Two-phase systems in which one is uniformly dispersed in another as particles small enough so they cannot be filtered or will not settle out. The dispersing or continuous phase or medium envelops the particles of the discontinuous phase. All three states of matter can form colloids among each other.
A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, liver, and spleen.
Benign, congenital, neuroepithelial cysts that are typically filled with a viscous mucus. They usually arise in the anterior portion of the THIRD VENTRICLE between the fornices.
Inorganic compounds that contain TECHNETIUM as an integral part of the molecule. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) is an isotope of technetium that has a half-life of about 6 hours. Technetium 99, which has a half-life of 210,000 years, is a decay product of technetium 99m.
Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.
A suspension of radioactive gold particles emitting negative beta particles and gamma irradiation. It was formerly used for liver scans and irradiation treatment of some metastatic malignancies.
Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.
Inorganic compounds that contain tin as an integral part of the molecule.
The first artificially produced element and a radioactive fission product of URANIUM. Technetium has the atomic symbol Tc, atomic number 43, and atomic weight 98.91. All technetium isotopes are radioactive. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) which is the decay product of Molybdenum 99, has a half-life of about 6 hours and is used diagnostically as a radioactive imaging agent. Technetium 99 which is a decay product of technetium 99m, has a half-life of 210,000 years.
Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)
Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.
A 3.5 per cent colloidal solution containing urea-cross-linked polymerized peptides. It has a molecular weight of approximately 35,000 and is prepared from gelatin and electrolytes. The polymeric solution is used as a plasma expander.
The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.
Radionuclide imaging of the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.
A narrow cleft inferior to the CORPUS CALLOSUM, within the DIENCEPHALON, between the paired thalami. Its floor is formed by the HYPOTHALAMUS, its anterior wall by the lamina terminalis, and its roof by EPENDYMA. It communicates with the FOURTH VENTRICLE by the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT, and with the LATERAL VENTRICLES by the interventricular foramina.
An element that is a member of the chalcogen family. It has an atomic symbol S, atomic number 16, and atomic weight [32.059; 32.076]. It is found in the amino acids cysteine and methionine.
The production of an image obtained by cameras that detect the radioactive emissions of an injected radionuclide as it has distributed differentially throughout tissues in the body. The image obtained from a moving detector is called a scan, while the image obtained from a stationary camera device is called a scintiphotograph.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Sb, atomic number 51, and atomic weight 121.75. It is used as a metal alloy and as medicinal and poisonous salts. It is toxic and an irritant to the skin and the mucous membranes.
An abnormally low volume of blood circulating through the body. It may result in hypovolemic shock (see SHOCK).
Fluids restored to the body in order to maintain normal water-electrolyte balance.
A highly vascularized endocrine gland consisting of two lobes joined by a thin band of tissue with one lobe on each side of the TRACHEA. It secretes THYROID HORMONES from the follicular cells and CALCITONIN from the parafollicular cells thereby regulating METABOLISM and CALCIUM level in blood, respectively.
A trace element that is required in bone formation. It has the atomic symbol Sn, atomic number 50, and atomic weight 118.71.
A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in cardiovascular and cerebral circulation.
Reduction of blood viscosity usually by the addition of cell free solutions. Used clinically (1) in states of impaired microcirculation, (2) for replacement of intraoperative blood loss without homologous blood transfusion, and (3) in cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.
The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A metallic element, atomic number 49, atomic weight 114.82, symbol In. It is named from its blue line in the spectrum. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A product formed from skin, white connective tissue, or bone COLLAGEN. It is used as a protein food adjuvant, plasma substitute, hemostatic, suspending agent in pharmaceutical preparations, and in the manufacturing of capsules and suppositories.
Silver. An element with the atomic symbol Ag, atomic number 47, and atomic weight 107.87. It is a soft metal that is used medically in surgical instruments, dental prostheses, and alloys. Long-continued use of silver salts can lead to a form of poisoning known as ARGYRIA.
Mononuclear cells with pronounced phagocytic ability that are distributed extensively in lymphoid and other organs. It includes MACROPHAGES and their precursors; PHAGOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS; HISTIOCYTES; DENDRITIC CELLS; LANGERHANS CELLS; and MICROGLIA. The term mononuclear phagocyte system has replaced the former reticuloendothelial system, which also included less active phagocytic cells such as fibroblasts and endothelial cells. (From Illustrated Dictionary of Immunology, 2d ed.)
Materials in intermediate state between solid and liquid.
Water-soluble proteins found in egg whites, blood, lymph, and other tissues and fluids. They coagulate upon heating.
Compounds that contain the triphenylmethane aniline structure found in rosaniline. Many of them have a characteristic magenta color and are used as COLORING AGENTS.
Relating to the size of solids.
Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.
Radiography of the ventricular system of the brain after injection of air or other contrast medium directly into the cerebral ventricles. It is used also for x-ray computed tomography of the cerebral ventricles.
PROCEDURES that use NEUROENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Neuroendoscopy, generally an integration of the neuroendoscope with a computer-assisted NEURONAVIGATION system, provides guidance in NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES.
Compounds similar to hydrocarbons in which a tetravalent silicon atom replaces the carbon atom. They are very reactive, ignite in air, and form useful derivatives.
A major protein in the BLOOD. It is important in maintaining the colloidal osmotic pressure and transporting large organic molecules.
A radiopharmaceutical used extensively in cholescintigraphy for the evaluation of hepatobiliary diseases. (From Int Jrnl Rad Appl Inst 1992;43(9):1061-4)
A polyvinyl polymer of variable molecular weight; used as suspending and dispersing agent and vehicle for pharmaceuticals; also used as blood volume expander.

Further studies on the mechanism of adrenaline-induced lipolysis in lipid micelles. (1/993)

Lipase [EC 3.1.1.3] depleted lipid micelles, in which lipolysis was not elicited by adrenaline, were prepared from lipid micelles. When these lipase-depleted lipid micelles incubated with adipose tissue extract containing lipase activity, adrenaline-induced lipolysis was restored to almost the same level as that of native lipid micelles. Adrenaline-induced lipolysis was not restored when the lipase-depleted lipid micelles were homogenized or sonicated. Various tissue extracts from kidney, lung, liver, and pancreas, and post-heparin plasma, which contained lipase activity, restored adrenaline-induced lipolysis in lipase-depleted lipid micelles.  (+info)

Sentinel lymph node biopsy and axillary dissection in breast cancer: results in a large series. (2/993)

BACKGROUND: Axillary lymph node dissection is an established component of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, and is an important procedure in cancer staging; however, it is associated with unpleasant side effects. We have investigated a radioactive tracer-guided procedure that facilitates identification, removal, and pathologic examination of the sentinel lymph node (i.e., the lymph node first receiving lymphatic fluid from the area of the breast containing the tumor) to predict the status of the axilla and to assess the safety of foregoing axillary dissection if the sentinel lymph node shows no involvement. METHODS: We injected 5-10 MBq of 99mTc-labeled colloidal particles of human albumin peritumorally in 376 consecutive patients with breast cancer who were enrolled at the European Institute of Oncology during the period from March 1996 through March 1998. The sentinel lymph node in each case was visualized by lymphoscintigraphy, and its general location was marked on the overlying skin. During breast surgery, the sentinel lymph node was identified for removal by monitoring the acoustic signal from a hand-held gamma ray-detecting probe. Total axillary dissection was then carried out. The pathologic status of the sentinel lymph node was compared with that of the whole axilla. RESULTS: The sentinel lymph node was identified in 371 (98.7%) of the 376 patients and accurately predicted the state of the axilla in 359 (95.5%) of the patients, with 12 false-negative findings (6.7%; 95% confidence interval = 3.5%-11.4%) among a total of 180 patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. CONCLUSIONS: Sentinel lymph node biopsy using a gamma ray-detecting probe allows staging of the axilla with high accuracy in patients with primary breast cancer. A randomized trial is necessary to determine whether axillary dissection may be avoided in those patients with an uninvolved sentinel lymph node.  (+info)

Transport of colloidal particles in lymphatics and vasculature after subcutaneous injection. (3/993)

This study was designed to determine the transport of subcutaneously injected viral-size colloid particles into the lymph and the vascular system in the hind leg of the dog. Transport of two colloid particles, with average size approximately 1 and 0.41 microm, respectively, and with and without leg rotation, was tested. Leg rotation serves to enhance the lymph flow rates. The right femoral vein, lymph vessel, and left femoral artery were cannulated while the animal was under anesthesia, and samples were collected at regular intervals after subcutaneous injection of the particles at the right knee level. The number of particles in the samples were counted under fluorescence microscopy by using a hemocytometer. With and without leg rotation, both particle sets were rapidly taken up into the venous blood and into the lymph fluid. The number of particles carried away from the injection site within the first 5 min was <5% of the injected pool. Particles were also seen in arterial blood samples; this suggests reflow and a prolonged residence time in the blood. These results show that particles the size of viruses are rapidly taken up into the lymphatics and blood vessels after subcutaneous deposition.  (+info)

Perineuronal nets of proteoglycans in the adult mouse brain, with special reference to their reactions to Gomori's ammoniacal silver and Ehrlich's methylene blue. (4/993)

As our previous studies have indicated, many subsets of neurons in the vertebrate brain possess a sulfated proteoglycan surface coat which reacts to cationic iron colloid and aldehyde fuchsin. The present study demonstrated that this surface coat is supravitally stained with Ehrlich's methylene blue, and doubly with this blue and aldehyde fuchsin, a finding suggesting its being identical to Cajal's superficial reticulum (red superficial) and to Golgi's reticular coating (revetement reticulare). The perineuronal surface coat was further stained with Gomori's ammoniacal silver, and doubly with this silver and cationic iron colloid. These neurons with such a proteoglycan surface coat usually expressed cell surface glycoproteins which were labeled with lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin. Hyaluronidase digestion did not interfere with this lectin labeling of the glycoproteins, methylene blue and Gomori's ammoniacal silver staining of the surface coat, while it erased the cationic iron colloid and aldehyde fuchsin staining of the surface coat. These findings suggest that the perineuronal proteoglycan surface coat is associated with some additional molecules which are resistant to hyaluronidase digestion and stainable with methylene blue and Gomori's ammoniacal silver. The possibility is suggested that these molecules might represent "ligand proteoglycans" connecting the perineuronal proteoglycans and cell surface glycoproteins.  (+info)

Failure of amphotericin B colloidal dispersion in the treatment of paracoccidioidomycosis. (5/993)

Although amphotericin B desoxycholate is considered the most effective treatment for disseminated Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infections, little is known about the efficacy of lipid-based formulations of amphotericin B in this infection. In this study, we treated four adults with the juvenile form of paracoccidioidomycosis with 3 mg/kg/day of amphotericin B colloidal dispersion for at least 28 days. Although all of the patients initially responded by clinical observation, all four patients relapsed within six months. The use of amphotericin B colloidal dispersion for the initial induction of paracoccidioidomycosis failed to cure this infection. Possible reasons for failure include dose, duration, or reduced efficacy of this lipid preparation. For many fungal infections, lipid-based preparations have been shown to have a therapeutic-toxic advantage, but our experience with Paracoccidioides infections suggests that more careful studies will need to be performed before they can be recommended for use in this mycosis.  (+info)

Osmotic pressure contribution of albumin to colloidal interactions. (6/993)

Two surfaces that come in close contact in a solution with macromolecules present experience an attractive force caused by the osmotic pressure. We present a measurement of this effect by using a micrometer-sized sphere bound to a flat plate through a single molecular attachment in an albumin-containing solution. We obtain the osmotic part of the interaction potential with a resolution of <1 nm and a fraction of kTroom. This attractive interaction is seen to have a range comparable to the size of the albumin molecule. The results are broadly in agreement with a geometric model first proposed by Asakura and Oosawa.  (+info)

The metabolic effects of estriol in female rat liver. (7/993)

The effects of estriol on oxygen uptake, glucose release, lactate and pyruvate production, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate production in perfused rat liver as well as, carbon uptake in rat liver and intracellular calcium in isolated Kupffer cells were investigated. Basal oxygen consumption of perfused liver increased significantly in estriol or ethanol-treated rats. But these increased effects were blocked by gadolinium chloride pretreatment. In a metabolic study, pretreatment with estriol resulted in a decrease in glucose production and in glycolysis while an increase in ketogenesis. A more oxidized redox state of the mitochondria was indicated by increased ratios of perfusate [lactate]/[pyruvate] and decreased ratios of perfusate [beta-hydroxybutyrate]/[acetoacetate]. Carbon uptake of Kupffer-cell increased significantly in estriol-treated rats. But these increased uptake were not shown in rats pre-treated by gadolinium chloride blocking phagocytosis. In isolated Kupffer cells from estriol-treated rats, intracellular calcium was more significantly increased after addition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) than in controls. These findings suggest that the metabolic effects of estriol (two mg per 100 mg body wt) can be summarized to be highly toxic in rat liver, and these findings suggest that oral administration of estrogens may induce hepatic dysfunctions and play a role in the development of liver disease.  (+info)

Phase I and pharmacologic study of 9-aminocamptothecin colloidal dispersion formulation in patients with refractory or relapsed acute leukemia. (8/993)

PURPOSE: Topoisomerase I inhibitors have shown promising anti leukemic activity in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome. In this phase I study, we investigated the toxicity profile, pharmacokinetics, and activity of a prolonged continuous infusion schedule of the colloidal dispersion formulation of 9-amino-camptothecin (9-AC/CD) in patients with acute leukemia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with refractory or relapsed AML, acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or chronic myelogenous leukemia in blastic phase (CML-BP) were included in the study. Eligibility criteria were age greater than 15 years, performance status of 2 or better, creatinine < 1.5 mg/dl, and bilirubin < 1.5 mg/dl. 9-AC/CD was given as a continuous intravenous infusion over seven days every three to four weeks. The starting dose was 0.2 mg/m2/d (1.4 mg/m2/course). Courses were given every three to four weeks according to toxicity and anti leukemic efficacy. This phase I study used the classical 3 + 3 design. The dose was escalated by 50% until grade I toxicity was observed, and then by 30% to 35% until the dose limiting toxicity was defined. At the maximal tolerated dose (MTD), 8 to 10 patients were planned to be treated to better define the toxicity and early-activity profiles. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients (AML thirty-six patients; ALL two patients; CML-BP one patient), median age 56 years, were treated. Severe mucositis was the dose limiting toxicity; it occurred in three of six patients treated at a dose of 1.6 mg/m2/d. The MTD was defined as 1.4 mg/m2/day by the phase I design. Upon expansion of the number of patients, 3 of 10 patients had grade 4 mucositis and 1 of 10 patients had grade 3 diarrhea. Nausea and vomiting were uncommon. No complete or partial remission was observed in 37 evaluable patients. However, 9-AC/CD exhibited antileukemic activity, as reflected by the finding of marrow hypoplasia on day 14 in 46% of the patients. Average steady-state concentration of 9-AC lactone was close to 10 nmol/l, and the of 9-AC lactone area under curve (AUC) was 1409 +/- 705 nmol/l. hr. CONCLUSION: The MTD of 9-AC/CD given as a seven-day continuous infusion was 1.4 mg/m2/d (9.8 mg/m2/course) in patients with acute leukemia. This represents three to fourfold dose escalation compared with the MTD of 9-AC given as shorter continuous infusion (three days) in patients with solid tumors. Future studies will determine the activity of prolonged administration of 9-AC/CD in patients with better prognosis acute leukemia.  (+info)

Colloids are a type of mixture that contains particles that are intermediate in size between those found in solutions and suspensions. These particles range in size from about 1 to 1000 nanometers in diameter, which is smaller than what can be seen with the naked eye, but larger than the molecules in a solution.

Colloids are created when one substance, called the dispersed phase, is dispersed in another substance, called the continuous phase. The dispersed phase can consist of particles such as proteins, emulsified fats, or finely divided solids, while the continuous phase is usually a liquid, but can also be a gas or a solid.

Colloids are important in many areas of medicine and biology, including drug delivery, diagnostic imaging, and tissue engineering. They are also found in nature, such as in milk, blood, and fog. The properties of colloids can be affected by factors such as pH, temperature, and the presence of other substances, which can influence their stability and behavior.

Technetium Tc 99m Sulfur Colloid is a radioactive tracer used in medical imaging procedures, specifically in nuclear medicine. It is composed of tiny particles of sulfur colloid that are labeled with the radioisotope Technetium-99m. This compound is typically injected into the patient's body, where it accumulates in certain organs or tissues, depending on the specific medical test being conducted.

The radioactive emissions from Technetium Tc 99m Sulfur Colloid are then detected by a gamma camera, which produces images that can help doctors diagnose various medical conditions, such as liver disease, inflammation, or tumors. The half-life of Technetium-99m is approximately six hours, which means that its radioactivity decreases rapidly and is eliminated from the body within a few days.

Colloid cysts are benign (non-cancerous) tumors that typically form in the third ventricle of the brain, near the center of the brain and between the two hemispheres. These cysts are filled with a gel-like substance called colloid material, which gives them their name.

Colloid cysts are relatively rare, accounting for less than 1% of all primary brain tumors. They can occur at any age but are most commonly found in adults between the ages of 20 and 50.

While colloid cysts are generally slow-growing, they can cause symptoms if they become large enough to obstruct the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. This obstruction can lead to increased pressure in the brain, a condition known as hydrocephalus. Symptoms of colloid cysts may include headache, nausea, vomiting, difficulty with balance and coordination, and changes in mental status.

Treatment for colloid cysts typically involves surgical removal of the cyst. This can often be done using minimally invasive techniques such as endoscopic surgery. In some cases, however, open surgery may be necessary to ensure complete removal of the cyst.

Technetium compounds refer to chemical substances that contain the radioactive technetium (Tc) element. Technetium is a naturally rare element and does not have any stable isotopes, making it only exist in trace amounts in the Earth's crust. However, it can be produced artificially in nuclear reactors.

Technetium compounds are widely used in medical imaging as radioactive tracers in diagnostic procedures. The most common technetium compound is Technetium-99m (Tc-99m), which has a half-life of 6 hours and emits gamma rays that can be detected by external cameras. Tc-99m is often bound to various pharmaceuticals, such as methylene diphosphonate (MDP) or human serum albumin (HSA), to target specific organs or tissues in the body.

Technetium compounds are used in a variety of diagnostic procedures, including bone scans, lung perfusion scans, myocardial perfusion imaging, and brain scans. They provide valuable information about organ function, blood flow, and tissue metabolism, helping doctors diagnose various medical conditions such as cancer, heart disease, and bone fractures.

It is important to note that technetium compounds should only be used under the supervision of trained medical professionals due to their radioactive nature. Proper handling, administration, and disposal procedures must be followed to ensure safety and minimize radiation exposure.

Plasma substitutes are fluids that are used to replace the plasma volume in conditions such as hypovolemia (low blood volume) or plasma loss, for example due to severe burns, trauma, or major surgery. They do not contain cells or clotting factors, but they help to maintain intravascular volume and tissue perfusion. Plasma substitutes can be divided into two main categories: crystalloids and colloids.

Crystalloid solutions contain small molecules that can easily move between intracellular and extracellular spaces. Examples include normal saline (0.9% sodium chloride) and lactated Ringer's solution. They are less expensive and have a lower risk of allergic reactions compared to colloids, but they may require larger volumes to achieve the same effect due to their rapid distribution in the body.

Colloid solutions contain larger molecules that tend to stay within the intravascular space for longer periods, thus increasing the oncotic pressure and helping to maintain fluid balance. Examples include albumin, fresh frozen plasma, and synthetic colloids such as hydroxyethyl starch (HES) and gelatin. Colloids may be more effective in restoring intravascular volume, but they carry a higher risk of allergic reactions and anaphylaxis, and some types have been associated with adverse effects such as kidney injury and coagulopathy.

The choice of plasma substitute depends on various factors, including the patient's clinical condition, the underlying cause of plasma loss, and any contraindications or potential side effects of the available products. It is important to monitor the patient's hemodynamic status, electrolyte balance, and coagulation profile during and after the administration of plasma substitutes to ensure appropriate resuscitation and avoid complications.

A gold colloid, radioactive, refers to a type of medical preparation where tiny particles of radioactive gold (usually in the form of gold-198 isotope) are suspended in a liquid medium. Gold-198 has a half-life of about 2.7 days and emits beta particles and gamma radiation.

Radioactive gold colloid is sometimes used in interventional radiology procedures for the treatment of various conditions, such as liver tumors or inflammatory diseases like arthritis. The radioactivity of the gold particles helps to deliver targeted radiation therapy to the affected area, while the small size and colloidal form allow for easy administration and distribution within the body.

It is important to note that the use of radioactive materials in medical procedures requires specialized training and equipment, and should only be performed by qualified healthcare professionals in a controlled environment.

Hydroxyethyl starch derivatives are modified starches that are used as plasma expanders in medicine. They are created by chemically treating corn, potato, or wheat starch with hydroxylethyl groups, which makes the starch more soluble and less likely to be broken down by enzymes in the body. This results in a large molecule that can remain in the bloodstream for an extended period, increasing intravascular volume and improving circulation.

These derivatives are available in different molecular weights and substitution patterns, which affect their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. They are used to treat or prevent hypovolemia (low blood volume) due to various causes such as bleeding, burns, or dehydration. Common brand names include Hetastarch, Pentastarch, and Voluven.

It's important to note that the use of hydroxyethyl starch derivatives has been associated with adverse effects, including kidney injury, coagulopathy, and pruritus (severe itching). Therefore, their use should be carefully monitored and restricted to specific clinical situations.

Tin compounds refer to chemical substances that contain tin (Sn) combined with one or more other elements. Tin can form various types of compounds, including oxides, sulfides, halides, and organometallic compounds. These compounds have different properties and uses depending on the other element(s) they are combined with.

For example:

* Tin (IV) oxide (SnO2) is a white powder used as an opacifying agent in glass and ceramics, as well as a component in some types of batteries.
* Tin (II) sulfide (SnS) is a black or brown solid used in the manufacture of some types of semiconductors.
* Tin (IV) chloride (SnCl4) is a colorless liquid used as a catalyst in the production of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and other plastics.
* Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are used as biocides and antifouling agents in marine paints. However, they have been found to be toxic to aquatic life and are being phased out in many countries.

Technetium is not a medical term itself, but it is a chemical element with the symbol Tc and atomic number 43. However, in the field of nuclear medicine, which is a branch of medicine that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose or treat diseases, Technetium-99m (a radioisotope of technetium) is commonly used for various diagnostic procedures.

Technetium-99m is a metastable nuclear isomer of technetium-99, and it emits gamma rays that can be detected outside the body to create images of internal organs or tissues. It has a short half-life of about 6 hours, which makes it ideal for diagnostic imaging since it decays quickly and reduces the patient's exposure to radiation.

Technetium-99m is used in a variety of medical procedures, such as bone scans, lung scans, heart scans, liver-spleen scans, brain scans, and kidney scans, among others. It can be attached to different pharmaceuticals or molecules that target specific organs or tissues, allowing healthcare professionals to assess their function or identify any abnormalities.

Isotonic solutions are defined in the context of medical and physiological sciences as solutions that contain the same concentration of solutes (dissolved particles) as another solution, usually the bodily fluids like blood. This means that if you compare the concentration of solute particles in two isotonic solutions, they will be equal.

A common example is a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, also known as normal saline. The concentration of NaCl in this solution is approximately equal to the concentration found in the fluid portion of human blood, making it isotonic with blood.

Isotonic solutions are crucial in medical settings for various purposes, such as intravenous (IV) fluids replacement, wound care, and irrigation solutions. They help maintain fluid balance, prevent excessive water movement across cell membranes, and reduce the risk of damaging cells due to osmotic pressure differences between the solution and bodily fluids.

Fluid therapy, in a medical context, refers to the administration of fluids into a patient's circulatory system for various therapeutic purposes. This can be done intravenously (through a vein), intraosseously (through a bone), or subcutaneously (under the skin). The goal of fluid therapy is to correct or prevent imbalances in the body's fluids and electrolytes, maintain or restore blood volume, and support organ function.

The types of fluids used in fluid therapy can include crystalloids (which contain electrolytes and water) and colloids (which contain larger molecules like proteins). The choice of fluid depends on the patient's specific needs and condition. Fluid therapy is commonly used in the treatment of dehydration, shock, sepsis, trauma, surgery, and other medical conditions that can affect the body's fluid balance.

Proper administration of fluid therapy requires careful monitoring of the patient's vital signs, urine output, electrolyte levels, and overall clinical status to ensure that the therapy is effective and safe.

Polygeline is a colloidal plasma expander, which is a type of intravenous fluid used to increase blood volume in hypovolemia or shock. It is made up of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules that are cross-linked with divinyl sulfone and then suspended in an electrolyte solution. Polygeline works by drawing water into the circulation, thereby increasing the volume of the plasma.

It is important to note that polygeline has been associated with anaphylactic reactions and therefore should be used with caution. It is also not recommended for use in patients with renal impairment or those who are allergic to PVP. As with any medical treatment, it should only be administered under the direction of a qualified healthcare professional.

Osmotic pressure is a fundamental concept in the field of physiology and biochemistry. It refers to the pressure that is required to be applied to a solution to prevent the flow of solvent (like water) into it, through a semi-permeable membrane, when the solution is separated from a pure solvent or a solution of lower solute concentration.

In simpler terms, osmotic pressure is the force that drives the natural movement of solvent molecules from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration, across a semi-permeable membrane. This process is crucial for maintaining the fluid balance and nutrient transport in living organisms.

The osmotic pressure of a solution can be determined by its solute concentration, temperature, and the ideal gas law. It is often expressed in units of atmospheres (atm), millimeters of mercury (mmHg), or pascals (Pa). In medical contexts, understanding osmotic pressure is essential for managing various clinical conditions such as dehydration, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and dialysis treatments.

Lymphoscintigraphy is a medical imaging technique that uses radioactive tracers to examine the lymphatic system, specifically the lymph nodes and vessels. In this procedure, a small amount of radioactive material is injected into the area of interest, usually an extremity or the site of a surgical incision. The tracer then travels through the lymphatic channels and accumulates in the regional lymph nodes. A specialized camera called a gamma camera detects the radiation emitted by the tracer and creates images that reveal the function and anatomy of the lymphatic system.

Lymphoscintigraphy is often used to diagnose and assess conditions affecting the lymphatic system, such as lymphedema, cancer metastasis to lymph nodes, or unusual lymphatic flow patterns. It can help identify sentinel lymph nodes (the first node(s) to receive drainage from a tumor) in patients with melanoma and breast cancer, which is crucial for surgical planning and staging purposes.

In summary, lymphoscintigraphy is a non-invasive imaging technique that utilizes radioactive tracers to visualize the lymphatic system's structure and function, providing valuable information for diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making in various clinical scenarios.

The third ventricle is a narrow, fluid-filled cavity in the brain that is located between the thalamus and hypothalamus. It is one of the four ventricles in the ventricular system of the brain, which produces and circulates cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) around the brain and spinal cord.

The third ventricle is shaped like a slit and communicates with the lateral ventricles through the interventricular foramen (also known as the foramen of Monro), and with the fourth ventricle through the cerebral aqueduct (also known as the aqueduct of Sylvius).

The third ventricle contains choroid plexus tissue, which produces CSF. The fluid flows from the lateral ventricles into the third ventricle, then through the cerebral aqueduct and into the fourth ventricle, where it can circulate around the brainstem and spinal cord before being absorbed back into the bloodstream.

Abnormalities in the third ventricle, such as enlargement or obstruction of the cerebral aqueduct, can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition characterized by an accumulation of CSF in the brain.

Sulfur is not typically referred to in the context of a medical definition, as it is an element found in nature and not a specific medical condition or concept. However, sulfur does have some relevance to certain medical topics:

* Sulfur is an essential element that is a component of several amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and is necessary for the proper functioning of enzymes and other biological processes in the body.
* Sulfur-containing compounds, such as glutathione, play important roles in antioxidant defense and detoxification in the body.
* Some medications and supplements contain sulfur or sulfur-containing compounds, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which is used topically for pain relief and inflammation.
* Sulfur baths and other forms of sulfur-based therapies have been used historically in alternative medicine to treat various conditions, although their effectiveness is not well-established by scientific research.

It's important to note that while sulfur itself is not a medical term, it can be relevant to certain medical topics and should be discussed with a healthcare professional if you have any questions or concerns about its use in medications, supplements, or therapies.

Radionuclide imaging, also known as nuclear medicine, is a medical imaging technique that uses small amounts of radioactive material, called radionuclides or radiopharmaceuticals, to diagnose and treat various diseases and conditions. The radionuclides are introduced into the body through injection, inhalation, or ingestion and accumulate in specific organs or tissues. A special camera then detects the gamma rays emitted by these radionuclides and converts them into images that provide information about the structure and function of the organ or tissue being studied.

Radionuclide imaging can be used to evaluate a wide range of medical conditions, including heart disease, cancer, neurological disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, and bone diseases. The technique is non-invasive and generally safe, with minimal exposure to radiation. However, it should only be performed by qualified healthcare professionals in accordance with established guidelines and regulations.

Antimony is a toxic metallic element with the symbol Sb and atomic number 51. It exists in several allotropic forms and can be found naturally as the mineral stibnite. Antimony has been used for centuries in various applications, including medicinal ones, although its use in medicine has largely fallen out of favor due to its toxicity.

In a medical context, antimony may still be encountered in certain medications used to treat parasitic infections, such as pentavalent antimony compounds (e.g., sodium stibogluconate and meglumine antimoniate) for the treatment of leishmaniasis. However, these drugs can have significant side effects and their use is typically reserved for severe cases that cannot be treated with other medications.

It's important to note that exposure to antimony in high concentrations or over prolonged periods can lead to serious health issues, including respiratory problems, skin irritation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and even neurological damage. Therefore, handling antimony-containing substances should be done with caution and appropriate safety measures.

Hypovolemia is a medical condition characterized by a decreased volume of circulating blood in the body, leading to inadequate tissue perfusion and oxygenation. This can occur due to various reasons such as bleeding, dehydration, vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive sweating, which result in a reduced amount of fluid in the intravascular space.

The severity of hypovolemia depends on the extent of fluid loss and can range from mild to severe. Symptoms may include thirst, dry mouth, weakness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and decreased urine output. Severe hypovolemia can lead to shock, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly and effectively.

Rehydration solutions are medically formulated drinks designed to restore fluid and electrolyte balance in the body, particularly when someone is dehydrated due to vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive sweating. These solutions typically contain water, glucose (or sucrose), and essential electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate in specific concentrations to match the body's needs. Common examples of rehydration solutions include oral rehydration salts (ORS) and sports drinks, which help replenish the body's water and electrolyte levels, promoting rapid and effective rehydration.

The thyroid gland is a major endocrine gland located in the neck, anterior to the trachea and extends from the lower third of the Adams apple to the suprasternal notch. It has two lateral lobes, connected by an isthmus, and sometimes a pyramidal lobe. This gland plays a crucial role in the metabolism, growth, and development of the human body through the production of thyroid hormones (triiodothyronine/T3 and thyroxine/T4) and calcitonin. The thyroid hormones regulate body temperature, heart rate, and the production of protein, while calcitonin helps in controlling calcium levels in the blood. The function of the thyroid gland is controlled by the hypothalamus and pituitary gland through the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH).

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Tin" does not have a medical definition. Tin is a chemical element with the symbol Sn and atomic number 50. It is a malleable, ductile, silvery-white post-transition metal. It is found in nature mainly as tin oxides and is obtained from the mineral cassiterite through mining and processing.

Tin has no known biological role in humans, animals, or plants, and it is not considered an essential nutrient. Small amounts of tin can be found in some foods and drinking water, but these levels are generally low and not considered harmful. High levels of tin can be toxic to the human body, causing symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

If you have any questions about a medical condition or treatment, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional for accurate information and guidance.

Technetium Tc 99m Aggregated Albumin is a radiopharmaceutical preparation used in diagnostic imaging. It consists of radioactive technetium-99m (^99m^Tc) chemically bonded to human serum albumin, which has been aggregated to increase its size and alter its clearance from the body.

The resulting compound is injected into the patient's bloodstream, where it accumulates in the reticuloendothelial system (RES), including the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. The radioactive emission of technetium-99m can then be detected by a gamma camera, producing images that reflect the distribution and function of the RES.

This imaging technique is used to diagnose and monitor various conditions, such as liver disease, inflammation, or tumors. It provides valuable information about the patient's health status and helps guide medical decision-making.

Hemodilution is a medical term that refers to the reduction in the concentration of certain components in the blood, usually referring to red blood cells (RBCs) or hemoglobin. This occurs when an individual's plasma volume expands due to the infusion of intravenous fluids or the body's own production of fluid, such as during severe infection or inflammation. As a result, the number of RBCs per unit of blood decreases, leading to a lower hematocrit and hemoglobin level. It is important to note that while hemodilution reduces the concentration of RBCs in the blood, it does not necessarily indicate anemia or blood loss.

Resuscitation is a medical term that refers to the process of reversing cardiopulmonary arrest or preventing further deterioration of someone in cardiac or respiratory arrest. It involves a series of interventions aimed at restoring spontaneous blood circulation and breathing, thereby preventing or minimizing tissue damage due to lack of oxygen.

The most common form of resuscitation is cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which combines chest compressions to manually pump blood through the body with rescue breaths to provide oxygen to the lungs. In a hospital setting, more advanced techniques such as defibrillation, medication administration, and intubation may also be used as part of the resuscitation process.

The goal of resuscitation is to stabilize the patient's condition and prevent further harm while treating the underlying cause of the arrest. Successful resuscitation can lead to a full recovery or, in some cases, result in varying degrees of neurological impairment depending on the severity and duration of the cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Indium is not a medical term, but it is a chemical element with the symbol In and atomic number 49. It is a soft, silvery-white, post-transition metal that is rarely found in its pure form in nature. It is primarily used in the production of electronics, such as flat panel displays, and in nuclear medicine as a radiation source for medical imaging.

In nuclear medicine, indium-111 is used in the labeling of white blood cells to diagnose and locate abscesses, inflammation, and infection. The indium-111 labeled white blood cells are injected into the patient's body, and then a gamma camera is used to track their movement and identify areas of infection or inflammation.

Therefore, while indium itself is not a medical term, it does have important medical applications in diagnostic imaging.

Gelatin is not strictly a medical term, but it is often used in medical contexts. Medically, gelatin is recognized as a protein-rich substance that is derived from collagen, which is found in the skin, bones, and connective tissue of animals. It is commonly used in the production of various medical and pharmaceutical products such as capsules, wound dressings, and drug delivery systems due to its biocompatibility and ability to form gels.

In a broader sense, gelatin is a translucent, colorless, flavorless food ingredient that is derived from collagen through a process called hydrolysis. It is widely used in the food industry as a gelling agent, thickener, stabilizer, and texturizer in various foods such as candies, desserts, marshmallows, and yogurts.

It's worth noting that while gelatin has many uses, it may not be suitable for vegetarians or those with dietary restrictions since it is derived from animal products.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Silver" is not a medical term. It is a chemical element with the symbol Ag and atomic number 47. Silver is a soft, white, lustrous transition metal that occurs in its pure, free form (native silver) as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite.

In the medical field, silver compounds have been used for their antimicrobial properties. For example, silver sulfadiazine is a common topical cream used to prevent or treat wound infections. Colloidal silver, a suspension of silver particles in a liquid, has also been promoted as a dietary supplement and alternative treatment for various conditions, but its effectiveness and safety are not well-established.

The Mononuclear Phagocyte System (MPS) is a network of specialized immune cells distributed throughout the body, primarily consisting of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. These cells share a common bone marrow-derived precursor and play crucial roles in innate and adaptive immunity. They are involved in various functions such as:

1. Phagocytosis: engulfing and destroying foreign particles, microbes, and cellular debris.
2. Antigen presentation: processing and presenting antigens to T-cells to initiate an adaptive immune response.
3. Cytokine production: releasing pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to regulate immune responses and maintain tissue homeostasis.
4. Immune regulation: modulating the activity of other immune cells, including T-cells, B-cells, and natural killer (NK) cells.

The MPS is essential for maintaining tissue integrity, fighting infections, and orchestrating immune responses. Its components are found in various tissues, including the liver (Kupffer cells), spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and connective tissues.

Liquid crystals (LCs) are not exclusive to the medical field, but they do have important applications in medicine, particularly in the development of display technologies for medical devices. Here is a general definition:

Liquid crystals are a state of matter that possess properties between those of conventional liquids and solid crystals. They can flow like liquids but have molecules oriented in a way that they can reflect light, creating birefringence. This unique property makes them useful in various applications, such as LCDs (liquid crystal displays) found in many electronic devices, including medical equipment.

In the context of medicine, liquid crystals are primarily used in LCD screens for medical devices like monitors, imaging systems, and diagnostic equipment. They enable high-resolution, clear, and adjustable visualization of medical images, which is crucial for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

Albumins are a type of protein found in various biological fluids, including blood plasma. The most well-known albumin is serum albumin, which is produced by the liver and is the most abundant protein in blood plasma. Serum albumin plays several important roles in the body, such as maintaining oncotic pressure (which helps to regulate fluid balance in the body), transporting various substances (such as hormones, fatty acids, and drugs), and acting as an antioxidant.

Albumins are soluble in water and have a molecular weight ranging from 65,000 to 69,000 daltons. They are composed of a single polypeptide chain that contains approximately 585 amino acid residues. The structure of albumin is characterized by a high proportion of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, which give it a stable, folded conformation.

In addition to their role in human physiology, albumins are also used as diagnostic markers in medicine. For example, low serum albumin levels may indicate liver disease, malnutrition, or inflammation, while high levels may be seen in dehydration or certain types of kidney disease. Albumins may also be used as a replacement therapy in patients with severe protein loss, such as those with nephrotic syndrome or burn injuries.

Rosaniline dyes are a type of basic dye that were first synthesized in the late 19th century. They are named after rosaniline, which is a primary chemical used in their production. Rosaniline dyes are characterized by their ability to form complexes with metal ions, which can then bind to proteins and other biological molecules. This property makes them useful as histological stains, which are used to highlight specific structures or features within tissues and cells.

Rosaniline dyes include a range of different chemicals, such as methyl violet, crystal violet, and basic fuchsin. These dyes are often used in combination with other staining techniques to provide contrast and enhance the visibility of specific cellular components. For example, they may be used to stain nuclei, cytoplasm, or other structures within cells, allowing researchers and clinicians to visualize and analyze tissue samples more effectively.

It's worth noting that some rosaniline dyes have been found to have potential health hazards, particularly when used in certain forms or concentrations. Therefore, it's important to follow proper safety protocols when handling these chemicals and to use them only under the guidance of trained professionals.

In the context of medical and health sciences, particle size generally refers to the diameter or dimension of particles, which can be in the form of solid particles, droplets, or aerosols. These particles may include airborne pollutants, pharmaceutical drugs, or medical devices such as nanoparticles used in drug delivery systems.

Particle size is an important factor to consider in various medical applications because it can affect the behavior and interactions of particles with biological systems. For example, smaller particle sizes can lead to greater absorption and distribution throughout the body, while larger particle sizes may be filtered out by the body's natural defense mechanisms. Therefore, understanding particle size and its implications is crucial for optimizing the safety and efficacy of medical treatments and interventions.

A cyst is a closed sac, having a distinct membrane and division between the sac and its surrounding tissue, that contains fluid, air, or semisolid material. Cysts can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, internal organs, and bones. They can be caused by various factors, such as infection, genetic predisposition, or blockage of a duct or gland. Some cysts may cause symptoms, such as pain or discomfort, while others may not cause any symptoms at all. Treatment for cysts depends on the type and location of the cyst, as well as whether it is causing any problems. Some cysts may go away on their own, while others may need to be drained or removed through a surgical procedure.

Cerebral ventriculography is a medical imaging technique that involves the injection of a contrast material into the cerebral ventricles, which are fluid-filled spaces within the brain. The purpose of this procedure is to produce detailed images of the ventricular system and the surrounding structures in order to diagnose and evaluate various neurological conditions, such as hydrocephalus (excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles), tumors, or other abnormalities that may be causing obstruction or compression of the ventricular system.

The procedure typically involves inserting a thin, flexible tube called a catheter into the lateral ventricle of the brain through a small hole drilled in the skull. The contrast material is then injected through the catheter and X-ray images are taken as the contrast material flows through the ventricular system. These images can help to identify any abnormalities or blockages that may be present.

Cerebral ventriculography has largely been replaced by non-invasive imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provide similar information without the need for invasive procedures. However, cerebral ventriculography may still be used in certain cases where these other methods are not sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis.

Neuroendoscopy is a minimally invasive surgical technique that involves the use of an endoscope to access and treat various conditions within the brain and spinal column. An endoscope is a long, flexible tube with a light and camera at its tip, which allows surgeons to view and operate on internal structures through small incisions or natural openings in the body.

In neuroendoscopy, the surgeon uses the endoscope to navigate through the brain's ventricular system (fluid-filled spaces) or other narrow spaces within the skull or spine to diagnose and treat conditions such as hydrocephalus, brain tumors, arachnoid cysts, and intraventricular hemorrhage.

The benefits of neuroendoscopy include reduced trauma to surrounding tissues, shorter hospital stays, faster recovery times, and improved outcomes compared to traditional open surgical approaches. However, neuroendoscopic procedures require specialized training and expertise due to the complexity of the anatomy involved.

Silanes are a group of chemical compounds that contain silicon and hydrogen. The general formula for silanes is Si_xH_(2x+2), where x is a positive integer. Silanes are named after their parent compound, silane (SiH4), which contains one silicon atom and four hydrogen atoms.

Silanes are colorless and highly flammable gases at room temperature. They are typically prepared by the reaction of metal silicides with acids or by the reduction of halogenated silanes. Silanes have a variety of industrial applications, including as intermediates in the production of silicon-based materials such as semiconductors and polymers.

In medical contexts, silanes are not typically used directly. However, some silane-containing compounds have been investigated for their potential therapeutic uses. For example, some organosilanes have been shown to have antimicrobial properties and may be useful as disinfectants or in the development of medical devices. Other silane-containing materials have been studied for their potential use in drug delivery systems or as imaging agents in diagnostic procedures.

It is important to note that some silanes can be hazardous if not handled properly, and they should only be used by trained professionals in a controlled environment. Exposure to silanes can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects.

Serum albumin is the most abundant protein in human blood plasma, synthesized by the liver. It plays a crucial role in maintaining the oncotic pressure or colloid osmotic pressure of blood, which helps to regulate the fluid balance between the intravascular and extravascular spaces.

Serum albumin has a molecular weight of around 66 kDa and is composed of a single polypeptide chain. It contains several binding sites for various endogenous and exogenous substances, such as bilirubin, fatty acids, hormones, and drugs, facilitating their transport throughout the body. Additionally, albumin possesses antioxidant properties, protecting against oxidative damage.

Albumin levels in the blood are often used as a clinical indicator of liver function, nutritional status, and overall health. Low serum albumin levels may suggest liver disease, malnutrition, inflammation, or kidney dysfunction.

Technetium Tc 99m Disofenin is not a medical condition, but rather a radiopharmaceutical used in diagnostic imaging. It is a radioactive tracer used in nuclear medicine scans, specifically for liver and biliary system imaging. The compound consists of the radioisotope Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) bonded to the pharmaceutical Disofenin.

The Tc-99m is a gamma emitter with a half-life of 6 hours, making it ideal for diagnostic imaging. When administered to the patient, the compound is taken up by the liver and excreted into the bile ducts and gallbladder, allowing medical professionals to visualize these structures using a gamma camera. This can help detect various conditions such as tumors, gallstones, or obstructions in the biliary system.

It's important to note that Technetium Tc 99m Disofenin is used diagnostically and not for therapeutic purposes. The radiation exposure from this compound is generally low and considered safe for diagnostic use. However, as with any medical procedure involving radiation, the benefits and risks should be carefully weighed and discussed with a healthcare professional.

Povidone, also known as PVP or polyvinylpyrrolidone, is not a medication itself but rather a pharmaceutical ingredient used in various medical and healthcare products. It is a water-soluble synthetic polymer that has the ability to bind to and carry other substances, such as drugs or iodine.

In medical applications, povidone is often used as a binder or coating agent in pharmaceutical tablets and capsules. It can also be found in some topical antiseptic solutions, such as those containing iodine, where it helps to stabilize and control the release of the active ingredient.

It's important to note that while povidone is a widely used pharmaceutical ingredient, it is not typically considered a medication on its own.

... it split into two parts Colloids and Surfaces A and Colloids and Surfaces B. The journal is published by Elsevier. Colloids and ... "Publisher's Note". Colloids Surf. A. Elsevier. 70 (1): v. 1993. doi:10.1016/0927-7757(93)80490-6. Colloids and Surfaces A: ... Colloids and Surfaces is a peer-reviewed journal of surface science. It was established in 1980. In 1993, ... The journal is published biweekly jointly edited by M. Adler, F. Grieser, J.B. Li and D. Prieve Colloids and Surfaces B: ...
Some colloids are translucent because of the Tyndall effect, which is the scattering of light by particles in the colloid. ... Other colloids may be opaque or have a slight color. Colloidal suspensions are the subject of interface and colloid science. ... Preparation of colloids. substech.com Everett, D. H. (1988). Basic principles of colloid science. London: Royal Society of ... Various types of colloids are recognised: inorganic colloids (e.g. clay particles, silicates, iron oxy-hydroxides), organic ...
A colloid mill is a machine that is used to reduce the particle size of a solid in suspension in a liquid, or to reduce the ... Colloid mills work on the rotor-stator principle: a rotor turns at high speeds (2000 - 18000 RPM). A high level of hydraulic ... Colloid mills are frequently used to increase the stability of suspensions and emulsions, but can also be used to reduce the ... Colloid mills are used in the following industries: Pharmaceutical Cosmetic Paint Soap Textile Paper Food Grease A colloidal ...
Properties of a Colloid (applicable to sols) Heterogeneous Mixture Size of colloid varies from 1 nm - 100 nm They show the ... Sols are stable and exhibit the Tyndall effect, which is the scattering of light by the particles in the colloid. Examples ... Colloids, Colloidal chemistry, All stub articles, Chemistry stubs). ...
... s can be diagnosed by symptoms presented. Additional testing is required and the colloid cyst symptoms can resemble ... A colloid cyst is a non-malignant tumor in the brain. It consists of a gelatinous material contained within a membrane of ... Colloid Cyst - New York Presbyterian Hospital Archived 22 June 2015 at the Wayback Machine. Nyp.org. Retrieved on 2013-08-15. ... Colloid cyst symptoms have been associated with four variables: cyst size, cyst imaging characteristics, ventricular size, and ...
... s are the most common kind of thyroid nodule. Colloid nodules are usually small enough to be undetectable without ... Colloid nodules, also known as adenomatous nodules or colloid nodular goiter are benign, noncancerous enlargement of thyroid ... Colloid nodules are distinguished by an apparently gelatinous mass of colloid both surrounding and contained within follicular ... Colloid nodules may be initially identified as an unspecified kind of thyroid nodule. Follow-up examinations typically include ...
In a colloid thruster, charged liquid droplets are produced by an electrospray process and then accelerated by a static ... A colloid thruster (or "electrospray thruster") is a type of low thrust electric propulsion rocket engine that uses ... By the end of April 2015, Busek had developed a smaller electrospray colloid thruster capable of generating 20 mN in a 17.8 x ... Colloid Thruster Lecture Notes - MIT v t e (Engines, Spacecraft propulsion, Electrostatic motors, All stub articles, Outer ...
A protective colloid is a lyophilic colloid that when present in small quantities keeps lyophobic colloids from precipitating ... When a small amount of hydrophilic colloid is added to hydrophobic colloids it may coagulate the latter. This is due to ... The gold number is the weight in milligrams of a protective colloid which checks the coagulation of 10ml of a given gold sol on ... Lyophilic sols like starch and gelatin act as protective colloids. For a comparative study Zsigmondy introduced a scale of ...
Various types of colloids are recognised: inorganic colloids (clay particles, silicates, iron oxy-hydroxides, ...), organic ... The question is less clear for small organic colloids often mixed in porewater with truly dissolved organic molecules. Colloid ... de Jonge, L.W.; C. Kjaergaard; P. Moldrup (2004). "Colloids and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in soils: An ... Colloid-facilitated transport designates a transport process by which colloidal particles serve as transport vector of diverse ...
... is an electroacoustic phenomenon that arises when ultrasound propagates through a fluid that contains ... This phenomenon is widely used for measuring zeta potential in concentrated colloids. Electric sonic amplitude Electroacoustic ... phenomena Interface and colloid science Zeta potential ISO International Standard 13099, Parts 1,2 and 3, "Colloidal systems - ...
Colloid chemistry is able to create materials with a structural hierarchy through appropriate functionalized colloids. This ... The Colloid Chemistry department, headed by Markus Antonietti, deals with the synthesis of various colloidal structures in the ... The Institute of Colloids and Interfaces is currently headed by the following people: Scientific Members, Directors Prof. Dr. ... "Colloid chemistry". Retrieved April 23, 2014. Max Planck Institute, Munich. "Biomaterials". Retrieved April 23, 2014. Max ...
... is a peer-reviewed scientific journal which publishes in the field of colloid and polymer science ... "Colloid and Polymer Science". 2020 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Clarivate. 2021. "Colloid and ... Colloid and Polymer Science had a 2021 impact factor of 2.434. The editors in chief of the journal are C.M. Papadakis (TU ...
Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces American Chemical Society division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry (Use American ... Interface and colloid science is an interdisciplinary intersection of branches of chemistry, physics, nanoscience and other ... Interface and colloid science has applications and ramifications in the chemical industry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, ... Interface (matter) Electrokinetic phenomena Surface science Lyklema, J. "Fundamentals of Interface and Colloid Science", vol.2 ...
Journal of Colloid and Interface Science Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science "Advances in Colloid and Interface ... Advances in Colloid and Interface Science is a quarterly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Elsevier. It covers all ... aspects of colloid and interface science, including surface chemistry, physical chemistry, and surface tension. The journal is ...
Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces Advances in Colloid and ... The Journal of Colloid and Interface Science is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Elsevier. It covers research ... "Journal of Colloid and Interface Science". 2020 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2021. ... The editor-in-chief is Martin Malmsten (Uppsala University). The journal was established in 1946 as Journal of Colloid Science ...
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science Current Opinion (Elsevier) Journal of Colloid and Interface Science "Current Opinion ... Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Elsevier. It covers ... in Colloid & Interface Science". 2021 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2022. Official ... the field of physical chemistry, especially research on colloids and interfaces. The journal was established in 1996 and the ...
... colloids; acoustics; viscosity and internal friction of solids; electrets; electrochemistry of oils; radioactive tracers in ...
"Origins of surface charge". Silver Colloids. 2010. Retrieved 27 April 2011. "The electric double layer". Silver Colloids. 2010 ... Hubbe, Martin (2007). "Flocculation of colloids or of fiber slurries". North Carolina State University. Retrieved 16 Apr 2011 ... Journal of Colloid and Interface Science. 280 (2): 544-545. Bibcode:2004JCIS..280..544K. doi:10.1016/j.jcis.2004.08.079. PMID ...
If the colloid particles are spheroid, Tyndall scattering can be mathematically analyzed in terms of Mie theory, which admits ... The Tyndall effect is light scattering by particles in a colloid such as a very fine suspension (a sol). Also known as Tyndall ... Fog scattering traffic light The colloid on the right shows Tyndall effect while the solution does not The path of the laser ... "Chemistry - Colloids". OpenStax. Archived from the original on Mar 7, 2021. Retrieved 2021-03-08. Wriedt, Thomas (2002). "Using ...
Colloids Surf. B Biointerfaces. 113: 276-284. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfb.2013.09.021. PMID 24121071. O'Brien, J.; Shea, K. J. (2016 ...
Colloids Surf. B Biointerfaces. 140: 392-402. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.01.008. PMID 26780252. Gajendiran, M; Rhee, JS; Kim, ... Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces. 146: 879-887. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.07.013. PMID 27459414. Jelkmann, M; Bonengel, S; ...
... is similar to any gel in the way that it is a colloid in which the disperse phase has combined with the ... "Patch Colloids". Research. erc Website. Archived from the original on 2013-12-06. Retrieved 2013-12-02. Ruzicka, Barbara; ... Soft matter is a conceptual term that can be used to categorize polymers, liquid crystals, colloids, amphilphilic molecules, ...
"15.11: Colloids". Chemistry LibreTexts. 27 June 2016. Archived from the original on 23 November 2022. Retrieved 23 November ...
Colloids and Surfaces. B, Biointerfaces. 91: 280-90. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfb.2011.11.015. PMID 22138117. Zhao Y, Shi L, Ji X, Li ... Journal of Colloid and Interface Science. 526: 43-50. Bibcode:2018JCIS..526...43Z. doi:10.1016/j.jcis.2018.04.071. PMID ...
Colloids and Surfaces. 50: 281-293. doi:10.1016/0166-6622(90)80270-E. Shcherbina, K. G.; Mokhosoev, M. V.; Gruba, A. I. ...
Colloids and Surfaces. B, Biointerfaces. 145: 251-256. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.05.007. PMID 27187189. Sharpe PC (November ...
Bohlin, L.; Carlson, T.L.G. (January 1981). "Shear stress relaxation of wheat flour dough and gluten". Colloids and Surfaces. 2 ...
The Lyophilic Colloids. C.C. Thomas, 1933.[6] Fischer, Martin H., George D. McLaughlin and Marian O. Hooker. Soaps and Proteins ... Their Colloid Chemistry in Theory and Practice. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1921.[7] Hooker, Katharine. Byways in ...
Colloids and Surfaces. B, Biointerfaces. 65 (1): 1-10. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfb.2008.02.013. PMID 18499408. Ryman-Rasmussen JP, ...
Colloids and Surfaces. B, Biointerfaces. 200: 111567. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfb.2021.111567. PMID 33454623. S2CID 231634828. van ...
A DOI name is a digital identifier of an object, any object - physical, digital, or abstract. DOIs solve a common problem: keeping track of things. Things can be matter, material, content, or activities.. Designed to be used by humans as well as machines, DOIs identify objects persistently. They allow things to be uniquely identified and accessed reliably. You know what you have, where it is, and others can track it too.. Read more about the identifier, its benefits, and how its used. ...
... it split into two parts Colloids and Surfaces A and Colloids and Surfaces B. The journal is published by Elsevier. Colloids and ... "Publishers Note". Colloids Surf. A. Elsevier. 70 (1): v. 1993. doi:10.1016/0927-7757(93)80490-6. Colloids and Surfaces A: ... Colloids and Surfaces is a peer-reviewed journal of surface science. It was established in 1980. In 1993, ... The journal is published biweekly jointly edited by M. Adler, F. Grieser, J.B. Li and D. Prieve Colloids and Surfaces B: ...
Colloids and Interfaces, an international, peer-reviewed Open Access journal. ... https://www.mdpi.com/journal/colloids/awards.pdf/0/pdf_253_2020_1_award.pdf. ...
The results are relevant to a variety of inclusions, ranging from colloids suspensions to multi-emulsion systems. Such systems ... Solodkov, N. V., Shim, J. & Jones, J. C. Data associated with "Self-Assembly of Fractal Liquid Crystal Colloids". University of ... Self-assembly of fractal liquid crystal colloids. *Nikita V. Solodkov ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-5120-15021, ... The results are relevant to a variety of inclusions, ranging from colloids suspensions to multi-emulsion systems. Such systems ...
Colloids. Class Summary. Colloids are used to provide oncotic expansion of plasma volume. They expand plasma volume to a ...
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Article Acoustic Spectroscopy for Concentrated Polydisperse Colloids with Low Density Contrast. The mechanisms of sound ... Acoustic Spectroscopy for Concentrated Polydisperse Colloids with Low Density Contrast 0 Share Share with Facebook Share with ... No comments were found for Acoustic Spectroscopy for Concentrated Polydisperse Colloids with Low Density Contrast. Be the first ...
View company leaders and background information for American Colloid Company. Search our database of over 100 million company ... These addresses are known to be associated with American Colloid Company however they may be inactive or mailing addresses only ... Create a free account to access additional details for American Colloid Company and other profiles that you visit ...
Welcome to the 18th Food Colloids Conference: Structure, dynamics and function. 19th-22nd of April 2020 in Lund, Sweden. The ... A challenge is that formulated foods often are colloids that are both complex and polydisperse, both in relation to composition ... international experts from academia and industry to share the latest research and developments in the field of food colloids. ...
E. Matijević i D. Goia, "Formation Mechanisms of Uniform Colloid Particles", Croatica Chemica Acta, vol.80, br. 3-4, str. 485- ... Matijević, E. i Goia, D. (2007). Formation Mechanisms of Uniform Colloid Particles. Croatica Chemica Acta, 80 (3-4), 485-491. ... Formation Mechanisms of Uniform Colloid Particles. Egon Matijević ; Center for Advanced Materials Processing Clarkson ... Matijević, E., i Goia, D. (2007). Formation Mechanisms of Uniform Colloid Particles, Croatica Chemica Acta, 80(3-4), str. 485 ...
... shell colloids composed of a 312 nm diameter silica core and a 20 nm thick Au shell are investigated. Large arrays of ... Large arrays of uniaxially aligned core−shell colloids with size aspect ratios ranging from 1.0 to 1.7 are fabricated using a ... The surface plasmon modes of spherical and oblate spheroidal core−shell colloids composed of a 312 nm diameter silica core and ... Optical Properties of Spherical and Oblate Spheroidal Gold Shell Colloids. *J. J. Penninkhof ...
Colloid and interface science is at the heart of all research at the Department of Bionanosciences. ... In a broad sense, colloid and interface science unites all the research themes at the Department of Bionanosciences. In many ...
Class PUC-60 vertical laboratory colloid mill includes a product inlet hopper and recirculation piping. It has a grinding gap ... Probst & Class - www.colloid-mills.com. Driven by a 2.2 kW (3 HP) motor, the Probst & Class PUC-60 vertical laboratory colloid ...
Andrij Trokhymchuk, Institute for Condensed Matter Physics. Ivan Smalyukh, University of Colorado at Boulder. Oleg Lavrentovich, Kent State University. Slobodan Zumer, University of Ljubljana ...
We provide secure, cost-effective access to the UKs richest collection of digital content: giving you access to the latest data and content from leading international publishers and providers.. Find out more at jisc.ac.uk. ...
Title:Evidence of Conformational Changes in Adsorbed Lysozyme Molecule on Silver Colloids. Authors:Goutam Chandra, Kalyan S. ... Download a PDF of the paper titled Evidence of Conformational Changes in Adsorbed Lysozyme Molecule on Silver Colloids, by ... Download a PDF of the paper titled Evidence of Conformational Changes in Adsorbed Lysozyme Molecule on Silver Colloids, by ...
Vietri, M.; Schultz, S. W.; Bellanger, A.; Jones, C. M.; Petersen, L. I.; Raiborg, C.; Skarpen, E.; Pedurupillay, C. R. J.; Kjos, I.; Kip, E. et al.; Timmer, R.; Jain, A.; Collas, P.; Knorr, R. L.; Grellscheid, S. N.; Kusumaatmaja, H.; Brech, A.; Micci, F.; Stenmark, H.; Campsteijn, C.: Unrestrained ESCRT-III drives micronuclear catastrophe and chromosome fragmentation. Nature Cell Biology (2020 ...
... and microstructures that are investigated at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces (MPICI) are built up from ...
... to predict the possible assembled structures from the properties of the colloids and thermodynamic conditions. Quantitative ... in the development of predictive theoretical tools for the study of directed self-assembly of superparamagnetic colloids under ...
Session J15: Active Colloids II. 2:30 PM-4:54 PM, Tuesday, March 3, 2020. Room: 210/212. Sponsoring Units: DFD DSOFT. Chair: ... Abstract: J15.00003 : New mechanism of motility-induced phase separation in active colloids*. Abstract ... We show that such torques take place in suspensions of Janus colloids driven by an electric field. From the electrostatic ...
In the first approach, colloid particles were deposited on surfaces in a process similar to dip coating. Large-area crystalline ... In the first approach, colloid particles were deposited on surfaces in a process similar to dip coating. Large-area crystalline ... In the first approach, colloid particles were deposited on surfaces in a process similar to dip coating. Large-area crystalline ... In the first approach, colloid particles were deposited on surfaces in a process similar to dip coating. Large-area crystalline ...
Satomimagaes Colloid is out now digitally, with four new songs + arrangements of intimate, enchanted sound. Lathe supply ... Satomimagaes Colloid is out now digitally, with four new songs + arrangements of intimate, enchanted sound. Lathe supply ...
Colloids and Light Scattering-ChemTopic™ Lab Activity. Carried out on an overhead projector, the reaction of sodium thiosulfate ... Aloha Chemical Sunset: Colloids and Light Scattering-ChemTopic™ Lab Activity. Aloha Chemical Sunset: Colloids and Light ... Watch as the sun sets over a chemical reaction with the Aloha Chemical Sunset: Colloids and Light Scattering-ChemTopic™ Lab ...
Anisotropic hydrodynamic function of dense confined colloids. *Mark. Nygård, Kim LU ; Buitenhuis, Johan ; Kagias, Matias LU ; ... issue by combining high-energy x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray-scattering experiments on colloid- ... issue by combining high-energy x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray-scattering experiments on colloid- ... issue by combining high-energy x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray-scattering experiments on colloid- ...
Colloid Cysts published on May 2000 by Journal of Neurosurgery Publishing Group. ... McDonald JA: Colloid cyst of the third ventricle and sudden death. Ann Emerg Med 11:365-367, 1982 McDonald JA: Colloid cyst of ... Kelly R: Colloid cysts of the third ventricle. Brain 74:23-65, 1951 Kelly R: Colloid cysts of the third ventricle. Brain 74:23- ... Colloid cyst of the third ventricle and sudden death.. Ann Emerg Med. 11. :. 365. -. 367. , 1982. McDonald JA: Colloid cyst of ...
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357e) A Microscopic Analog of Saturated Soil for the Study of Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Contaminants. Conference ... Therefore, understanding colloid-facilitated transport is important for predicting the spatial and temporal distribution of ... Although many contaminants have low solubility in water, they can adsorb on mobile colloids and travel with underground water ... However, the detailed flow pathway and transport mechanism of those colloids are still elusive due to the conventional non- ...
At 28 days, there were 359 deaths (25.4%) in the colloids group vs. 390 deaths (27.0%) in the crystalloids group (P=0.26). At ... Renal replacement therapy was used in 11.0% of the colloids group vs. 12.5% of the crystalloids group (P=0.19). There were more ... Clinical question: In critically ill patients admitted to the ICU with hypovolemic shock, does the use of colloid for fluid ... Bottom line: In ICU patients with hypovolemia requiring resuscitation, the use of colloids vs. crystalloids did not result in a ...
Abstract: U8.00003 : A New Diffusion NMR Experimental Model System for Studies of Bidisperse Colloids*. 8:24 AM-8:36 AM ... A systematic approach to obtain spectrally resolved diffusion coefficients for every component (colloid and solvent) in a ... We also prepared bidisperse colloidal suspensions where each colloid component has a distinct NMR spectral signature, and ... This colloidal model system enables the study of bidisperse colloids at different size ratios and number ratios. ...
Colloid studies occur regularly on the space station and one of these investigations is the Advanced Colloids Experiment-1, or ... Colloids, however, exist around and near the boundaries of these states-not quite being one or the other. Colloids generally ... In todays A Lab Aloft, guest blogger Donald Barker explains the complex world of colloids and how studying them aboard the ... Another set of colloid studies aboard station is the Binary Colloidal Alloy/Aggregation Test, or BCAT investigation. The BCAT-6 ...
  • Formation Mechanisms of Uniform Colloid Particles', Croatica Chemica Acta , 80(3-4), str. (srce.hr)
  • Matijević E, Goia D. Formation Mechanisms of Uniform Colloid Particles. (srce.hr)
  • E. Matijević i D. Goia, "Formation Mechanisms of Uniform Colloid Particles", Croatica Chemica Acta , vol.80, br. (srce.hr)
  • In the first approach, colloid particles were deposited on surfaces in a process similar to dip coating. (bsz-bw.de)
  • Colloids form when particles disperse throughout a solvent, usually a liquid, depending on the purpose of the mixture. (nasa.gov)
  • The mixture behaves in different ways, based on both the size of the colloid particles and their interactions with the solvent. (nasa.gov)
  • Scanning electron microscope, or SEM, images of a mixture of 3.8 micron diameter "seed" particles together with the bulk colloid-0.33 micron diameter Polymethylmetachrylate, or PMMA, spheres. (nasa.gov)
  • Hydrophobic colloids are basically unstable on given sufficient time, the dispersed phase comes out of solution by aggregating into larger particles. (pw.live)
  • Structural and thermodynamical properties of colloids with focus on anisotropic particles (clay). (lu.se)
  • Besides film growth studies, the gold colloid particle growth in acetone was investigated. (rsc.org)
  • Maximise the number of tests per litre with BBI Solutions' Gold Colloid. (bbisolutions.com)
  • BBI Solutions' gold colloid is cost-efficient and renowned for enhancing assay sensitivity and stability. (bbisolutions.com)
  • Our gold colloid is used in over 400 million tests in the global marketplace per year. (bbisolutions.com)
  • Our proprietary gold colloid manufacturing technique allows for the production of large-volume batches of gold to a high level of reproducibility of size, dispersion, and shape, and we maintain this through tight quality control release specifications. (bbisolutions.com)
  • Although theoretically attractive, the benefit of colloid resuscitation over isotonic crystalloids is not proven. (medscape.com)
  • Understanding the behavior of colloids allows scientists to create models and process that can be used to enhance food and chemical preservation, evenly distribute ingredients used to produce glues, jellies and gelatins or even to control the movement of light in optical devices and materials. (nasa.gov)
  • Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. (figshare.com)
  • In this behavior, they are quit unlike true solutions and hydrophilic colloid. (pw.live)
  • Researchers randomized 2,857 adult patients who were admitted to an ICU and required fluid resuscitation for acute hypovolemia to receive either crystalloids or colloids. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • At 28 days, there were 359 deaths (25.4%) in the colloids group vs. 390 deaths (27.0%) in the crystalloids group (P=0.26). (the-hospitalist.org)
  • At 90 days, there were 434 deaths (30.7%) in the colloids group vs. 493 deaths (34.2%) in the crystalloids group (P=0.03). (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Renal replacement therapy was used in 11.0% of the colloids group vs. 12.5% of the crystalloids group (P=0.19). (the-hospitalist.org)
  • There were more days alive without mechanical ventilation in the colloids group vs. the crystalloids group at seven days (P=0.01) and at 28 days (P=0.01), and there were more days alive without vasopressor therapy in the colloids group vs. the crystalloids group at seven days (P=0.04) and at 28 days (P=0.03). (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Moreover, the study compared two therapeutic strategies (colloid vs. crystalloids) rather than two types of molecules. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Effects of fluid resuscitation with colloids vs crystalloids on mortality of critically ill patients presenting with hypovolemic shock: the CRISTAL randomization trial. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • The restoration of hemodynamic stability may require use of intravenous (IV) crystalloids, colloids, blood products, and/or pressors to maintain blood pressure and cardiac output. (medscape.com)
  • We have synthesized large area, well ordered binary crystals composed of two different sizes of silica colloid spheres as small as 20 nm in diameter. (psu.edu)
  • Magnetic colloids were formulated by dispersion of magnetic oxide spheres in water. (aip.org)
  • The aim of the course is to enable the participants to acquire in-depth physicochemical knowledge in the field of surface and colloid chemistry from a molecular perspective and a quantitative understanding of selected fundamental colloidal and interfacial phenomena. (lu.se)
  • The theoretical component contains lectures and tutorials that treat surface and colloid chemistry from a molecular physicochemical perspective. (lu.se)
  • The laboratory classes introduce central experimental techniques in surface and colloid chemistry and are designed to, together with the computer exercises, illustrate central phenomena treated in the theoretical component. (lu.se)
  • The theoretical part consists of lectures and exercises dealing with surface and colloid chemistry from a molecular physicochemical perspective The key topics comprise the self-association of amphiphilic molecules, polymers in colloidal systems, phase equilibria in solutions, interface phenomena, and interactions between molecules and surfaces with applications to colloidal stability. (lu.se)
  • The laboratory sessions introduce key experimental techniques within the field of surface and colloid chemistry and illustrate, together with the computer exercises, central phenomena from the theory part. (lu.se)
  • Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. (figshare.com)
  • Colloids in which the continuous phase is water are also divided into two major classes: hydrophilic and hydrophobic colloids. (pw.live)
  • These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. (figshare.com)
  • We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. (figshare.com)
  • The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. (figshare.com)
  • Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. (figshare.com)
  • A Hydrophilic Colloid is a solid in which there is a strong attraction between the dispersed phase and the continuous phase (water). (pw.live)
  • Protein solution such as gelatin in water, are hydrophilic colloids. (pw.live)
  • A systematic approach to obtain spectrally resolved diffusion coefficients for every component (colloid and solvent) in a monodisperse colloidal suspension is presented. (aps.org)
  • In critically ill patients admitted to the ICU with hypovolemic shock, does the use of colloid for fluid resuscitation, compared with crystalloid, improve mortality? (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Soft Colloids Using Optical Tweezers: Scientists at the Raman Research Institute (RRI) in India have developed a technique to track and manipulate minute clay particle movements within soft clay colloids using optical tweezers. (thewitfire.in)
  • The journal is published biweekly jointly edited by M. Adler, F. Grieser, J.B. Li and D. Prieve Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces focuses on the biological aspects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces;182: 110356, 2019 Oct 01. (bvsalud.org)
  • Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) using Technetium tagged Sulphur colloid is a convenient and safe method to assess lymph node status. (aacrjournals.org)
  • About 50% of the administered colloid stays intravascular. (medscape.com)
  • however, evidence supporting the choice of intravenous colloid vs. crystalloid solutions for management of hypovolemic shock is weak. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Using this approach, we measured and simulated colloidal transport trajectories and extracted key parameters such as the breakthrough curve, effective retention, and entrapped colloids distribution. (aiche.org)
  • This colloidal model system enables the study of bidisperse colloids at different size ratios and number ratios. (aps.org)
  • Another set of colloid studies aboard station is the Binary Colloidal Alloy/Aggregation Test, or BCAT investigation. (nasa.gov)
  • The surface plasmon modes of spherical and oblate spheroidal core−shell colloids composed of a 312 nm diameter silica core and a 20 nm thick Au shell are investigated. (acs.org)
  • The conference aim is to gather leading international experts from academia and industry to share the latest research and developments in the field of food colloids. (delegia.com)
  • The pathogenesis of cerebral symptoms in colloid cysts of the third ventricle: a clinical and pathoanatomical study. (thejns.org)
  • Driven by a 2.2 kW (3 HP) motor, the Probst & Class PUC-60 vertical laboratory colloid mill includes a product inlet hopper and recirculation piping. (foodengineeringmag.com)
  • For researchers interested in colloids, the International Space Station provides a unique laboratory environment to examine their properties. (nasa.gov)
  • Recent International Space Station colloid studies show a cycle of replication, as large crystals generate smaller ones that separate and continue to grow and produce. (nasa.gov)
  • The results are relevant to a variety of inclusions, ranging from colloids suspensions to multi-emulsion systems. (nature.com)
  • We show that such torques take place in suspensions of Janus colloids driven by an electric field. (aps.org)
  • Here we solve this issue by combining high-energy x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray-scattering experiments on colloid-filled microfluidic channels to yield the confined fluid's hydrodynamic function in the short-time limit. (lu.se)
  • In this research, we conducted a series of simple experiments where both coffee colloids and carbon black nanofluids were analyzed under the same conditions. (uib.no)
  • Colloids and Surfaces is a peer-reviewed journal of surface science. (wikipedia.org)
  • Receive an email notification when changes occur for American Colloid Company. (corporationwiki.com)
  • Colloids are used to provide oncotic expansion of plasma volume. (medscape.com)
  • Colloid osmotic pressure is also called oncotic pressure and in plasma is about 0.5% of the total osmotic pressure. (mdapp.co)
  • Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects focused on aspects related to applications of colloids and interfacial phenomena. (wikipedia.org)
  • Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects Editorial Board. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1993, it split into two parts Colloids and Surfaces A and Colloids and Surfaces B. The journal is published by Elsevier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Is it a requirement for a moisture scan to be performed upon an existing insulated roof assembly before the installation of the Western Colloid System? (westerncolloid.com)
  • It is a preferred roofing practice to perform a moisture scan prior to installing the Western Colloid Systems. (westerncolloid.com)
  • A scan will locate any wet areas, which could then be removed and replaced, thereby protecting the integrity of the re-cover roof assembly, the owner, contractor, and Western Colloid. (westerncolloid.com)
  • However, the detailed flow pathway and transport mechanism of those colloids are still elusive due to the conventional non-transparent experimental methods ( e.g. soil cores) and the physical and chemical heterogeneity of the pore space. (aiche.org)
  • Many such colloids consist of macromolecules (very large molecules) dispersed in water. (pw.live)
  • Colloid and interface science is at the heart of all research at the Department of Bionanosciences. (boku.ac.at)
  • In a broad sense, colloid and interface science unites all the research themes at the Department of Bionanosciences. (boku.ac.at)
  • No, there is very little odor/VOC's with Western Colloid products. (westerncolloid.com)
  • Where can I buy Western Colloid Products? (westerncolloid.com)
  • Western Colloid Products are sold through most roofing distributors in the Western United States. (westerncolloid.com)
  • The More You Buy, The More You Save on all colloids for life products. (colloidsforlife.com)
  • At Colloids we collaborate with brand owners and OEMS to create new colours and effects that work perfectly with any polymer, the design team can also offer uprated performance formulations of existing products to prevent defects such as scuffs and scratches, dust, and colour fading. (colloids.com)
  • According to our results, the thermal efficiency of coffee colloid and the nanofluid systems is, respectively, 12% and 16% greater than that of pure water. (uib.no)
  • A challenge is that formulated foods often are colloids that are both complex and polydisperse, both in relation to composition and structure, as well as in terms of changes with time. (delegia.com)
  • On Earth, gravity-induced settling or sedimentation changes or destroys the structure of a colloid over time. (nasa.gov)
  • The goal of ACE-1 is to understand how colloids move over time in the microgravity environment. (nasa.gov)
  • In time, many colloid goiters undergo this type of pathologic evolution, becoming nodular in appearance. (cdc.gov)
  • Large arrays of uniaxially aligned core−shell colloids with size aspect ratios ranging from 1.0 to 1.7 are fabricated using a novel ion irradiation technique. (acs.org)
  • A practical view is presented of how to employ the new concepts (derived from thermodynamic theory) to predict the possible assembled structures from the properties of the colloids and thermodynamic conditions. (icmab.es)
  • Manufacturers use colloids and their unique structure and properties for wine making, coloring glass, and fabric softeners. (nasa.gov)
  • Therefore, understanding colloid-facilitated transport is important for predicting the spatial and temporal distribution of contaminants. (aiche.org)
  • In this study we have investigated the effectiveness and safety of fluorescein in sentinel node biopsy in a cross-sectional analytical study compared to Methylene Blue and Technitium Sulphar colloid. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Although many contaminants have low solubility in water, they can adsorb on mobile colloids and travel with underground water flow over 80 m/year. (aiche.org)
  • These binary colloid crystal films serve as templates for new types of "metalattices" formed by void-free infiltration of materials into them. (psu.edu)