The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.
Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.
Artificial openings created by a surgeon for therapeutic reasons. Most often this refers to openings from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the ABDOMINAL WALL to the outside of the body. It can also refer to the two ends of a surgical anastomosis.
Pathological processes in the SIGMOID COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).
Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).
An abnormal anatomical passage between the RECTUM and the VAGINA.
The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between TRANSVERSE COLON and the SIGMOID COLON.
The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.
An acute necrotic infection of the SCROTUM; PENIS; or PERINEUM. It is characterized by scrotum pain and redness with rapid progression to gangrene and sloughing of tissue. Fournier gangrene is usually secondary to perirectal or periurethral infections associated with local trauma, operative procedures, or urinary tract disease.
Pathological developments in the RECTUM region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).
A segment of the COLON between the RECTUM and the descending colon.
Neodymium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Nd, atomic number 60, and atomic weight 144.24, and is used in industrial applications.
A twisting in the intestine (INTESTINES) that can cause INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.
Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.
Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.
Inflammation of the COLONIC DIVERTICULA, generally with abscess formation and subsequent perforation.
Protrusion of the rectal mucous membrane through the anus. There are various degrees: incomplete with no displacement of the anal sphincter muscle; complete with displacement of the anal sphincter muscle; complete with no displacement of the anal sphincter muscle but with herniation of the bowel; and internal complete with rectosigmoid or upper rectum intussusception into the lower rectum.
Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.
Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.
The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.
The terminal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, beginning from the ampulla of the RECTUM and ending at the anus.
A congenital abnormality characterized by the persistence of the anal membrane, resulting in a thin membrane covering the normal ANAL CANAL. Imperforation is not always complete and is treated by surgery in infancy. This defect is often associated with NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS; MENTAL RETARDATION; and DOWN SYNDROME.
Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.
Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.
Tumors or cancer of the ANAL CANAL.
The body region lying between the genital area and the ANUS on the surface of the trunk, and to the shallow compartment lying deep to this area that is inferior to the PELVIC DIAPHRAGM. The surface area is between the VULVA and the anus in the female, and between the SCROTUM and the anus in the male.
Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.
Fastening devices composed of steel-tantalum alloys used to close operative wounds, especially of the skin, which minimizes infection by not introducing a foreign body that would connect external and internal regions of the body. (From Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995)
A solution or compound that is introduced into the RECTUM with the purpose of cleansing the COLON or for diagnostic procedures.
Methods to repair breaks in abdominal tissues caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions during abdominal surgery.
The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.
Congenital MEGACOLON resulting from the absence of ganglion cells (aganglionosis) in a distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE. The aganglionic segment is permanently contracted thus causing dilatation proximal to it. In most cases, the aganglionic segment is within the RECTUM and SIGMOID COLON.
Tumors or cancer of the SIGMOID COLON.
Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Surgical construction of an opening into the CECUM with a tube through the ABDOMINAL WALL (tube cecostomy) or by skin level approach, in which the cecum is sewn to the surrounding PERITONEUM. Its primary purpose is decompression of colonic obstruction.
A pouch or sac opening from the COLON.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the rectum.
Surgical construction of an artificial opening (stoma) for external fistulization of a duct or vessel by insertion of a tube with or without a supportive stent.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
An abnormal anatomical passage connecting the RECTUM to the outside, with an orifice at the site of drainage.
The protrusion of an organ or part of an organ into a natural or artificial orifice.
Monomeric subunits of primarily globular ACTIN and found in the cytoplasmic matrix of almost all cells. They are often associated with microtubules and may play a role in cytoskeletal function and/or mediate movement of the cell or the organelles within the cell.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'England' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, cultural heritage, and contributions to medical science. However, in a medical context, it may refer to the location of a patient, healthcare provider, or research study, but it is not a term with a specific medical meaning.
Chronic, non-specific inflammation of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Etiology may be genetic or environmental. This term includes CROHN DISEASE and ULCERATIVE COLITIS.

Faecal composition after surgery for Hirschsprung's disease. (1/295)

Diarrhoea and perianal excoriation occur frequently after the endorectal pull-through operation for Hirschsprung's disease. A new method of faecal analysis was performed on 3-day stool collections in 17 postoperative Hirschsprung patients and in 14 normal children, in order to define the faecal abnormality and to establish the cause of perianal excoriation in these patients. Loose stools in postoperative patients were deficient in dry solid content and contained an excess of extractable faecal water. This also had a raised electrolyte concentration, particularly with respect to sodium. Total daily output of faecal water was normal. Formed stools from postoperative patients were also deficient in drysolids but had a normal extractable water content. Excess extractable faecal water, the main abnormality of loose stools in these patients, is the result of abnormal water absorption from the distal colon. Perianal excoriation in these patients is most closely associated with the concentration of sodium in faecal water.  (+info)

Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: treatment and long term follow up of 44 patients. (2/295)

AIMS: To document the long term course of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndrome (CIIPS) in children with defined enteric neuromuscular disease, and the place and type of surgery used in their management; in addition, to identify prognostic factors. METHODS: Children with CIIPS were investigated and treated prospectively. RESULTS: Twenty four children presented congenitally, eight during the 1st year of life, and 10 later. Twenty two had myopathy and 16 neuropathy (11 familial). Malrotation was present in 16 patients, 10 had short small intestine, six had non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, and 16 had urinary tract involvement. Thirty two patients needed long term parenteral nutrition (TPN): for less than six months in 19 and for more than six months in 13, 10 of whom are TPN dependent; 14 are now enteral feeding. Prokinetic treatment improved six of 22. Intestinal decompression stomas were used in 36, colostomy relieved symptoms in five of 11, and ileostomy in 16 of 31. A poor outcome (death (14) or TPN dependence (10)) was seen with malrotation (13 of 16), short small bowel (eight of nine), urinary tract involvement (12 of 16), and myopathic histology (15 of 22). CONCLUSIONS: In CIIPS drugs are not helpful but decompression stomas are. Outcome was poor in 24 of 44 children (15 muscle disorder, 10 nerve disease).  (+info)

Systemic lupus erythematosus with a giant rectal ulcer and perforation. (3/295)

A 41-year-old man with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed pelvic inflammation due to perforation of a giant rectal ulcer is described. The patient presented with persistent diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever without development of disease activity of SLE. Endoscopic and radiological examinations revealed a perforated giant ulcer on the posterior wall at the rectum below the peritoneal evagination. The ulcerated area was decreased after a colostomy was performed at the transverse colon to preserve anal function. The patient is currently being monitored on an outpatient basis. It should be noted that life-threatening complications such as perforated ulcer of the intestinal tract could occur without SLE disease activity.  (+info)

Sacral chordoma--a case report. (4/295)

Chordoma, a rare malignant tumour of early adulthood, rarely presents in children. We report such a case of rare malignant tumour which was diagnosed in the first decade of life.  (+info)

Closure of colostomy. (5/295)

We analyzed the records of 77 cases of loop colostomy closure in Vietnam War Casualties. All records were complete from the date of injury to discharge following colostomy closure. Simple of the loop colostomy was performed in 44 patients and resection of the stoma and reanastomosis of bowel segments was performed in 33 patients. Average operating time for simple closure of the loop was 70 minutes compared to 115 minutes for resection and anastomosis. Nasogastric suction was used less frequently and for a shorter time with simple loop closure. The total postoperative complication rate was 9% with simple loop closure as compared to 24% for resection and anastomosis. Simple closure of the loop described in this report is technically easier and as safe as resection of the stoma and reanastomosis.  (+info)

Effect of elective abdominal surgery on human colon protein synthesis in situ. (6/295)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of elective abdominal surgery on the rate of human colon fractional protein synthesis in situ. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Efficient intestinal protein synthesis plays an important role in the physiology and pathophysiology of the intestinal tract, allowing preservation of gut integrity and thereby preventing bacterial or endotoxin translocation. Because of species differences, animal studies have only limited applicability to human intestinal protein metabolism, and because of methodologic restrictions, no studies on colon protein synthesis in situ are available in humans. METHODS: The authors used advanced mass spectrometry techniques (capillary gas chromatography and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry) to determine directly the incorporation rate of 1-[13C]-leucine into colon mucosal protein in control subjects and nonseptic postoperative patients. All subjects had a colostomy, which allowed easy access to the colon mucosa, and consecutive sampling from the same tissue was performed during continuous isotope infusion (0.16 micromol/kg per minute). RESULTS: Control subjects demonstrated a colon protein fractional synthetic rate of 0.74 +/- 0.09% per hour. In postsurgical patients, colon protein synthesis was significantly higher and the tissue free leucine enrichment was significantly lower, compatible with an increased colon proteolytic rate. CONCLUSIONS: Elective abdominal surgery followed by an uncomplicated postoperative course is associated with a stimulation of colon protein synthesis and possibly also of protein degradation. The postoperative rate of colon protein synthesis is, compared with other tissues, among the highest measured thus far in humans.  (+info)

Importance of the fecal stream on the induction of colon tumors by azoxymethane in rats. (7/295)

The effect of the fecal stream on intestinal carcinogenesis with azoxymethane was studied in male rats. Colostomies were performed approximately 2 cm distal to the cecum in 50 Sprague-Dawley rats to produce a 20-cm segment of nonfunctional large bowel; an additional 50 animals were left intact. Each of these groups was divided equally and was fed a normal diet or a diet containing 2% cholestyramine by weight. All animals were given azoxymethan s.c. At the end of 7 months all rats were sacrificed. The animals with colostomies developed significantly fewer tumors in the defunctionalized bowel than did intact animals in the same bowel segment. Cholestyramine appeared to increase the tumor yield in the large bowel of the intact animals but had no effect on the number of tumors in the defunctionalized bowel. Further, the intact animals on both dietary regimens developed a greater number of large tumors in the distal 20 cm of bowel. The results show that the fecal stream alters the carcinogenic activity of azoxymethane in the large bowel of the rat. It also appears that the carcinogen can reach its target tissue by a route other than the fecal stream.  (+info)

Gastrocolic and gastrojejunocolic fistulae: report of twelve cases and review of the literature. (8/295)

Seven gastrocolic and five gastrojejunocolic fistulae were recorded at Charity Hospital between 1940 and 1970. Such fistulae occurred in males more often than females. In this series, as in others, the most common cause was gastric surgery for peptic ulcer disease. Pain, diarrhea, and weight loss were clinical findings in half the patients; anemia, leukocytosis, electrolyte disturbances and hypoalbuminemia were common laboratory findings. A fistula was demonstrated radiologically in nine of the twelve patients, management of these patients included no operation (3); two-stage procedure (2); and one-stage procedure (7); with a recent trend toward the one-stage procedure. A case report of a fistula resulting from postoperative complications of perforative appendicitis in which a successful combination of hyperalimentation and diverting colostomy was used is presented.  (+info)

A colostomy is a surgical procedure that involves creating an opening, or stoma, through the abdominal wall to divert the flow of feces from the colon (large intestine) through this opening and into a pouch or bag worn outside the body. This procedure is typically performed when a portion of the colon has been removed due to disease or injury, such as cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, or trauma.

There are several types of colostomies, including end colostomy, loop colostomy, and double-barrel colostomy, which differ in terms of the location and configuration of the stoma. The type of colostomy performed will depend on the individual's medical condition and the specific goals of the surgery.

After a colostomy, patients will need to learn how to care for their stoma and manage their bowel movements using specialized equipment and techniques. With proper care and management, most people are able to lead active and fulfilling lives after a colostomy.

An ileostomy is a surgical procedure in which the end of the small intestine, called the ileum, is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall (stoma) to create a path for waste material to leave the body. This procedure is typically performed when there is damage or removal of the colon, rectum, or anal canal due to conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis), cancer, or trauma.

After an ileostomy, waste material from the small intestine exits the body through the stoma and collects in a pouch worn outside the body. The patient needs to empty the pouch regularly, typically every few hours, as the output is liquid or semi-liquid. Ileostomies can be temporary or permanent, depending on the underlying condition and the planned course of treatment. Proper care and management of the stoma and pouch are essential for maintaining good health and quality of life after an ileostomy.

A surgical stoma, also known simply as a stoma, is a surgically created opening on the surface of the body that allows for the passage of bodily waste. This procedure is typically performed when a person has a malfunctioning or diseased organ in the digestive or urinary system that cannot be effectively treated or repaired.

In a colostomy or ileostomy, which are common types of surgical stomas, a portion of the colon or small intestine is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall to create a new pathway for waste to exit the body. The stoma may be temporary or permanent, depending on the underlying condition and the success of any additional treatments.

After surgery, patients with a stoma will need to wear a pouching system to collect and contain the waste that is expelled through the stoma. This can take some getting used to, but with proper care and support, most people are able to adjust to life with a stoma and maintain a good quality of life.

"Sigmoid diseases" is not a widely recognized medical term. However, the sigmoid colon is a part of the large intestine, and it can be affected by various conditions such as:

1. Sigmoid diverticulitis: Inflammation or infection of small pouches (diverticula) that form on the wall of the sigmoid colon.
2. Sigmoid volvulus: Twisting of the sigmoid colon on itself, which can lead to obstruction and ischemia.
3. Sigmoid cancer: Malignant tumor arising from the epithelial cells lining the sigmoid colon.
4. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): Chronic inflammation of the intestine, including the sigmoid colon, that can lead to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss.
5. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): Functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and altered bowel habits, which can affect the sigmoid colon.

Therefore, "sigmoid diseases" could refer to any of these conditions or others that specifically affect the sigmoid colon.

Colonic diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the colon, also known as the large intestine or large bowel. The colon is the final segment of the digestive system, responsible for absorbing water and electrolytes, and storing and eliminating waste products.

Some common colonic diseases include:

1. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): This includes conditions such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which cause inflammation and irritation in the lining of the digestive tract.
2. Diverticular disease: This occurs when small pouches called diverticula form in the walls of the colon, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements.
3. Colorectal cancer: This is a type of cancer that develops in the colon or rectum, often starting as benign polyps that grow and become malignant over time.
4. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): This is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel movements, but without any underlying structural or inflammatory causes.
5. Constipation: This is a common condition characterized by infrequent bowel movements, difficulty passing stools, or both.
6. Infectious colitis: This occurs when the colon becomes infected with bacteria, viruses, or parasites, leading to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever.

Treatment for colonic diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include medications, lifestyle changes, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

A rectovaginal fistula is an abnormal connection or passage between the rectum (the lower end of the colon, leading to the anus) and the vagina. This type of fistula can result from various causes, such as childbirth injuries, surgery complications, Crohn's disease, radiation therapy, or infections. The condition may lead to symptoms like fecal matter passing through the vagina, recurrent vaginal infections, discomfort during sexual intercourse, and skin irritation around the vaginal area. Treatment options typically involve surgical repair of the fistula, depending on its size, location, and underlying cause.

The descending colon is a part of the large intestine in the human digestive system. It is called "descending" because it is located inferiorly and posteriorly to the transverse colon, and its direction goes downward as it continues toward the rectum. The descending colon receives digested food material from the transverse colon via the splenic flexure, also known as the left colic flexure.

The primary function of the descending colon is to absorb water, electrolytes, and any remaining nutrients from the undigested food materials that have passed through the small intestine. The descending colon also stores this waste material temporarily before it moves into the rectum for eventual elimination from the body.

The descending colon's wall contains a layer of smooth muscle, which helps propel the waste material along the gastrointestinal tract via peristalsis. Additionally, the inner mucosal lining of the descending colon contains numerous goblet cells that produce and secrete mucus to lubricate the passage of stool and protect the intestinal wall from irritation or damage caused by waste materials.

In summary, the medical definition of 'Colon, Descending' refers to a section of the large intestine responsible for absorbing water and electrolytes while storing and eliminating waste materials through peristaltic movements and mucus secretion.

The rectum is the lower end of the digestive tract, located between the sigmoid colon and the anus. It serves as a storage area for feces before they are eliminated from the body. The rectum is about 12 cm long in adults and is surrounded by layers of muscle that help control defecation. The mucous membrane lining the rectum allows for the detection of stool, which triggers the reflex to have a bowel movement.

Fournier gangrene is a type of necrotizing fasciitis, which is a severe soft tissue infection that involves the fascia (the layer of connective tissue covering the muscle). Fournier gangrene specifically affects the genital region and can spread to the abdominal wall or thighs. It's characterized by rapid progression, extensive tissue damage, and a high mortality rate if not treated promptly with surgical debridement (removal of dead tissue) and antibiotics. The infection typically involves multiple types of bacteria, both aerobic and anaerobic, and can arise from various sources such as urinary tract infections, anal abscesses, or trauma to the genital area.

Rectal diseases refer to conditions that affect the structure or function of the rectum, which is the lower end of the large intestine, just above the anus. The rectum serves as a storage area for stool before it is eliminated from the body. Some common rectal diseases include:

1. Hemorrhoids: Swollen veins in the rectum or anus that can cause pain, itching, bleeding, and discomfort.
2. Rectal cancer: Abnormal growth of cells in the rectum that can invade and destroy nearby tissue and spread to other parts of the body.
3. Anal fissures: Small tears in the lining of the anus that can cause pain, bleeding, and itching.
4. Rectal prolapse: A condition where the rectum slips outside the anus, causing discomfort, fecal incontinence, and other symptoms.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): A group of chronic inflammatory conditions that affect the digestive tract, including the rectum, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
6. Rectal abscess: A collection of pus in the rectum caused by an infection, which can cause pain, swelling, and fever.
7. Fistula-in-ano: An abnormal connection between the rectum and the skin around the anus, which can cause drainage of pus or stool.
8. Rectal foreign bodies: Objects that are accidentally or intentionally inserted into the rectum and can cause injury, infection, or obstruction.

These are just a few examples of rectal diseases, and there are many other conditions that can affect the rectum. If you experience any symptoms related to the rectum, it is important to seek medical attention from a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

The sigmoid colon is a part of the large intestine that forms an "S"-shaped curve before it joins the rectum. It gets its name from its unique shape, which resembles the Greek letter sigma (σ). The main function of the sigmoid colon is to store stool temporarily and assist in the absorption of water and electrolytes from digestive waste before it is eliminated from the body.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Neodymium" is not a medical term. It is a chemical element with the symbol Nd and atomic number 60. Neodymium is a rare-earth metal that has been used in various industrial and technological applications, such as magnets, lasers, and glass coloration. It is not directly related to medical terminology or healthcare.

Intestinal volvulus is a serious medical condition that occurs when a segment of the intestine twists around itself, cutting off its blood supply. This can lead to tissue death and perforation of the intestine if not promptly treated. Intestinal volvulus can occur in any part of the intestine but is most common in the colon, particularly in the sigmoid colon.

Volvulus can be caused by a variety of factors, including congenital abnormalities, adhesions from previous surgeries, and conditions that cause the intestines to become mobile or elongated. Symptoms of intestinal volvulus may include severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating, and constipation. In some cases, a physical examination or imaging tests such as X-rays or CT scans may be used to diagnose the condition.

Treatment for intestinal volvulus typically involves surgery to untwist the intestine and restore blood flow. In some cases, a portion of the intestine may need to be removed if it has been damaged beyond repair. Preventative measures such as avoiding constipation and seeking prompt medical attention for abdominal pain can help reduce the risk of developing intestinal volvulus.

Intestinal obstruction, also known as bowel obstruction, is a medical condition characterized by a blockage that prevents the normal flow of contents through the small intestine or large intestine (colon). This blockage can be caused by various factors such as tumors, adhesions (scar tissue), hernias, inflammation, or impacted feces.

The obstruction can be mechanical, where something physically blocks the intestinal lumen, or functional, where the normal muscular contractions of the bowel are impaired. Mechanical obstructions are more common than functional ones.

Symptoms of intestinal obstruction may include abdominal pain and cramping, nausea and vomiting, bloating, inability to pass gas or have a bowel movement, and abdominal distention. If left untreated, intestinal obstruction can lead to serious complications such as tissue death (necrosis), perforation of the intestine, and sepsis. Treatment typically involves hospitalization, intravenous fluids, nasogastric decompression, and possibly surgery to remove the obstruction.

Surgical anastomosis is a medical procedure that involves the connection of two tubular structures, such as blood vessels or intestines, to create a continuous passage. This technique is commonly used in various types of surgeries, including vascular, gastrointestinal, and orthopedic procedures.

During a surgical anastomosis, the ends of the two tubular structures are carefully prepared by removing any damaged or diseased tissue. The ends are then aligned and joined together using sutures, staples, or other devices. The connection must be secure and leak-free to ensure proper function and healing.

The success of a surgical anastomosis depends on several factors, including the patient's overall health, the location and condition of the structures being joined, and the skill and experience of the surgeon. Complications such as infection, bleeding, or leakage can occur, which may require additional medical intervention or surgery.

Proper postoperative care is also essential to ensure the success of a surgical anastomosis. This may include monitoring for signs of complications, administering medications to prevent infection and promote healing, and providing adequate nutrition and hydration.

Diverticulitis, Colonic is a medical condition characterized by the inflammation or infection of one or more diverticula in the colon. Diverticula are small, bulging pouches that form in the wall of the colon, usually in older adults. They are caused by increased pressure on weakened areas of the colon wall, resulting in the formation of these sac-like protrusions.

When diverticula become inflamed or infected, it leads to the condition known as diverticulitis. Symptoms of colonic diverticulitis may include abdominal pain, fever, nausea, vomiting, constipation or diarrhea, and a decreased appetite. In severe cases, complications such as perforation, abscess formation, or peritonitis (inflammation of the lining of the abdominal cavity) may occur, requiring hospitalization and surgical intervention.

The exact cause of diverticulitis is not fully understood, but it is believed to be associated with a low-fiber diet, obesity, smoking, and lack of exercise. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to clear the infection, a liquid diet to allow the colon to rest, and over-the-counter or prescription pain medications to manage discomfort. In severe cases or in patients who experience recurrent episodes of diverticulitis, surgery may be necessary to remove the affected portion of the colon.

Rectal prolapse is a medical condition where the rectum, which is the lower end of the colon, slips outside the anus, the opening through which stool leaves the body. This usually occurs due to weakened muscles and supporting structures in the pelvic area, often as a result of aging, childbirth, or long-term constipation or diarrhea.

The rectal prolapse can be partial, where only a small portion of the rectum slips outside the anus, or complete, where the entire rectum protrudes. This condition can cause discomfort, pain, bleeding, and difficulty with bowel movements. Treatment options may include dietary changes, medication, or surgical intervention.

Gangrene is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that occurs when there is a loss of blood flow to a specific area of the body, resulting in tissue death. It can be caused by various factors such as bacterial infections, trauma, diabetes, vascular diseases, and smoking. The affected tissues may become discolored, swollen, and emit a foul odor due to the accumulation of bacteria and toxins.

Gangrene can be classified into two main types: dry gangrene and wet (or moist) gangrene. Dry gangrene develops slowly and is often associated with peripheral arterial disease, which reduces blood flow to the extremities. The affected area turns black and shriveled as it dries out. Wet gangrene, on the other hand, progresses rapidly due to bacterial infections that cause tissue breakdown and pus formation. This type of gangrene can spread quickly throughout the body, leading to severe complications such as sepsis and organ failure if left untreated.

Treatment for gangrene typically involves surgical removal of the dead tissue (debridement), antibiotics to control infections, and sometimes revascularization procedures to restore blood flow to the affected area. In severe cases where the infection has spread or the damage is irreversible, amputation of the affected limb may be necessary to prevent further complications and save the patient's life.

Intestinal perforation is a medical condition that refers to a hole or tear in the lining of the intestine. This can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, including the small intestine, large intestine (colon), or stomach. Intestinal perforation allows the contents of the intestines, such as digestive enzymes and bacteria, to leak into the abdominal cavity, which can lead to a serious inflammatory response known as peritonitis.

Intestinal perforation can be caused by various factors, including:

* Mechanical trauma (e.g., gunshot wounds, stab wounds)
* Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis)
* Diverticulitis
* Appendicitis
* Intestinal obstruction
* Infections (e.g., typhoid fever, tuberculosis)
* Certain medications (e.g., nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids)
* Radiation therapy
* Ischemic bowel disease (lack of blood flow to the intestines)

Symptoms of intestinal perforation may include sudden abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, and decreased bowel movements. Treatment typically involves surgery to repair the perforation and remove any damaged tissue. Antibiotics are also administered to prevent infection. In severe cases, a temporary or permanent colostomy or ileostomy may be necessary.

The colon, also known as the large intestine, is a part of the digestive system in humans and other vertebrates. It is an organ that eliminates waste from the body and is located between the small intestine and the rectum. The main function of the colon is to absorb water and electrolytes from digested food, forming and storing feces until they are eliminated through the anus.

The colon is divided into several regions, including the cecum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, rectum, and anus. The walls of the colon contain a layer of muscle that helps to move waste material through the organ by a process called peristalsis.

The inner surface of the colon is lined with mucous membrane, which secretes mucus to lubricate the passage of feces. The colon also contains a large population of bacteria, known as the gut microbiota, which play an important role in digestion and immunity.

The anal canal is the terminal portion of the digestive tract, located between the rectum and the anus. It is a short tube-like structure that is about 1 to 1.5 inches long in adults. The main function of the anal canal is to provide a seal for the elimination of feces from the body while also preventing the leakage of intestinal contents.

The inner lining of the anal canal is called the mucosa, which is kept moist by the production of mucus. The walls of the anal canal contain specialized muscles that help control the passage of stool during bowel movements. These muscles include the internal and external sphincters, which work together to maintain continence and allow for the voluntary release of feces.

The anal canal is an important part of the digestive system and plays a critical role in maintaining bowel function and overall health.

Imperforate anus is a congenital condition in which the opening of the anus is absent or abnormally closed or narrowed, preventing the normal passage of stool. This results in a blockage in the digestive tract and can lead to serious health complications if not treated promptly.

The anus is the external opening of the rectum, which is the lower end of the digestive tract. During fetal development, the rectum and anus normally connect through a canal called the anal canal or the recto-anal canal. In imperforate anus, this canal may be completely closed or narrowed, or it may not form properly.

Imperforate anus can occur as an isolated condition or as part of a genetic syndrome or other congenital abnormalities. The exact cause is not fully understood, but it is believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Treatment for imperforate anus typically involves surgery to create an opening in the anus and restore normal bowel function. In some cases, additional procedures may be necessary to correct related abnormalities or complications. The prognosis for individuals with imperforate anus depends on the severity of the condition and any associated abnormalities. With prompt and appropriate treatment, most people with imperforate anus can lead normal lives.

Penetrating wounds are a type of traumatic injury that occurs when an object pierces through the skin and underlying tissues, creating a hole or cavity in the body. These wounds can vary in severity, depending on the size and shape of the object, as well as the location and depth of the wound.

Penetrating wounds are typically caused by sharp objects such as knives, bullets, or glass. They can damage internal organs, blood vessels, nerves, and bones, leading to serious complications such as bleeding, infection, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly and properly.

The management of penetrating wounds involves a thorough assessment of the wound and surrounding tissues, as well as the identification and treatment of any associated injuries or complications. This may include wound cleaning and closure, antibiotics to prevent infection, pain management, and surgery to repair damaged structures. In some cases, hospitalization and close monitoring may be necessary to ensure proper healing and recovery.

The digestive system is a series of organs that work together to convert food into nutrients and energy. Digestive system surgical procedures involve operations on any part of the digestive system, including the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, pancreas, and gallbladder. These procedures can be performed for a variety of reasons, such as to treat diseases, repair damage, or remove cancerous growths.

Some common digestive system surgical procedures include:

1. Gastric bypass surgery: A procedure in which the stomach is divided into two parts and the smaller part is connected directly to the small intestine, bypassing a portion of the stomach and upper small intestine. This procedure is used to treat severe obesity.
2. Colonoscopy: A procedure in which a flexible tube with a camera on the end is inserted into the rectum and colon to examine the lining for polyps, cancer, or other abnormalities.
3. Colectomy: A procedure in which all or part of the colon is removed, often due to cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, or diverticulitis.
4. Gastrostomy: A procedure in which a hole is made through the abdominal wall and into the stomach to create an opening for feeding. This is often done for patients who have difficulty swallowing.
5. Esophagectomy: A procedure in which all or part of the esophagus is removed, often due to cancer. The remaining esophagus is then reconnected to the stomach or small intestine.
6. Liver resection: A procedure in which a portion of the liver is removed, often due to cancer or other diseases.
7. Pancreatectomy: A procedure in which all or part of the pancreas is removed, often due to cancer or chronic pancreatitis.
8. Cholecystectomy: A procedure in which the gallbladder is removed, often due to gallstones or inflammation.

These are just a few examples of digestive system surgical procedures. There are many other types of operations that can be performed on the digestive system depending on the specific needs and condition of each patient.

Anus neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the anus, which is the opening at the end of the digestive tract where solid waste leaves the body. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Common types of anus neoplasms include squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and melanoma.

Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of anus cancer, accounting for about 80% of all cases. It begins in the squamous cells that line the anal canal and can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated.

Adenocarcinoma is a less common type of anus cancer that arises from glandular cells in the anus. This type of cancer is often associated with long-standing inflammatory conditions, such as anal fistulas or ulcerative colitis.

Melanoma is a rare form of skin cancer that can also occur in the anus. It develops from pigment-producing cells called melanocytes and tends to be aggressive with a high risk of spreading to other parts of the body.

Other less common types of anus neoplasms include basal cell carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. Treatment options for anus neoplasms depend on the type, stage, and location of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health.

The perineum is the region between the anus and the genitals. In anatomical terms, it refers to the diamond-shaped area located in the lower part of the pelvis and extends from the coccyx (tailbone) to the pubic symphysis, which is the joint in the front where the two pubic bones meet. This region contains various muscles that support the pelvic floor and contributes to maintaining urinary and fecal continence. The perineum can be further divided into two triangular regions: the urogenital triangle (anterior) and the anal triangle (posterior).

Rectal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the tissues of the rectum, which can be benign or malignant. They are characterized by uncontrolled cell division and can invade nearby tissues or spread to other parts of the body (metastasis). The most common type of rectal neoplasm is rectal cancer, which often begins as a small polyp or growth in the lining of the rectum. Other types of rectal neoplasms include adenomas, carcinoids, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Regular screenings are recommended for early detection and treatment of rectal neoplasms.

Surgical staplers are medical devices used in various surgical procedures to create secure and precise connections between tissues, vessels, or organs. They function by placing sterile, disposable staple cartridges into the device that contain rows of stainless steel staples. The stapler then applies pressure to deform the staples, forming a B-shaped staple line that holds the tissue together.

These devices are often used in place of traditional suturing methods due to their speed, accuracy, and ability to reduce surgical trauma. They can be employed in various types of surgeries, including gastrointestinal, thoracic, gynecologic, and orthopedic procedures.

Surgical staplers come in different shapes and sizes, with some designed for specific applications such as linear or circular stapling. Linear staplers are used to create straight lines of staples, while circular staplers form a ring-shaped connection, often used in anastomosis procedures (the joining of two hollow organs or vessels).

It is essential to follow proper techniques and indications when using surgical staplers, as improper usage can lead to complications such as bleeding, infection, leakage, or even tissue necrosis.

An enema is a medical procedure in which liquid is introduced into the lower part of the large intestine, specifically the sigmoid colon or rectum, through the anus using a special device called an enema kit. The liquid used can be plain water, saline solution, or a medicated solution, and it is typically retained for a short period of time before being expelled.

The purpose of an enema may vary, but it is often used to relieve constipation, prepare the bowel for medical procedures such as colonoscopy, or administer medications or nutrients that cannot be taken by mouth. Enemas can also be used for therapeutic purposes, such as to stimulate the immune system or promote relaxation.

It is important to follow proper instructions when administering an enema to avoid injury or discomfort. Possible side effects of enemas may include cramping, bloating, nausea, or electrolyte imbalances. If you have any health concerns or conditions that may be affected by an enema, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before using one.

Abdominal wound closure techniques refer to the methods used to close and repair surgical incisions in the abdomen. The goal of these techniques is to restore the integrity of the abdominal wall, minimize the risk of infection or dehiscence (wound separation), and promote optimal healing. Several abdominal wound closure techniques are available, and the choice of which one to use depends on various factors such as the size and location of the incision, the patient's individual needs and medical history, and the surgeon's preference. Here are some commonly used abdominal wound closure techniques:

1. Continuous running suture: This technique involves using a continuous strand of suture material to close the wound in a single pass. The suture is inserted through the full thickness of the abdominal wall, including the fascia (the strong connective tissue that surrounds the muscles), and then passed continuously along the length of the incision, pulling the edges of the wound together as it goes. This technique can be faster and more efficient than other methods, but it may increase the risk of infection or wound breakdown if not done properly.
2. Interrupted suture: In this technique, the surgeon uses individual stitches placed at regular intervals along the incision to close the wound. Each stitch is tied separately, which can make the closure more secure and reduce the risk of infection or wound breakdown. However, interrupted sutures can be more time-consuming than continuous running sutures.
3. Mass closure: This technique involves using a large, continuous suture to close the entire length of the incision in one pass. The suture is inserted through the full thickness of the abdominal wall and tied at both ends, pulling the edges of the wound together. Mass closure can be faster and more efficient than other methods, but it may increase the risk of infection or wound breakdown if not done properly.
4. Retention sutures: These are additional sutures that are placed deep within the abdominal wall to provide extra support and strength to the closure. They are often used in high-tension areas or in patients who are at increased risk of wound dehiscence, such as those with obesity or diabetes.
5. Layered closure: In this technique, the surgeon closes the incision in multiple layers, starting with the deepest layer of muscle and fascia and working outward to the skin. Each layer is closed separately using either interrupted or continuous sutures. Layered closure can provide added strength and stability to the closure, but it can be more time-consuming than other methods.
6. Skin closure: The final step in wound closure is to close the skin, which can be done using a variety of techniques, including staples, sutures, or surgical glue. The choice of closure method depends on several factors, including the size and location of the incision, the patient's individual needs and preferences, and the surgeon's experience and expertise.

Overall, the choice of wound closure technique depends on several factors, including the size and location of the incision, the patient's individual needs and preferences, and the surgeon's experience and expertise. The goal is to provide a strong, secure, and cosmetically appealing closure that minimizes the risk of infection, wound breakdown, or other complications.

Therapeutic irrigation, also known as lavage, is a medical procedure that involves the introduction of fluids or other agents into a body cavity or natural passageway for therapeutic purposes. This technique is used to cleanse, flush out, or introduce medication into various parts of the body, such as the bladder, lungs, stomach, or colon.

The fluid used in therapeutic irrigation can be sterile saline solution, distilled water, or a medicated solution, depending on the specific purpose of the procedure. The flow and pressure of the fluid are carefully controlled to ensure that it reaches the desired area without causing damage to surrounding tissues.

Therapeutic irrigation is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including infections, inflammation, obstructions, and toxic exposures. It can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help identify abnormalities or lesions within body cavities.

Overall, therapeutic irrigation is a valuable technique in modern medicine that allows healthcare providers to deliver targeted treatment directly to specific areas of the body, improving patient outcomes and quality of life.

Hirschsprung disease is a gastrointestinal disorder that affects the large intestine, specifically the section known as the colon. This condition is congenital, meaning it is present at birth. It occurs due to the absence of ganglion cells (nerve cells) in the bowel's muscular wall, which are responsible for coordinating muscle contractions that move food through the digestive tract.

The affected segment of the colon cannot relax and propel the contents within it, leading to various symptoms such as constipation, intestinal obstruction, or even bowel perforation in severe cases. Common diagnostic methods include rectal suction biopsy, anorectal manometry, and contrast enema studies. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the aganglionic segment and reattachment of the normal colon to the anus (known as a pull-through procedure).

Sigmoid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the sigmoid colon, which is the lower portion of the large intestine that extends from the descending colon to the rectum. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms, such as adenomas, are typically removed through a polypectomy during a colonoscopy to prevent their potential transformation into malignant tumors. Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, are often referred to as sigmoid colon cancers and can be classified into different types based on their cellular origin, such as adenocarcinomas, lymphomas, carcinoids, or sarcomas.

Adenocarcinomas are the most common type of sigmoid neoplasm, accounting for more than 95% of all cases. These tumors originate from the glandular cells lining the colon's inner surface and can invade surrounding tissues, leading to local spread or distant metastasis if left untreated. Early detection and removal of sigmoid neoplasms significantly improve treatment outcomes and overall prognosis.

A colectomy is a surgical procedure in which all or part of the large intestine (colon) is removed. This surgery may be performed to treat or prevent various medical conditions, including colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, and severe obstructions or injuries of the colon.

There are several types of colectomies, depending on how much of the colon is removed:

* Total colectomy: Removal of the entire colon.
* Partial colectomy: Removal of a portion of the colon.
* Hemicolectomy: Removal of one half of the colon.
* Sigmoidectomy: Removal of the sigmoid colon, which is the part of the colon that is closest to the rectum.

After the affected portion of the colon is removed, the remaining ends of the intestine are reconnected, allowing stool to pass through the digestive system as usual. In some cases, a temporary or permanent colostomy may be necessary, in which a surgical opening (stoma) is created in the abdominal wall and the end of the colon is attached to it, allowing stool to be collected in a pouch outside the body.

Colectomies are major surgeries that require general anesthesia and hospitalization. The recovery time can vary depending on the type of colectomy performed and the individual's overall health, but typically ranges from several weeks to a few months. Complications of colectomy may include bleeding, infection, leakage from the surgical site, bowel obstruction, and changes in bowel habits or function.

A cecostomy is a surgical procedure that creates an opening from the colon (large intestine) to the abdominal wall, specifically through the cecum which is the first part of the large intestine. This opening allows for the introduction of a tube or catheter into the colon to help with decompression, irrigation, or medication delivery in individuals with certain gastrointestinal conditions such as chronic constipation or fecal incontinence. It's important to note that this procedure is not commonly performed due to advancements in alternative treatments and potential complications associated with cecostomy.

A diverticulum of the colon is a small sac or pouch that forms in the wall of the large intestine (colon). These sacs usually develop in areas where the blood vessels pass through the muscle layer of the colon, creating a weak spot that eventually bulges outward. Diverticula can occur anywhere along the length of the colon, but they are most commonly found in the lower part of the colon, also known as the sigmoid colon.

Diverticula themselves are not harmful and often do not cause any symptoms. However, when these sacs become inflamed or infected, it can lead to a condition called diverticulitis, which can cause pain, fever, nausea, vomiting, constipation, or diarrhea. Diverticulitis is usually treated with antibiotics and a liquid diet, but in severe cases, surgery may be required.

Risk factors for developing colonic diverticula include aging, obesity, smoking, low fiber intake, and lack of physical activity. Regular screening is recommended for individuals over the age of 50 to detect and prevent complications associated with diverticular disease.

Proctoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a proctoscope, which is a short, rigid telescope with a light, into the rectum for the purpose of examining the interior walls of the rectum and anus. This procedure can help diagnose various anal and rectal conditions such as hemorrhoids, fissures, inflammation, tumors, or other abnormalities.

The proctoscope is usually about 25 cm long and has a diameter of around 2 cm. It allows the medical professional to directly visualize the interior of the lower rectum and anus, and may also include a channel for the introduction of air or water to aid in the examination, as well as tools for taking biopsies or removing polyps if necessary.

Proctoscopy is typically performed on an outpatient basis and does not usually require any special preparation, although it may be recommended to avoid food and drink for a few hours before the procedure to minimize the risk of discomfort or complications. The procedure itself is generally quick and relatively painless, though patients may experience some mild discomfort, bloating, or cramping during or after the examination.

An ostomy is a surgical procedure that creates an opening (a stoma) in the abdominal wall through which the function of an impaired digestive or urinary organ can be performed. This procedure is often necessary for patients with certain diseases such as cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, or birth defects that prevent normal bodily functions.

There are several types of ostomies, including colostomy, ileostomy, and urostomy. A colostomy involves creating a stoma from the colon (large intestine), an ileostomy involves creating a stoma from the ileum (the last part of the small intestine), and a urostomy involves creating a stoma for the urinary system.

After the ostomy procedure, patients will need to wear a pouching system to collect waste that is expelled through the stoma. With proper care and management, most people with an ostomy can lead active and fulfilling lives.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

A rectal fistula is an abnormal connection or tunnel that develops between the rectum, which is the lower end of the colon, and another organ or the skin surface surrounding the anus. This condition often results from inflammation, infection, trauma, or surgery in the anal area. The fistula can cause symptoms such as pain, discharge, irritation, and swelling around the anus. In some cases, it may also lead to complications like abscesses or recurrent infections if not treated promptly and effectively. Treatment options typically include surgical intervention to close the fistula and promote healing of the affected tissues.

A prolapse is a medical condition where an organ or tissue in the body slips from its normal position and drops down into a lower part of the body. This usually occurs when the muscles and ligaments that support the organ become weak or stretched. The most common types of prolapses include:

* Uterine prolapse: When the uterus slips down into or protrudes out of the vagina.
* Rectal prolapse: When the rectum (the lower end of the colon) slips outside the anus.
* Bladder prolapse (cystocele): When the bladder drops into the vagina.
* Small bowel prolapse (enterocele): When the small intestine bulges into the vagina.

Prolapses can cause various symptoms, such as discomfort, pain, pressure, and difficulty with urination or bowel movements. Treatment options depend on the severity of the prolapse and may include lifestyle changes, physical therapy, medication, or surgery.

Microfilament proteins are a type of structural protein that form part of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. They are made up of actin monomers, which polymerize to form long, thin filaments. These filaments are involved in various cellular processes such as muscle contraction, cell division, and cell motility. Microfilament proteins also interact with other cytoskeletal components like intermediate filaments and microtubules to maintain the overall shape and integrity of the cell. Additionally, they play a crucial role in the formation of cell-cell junctions and cell-matrix adhesions, which are essential for tissue structure and function.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "England" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom, along with Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. England is located in the southern part of Great Britain, which is the largest island of the British Isles.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) are a group of chronic inflammatory conditions primarily affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The two main types of IBD are Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

Crohn's disease can cause inflammation in any part of the digestive system, from the mouth to the anus, but it most commonly affects the lower part of the small intestine (the ileum) and/or the colon. The inflammation caused by Crohn's disease often spreads deep into the layers of affected bowel tissue.

Ulcerative colitis, on the other hand, is limited to the colon, specifically the innermost lining of the colon. It causes long-lasting inflammation and sores (ulcers) in the lining of the large intestine (colon) and rectum.

Symptoms can vary depending on the severity and location of inflammation but often include abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, and reduced appetite. IBD is not the same as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which is a functional gastrointestinal disorder.

The exact cause of IBD remains unknown, but it's thought to be a combination of genetic factors, an abnormal immune response, and environmental triggers. There is no cure for IBD, but treatments can help manage symptoms and reduce inflammation, potentially leading to long-term remission.

Types of colostomy include: Loop colostomy: This type of colostomy is usually used in emergencies and is a temporary and large ... Jones and Kehm preferred tissue paper as a colostomy cover (held in place with a band or garment) rather than a colostomy bag. ... "Colostomy irrigation: Colostomy Guide" (PDF). United Ostomy Associations of America. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 ... "Colostomy irrigation: A personal account managing colostomy" (PDF). Ostomy. Retrieved 7 September 2012. Wax, Arnold. "What is ...
A colostomy reversal, also known as a colostomy takedown, is a reversal of the colostomy process by which the colon is ... Colostomy General Surgery Schmelzer, T. M.; Hope, W. W.; Iannitti, D. A.; Kercher, K. W.; Heniford, B. T. (December 2006). " ... and herniation at the colostomy site. The technical aspects of the surgery depend on the amount of remaining colon and rectum. ... "Laparoscopic colostomy takedown offers advantages over traditional surgery". J Minim Access Surg. 2 (4): 201-2. doi:10.4103/ ...
"Tidings Magazines". Colostomy Association. "Stoma Aid". Colostomy Association. Colostomy Association homepage (CS1: long volume ... The Colostomy Association is a British health charity that began in 1967 as the Colostomy Welfare Group. It became the ... The Colostomy Welfare Group was later rebranded in 1989 as the 'British Colostomy Association' and in the following year moved ... The predecessor of the Colostomy Association was the Colostomy Welfare Group, formed in 1967 by Frances Goodall and Gertrude ...
After colostomy, the distal section of bowel continues to produce mucus despite fecal diversion, often resulting in mucinous ... When the fecal stream is diverted as part of a colostomy, a condition called diversion colitis may develop in the section of ... "About rectal discharge" (PDF). Colostomy association. Feigen, GM (August 1987). "Suppurative anal cryptitis associated with ...
Stapled transanal local excision (STARR) (has been used for SRUS with internal prolapse). Diversion colostomy. Transanal ...
"Colostomy Guide". January 4, 2006. Retrieved September 10, 2007. Suarez, F.L.; Furne, J.K.; Springfield, J.R.; Levitt, M.D. ( ...
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" "Day for Night" (Quarter Master Mix) "Indigo" (Damn! Colostomy Jam! - All Seeing I Mix) "The Flipside" (Swag Numbskull Vocal ...
"Colostomy irrigation: Colostomy Guide" (PDF). United Ostomy Associations of America. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 ... "Colostomy irrigation: A personal account managing colostomy" (PDF). Ostomy. Retrieved 7 September 2012. Wax, Arnold. "What is ... People with colostomies who have ostomies of the sigmoid colon or descending colon may have the option of irrigation, which ... People with colostomies must wear an ostomy pouching system to collect intestinal waste. Ordinarily the pouch must be emptied ...
and "Colostomy Bag" respectively. All three videos are directed by Dan Gedman. ""Spit It Out" Music Video Premiere at MTV.com ... "Brotha Lynch Hung "Colostomy Bag" - Director's Cut". Strange Music Inc. 2011-03-08. Archived from the original on 2021-12-15. ...
... he underwent a colostomy for cancer; Mougouch had an affair with Roberto Matta. In 1948, Gorky's neck was broken and his ...
Barrie, Barbara (1997). Second Act: Life After Colostomy and Other Adventures. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 978-0-684-83587-7. ... ISBN 978-0-684-84624-8. Phiffer, Cindy (May-June 1998). "Barbara Barrie - Colostomy and Other Adventures". Coping with Cancer. ... Barrie, Barbara (March 18, 1999). Don't Die of Embarrassment: Life After Colostomy and Other Adventures. Scribner. ...
While in the hospital for that beating, Johnny discovers he is HIV positive; he also undergoes a colostomy operation. Johnny is ...
In 1967 she was a founder of the Colostomy Welfare Group with Gertrude Swithenbank. This would become the Colostomy Association ... was a British nurse who was General Secretary of the Royal College of Nursing and a founder of what became the Colostomy ...
He did much to popularize colostomy. A successful operator, he nevertheless was attached to conservative surgery, and was ...
He also undergoes a colostomy operation. Unlike Bubbles he shows no interest in giving up his addiction and continues thievery ... and various other scams with Bubbles, despite carrying a colostomy bag. In the season three finale he dies from an overdose. ...
Emily Brain, General Secretary, Colostomy Welfare Group. Mary Hunter Brodie. For services to the Royal British Legion in ...
He was an early advocate of inguinal colostomy. He suggested in 1882 that having multiple rectal polyps could be familial. ...
Colostomy is always safer, but places a societal, psychological and physical burden on the patient. The choice is by no means ... or creating a colostomy. Several factors are taken into account, including: Circumstances of the operation (elective vs ... or Mikulicz colostomy, which is preferred because it makes "takedown" (reoperation to restore normal intestinal continuity by ... When a sigmoidectomy is followed by terminal colostomy and closure of the rectal stump, it is called a Hartmann operation; this ...
The Times, Ida (29 July 2022). "MCC chairman is caught out after colostomy bag gaffe". The Times. Jones, Huw (29 June 2023). " ...
After the surgery, he had to use a colostomy bag. He was focused on enjoying the small things in life through his videos, a ...
A variety of potential problems and complications can occur, including need for long-term colostomy or vesicostomy. In many ... A variety of potential problems and complications can occur, including need for long-term colostomy or vesicostomy. Creating a ... Functional problems can warrant a temporary or long-term colostomy. The added challenge for the most severely affected genetic ... Repair may involve closure of the bladder, closure of the anterior abdominal wall, colostomy (temporary or permanent) with ...
In 2017, Fowler underwent treatment for anal cancer which required him to use a colostomy bag; however this did not stop him ... Harby, Jennifer (19 May 2023). "Colostomy bag climber makes first ascent of Kerry sea stack". BBC. Retrieved 30 July 2023. ... "Derbyshire climber who uses colostomy bag to lead Himalayas trip". BBC. 26 March 2019. Retrieved 30 July 2023. ...
Simple Anterior Closure of Transverse Colostomy (Right Side); Right side colostomies less frequent than left side colostomies; ... Abdominal Colostomy Closure - Pauchet Method, case of well-functioning colostomy of double loop type located on left side in ... Intra-Abdominal Colostomy Closures (Right and Left Side), series of right sided colostomy cases; factors essential to adequate ... Colostomy Closure (End-to-End Anastomosis), surgical repair of left upper abdominal colostomy (13 min). PMF 5002 (1947) - ...
In 1915 Debussy underwent one of the earliest colostomy operations. It achieved only a temporary respite, and occasioned him ...
There's no sex appeal if you use a colostomy bag". On 13 February 2012, 360 and Crystal Bale became engaged; the pair then ... The first thing I checked once I woke up was I didn't need to use a colostomy bag. My sex life is intact. ...
Colostomies were ordered for all colon wounds. This practice proved to be a very important advance, although we now know that ...
In 1969, he underwent a major surgery and got a colostomy. Also like Chico, Islas lived in San Francisco; he also used his ...
For services to the community, especially to the Colostomy Rehabilitation Association. Florence Harriet Jukes-Heley, of Eden ...
Phil inserts his penis into Hanger's leaking colostomy. Russell and Hanger get their revenge on Phil at the junkyard, knocking ...
Types of colostomy include: Loop colostomy: This type of colostomy is usually used in emergencies and is a temporary and large ... Jones and Kehm preferred tissue paper as a colostomy cover (held in place with a band or garment) rather than a colostomy bag. ... "Colostomy irrigation: Colostomy Guide" (PDF). United Ostomy Associations of America. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 ... "Colostomy irrigation: A personal account managing colostomy" (PDF). Ostomy. Retrieved 7 September 2012. Wax, Arnold. "What is ...
Tips for coping with your stoma after colostomy, ileostomy or urostomy surgery. ... Colostomy. Colostomy. In some cases, after the surgeon removes a portion of the colon, it may be necessary to attach the ... Can you go back to work after colostomy? Can you ride your bike if you have an ileostomy? Will everyone figure out youve had ... Ostomy: Adapting to life after colostomy, ileostomy or urostomy. Learn all you can about life with an ostomy. Use this ...
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... colostomy and ileostomy - Removing a section of the bowel, normally to treat cancer.. Choose Spire Manchester Hospital. ... Bowel surgery, colostomy and ileostomy at Spire Manchester Hospital. Removing a section of the bowel, normally to treat cancer. ... If the two ends of the bowel cannot be rejoined, you may need a colostomy (a procedure to divert one end of your colon through ... Colostomies and ileostomies may be temporary, allowing your bowel time to heal after an operation. Once healed, the procedure ...
... stump closure and colostomy formation in a left lower quadrant perforated sigmoid bowel resection. ... Resection with Colostomy. This medical illustration series features four laparotomy views of the male abdomen revealing the ... abdomen, all, back, backbone, backs, below, bone, bones, bowel, bowels, colic, colon, colonic, colostomies, colostomy, column, ... Large Bowel Surgery - Resection with Colostomy. This medical illustration series features four laparotomy views of the male ...
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The emerging patient-led revolution of early colostomy following spinal cord injury. Journal of Clinical Nursing. (In Press) ... Journal of Clinical Nursing - 2023 - Boucher - The emerging patient‐led revolution of early colostomy following spinal cord.pdf ... The emerging patient-led revolution of early colostomy following spinal cord injury. ...
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Advanced Colostomy Care. It is aimed at anyone needing to develop the underpinning knowledge of Advanced Colostomy care ...
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  • Colostomy or ileostomy is now rarely performed for rectal cancer, with surgeons usually preferring primary resection and internal anastomosis, e.g. an ileo-anal pouch. (wikipedia.org)
  • If you have a colostomy or ileostomy, you'll find that various foods affect your digestive tract differently. (mayoclinic.org)
  • At the University of Chicago Medicine, our specialty nurses, certified in ostomy wound and continence care, work with adults anticipating the creation of an ileostomy or colostomy. (uchicagomedicine.org)
  • A stoma is a surgically-created opening into the small intestine (ileostomy) or large intestine (colostomy). (uchicagomedicine.org)
  • Practice ileostomy and colostomy procedures with realistic draining and excretion. (anatomystuff.co.uk)
  • Learn how to apply post-operative and permanent ostomy bags, whilst also creating real-life simulations of colostomy and ileostomy procedures, with this realistic Ostomy Trainer by Realityworks. (anatomystuff.co.uk)
  • For realistic draining and excretion at the ileostomy and colostomy sites, use the simulated stool mix that is included with this ostomy trainer. (anatomystuff.co.uk)
  • Some of the common types of stomas that we encounter in surgical practice are colostomy, ileostomy, urostomy, etc. (medscape.com)
  • A colostomy is an opening (stoma) in the large intestine (colon), or the surgical procedure that creates one. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this case, the colostomy is often temporary and is usually reversed at a later date, leaving the patient with a small scar in place of the stoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Types of colostomy include: Loop colostomy: This type of colostomy is usually used in emergencies and is a temporary and large stoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • End colostomy: A stoma is created from one end of the bowel. (wikipedia.org)
  • A colostomy bag attaches to the stoma to collect the waste. (mayoclinic.org)
  • During a surgical procedure known as a colostomy, an opening called a stoma or ostomy is formed between the intestine and the abdominal wall. (orlandohealth.com)
  • A colostomy bag, also called a stoma bag or ostomy bag, is a small waterproof pouch, typically made of plastic. (orlandohealth.com)
  • The two types of colostomies are an end and a loop stoma. (uchicagomedicine.org)
  • One-Piece System colostomy bag consists of a base plate used as a skin barrier around the stoma, with the pouch joined together as a single unit. (advacarepharma.com)
  • Non-adhesive Two-Piece System colostomy bags are designed to allow the pouch to be changed while leaving the barrier/wafer attached to the skin around the stoma. (advacarepharma.com)
  • Adhesive Two-Piece System colostomy bags are designed to allow for easy and convenient changes of the pouch while leaving the barrier or wafer attached to the skin surrounding the stoma. (advacarepharma.com)
  • A colostomy is a surgical procedure by which a stoma is constructed by exteriorization of the large intestine. (medscape.com)
  • A loop colostomy is defined as a stoma when the entire loop of colon is exteriorized and both proximal and distal limbs are open into the common stoma opening and not transected through. (medscape.com)
  • Methods A patient- and observer reported cross-sectional study of ARM patients with previous colostomies surgically treated 1997-2015 with minimum 4 years' follow-up after stoma closure. (lu.se)
  • Even as long ago as the 1940s, surgeons conducting a review at the Cleveland Clinic (Jones and Kehm, 1946) could summarize the routine care of the permanent colostomy as usually quite satisfactory, stating that after patients recover from the initial worry prompted by the need for a colostomy, most of them learn to manage their colostomy quite well. (wikipedia.org)
  • While this may be somewhat overstated, it is true that most people with a permanent colostomy can live a useful, happy life. (wikipedia.org)
  • When part of the rectum becomes diseased - such as with cancer - a permanent colostomy is done. (healthline.com)
  • A permanent colostomy bag acts as a replacement for the bowel. (orlandohealth.com)
  • Double barrel colostomy: The bowel is severed and both ends are brought out onto the abdomen. (wikipedia.org)
  • They found that irrigation of the colostomy varied with each patient's bowel habit but that most patients developed a routine of every-other-day irrigation, whereas a few needed no irrigation. (wikipedia.org)
  • A colostomy may also be referred to as bowel diversion therapy. (healthline.com)
  • Colostomies are performed due to problems with the lower bowel and create new pathways for stools to pass. (healthline.com)
  • A temporary colostomy gives part of the bowel time to heal by redirecting where stools go. (healthline.com)
  • A double-barrel transverse colostomy involves dividing the bowel into two complete parts. (healthline.com)
  • If you have a serious gastroenterology condition such as cancer, inflammatory bowel disease or severe diverticulitis, a colostomy bag might give you more freedom - you won't have to spend as much time in the bathroom or in bed from the pain. (orlandohealth.com)
  • When the opening is in the large bowel (colon) is it is called a colostomy. (orlandohealth.com)
  • Normal excretion from a colostomy has pasty to semi-solid consistency, with bowel movements occurring in a more regular pattern. (uchicagomedicine.org)
  • Large Bowel Surgery - Resection with Colostomy. (doctorstock.com)
  • This medical illustration series features four laparotomy views of the male abdomen revealing the incision, resection, stump closure and colostomy formation in a left lower quadrant perforated sigmoid bowel resection. (doctorstock.com)
  • Patients diagnosed or with suspicion of colorectal cancer or adenoma, inflammatory bowel disease, late complications to colon diverticulosis, colostomy reversal or other diagnoses requiring colorectal resection. (who.int)
  • WIth transverse colostomies, a lightweight, drainable pouch holds the stool and mucus and protects the skin from coming into contact with the stool. (healthline.com)
  • Drainable with Clamp Closure colostomy bag is an open-ended pouch that comes with a closing device, such as a clamp or tail clip, which is left attached to the body during emptying. (advacarepharma.com)
  • A sigmoid colostomy is done on the sigmoid colon, and is a few inches lower than a descending colostomy. (healthline.com)
  • A sigmoid colostomy allows for a larger part of the colon to still do its job, so the stool output is usually more solid and happens on a regular basis. (healthline.com)
  • There are four areas of the colon that a colostomy can be created from: ascending, transverse, descending and sigmoid. (uchicagomedicine.org)
  • Drainable with Velcro Closure colostomy bags are open-ended pouches that come with a velcro closure. (advacarepharma.com)
  • This historical experience has been borne out, as today the conclusion still stands that most patients can successfully manage a colostomy as part of their activities of daily living. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with a colostomy can receive training and support to learn how to manage their ostomy appliance and maintain good hygiene to prevent skin irritation and infection. (advacarepharma.com)
  • Closed colostomy bags are pouches that are sealed at the bottom and are recommended for patients who have regular elimination patterns and solid stools. (advacarepharma.com)
  • In patients with multiple previous abdominal surgeries, a CT scan of the abdomen may be useful in order to decide the best location of the colostomy. (medscape.com)
  • More than 60 cancer patients in Nyeri County have received colostomy bags to ease the struggle they go through while 'answering calls of nature. (go.ke)
  • Le protocole utilisé dans le traitement du myélome multiple a été le VMCD-REV à 76,92% avec pour réponse thérapeutique complète chez 6 patients, 3 réponses partielles et 4 en cours de traitement. (bvsalud.org)
  • Colostomy bags come in different sizes to be used during the day and at night while sleeping, and they are quite discreet. (orlandohealth.com)
  • Carry spare colostomy bags and accessories whenever possible. (orlandohealth.com)
  • Colostomy bags are designed to be discreet and comfortable, with features such as odor barriers and soft materials to help maintain patient dignity and comfort. (advacarepharma.com)
  • AdvaCare Pharma manufactures Colostomy Bags in ISO and CE-certified facilities located in China, India, and the USA. (advacarepharma.com)
  • AdvaCare Pharma is a leading manufacturer of Colostomy Bags and other top-quality medical devices. (advacarepharma.com)
  • Another cancer patient, Allan Wachira, lauded the home as well as the initiative saying that before then, he was facing problems of high cost of the colostomy bags and lack of knowledge on how to use them. (go.ke)
  • But since I came here, I am guaranteed free quality colostomy bags. (go.ke)
  • Most often, double-barrel colostomy is a temporary colostomy with two openings into the colon (distal and proximal). (wikipedia.org)
  • In this case, the diseased part of the colon is removed, or permanently cut off with the colostomy positioning. (healthline.com)
  • This type of colostomy allows the stool to leave the body before it reaches the descending colon, and is typically temporary, allowing parts of the colon to heal. (healthline.com)
  • In an ascending colostomy, only a small portion of the colon stays active, and the colostomy itself is placed on the right side of the abdomen. (healthline.com)
  • As the name would suggest, a descending colostomy is placed in the descending colon, on the lower left side of the abdomen. (healthline.com)
  • In some cases, after the surgeon removes a portion of the colon, it may be necessary to attach the remaining colon to the outside of the body in a procedure called colostomy. (mayoclinic.org)
  • When it is temporary, a colostomy bag is intended to allow your colon to rest. (orlandohealth.com)
  • A colostomy is an opening into the large intestine (colon). (uchicagomedicine.org)
  • A colostomy is created from a section of the large intestine or colon, is surgically moved through the abdominal tissue to a previously marked site on the skin. (uchicagomedicine.org)
  • A Colostomy Bag is a medical device used to collect waste from the colon that is surgically diverted through an opening in the abdomen. (advacarepharma.com)
  • People with temporary or long-term colostomies have pouches attached to their sides where feces collect and can be easily disposed of. (healthline.com)
  • Loop colostomies are usually temporary and preferentially constructed over end colostomies whenever the end colostomy is intended to be reversed at a later date. (medscape.com)
  • One patient stated that he could see no advantage of the normal anus over a colostomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • You should avoid having anal sex (if the anus is still in place) after a colostomy because it can cause tearing and bleeding. (orlandohealth.com)
  • If your child had a colostomy before this surgery, the colostomy may be closed when the goal size of the anus is reached. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • After the colostomy is closed, you will still need to dilate your child's anus until the dilator goes in easily with no discomfort. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • A colostomy is a surgical procedure that brings one end of the large intestine out through the abdominal wall. (healthline.com)
  • In general, transverse colostomies are done in the upper abdomen. (healthline.com)
  • A loop transverse colostomy creates two openings in the abdomen: One opening is for stools, the other is only for mucus, which is a normal byproduct of defecation. (healthline.com)
  • Children undergoing surgery for extensive pelvic tumors commonly are given a colostomy in preparation for surgery to remove the tumor, followed by reversal of the colostomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • A colostomy can be constructed as a loop or an end colostomy. (medscape.com)
  • In this chapter, the authors focus on the surgical techniques for constructing a loop colostomy. (medscape.com)
  • An image depicting a loop colostomy can be seen below. (medscape.com)
  • Construction of loop colostomy. (medscape.com)
  • Colostomy surgery that is planned usually has a higher rate of long-term success than surgery performed in an emergency situation. (wikipedia.org)
  • A colostomy is a major surgery. (healthline.com)
  • You can do many of the same activities you enjoyed before your colostomy or other ostomy surgery. (mayoclinic.org)
  • sex and age with the study group, were · bladder extrophy or colostomy. (who.int)
  • People with colostomies must wear an ostomy pouching system to collect intestinal waste. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ascending colostomies are rare these days, and ileostomies are usually recommended instead. (healthline.com)
  • Stools and other waste products are drained into a colostomy bag, which can then be emptied or changed at regular intervals. (orlandohealth.com)
  • It is aimed at anyone needing to develop the underpinning knowledge of Advanced Colostomy care Management, It is also suitable for employees who require refresher/CPD training or new staff members who work in health care settings. (meducation.me)
  • This type of colostomy bag is suitable for individuals who prefer an adhesive attachment over a snap ring or flange. (advacarepharma.com)
  • Colostomies aren't always permanent, especially in children with birth defects. (healthline.com)
  • Be careful around pets and children who may unintentionally dislodge or damage your colostomy bag. (orlandohealth.com)
  • Uneétude descriptive, transversale portant sur les patientes traitées en radiothérapie à l'Hôpital Général de Douala pour cancer du col de l'utérus a été réalisée d'octobre 2020 à janvier 2021.Résultats. (bvsalud.org)
  • Jones and Kehm preferred tissue paper as a colostomy cover (held in place with a band or garment) rather than a colostomy bag. (wikipedia.org)
  • Really like this colostomy bag cover. (abilitee.com)
  • This healing can take a few months or a few years, but once healing has occurred, the colostomy can be reversed. (healthline.com)
  • Hi, I have had a colostomy for almost 3 years now. (meetanostomate.org)
  • Notre objectif était d'évaluer le coût réel de la prise en charge afin de servir de support aux politiques d'aide aux patientes. (bvsalud.org)