A genus of REOVIRIDAE infecting Ixodidae ticks and transmitted by them to humans, deer, and small animals. The type species is COLORADO TICK FEVER VIRUS.
A febrile illness characterized by chills, aches, vomiting, leukopenia, and sometimes encephalitis. It is caused by the COLORADO TICK FEVER VIRUS, a reovirus transmitted by the tick Dermacentor andersoni.
A species of COLTIVIRUS transmitted by the tick DERMACENTOR andersonii and causing fever, chills, aching head and limbs, and often vomiting. It occurs in the northwestern United States, except the Pacific Coast.

Complete sequence determination and genetic analysis of Banna virus and Kadipiro virus: proposal for assignment to a new genus (Seadornavirus) within the family Reoviridae. (1/11)

Arboviruses with genomes composed of 12 segments of double-stranded (ds) RNA have previously been classified as members or probable members of the genus Coltivirus within the family REOVIRIDAE: A number of these viruses have been isolated in North America and Europe and are serologically and genetically related to Colorado tick fever virus, the Coltivirus type species. These isolates constitute subgroup A of the coltiviruses. The complete genome sequences are now presented of two Asian arboviruses, Kadipiro virus (KDV) and Banna virus (BAV), which are currently classified as subgroup B coltiviruses. Analysis of the viral protein sequences shows that all of the BAV genome segments have cognate genes in KDV. The functions of several of these proteins were also indicated by this analysis. Proteins with dsRNA-binding domains or with significant similarities to polymerases, methyltransferases, NTPases or protein kinases were identified. Comparisons of amino acid sequences of the conserved polymerase protein have shown that BAV and KDV are only very distantly related to the subgroup A coltiviruses. These data demonstrate a requirement for the subgroup B viruses to be reassigned to a separate new genus, for which the name Seadornavirus is proposed.  (+info)

A reovirus of the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica that is infectious as particles and related to the coltivirus genus of animal pathogens. (2/11)

RNA viruses of filamentous fungi fall into two broad categories, those that contain double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes in rigid particles and those that are more closely related to positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses with dsRNA replicative intermediates found within lipid vesicles. Effective infectivity systems have been described for the latter, using RNA transcripts, but not for the former. We report the characterization of a reovirus from Cryphonectria parasitica, the filamentous fungus that causes chestnut blight disease. The virus substantially reduces the virulence of the fungus and results in dramatically altered colony morphology, as well as changes in other associated fungal traits, relative to the virus-free isogenic strain. Virus particles from infected mycelium contained 11 segments of dsRNA and showed characteristics typical of the family Reoviridae. Sequences of the largest three segments revealed that the virus is closely related to the Coltivirus genus of animal pathogens, which includes the human pathogen Colorado tick fever virus. The introduction of purified virus particles into protoplasts from virus-free isolates of the fungus resulted in a newly infected mycelium with the same morphology and virus composition as the original virus-infected isolate. This represents the completion of Koch's postulates for a true dsRNA virus from a filamentous fungus and the description of a definitive fungal member of the family Reoviridae.  (+info)

The structure and function of the outer coat protein VP9 of Banna virus. (3/11)

Banna virus (BAV: genus Seadornavirus, family Reoviridae) has a double-shelled morphology similar to rotavirus and bluetongue virus. The structure of BAV outer-capsid protein VP9 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.6 A resolution, revealing a trimeric molecule, held together by an N-terminal helical bundle, reminiscent of coiled-coil structures found in fusion-active proteins such as HIV gp41. The major domain of VP9 contains stacked beta sheets with marked structural similarities to the receptor binding protein VP8 of rotavirus. Anti-VP9 antibodies neutralize viral infectivity, and, remarkably, pretreatment of cells with trimeric VP9 increased viral infectivity, indicating that VP9 is involved in virus attachment to cell surface and subsequent internalization. Sequence similarities were also detected between BAV VP10 and VP5 portion of rotavirus VP4, suggesting that the receptor binding and internalization apparatus, which is a single gene product activated by proteoloysis in rotavirus, is the product of two separate genome segments in BAV.  (+info)

Identification and functional analysis of VP3, the guanylyltransferase of Banna virus (genus Seadornavirus, family Reoviridae). (4/11)

Banna virus (BAV) particles contain seven structural proteins: VP4 and VP9 form an outer-capsid layer, whilst the virus core contains three major proteins (VP2, VP8 and VP10) and two minor proteins (VP1 and VP3). Sequence analysis showed that VP3 contains motifs [Kx(I/V/L)S] and (Hx(n)H) that have previously been identified in the guanylyltransferases of other reoviruses. Incubation of purified BAV-Ch core particles with [alpha-32P]GTP resulted in exclusive covalent labelling of VP3, demonstrating autoguanylation activity (which is considered indicative of guanylyltransferase activity). Recombinant VP3 prepared in a cell-free expression system was also guanylated under similar reaction conditions, and products were synthesized (in the presence of non-radiolabelled GDP) that co-migrated with GMP, GDP and GpppG during TLC. This reaction, which required magnesium ions for optimum activity, demonstrates that VP3 possesses nucleoside triphosphatase (GTPase) activity and is the BAV guanylyltransferase (RNA 'capping' enzyme).  (+info)

Structural organization of an encephalitic human isolate of Banna virus (genus Seadornavirus, family Reoviridae). (5/11)

Banna virus (BAV) is the type species of the genus Seadornavirus within the family Reoviridae. The Chinese BAV isolate (BAV-Ch), which causes encephalitis in humans, was shown to have a structural organization and particle morphology reminiscent of that of rotaviruses, with fibre proteins projecting from the surface of the particle. Intact BAV-Ch virus particles contain seven structural proteins, two of which (VP4 and VP9) form the outer coat. The inner (core) particles contain five additional proteins (VP1, VP2, VP3, VP8 and VP10) and are 'non-turreted', with a relatively smooth surface appearance. VP2 is the 'T = 2' protein that forms the innermost 'subcore' layer, whilst VP8 is the 'T = 13' protein forming the core-surface layer. Sequence comparisons indicate that BAV VP9 and VP10 are equivalent to the VP8* and VP5* domains, respectively, of rotavirus outer-coat protein VP4 (GenBank accession no. P12976). VP9 has also been shown to be responsible for virus attachment to the host-cell surface and may be involved in internalization. These similarities reveal a previously unreported genetic link between the genera Rotavirus and Seadornavirus, although the expression of BAV VP9 and VP10 from two separate genome segments, rather than by the proteolytic cleavage of a single gene product (as seen in rotavirus VP4), suggests a significant evolutionary jump between the members of these two genera.  (+info)

Studies of coltivirus in China. (6/11)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to review the developments of studies of Coltivirus in China. DATA SOURCES: The data used in this review was obtained mainly from the studies of Coltivirus reported from 1990 to 2003 in China. STUDY SELECTION: Relevant articles on studies of Coltivirus in domestic and foreign literature were selected. DATA EXTRACTION: Data were maily extracted from the articles which are listed in the reference section of this review. RESULTS: Many Coltiviruses have been isolated not only from blood samples of patients with unknown fever or from cerebrospinal fluid of patients with encephalitis in Xishuangbanna area in Yunnan province, but also from mosquitoes collected in many areas in China. In some patients diagnosed as Japanese encephalitis or unknown fever, an increase of Coltivirus IgG antibody of fourfold, or more, has been detected using ELISA. Similarly, Coltivirus IgM antibody was positive in some patients with Japanese encephalitis or viral encephalitis. From most Chinese patients, except the northeastern, the isolates of Coltiviruses belong to subgroup B2, according to RT-PCR amplification of the ninth and twelfth segments of the isolates and sequence analysis of their amplicons. Some biological properties of Chinese Coltiviruses isolates are different from that of North American Coltiviruses. CONCLUSIONS: The isolates of Coltiviruses from Chinese patients are one of the common agents causing viral encephalitis and unknown fever in summer-autumn season. It might be an important public health problem due to its high isolation rate and wide distribution in China. Mosquito is the main transmission vector of the virus.  (+info)

Coltiviruses and seadornaviruses in North America, Europe, and Asia. (7/11)

Coltiviruses are tickborne viruses of the genus Coltivirus. The type species, Colorado tick fever virus (from North America), has been isolated from patients with flulike syndromes, meningitis, encephalitis, and other severe complications. Another coltivirus, Eyach virus, has been isolated from ticks in France and Germany and incriminated in febrile illnesses and neurologic syndromes. Seadornaviruses are endemic in Southeast Asia, particularly Indonesia and China. The prototype virus of the genus, Banna virus (BAV), has been isolated from many mosquito species, humans with encephalitis, pigs, and cattle. Two other seadornaviruses, Kadipiro and Liao Ning, were isolated only from mosquitoes. The epidemiology of seadornaviruses remains poorly documented. Evidence suggests that BAV is responsible for encephalitis in humans. Infection with BAV may be underreported because it circulates in regions with a high incidence of Japanese encephalitis and could be misdiagnosed as this disease.  (+info)

Complete characterisation of the American grass carp reovirus genome (genus Aquareovirus: family Reoviridae) reveals an evolutionary link between aquareoviruses and coltiviruses. (8/11)

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Banna virus (BAV: genus Seadornavirus, family Reoviridae) has a double-shelled morphology similar to rotavirus and bluetongue virus. The structure of BAV outer-capsid protein VP9 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.6 A resolution, revealing a trimeric molecule, held together by an N-terminal helical bundle, reminiscent of coiled-coil structures found in fusion-active proteins such as HIV gp41. The major domain of VP9 contains stacked beta sheets with marked structural similarities to the receptor binding protein VP8 of rotavirus. Anti-VP9 antibodies neutralize viral infectivity, and, remarkably, pretreatment of cells with trimeric VP9 increased viral infectivity, indicating that VP9 is involved in virus attachment to cell surface and subsequent internalization. Sequence similarities were also detected between BAV VP10 and VP5 portion of rotavirus VP4, suggesting that the receptor binding and internalization apparatus, which is a single gene product activated by proteoloysis in rotavirus, is the
We isolated and characterized a Banna virus from mosquitoes in Vietnam; 5 strains were isolated from field-caught mosquitoes at various locations; Banna virus was previously isolated from encephalitis patients in Yunnan, China, in 1987. Together, these findings suggest widespread distribution of this virus throughout Southeast Asia ...
Colorado tick fever (CTF) (also called mountain tick fever, American tick fever, and American mountain tick fever) is a viral infection (Coltivirus) transmitted from the bite of an infected Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni). It should not be confused with the bacterial tick-borne infection, Rocky Mountain spotted fever. The type species of the genus Coltivirus, Colorado tick fever virus (CTFV) infects haemopoietic cells, particularly erythrocytes, which explains how the virus is transmitted by ticks and also accounts for the incidence of transmission by blood transfusion. The disease develops from March to September, with the highest infections occurring in June. The disease is found almost exclusively in the western United States and Canada, mostly in high mountain areas such as Colorado and Idaho. The CTFV was first isolated from human blood in 1944. The virus particle, like other coltiviruses, is about 80 nm in diameter and is generally not enveloped. The double-stranded RNA ...
Read Complete nucleotide sequences of genome segments 1 and 3 of Rosellinia anti-rot virus in the family Reoviridae, Archives of Virology on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Colorado tick fever virus ATCC ® VR-1233CAF™ Designation: Colorado tick fever control ascitic fluid [V-506-401-562] Application:
Colorado tick fever (CTF) is a disease caused by an RNA virus, Colorado tick fever virus (CTFV). Symptoms, which are often non-specific, begin 3 to 5 days after the bite with an abrupt onset of fever and any of these: headaches, chills, malaise, photophobia, myalgias, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. In 5 to 15% of cases a rash occurs. Neurologic complications may also occur. 50% of patients have single recurrence of fever (saddleback fever).. IFA titers for diagnosis. PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) is the test most often used to diagnose the disease. CTF is transmitted by Dermacentor andersoni (Rocky Mt. wood tick) which causes illness from the Western Black Hills to the West Coast in the USA. Some cases of transmission through blood transfusion have been reported. Treatment consists of supportive care.. ©LDA. 2014. 2015. This web site provides practical and useful information on the subject matters covered. It is distributed with the understanding that LDA is not engaged in ...
Colorado Tick Fever. In: Hay, Jr WW, Levin MJ, Deterding RR, Abzug MJ. Hay, Jr W.W., Levin M.J., Deterding R.R., Abzug M.J. Eds. William W. Hay, Jr, et al.eds. Quick Medical Diagnosis & Treatment Pediatrics New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; . http://accesspediatrics.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=2196§ionid=166956538. Accessed January 20, 2018 ...
All the Dogs owners asked this common question as to how can we identify the Dog Tick Fever? No worries, we will help you. If a dog has tick fever which appears in acute, sub-clinical and chronic stages. Acute will experience symptoms such as respiratory troubles, swollen lymph nodes, loss of weight, fever, bleeding problems, and neurological issues. It appears in the beginning stages of tick fever. In fact, sub-clinical stage of Dog Tick Fever, display zero indication of the disease. So that dont exhibit symptoms and the dog possesses a good immune system, they could potentially fight off tick fever during the sub-clinical period. In the chronic stages, they might display severe symptoms such as anemia, vision difficulties, eye hemorrhaging is one example and lameness, uncontrollable bleeding, limb swelling, and failure of the bone marrow. Then their health condition characterized by low blood-platelet counts. So that chronic ehrlichiosis sometimes succumbs to the ailment.. Beyond that, After ...
Abstract Isolation of the virus, the most reliable means of diagnosing Colorado tick fever, is not always practicable. The standard complement-fixation test, using a mouse-brain-derived antigen, may not detect significant rises in antibody titer during the usual 2- or 3-week observation period. Complement-fixation (CF) tests, with antigens derived from infected mouse brains and from an established line of hamster-kidney cells, were compared with a neutralization (plaque-reduction) test and an indirect fluorescent-antibody (IFA) staining test for usefulness in the serologic diagnosis of 34 cases of Colorado tick fever. The cell-culture antigen was as reliable as the mouse-brain antigen, and its preparation was simpler. The CF-antibody titers and the neutralizing-antibody titers tended to be lower and slower to appear than the IFA titers. The IFA method was simple, rapid, and accurate. The IFA titers frequently appeared earlier after onset of illness and reached higher levels than did the CF titers.
When Fausto was found, he was running desoriented in the middle of the road among the cars, very thin and covered with wounds that did not seem to be healing. We took him to the vet who did the snap blood tests and it resulted that he had a tick fever and a suspicion of leshmaniasis. When a dog has a tick fever, the leshmaniasis test is very often inconclusive - neither positive nor negative but suspected. The tick fever influences the results so it is advisable to cure the tick fever first and then repeat the leshmaniasis test. So we did ...
Another name for Mediterranean Tick Fever is Boutonneuse Fever. Physicians from the following specialties evaluate and treat boutonneuse fever: * Infectious ...
belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. Recent studies have focused on the interferon-α/β receptor knock-out mice (IFNAR (-/-)) as a small animal laboratory for the development of AHSV vaccines .... ...
Learn more about Colorado Tick Fever at Atlanta Outpatient Surgery Center DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Colorado tick fever is a condition acquired from a bite of the Dermacentor andersoni wood tick. Learn to recognize the indications by reading here.
Additional Information and References:. Parasitic Diseases of Wild Mammals, Second Edition. Edited by William M. Samuel, Margo J. Pybus, A. Alan Kocan. 2001. Chapter 4-Ticks. Artsob H. 1989. Powassan encephalitis, p. 29-49 In T. P Monath (ed.), The arboviruses: epidemiology and ecology, vol. IV. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.. Bishopp FC and CN Smith. (1937). A new species of Ixodes from Massachusetts. Proc. Entomol. Soc. Wash. 39: 133-138.. Bowen GS. (1989). Colorado tick fever virus, In: T. P. Monath (ed.), The Arboviruses: Epidemiology and Ecology. Vol. II. pp. 159-176. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.. Bowen GS, McLean RG, Shriner RB, Francy DB, Pokorny KS, Trimble JM, Bolin RA, Barnes AM, Calisher CH, and Muth DJ. (1981). The ecology of Colorado tick fever in Rocky Mountain National Park in 1974. II. Infection in small mammals. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 30: 490-496.. Calisher CH. 1994. Medically important arboviruses of the United States and Canada. Clinical Microbiology Reviews. 7(1): 89-116.. Carey ...
Rotavirus is a genus of double-stranded RNA virus in the family Reoviridae. It is transmitted by the faecal-oral route and is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea among infants and young children.
cite news ,url=http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3266511 ,title=FOR PREVENTING THE INTRODUCTION OR SPREAD OF TICK FEVER. ,newspaper=[[Northern Territory Times And Gazette]] ,volume=XXXVI, ,issue=1942 ,location=Northern Territory, Australia ,date=27 January 1911 ,accessdate=18 December 2017 ,page=4 ,via=National Library of Australia ...
Rotavirus is the most common cause of diarrhoeal disease among infants and young children. It is a genus of double-stranded RNA viruses in the family Reoviridae. Nearly every child in the world is infected with rotavirus at least once by the age of five. Immunity develops with each infection, so subsequent infections are less severe; adults are rarely affected. There are eight species of this virus, referred to as A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H. Rotavirus A, the most common species, causes more than 90% of rotavirus infections in humans.. ...
Tick fever is a significant disease of cattle in Australia with up to 7 million animals potentially at risk. It is a serious, often fatal complex of diseases caused by one or more of the tick-borne parasites Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina and Anaplasma marginale. The Tick Fever Centre (TFC) operates as a unit located within Biosecurity Queensland of the Queensland Primary Industries and Fisheries (QPIF), Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI). It was established at Wacol in 1966 to specifically develop and produce an effective vaccine for the control of tick fever. It currently supplies an average of 850 000 doses each year with 95 per cent used within Queensland (QPIF 2009). One purpose of the evaluation was to identify the economic benefits provided by the ongoing provision of the tick fever vaccine. The measureable economic benefits accruing to the TFC are mainly due to potential reductions in the rate of mortality incurred in the northern beef herd. The TFC provides

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