toxicologists (SOFT) in ... colleges and to hospital staff, drug abuse task forces and many other groups. In 1971 Lynch performed pharmacological tests on ... with New York State's Drug Abuse Control Commission, the New York State Senate Committee on Crime in the years 1970 and 1971 ... the board of directors of Queens Children's Hospital, the New York Metropolitan Transit Authority, Nassau County's Poison ...
Étaples was the scene of much Allied activity during World War I due to its safety from attack by enemy land forces and the ... 1 Canadian General Hospital at Étaples in May 1918. Major Douglas Reynolds, VC, Royal Field Artillery. Sergeant Dick Wynn, ... Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Etaples Military Cemetery on the website "Remembrance Trails of the Great War in Northern ... professional soccer player notably for Manchester United Nursing Sister Katherine Maud MacDonald, the first Canadian woman to ...
Morozov Children's Municipal Clinical Hospital, and S.P. Botkin Municipal Clinical Hospital, and oncology centers in Russian ... The most recent data on Gift of Life income and spending can be searched at the Charity Commission website. On 1 June 2015, ... The foundation engages in multiple activities in the field of oncology in Russia. Its stated goals are: to raise money for the ... Its mission is to advance public education about childhood cancer and to increase awareness among medical professionals in ...
High Commission of Bangladesh. Archived from the original on 18 December 2016. Retrieved 18 January 2023. Islam, Muhammad ... Khan died at Dhaka's Evercare Hospital around 5:45 PM (BDT). "সাবেক তথ্যমন্ত্রী হাবিব উল্লাহ খান মারা গেছেন (ভিডিও)" [Former ... "Habibullah Khan Talks About the Rotary Activities in Bangladesh". Voice of America (in Bengali). 16 July 2005. Retrieved 18 ... which changed the life and status of these professionals. He is also the first ambassador of Bangladesh to South Africa. He is ...
ORHP is the lead office for coordinating and carrying out these grant activities, which help fund Critical Access Hospitals and ... HRSA works with the Appalachian Regional Commission, the Delta Regional Authority, the Denali Commission, and the U.S.-Mexico ... The agency also supports the Rural Recruitment and Retention Network, which helps locate qualified health care professionals to ... ORHP manages HRSA's Border Health Activities. Much of the U.S.-Mexico border is rural, and the few urban areas located on the ...
Deputy Chairman of the Scottish Insurance Commission. He began his professional career in 1873. He initially worked in general ... In some part contributed to by the reliance on philanthropic activities to supply nurses to some areas. Their importance to an ... He was medical superintendent at Belford Hospital for 41 years and was a former President of the Caledonian Medical Association ... The report was commissioned in 1910 to overcome the difficulties of implementing the forthcoming National Insurance Act 1911 in ...
The Alberta Federation of Regulated Health Professionals lists 19 to Zero as one of its COVID-19 resource providers. Additional ... Beamish, Laura (2021-10-28). "'It's never too late until it is': Campaign targets vaccine hesitancy as hospitals struggle with ... Some of 19 to Zero's community engagement activities included handing out postcards with QR codes linking to available ... College of Pharmacists Partners In Health Canada South Asian Covid Task Force Toronto Public Health Toronto Transit Commission ...
Victoria Civil Hospital; High Specialty Regional Hospital of Ciudad Victoria; which provides professional, surgical and nursing ... In Ciudad Victoria there is a varied sporting activity; In the field of professional football, the team of the Correcaminos of ... The Municipal Commission for Drinking Water and Sewerage of Ciudad Victoria (COMAPA), is a public body of the Municipal ... professional football player Alan Pulido Izaguirre, professional football player Oscar Mascorro, professional footballer José ...
This success was the result of the professional unanimous actions of the Veterinary section to the Ministry of Agriculture and ... Some years later (1964-1965), the mobile clinic courses were relocated in the premise of the Military Hospital. In the ... With Order No 3294 from August 13, 1921, the Minister of Public Education appointed a commission (interim Faculty Council) with ... They were charged to perform the preliminary work related to the activities of the new faculty. As a result, on May 11, 1923, ...
The Joint Commission released guidelines for the use of medical scribes in July 2012. The Joint Commission's guidelines ... hospitals, emergency departments, long-term care facilities, long-term acute care hospitals, public health clinics, and ... The Medical Scribe Professional Training Program is designed for individuals new to healthcare or those looking to augment ... may not act independently but can document the previously determined physician's or practitioner's dictation and/or activities ...
In September 1924, Quesada enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a flying cadet and was commissioned as a reserve officer a ... General Quesada died on February 9, 1993, at a Jupiter, Florida, hospital and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery, in ... Quesada became involved in professional sports when he became owner of the expansion Washington Senators in 1961. Quesada sold ... On September 14, 2011, he was honored posthumously during Hispanic Heritage Month activities in Cleveland, Ohio. In 2012 ...
Bartemeiers professional life was filled with teaching and professional activities. He actively worked with the American ... He was Chairman of the Joint Commission of Mental Health in the 1950s. The U.S. Congress authorized the Joint Commission to ... and director of professional education at the Pontiac State Hospital (1949-1954). In 1952, when the American Medical ... Bartemeier moved to Baltimore to head Seton Hospital, a private mental hospital, where he practiced until 1980. ...
Read more about Sally Vinter Manages Staff Development For Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities, September 1971 ... Sally Vinter Manages Staff Development For Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities, September 1971 Photographer: ...
CPHA Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities 1968 Green Road Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 DOCUMENTATION FORMS. File ... The Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities through its affiliated division, the Council on Clinical Classification ... UHDD5 Glasses of Procedures, ICD-9-CM, published by the Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities, Ann Arbor, Michigan ... with the Commission on Professional and Hospital activities to produce certain of these adjunct materials. This contract (HCFA ...
Professional Activities. *American Health Lawyers Association. - Current Member, Past Vice Chair, Medical Staff, Credentialing ... American Hospital Association, Staff Counsel. *Ohio General Assembly, Ohio Nursing Home Commission, Attorney ... Represented hospital-based physician groups with hospital contract negotiations resulting in additional compensation for groups ... Editor, Record Management Reference 2013 Edition, Illinois Hospital Association, 2013. Media Hits. *Quoted, "Many Patients ...
Civic and Community Activities. Appointive or Elective Positions Held:. Member, Town of South Hadley Conservation Commission ( ... Professional. Legal Employment History:. Partner, Davenport, Connon & Ryan, Holyoke.. ... Corporator, Holyoke Hospital;. Holyoke Visiting Nurse Association;. Holyoke Rotary.. *Reported Decisions. *Other Links ... This free daily email alert delivers the most recent coverage of the courts and law firms activity that is important to you ...
Commission on Professional Hospital Activities. International classification of diseases, 9th revision, clinical modification. ... social activity, and chronic and acute symptoms and conditions [37, 38]. From the QWB-SA, a total score can be calculated that ... Outcomes of blast-related injury can frequently result in activity limitation, participation restriction, and other reduced ...
... of hospital discharge data from the Professional Activity Study of the Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities. Our ... hospital region, season, presence of certain underlying conditions, in-hospital deaths, length of stay, and hospital charges by ... 10.9%; p = 0.006), and the hospital stay was more likely to be longer (6.9 vs. 4.6 days; p,0.001) and costlier (mean charges $ ... These findings may reflect participation in outdoor activities that could expose persons to Sporothrix (4). Although most ...
PANINI also conducted significant public engagement activities with older adults, health professionals and key organisations to ... These include hospital inpatient, outpatient, care home and community-dwelling older adults. This is important so we can ... Periodic Reporting for period 2 - PANINI (Physical Activity and Nutrition INfluences In ageing). Reporting period: 2018-01-01 ... PANINI has developed a toolkit of standardized best practice measures for assessing physical activity and nutrition as well as ...
Hospitals and nursing homes are responding to changes in the health care system by modify... ... 1 Study Activities 241-276 * 2 Statistical Resources 277-305 * 3 Commissioned Papers 306-307 ... In many cases nursing staff must substitute for health professionals that are not on site. An example is if a medical problem ... Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate? (1996) Chapter: Quality of Care and Nursing Staff in Nursing ...
Ann Arbor, Michigan: Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities, 1986.. *↵ Watt G. Hospitalized injuries Victoria, July ... HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS. One complete year (July 1995 to June 1996) of hospital admission data was available for all Australian ... Hospital admission rates are shown in table 1. The trend for all age hospitalized dog bite in Victoria, Australia showed no ... Length of stay in hospital is taken as a proxy for severity. In Australia, July 1993 to June 1996, the average length of stay ...
The nine-member commission will promote horse health and encourage sound agricultural practices with equine activities and the ... "With this group of experts who have personal and professional knowledge in the horse industry, Im confident animal health ... Samantha Beaty, State Veterinarian and Assistant Commissioner for Animal Health; Monty McInturff, Tennessee Equine Hospital ... The commission was enacted by legislative action in 2020 and is charged with studying the status of equine health and emerging ...
Other professional and community partnerships include the Victoria County Bar Association, DeTar Hospital, Prospera Housing & ... He is the current president of the City of Victoria Parks and Recreation Commission and is a board member of Hospice of South ... Robert Cresanti, JD 91, has joined Accenture as managing director to lead government relations activities in North America. He ... If you have been recognized or have other professional news to share, please e-mail [email protected] for inclusion in a ...
U.S. Naval Hospital, Guam : Competitive Analysis mission statement directs the activities of the hospital. Not only does the ... Organizational Behavior Problem in Hospitals A study by the Joint Commission revealed that communication failures were ... Case STudy Hospital Readmissions Hospital readmissions of patients is upsetting to patients and families, especially when that ... Doctors Hospital Of Sarasota Analysis are experiencing high growth rates. There are three facilities, hospitals & Medical ...
Current professional license in discipline and Board Certified required at time of hire and must be maintained throughout the ... The Surveyor Hospital MD surveys health care organizations throughout the United States. Applies systems analysis skills and ... including the following activities: ... Participates in other Joint Commission activities as assigned ... Candidates must have Five years of experience working in various components of a hospital and health care system, including ...
... as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Centers Commission on ... This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the ... Jude Childrens Research Hospital and Le Bonheur Childrens Hospital employees and trainees. $75 $75 ... Jude Childrens Research Hospital and Le Bonheur Childrens Hospital/University of Tennessee Health Science Center. St. Jude ...
Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities 5% * Bronchodilator Agents 5% * Biomarkers 5% ...
... s largest professional.! Opened in 1892 as the New Rochelle Hospital and Dentistry strive to improve the quality of health care ... activity, articles Allie Dakroub, MD, MS. Assistant Program Director. Montefiore New Rochelle Hospital is a community-based, ... which has been awarded Joint Commission Advanced Certification for Total Hip and Total Knee Replacement. It is named for Moses ... The hospital opened in 1892 as the New Rochelle Hospital. Montefiore Medical Center . The Growth of a Program. Montefiore ...
Once the Professional Training Practice Commission (CTP) has carried out the necessary evaluation and confirmed the subsequent ... 60 credits consist of activities aimed at acquiring specific professional skills. Each ECTS corresponds to 12 hours of teaching ... The Degree Programme Committee can identify non-teaching hospitals or healthcare facilities where internships may be either in ... Professional training During clinical studies (Years Four, Five and Six) students must acquire specific knowledge in internal ...
... urology and oncology in select ESIC hospitals in Delhi-NCR region to be strengthened ... To improve the infrastructure in its hospitals across the country, the corporation will engage professionals from hospital ... of hospital and dispensary construction projects of the corporation from the stage of conception till the commissioning of the ... patient safety and other ancillary activities, the ministry said. ... Business News/ News / India/ ESIC to run new hospitals by ...
Marguerite Hospital in Marseille, France in 2002.. Deputy Director of the Department of Pneumology in the Clínica Universidad ... Activity. As an educator. Clinical associate professor and collaborator. Tutor of residents. Department of Pneumology. Clinica ... Professional career. Graduated in Philosophy. Columbia University, New York, USA, 1990. Doctor of Medicine and Surgery at the ... Assistant Doctor in the Department of Pneumology, Member of the Pharmacy Commission, Clinical Teaching Collaborator. Faculty of ...
... that women who experience a third or fourth degree perineal tear receive appropriate follow-up care after leaving hospital, to ... After leaving hospital, you should receive follow-up care to promote your physical and emotional recovery and to provide advice ... Healthcare professionals with specialist expertise providing care to women with third and fourth degree perineal tears, such as ... They can help you if you have concerns about pain, incontinence, sexual activities, exercise, or relationship difficulties ...
Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities. N4.761.380.100 N4.761.700.250.500.100. N5.700.500.200 N5.700.175.500.200. ... Complement Hemolytic Activity Assay E5.478.245.150 E5.478.594.160.150. E5.478.594.760.155. Conjunctiva A9.371.192 A9.371.60.200 ... United States Federal Trade Commission I1.409.275.380 I1.409.137.500.968. N3.540.427.380 N3.540.348.500.500.968. United States ...
Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities. N4.761.380.100 N4.761.700.250.500.100. N5.700.500.200 N5.700.175.500.200. ... Complement Hemolytic Activity Assay E5.478.245.150 E5.478.594.160.150. E5.478.594.760.155. Conjunctiva A9.371.192 A9.371.60.200 ... United States Federal Trade Commission I1.409.275.380 I1.409.137.500.968. N3.540.427.380 N3.540.348.500.500.968. United States ...
Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities. N4.761.380.100 N4.761.700.250.500.100. N5.700.500.200 N5.700.175.500.200. ... Complement Hemolytic Activity Assay E5.478.245.150 E5.478.594.160.150. E5.478.594.760.155. Conjunctiva A9.371.192 A9.371.60.200 ... United States Federal Trade Commission I1.409.275.380 I1.409.137.500.968. N3.540.427.380 N3.540.348.500.500.968. United States ...
Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities. N4.761.380.100 N4.761.700.250.500.100. N5.700.500.200 N5.700.175.500.200. ... Complement Hemolytic Activity Assay E5.478.245.150 E5.478.594.160.150. E5.478.594.760.155. Conjunctiva A9.371.192 A9.371.60.200 ... United States Federal Trade Commission I1.409.275.380 I1.409.137.500.968. N3.540.427.380 N3.540.348.500.500.968. United States ...
Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities. N4.761.380.100 N4.761.700.250.500.100. N5.700.500.200 N5.700.175.500.200. ... Complement Hemolytic Activity Assay E5.478.245.150 E5.478.594.160.150. E5.478.594.760.155. Conjunctiva A9.371.192 A9.371.60.200 ... United States Federal Trade Commission I1.409.275.380 I1.409.137.500.968. N3.540.427.380 N3.540.348.500.500.968. United States ...
Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities. N4.761.380.100 N4.761.700.250.500.100. N5.700.500.200 N5.700.175.500.200. ... Complement Hemolytic Activity Assay E5.478.245.150 E5.478.594.160.150. E5.478.594.760.155. Conjunctiva A9.371.192 A9.371.60.200 ... United States Federal Trade Commission I1.409.275.380 I1.409.137.500.968. N3.540.427.380 N3.540.348.500.500.968. United States ...

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