Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Neoadjuvant Therapy: Preliminary cancer therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone/endocrine therapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) that precedes a necessary second modality of treatment.Radiotherapy, Adjuvant: Radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery or chemotherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Chemoradiotherapy, Adjuvant: Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery. It is commonly used in the therapy of cancer.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Chemoradiotherapy: Treatment that combines chemotherapy with radiotherapy.Proctoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the rectum.Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Colorectal Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Anal Canal: The terminal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, beginning from the ampulla of the RECTUM and ending at the anus.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Colon, Descending: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between TRANSVERSE COLON and the SIGMOID COLON.Early Detection of Cancer: Methods to identify and characterize cancer in the early stages of disease and predict tumor behavior.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.UtahPelvic Exenteration: Removal of all of the organs and adjacent structures of the pelvis. It is usually performed to surgically remove cancer involving the bladder, uterine cervix, or rectum. (Stedman, 25th ed)Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic: Antimetabolites that are useful in cancer chemotherapy.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Anastomotic Leak: Breakdown of the connection and subsequent leakage of effluent (fluids, secretions, air) from a SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS of the digestive, respiratory, genitourinary, and cardiovascular systems. Most common leakages are from the breakdown of suture lines in gastrointestinal or bowel anastomosis.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Organoplatinum Compounds: Organic compounds which contain platinum as an integral part of the molecule.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Radiotherapy: The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.DeoxycytidineLung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Pelvic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the pelvic region.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Leucovorin: The active metabolite of FOLIC ACID. Leucovorin is used principally as an antidote to FOLIC ACID ANTAGONISTS.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Sigmoid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SIGMOID COLON.Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Surgical Stomas: Artificial openings created by a surgeon for therapeutic reasons. Most often this refers to openings from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the ABDOMINAL WALL to the outside of the body. It can also refer to the two ends of a surgical anastomosis.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Endosonography: Ultrasonography of internal organs using an ultrasound transducer sometimes mounted on a fiberoptic endoscope. In endosonography the transducer converts electronic signals into acoustic pulses or continuous waves and acts also as a receiver to detect reflected pulses from within the organ. An audiovisual-electronic interface converts the detected or processed echo signals, which pass through the electronics of the instrument, into a form that the technologist can evaluate. The procedure should not be confused with ENDOSCOPY which employs a special instrument called an endoscope. The "endo-" of endosonography refers to the examination of tissue within hollow organs, with reference to the usual ultrasonography procedure which is performed externally or transcutaneously.Colon, Sigmoid: A segment of the COLON between the RECTUM and the descending colon.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Colon, Ascending: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the TRANSVERSE COLON. It passes cephalad from the cecum to the caudal surface of the right lobe of the LIVER where it bends sharply to the left, forming the right colic flexure.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Perineum: The body region lying between the genital area and the ANUS on the surface of the trunk, and to the shallow compartment lying deep to this area that is inferior to the PELVIC DIAPHRAGM. The surface area is between the VULVA and the anus in the female, and between the SCROTUM and the anus in the male.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Microsatellite Instability: The occurrence of highly polymorphic mono- and dinucleotide MICROSATELLITE REPEATS in somatic cells. It is a form of genome instability associated with defects in DNA MISMATCH REPAIR.SEER Program: A cancer registry mandated under the National Cancer Act of 1971 to operate and maintain a population-based cancer reporting system, reporting periodically estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a continuing project of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Among its goals, in addition to assembling and reporting cancer statistics, are the monitoring of annual cancer incident trends and the promoting of studies designed to identify factors amenable to cancer control interventions. (From National Cancer Institute, NIH Publication No. 91-3074, October 1990)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.HT29 Cells: Human colonic ADENOCARCINOMA cells that are able to express differentiation features characteristic of mature intestinal cells such as the GOBLET CELLS.United StatesOdds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Cancer Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines designed to prevent or treat cancer. Vaccines are produced using the patient's own whole tumor cells as the source of antigens, or using tumor-specific antigens, often recombinantly produced.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Tegafur: Congener of FLUOROURACIL with comparable antineoplastic action. It has been suggested especially for the treatment of breast neoplasms.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Colon, Transverse: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between ASCENDING COLON and DESCENDING COLON. It passes from the RIGHT COLIC FLEXURE across the ABDOMEN, then turns sharply at the left colonic flexure into the descending colon.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Dose Fractionation: Administration of the total dose of radiation (RADIATION DOSAGE) in parts, at timed intervals.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Carcinoembryonic Antigen: A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Intestinal Polyps: Discrete abnormal tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the INTESTINE. A polyp is attached to the intestinal wall either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays: In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.Semustine: 4-Methyl derivative of LOMUSTINE; (CCNU). An antineoplastic agent which functions as an alkylating agent.Anticarcinogenic Agents: Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved.DNA Methylation: Addition of methyl groups to DNA. DNA methyltransferases (DNA methylases) perform this reaction using S-ADENOSYLMETHIONINE as the methyl group donor.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Conversion to Open Surgery: Changing an operative procedure from an endoscopic surgical procedure to an open approach during the INTRAOPERATIVE PERIOD.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Proctocolectomy, Restorative: A surgical procedure involving the excision of the COLON and RECTUM and the formation of an ILEOANAL RESERVOIR (pouch). In patients with intestinal diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, this procedure avoids the need for an OSTOMY by allowing for transanal defecation.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Colonic Pouches: Sacs or reservoirs created to function in place of the COLON and/or RECTUM in patients who have undergone restorative proctocolectomy (PROCTOCOLECTOMY, RESTORATIVE).Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Preoperative Period: The period before a surgical operation.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Neoplasm Grading: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Genes, ras: Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (ras) originally isolated from Harvey (H-ras, Ha-ras, rasH) and Kirsten (K-ras, Ki-ras, rasK) murine sarcoma viruses. Ras genes are widely conserved among animal species and sequences corresponding to both H-ras and K-ras genes have been detected in human, avian, murine, and non-vertebrate genomes. The closely related N-ras gene has been detected in human neuroblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. All genes of the family have a similar exon-intron structure and each encodes a p21 protein.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.National Cancer Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research with the objective of cancer prevention, early stage identification and elimination. This Institute was established in 1937.SwedenTomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.JapanOrgan Sparing Treatments: Techniques, procedures, and therapies carried out on diseased organs in such a way to avoid complete removal of the organ and preserve the remaining organ function.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Camptothecin: An alkaloid isolated from the stem wood of the Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminata. This compound selectively inhibits the nuclear enzyme DNA TOPOISOMERASES, TYPE I. Several semisynthetic analogs of camptothecin have demonstrated antitumor activity.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.UracilGastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized: Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Azoxymethane: A potent carcinogen and neurotoxic compound. It is particularly effective in inducing colon carcinomas.Thymidylate Synthase: An enzyme of the transferase class that catalyzes the reaction 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate and dUMP to dihydrofolate and dTMP in the synthesis of thymidine triphosphate. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 2.1.1.45.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Receptor, erbB-2: A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Tissue Array Analysis: The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.Health Facility Size: The physical space or dimensions of a facility. Size may be indicated by bed capacity.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)EuropeDown-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor: Methods of investigating the effectiveness of anticancer cytotoxic drugs and biologic inhibitors. These include in vitro cell-kill models and cytostatic dye exclusion tests as well as in vivo measurement of tumor growth parameters in laboratory animals.Endometrial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Defecation: The normal process of elimination of fecal material from the RECTUM.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Prostate-Specific Antigen: A glycoprotein that is a kallikrein-like serine proteinase and an esterase, produced by epithelial cells of both normal and malignant prostate tissue. It is an important marker for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Sigmoidoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the sigmoid flexure.Neoplastic Stem Cells: Highly proliferative, self-renewing, and colony-forming stem cells which give rise to NEOPLASMS.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor: A cell surface receptor involved in regulation of cell growth and differentiation. It is specific for EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR and EGF-related peptides including TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR ALPHA; AMPHIREGULIN; and HEPARIN-BINDING EGF-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR. The binding of ligand to the receptor causes activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and rapid internalization of the receptor-ligand complex into the cell.California
Colon Rectum. 24 (2): 73-5. doi:10.1007/bf02604287. PMID 7215078. Ehrenpreis, Eli (2003). Anal and Rectal Diseases Explained. ... Blumetti, Jennifer; Bastawrous, Amir (27 May 2009). "Epidermoid Cancers of the Anal Canal: Current Treatment". Clinics in Colon ... The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Winter 2010. pp. 8-9. Retrieved 13 August 2016. ... Nigro ND, Vaitkevicius VK, Buroker T, Bradley GT, Considine B (1981). "Combined therapy for cancer of the anal canal". Dis. ...
2014). "Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer". Nature. 513 (7518): 382-7. doi:10.1038/nature13438. ... Increased amplification of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha has been observed in colorectal cancer. Hepatocyte nuclear factor ...
Clin Colon Rectal Surg". 25 (4), s. 219-27, Dec 2012. DOI: 10.1055/s-0032-1329393. PMID: 24294124. ... Management of stage IV rectal cancer: palliative options.. „World J Gastroenterol". 17 (7), s. 835-47, Feb 2011. DOI: 10.3748/ ... Clin Colon Rectal Surg". 23 (1), s. 31-6, Feb 2010. DOI: 10.1055/s-0030-1247855. PMID: 21286288. ... Clin Colon Rectal Surg". 17 (3), s. 195-204, Aug 2004. DOI: 10.1055/s-2004-832702. PMID: 20011276. ...
"Comprehensive molecular characterization of human colon and rectal cancer". Nature. 487 (7407): 330-337. Bibcode:2012Natur.487 ... The Cancer Genome Atlas Network; Bainbridge; Chang; Dinh; Drummond; Fowler; Kovar; Lewis; Morgan; Newsham; Reid; Santibanez; ... "DNA polymerase ε and δ proofreading suppress discrete mutator and cancer phenotypes in mice" ... 100 mutations per Mbase of DNA in human colorectal cancers.[5] ...
Colon & rectal cancer Bleeding per rectum, alteration of bowel habits. Liver cancer Jaundice, pain and mass in right upper ... American Cancer Society American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network American Cancer Society Center American Society of ... Screening is recommended for cancers of breast, cervix, colon and lung. Symptoms usually depend on the site and type of cancer ... Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version. Bethesda (MD): National Cancer Institute (US). 2002-01-01. PMID ...
Preoperative staging of rectal cancers may be done with endoscopic ultrasound. Adjunct staging of metastasis include Abdominal ... T0: No evidence of cancer in the colon or rectum.. *Tis: Carcinoma in situ; Cancer cells are found only in the epithelium or ... Colon cancer staging is an estimate of the amount of penetration of a particular cancer. It is performed for diagnostic and ... Turnbull RB Jr, Kyle K, Watson FR, et al: Cancer of the colon: the influence of the no touch isolation technique on survival ...
Two SNPs in the MAP3K3 gene were found as candidates for association with colon and rectal cancers. MEKK3 is highly expressed ... Slattery ML, Lundgreen A, Wolff RK (2012). "MAP kinase genes and colon and rectal cancer". Carcinogenesis. 33 (12): 2398-408. ... In this sense, knockdown of MEKK3 caused ovarian cancer cells to be more sensitive to drugs. MEKK3 also interacts with BRCA1. ... Genes related to cell survival and anti-apoptosis have increased expression in most cancer cells with high levels of MEKK3. ...
"Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer Causes Prolonged Pudendal Nerve Terminal Motor Latency". Diseases of the Colon & ... 2007). The ASCRS textbook of colon and rectal surgery. New York: Springer. ISBN 0-387-24846-3. CS1 maint: Uses editors ... Inside the pudendal canal, the nerve divides into branches, first giving off the inferior rectal nerve, then the perineal nerve ...
Lynch ML, Brand MI (2005). "Preoperative evaluation and oncologic principles of colon cancer surgery". Clin Colon Rectal Surg. ... Synonym(s): rectal shelf Layke, JC; Lopez, PP (1 March 2004). "Gastric cancer: diagnosis and treatment options". American ... Blumer, G. (1909). "Rectal shelf: neglected rectal sign of value in diagnosis of obscure malignant and inflammatory disease ... It is usually a site of metastasis of cancers of the lung, pancreas, and stomach. Blumer's shelf or peritoneal cul-de-sac, is a ...
2012). "Comprehensive molecular characterization of human colon and rectal cancer". Nature. 487 (7407): 330-337. Bibcode: ... The Cancer Genome Atlas Network; Bainbridge; Chang; Dinh; Drummond; Fowler; Kovar; Lewis; Morgan; Newsham; Reid; Santibanez; ... 100 mutations per Mbase of DNA in human colorectal cancers. The extent of proofreading in other molecular processes can depend ... "DNA polymerase ε and δ proofreading suppress discrete mutator and cancer phenotypes in mice" Tseng, Shun-Fu; Gabriel, Abram; ...
"Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery. 17 (3): 147-53. doi:10.1055/s-2004-832695. PMC 2780060. PMID 20011269.. ... Stefánsson T, Ekbom A, Sparèn P, Påhlman L (Aug 2004). "Association between sigmoid diverticulitis and left-sided colon cancer ... Diverticular disease was found associated with a higher risk of left sided colon cancer.[8] ... They typically occur in the sigmoid colon, which is a common place for increased pressure. The left side of the colon is more ...
Corman's Colon and Rectal Surgery, 6th ed. Publisher: Wolters Kluwer; Philadelphia, 2012 IBSN 978-1-451-11114-9 Francis, ... Bergamaschi completed his PhD in colorectal cancer at Bergen University in Norway under the guidance of professor Odd Søreide. ... Noble, Barnes &. "Corman's Colon and Rectal Surgery / Edition 6". Barnes & Noble. Retrieved 2017-08-01. "Wolters Kluwer - ... Currently, Bergamaschi is editor of the Colorectal Disease journal and president of the New York Society of Colon & Rectal ...
"The role of total mesorectal excision in the management of rectal cancer" (PDF). Cancer control. 10 (3): 205-11. PMID 12794618 ... It is possible to rejoin the two ends of the colon; however, most patients require a temporary ileostomy pouch to bypass the ... treatment for rectal cancer in the West. An occasional side effect of the operation is the formation and tangling of fibrous ... "The mesorectum in rectal cancer surgery-the clue to pelvic recurrence?". British Journal of Surgery. 69 (10): 613-6. doi: ...
Specialising in colon and rectal surgery, Fazio's clinical interests were Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis; colorectal ... Good Housekeeping magazine named him one of the country's top cancer doctors for women; American Health said he was one of the ... He pioneered surgical techniques and improved the quality of life for cancer patients around the world. He wrote or co-authored ... cancer; and pelvic floor reservoir procedures, created inside the body of patients who had intestines removed, to collect the ...
It is used primarily to stage newly diagnosed rectal or anal cancer. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration may be used to sample ... Echo-endoscopy can also be used for imaging of the rectum and colon, although these applications are lesser known. ... Among other uses, it allows for screening for pancreatic cancer, esophageal cancer, and gastric cancer, as well as benign ... The technique is highly sensitive for detection of pancreatic cancer (90-95% sensitivity), particularly in patients who are ...
Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer Causes Prolonged Pudendal Nerve Terminal Motor Latency. Diseases of the Colon & ... 编). The ASCRS textbook of colon and rectal surgery. New York: Springer. 2007. ISBN 0-387-24846-3.. ... 下直腸神經(英语:Inferior rectal nerves). 會陰神經. 陰莖背神經(英语:dorsal nerve of the penis). 陰蒂背神經(英语:dorsal nerve of
Stoma (medicine) American Cancer Society. Detailed Guide: Colon and Rectum Cancer. cancer.org. URL: http://www.cancer.org/ ... or the Miles operation is a surgery for rectal cancer or anal cancer. It is frequently abbreviated as AP resection, APR and ... November 2002). "Hospital and surgeon procedure volume as predictors of outcome following rectal cancer resection". Ann. Surg. ... Education and case volume are strong prognostic factors in rectal cancer surgery]". Lakartidningen (in Swedish). 102 (6): 374-6 ...
"Detailed Guide: Colon and Rectum Cancer". American Cancer Society. Retrieved February 5, 2008. McLeod RS (2001). "Comparison of ... Clinics in colon and rectal surgery. 29 (3): 239-45. doi:10.1055/s-0036-1584500. PMC 4991969 . PMID 27582649. Dulskas, A; ... is a common surgery for rectal cancer and occasionally is performed to remove a diseased or ruptured portion of the intestine ... LARs are generally the preferred treatment for rectal cancer insofar as this is surgically feasible. APRs lead to a permanent ...
There is an increase in colon and rectal cancer in Asian Americans due to dietary changes. This may be attributed to the ... Breast cancer is not the only cancer where this can be seen. Asian Americans also have high rates of cervical cancer. ... Yu, H; Harris, RE; Gao, Y (1991). "Comparative epidemiology of cancers of the colon, rectum, prostate and breast in Shanghai ... The cancer burden that affects Asian Americans is unusual because of the nature of the cancers. The ones with higher rates in ...
Colon cancer Colon cancer is often asymptomatic, but it can cause constipation, bowel obstruction, bloody stool and more. Colon ... Proctitis Proctitis is pain and inflammation of the rectal lining caused by infection. Ulcerative colitis Ulcerative colitis ... Pancreatic cancer Pancreatic cancer is typically asymptomatic until the cancer has advanced, making treatment difficult. Drug ... Small intestine cancer Small intestine cancer is rare and often has no symptoms, but can cause symptoms in its advanced stages ...
Rectal cancer, a subgroup of colorectal cancer specific to the rectum. Rectal prolapse, referring to the prolapse of the rectum ... Colon and Rectum", AJCC Cancer Staging Atlas (PDF), American Joint Committee on Cancer, 2006, p. 109 al.], senior editors, ... For the diagnosis of certain ailments, a rectal exam may be done. These include faecal impaction, prostatic cancer and benign ... Unlike other portions of the colon, the rectum does not have taeniae coli. The rectum connects with the sigmoid colon at the ...
Under consideration by a medical company for real-time diagnosis of rectal colon cancer. Under consideration by a medical ...
... in all eligible colon cancer patients but no benefits in rectal cancer patients. * Phase III study in stage II and III colon ... Pilot trial in colon and rectal cancer. Michael Hanna first took his ASI approach into the clinic in a pilot trial at Johns ... The study, which evaluated 80 colon and rectal cancer patients, finally read out data in March 1993 in the Journal of Clinical ... This product was evaluated in Phase III in colon cancer in the 1990s and another Phase III study, called ACTIVE, is currently ...
From the age of 70, Rutherford underwent several medical treatments for cancer of the colon. This included an operation on ... November 5, 1941, which found "carcinoma of the rectal sigmoid". Doctors gave him less than six months to live. Rutherford died ...
5-aminosalicylate (ASA) has been shown to reduce β-catenin and its localization to the nucleus in colon cancer cells isolated ... "Wnt-signaling and apoptosis after neoadjuvant short-term radiotherapy for rectal cancer". Int. J. Oncol. 25 (6): 1543-9. doi: ... Hirohashi S, Kanai Y (July 2003). "Cell adhesion system and human cancer morphogenesis". Cancer Sci. 94 (7): 575-81. doi: ... Summary: Associated Cancers: colorectal and ovarian cancer; pilomatrixoma; medulloblastoma; pleomorphic adenomas; malignant ...
চিত্রঃ cancer.gov:. * 1. পাকস্থলির দেহ. * 2. ফান্ডাস. * 3. সম্মুখ প্রাচীর. * 4. বৃহত্তর বক্রতা. * 5. ক্ষুদ্রতর বক্রতা. * 6. ... ascending colon. *hepatic flexure. *transverse colon. *splenic flexure. *descending colon. *sigmoid colon ...
... indicating metastasis from the colorectal cancer. The rectal and ovarian tumors were similar to transverse colon cancer in ... These findings support a possible diagnosis of rectal and ovarian metastasis from the primary transverse colon cancer. The ... The patient underwent a laparoscopic extended right hemicolectomy for primary transverse colon cancer. Histopathological ... report a case of a 65-year-old woman with suspected metachronous metastasis to the rectum from primary transverse colon cancer ...
Cancer patient wins years worth of pizza - then donates it to food bank ...
Risk for colon cancer increases after age 50. Screening is important and includes colonoscopy. Learn about symptoms, risk ... Stages of Colon Cancer (National Cancer Institute) Also in Spanish * Stages of Rectal Cancer (National Cancer Institute) Also ... Rectal Cancer) (National Cancer Institute) Also in Spanish * Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer (National Cancer ... General Information about Colon Cancer (National Cancer Institute) Also in Spanish * General Information about Rectal Cancer ( ...
The American Cancer Society sees the risk rising in younger people. ... Its unknown what is causing the increase in colon cancer diagnosis and deaths. ... Colorectal cancer, which includes both colon and rectal cancers, is still most frequently diagnosed in adults over 65. Whats ... which showed that those born around 1990 have double the risk of colon cancer and quadruple the risk of rectal cancer, compared ...
This material is derived from the Patient-Centered Guides book, Colon and Rectal Cancer, a Comprehensive Guide for Patients and ... This resource center is for patients and families coping with colon and rectal cancers. You can find resources, including ... Transverse colon The portion of horizontal colon between the ascending and descending colon. The transverse colon crosses the ... The following excerpt is taken from Colon & Rectal Cancer: A Comprehensive Guide for Patients & Families by Lorraine Johnston, ...
Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 20;108(3):433-42. Comparative Study; Research Support, U.S. Govt, P.H.S. ... Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 20;108(3):433-42.. Comparison of risk factors for colon and rectal cancer.. Wei EK1, Giovannucci E, Wu K ... we identified 1,139 cases of colon cancer and 339 cases of rectal cancer. We used pooled logistic regression to estimate ... Future investigations of colon or rectal cancer should take into consideration risk factor differences by subsite. ...
These and other insights from a new study may change the way we identify and treat these cancers. ... Researchers discovered that the major difference between most colon and rectal cancers is where they start. ... Colon and Rectal Cancers Surprisingly Similar. Cultured colon cancer cells.Lorna McInroy, Wellcome Images. All rights reserved ... The colon is the first several feet of the large intestine. The rectum is the last few inches. But cancers of the colon and ...
DOwnload Trap -|-|-|-| http://urlgoal.com/jrcwf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514d6da5d5 ...
Many dont realize that the list of expenses for a cancer patient doesnt only cover specific treatments, but everything from ... family we will always be there for each other but when tragedy like this happen your never prepared.My dad is battling cancer ... Cancer treatment takes a toll on the body, both physically and emotionally, but can also significantly impact the patients ... Cancer treatment takes a toll on the body, both physically and emotionally, but can also significantly impact the patients ...
... according to a new report from the American Cancer Society. ... The rate at which people are diagnosed with colon cancer and ... rectal cancer in the US has dropped 32% from 2000 to 2013 for those aged 50 years and older, ... Colon and rectal cancer combined is the third most commonly diagnosed can-cer in both men and women in the US. The report ... The rate at which people are diagnosed with colon cancer and rectal cancer in the US has dropped 32% from 2000 to 2013 for ...
This material is derived from the Patient-Centered Guides book, Colon and Rectal Cancer, a Comprehensive Guide for Patients and ... This resource center is for patients and families coping with colon and rectal cancers. You can find resources, including ... The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 12 of Colon & Rectal Cancer: A Comprehensive Guide for Patients & Families by ... often in cancer support groups. Other cancer survivors try to keep their old friends by never talking about cancer. Bear in ...
Rectal Cancer Program offers multidisciplinary expertise in diagnosing and treating cancers of the large intestine, small ... Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in the colon or the rectum, and may be called colon cancer or rectal cancer or ... More Within Colon and Rectal Cancer Program Colon and Rectal Cancer Program * Meet Our Team ... Center Center for Advanced Endoscopy Chest Disease Center Cognitive Neurology Colon and Rectal Cancer Program Colon and Rectal ...
Colon and Rectal Cancer Follow-Up Care Expanded Version Following treatment for either colon or rectal cancer, ongoing follow- ... Rectal Cancer The rectum is the last 6 inches of the large intestine (colon). Rectal cancer arises from the lining of the ... All cancers, but especially colon and rectal cancers, commonly referred to as colorectal cancer (CRC), have hereditary facto... ... Colon Cancer Expanded Version Colon cancer is a common malignancy in the United States. The treatment of patients with colon ...
... gained technical experience in minimally invasive colon and rectal surgical oncology including low and complex rectal cancer, ... Cancer Prevention Center The Lyda Hill Cancer Prevention Center provides cancer risk assessment, screening and diagnostic ... MD Anderson Cancer Center is accepting applications for a one-year advanced training fellowship in Advanced Colon and Rectal ... The ACRSO fellows are integrated into the research program of the section of Colon and Rectal Surgery. There are abundant ...
Comprehensive molecular characterization of human colon and rectal cancer.. Cancer Genome Atlas Network. ... Excluding the hypermutated cancers, colon and rectum cancers were found to have considerably similar patterns of genomic ... A. Clustering of genes and pathways affected in colon and rectum tumors deduced by PARADIGM analysis. Blue = under-expressed ...
... ( By JASCAP ). Reading Room Home. Index. *Risk factors and causes of colon and rectal cancer. ... Screening for colon and rectal cancer. *Symptoms & diagnosis of colon and rectal cancer. ... Colon and Rectal Cancer. *Treating colon cancer. *Treating rectal cancer. *Living with colon and rectal cancer. ...
... Nature. 2012 Jul 18;487(7407):330-7. doi: 10.1038/ ... Excluding the hypermutated cancers, colon and rectum cancers were found to have considerably similar patterns of genomic ... Cancer Genome Atlas Network: Donna M Muzny, Matthew N Bainbridge, Kyle Chang, Huyen H Dinh, Jennifer A Drummond, Gerald Fowler ...
... This drop-in group is for people who are experiencing bowel management issues as ... A colorectal cancer nurse navigator from John Muir Cancer Institute, Sarah Leonard, will provide bowel management information ... a result of cancer treatment. Family members and caregivers are welcome. The group is a place to share information, meet with ...
The change reflects a rise in colon and rectal cancer cases and deaths among adults under 50. ... The change reflects a rise in colon and rectal cancer cases and deaths among adults under 50. ... The American Cancer Society recommended that individuals begin colorectal cancer screening at age 45, five years earlier than ... The American Cancer Society recommended that individuals begin colorectal cancer screening at age 45, five years earlier than ...
... collectively known as colorectal cancer, have many similar characteristics and will be discussed as one cancer type in this ... 21. a. b. c. d. Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests. American Cancer Society. [https://www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer/ ... Colon cancer and rectal cancer, collectively known as colorectal cancer, have many similar characteristics and will be ... 11. Cancer Stat Facts: Colorectal Cancer represented by the National Cancer Institute. [SEER Colon Cancer Data] ...
Advanced Colon and Rectal Cancer Core Subjects Update 2015 , ASCRS. Advanced Colon Cancer ... The information presented on The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) website is solely intended to provide ...
To address this problem, we analysed proteomes of colon and rectal tumours characterized previously by The Cancer Genome Atlas ... Extensive genomic characterization of human cancers presents the problem of inference from genomic abnormalities to cancer ... of Cell-Free DNA Tumor Fraction and Somatic Copy Number Alterations With Survival in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer. ... analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords a new paradigm for understanding cancer ...
... leading-edge colon and rectal cancer care, providing patients and their families with access to a comprehensive range of ... At the Colon and Rectal Cancer Center, our mission is to deliver compassionate, multi-disciplinary, ... About the Colon and Rectal Cancer Center. * At the Colon and Rectal Cancer Center, our mission is to deliver compassionate, ... The latest thinking in precision cancer medicine for colon and rectal cancer. ...
Colon and rectal cancer were analysed separately and each cancer stage was analysed separately (Stages I and II grouped ... Colon cancer, rectal cancer, formal competence, case load, hospital category, long-term survival, population based Nationell ... For the study on colon cancer patients operated as an emergency, the local colon cancer registry for the Stockholm-Gotland ... Örebro health care region were extracted for the periods 1995-2006 for rectal cancer, and 1997-2006 for colon cancer. These ...
Cancernet-UK: What is cancer; About specific cancers; Breast , Prostate , Bowel. About cancer treatments; Chemotherapy , ... are diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the UK of which about two-thirds accounts for colon and one-third for rectal cancer.- ... UK incidence: At present, colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer whereas in men it ... Types: Colorectal cancer comes in many forms. Most colorectal cancer are adenocarcinomas (cancer that originates in the ...
  • Robin Mendelsohn, M.D., codirector of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center's three-month-old Center for Young Onset Colorectal Cancer, says that her hospital has tracked over 4,000 cases of colon and rectal cancers in those under 50 in the past 10 years. (aarp.org)
  • HPFS: 1986 to January 31, 2000), we identified 1,139 cases of colon cancer and 339 cases of rectal cancer. (nih.gov)
  • The increase in people developing cancer at a younger age made headlines last year with the release of research by the ACS' Journal of the National Cancer Institute, which showed that those born around 1990 have double the risk of colon cancer and quadruple the risk of rectal cancer, compared with people born around 1950, who have the lowest risk. (aarp.org)
  • Taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was associated with a reduced risk of colon cancer in the presence of the R allele of the ERβ gene, whereas an R allele was associated with increased risk among postmenopausal women who did not take HRT. (aacrjournals.org)
  • A lower risk of colon cancer was observed with higher self-reported consumption of fruit and vegetable combined (HR Q4 vs. Q1 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.01, p for trend 0.02), but no consistent association was observed for separate consumption of fruits and vegetables. (diva-portal.org)
  • Although a lower risk of colon cancer is suggested with high consumption of fruit and vegetables, this study does not support a clear inverse association between fruit and vegetable consumption and colon or rectal cancer beyond a follow-up of more than 10 years. (diva-portal.org)
  • Conversely, physical activity (PA) has also been established as a predictor associated with a reduced risk of colon cancer (CC), but its association with rectal cancer (RC) remains inconclusive [ 3 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In conclusion, with higher enterolactone levels, we found lower risk of colon cancer among women and higher risk of rectal cancer among men. (fao.org)