Phlebotomy: The techniques used to draw blood from a vein for diagnostic purposes or for treatment of certain blood disorders such as erythrocytosis, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, and porphyria cutanea tarda.Bloodletting: Puncture of a vein to draw blood for therapeutic purposes. Bloodletting therapy has been used in Talmudic and Indian medicine since the medieval time, and was still practiced widely in the 18th and 19th centuries. Its modern counterpart is PHLEBOTOMY.Hemochromatosis: A disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a triad of HEMOSIDEROSIS; LIVER CIRRHOSIS; and DIABETES MELLITUS. It is caused by massive iron deposits in parenchymal cells that may develop after a prolonged increase of iron absorption. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes & Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)Polycythemia: An increase in the total red cell mass of the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Iron Overload: An excessive accumulation of iron in the body due to a greater than normal absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract or from parenteral injection. This may arise from idiopathic hemochromatosis, excessive iron intake, chronic alcoholism, certain types of refractory anemia, or transfusional hemosiderosis. (From Churchill's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 1989)Anemia, Neonatal: The mildest form of erythroblastosis fetalis in which anemia is the chief manifestation.Polycythemia Vera: A myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume, associated frequently with splenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocythemia. Hematopoiesis is also reactive in extramedullary sites (liver and spleen). In time myelofibrosis occurs.Chelation Therapy: Therapy of heavy metal poisoning using agents which sequester the metal from organs or tissues and bind it firmly within the ring structure of a new compound which can be eliminated from the body.Ferritins: Iron-containing proteins that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Their major function is to store IRON in a nontoxic bioavailable form. Each ferritin molecule consists of ferric iron in a hollow protein shell (APOFERRITINS) made of 24 subunits of various sequences depending on the species and tissue types.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Erythropoietin: Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.Porphyria Cutanea Tarda: An autosomal dominant or acquired porphyria due to a deficiency of UROPORPHYRINOGEN DECARBOXYLASE in the LIVER. It is characterized by photosensitivity and cutaneous lesions with little or no neurologic symptoms. Type I is the acquired form and is strongly associated with liver diseases and hepatic toxicities caused by alcohol or estrogenic steroids. Type II is the familial form.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Manometric pressure of the CEREBROSPINAL FLUID as measured by lumbar, cerebroventricular, or cisternal puncture. Within the cranial cavity it is called INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE.Blood Volume Determination: Method for determining the circulating blood volume by introducing a known quantity of foreign substance into the blood and determining its concentration some minutes later when thorough mixing has occurred. From these two values the blood volume can be calculated by dividing the quantity of injected material by its concentration in the blood at the time of uniform mixing. Generally expressed as cubic centimeters or liters per kilogram of body weight.Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.Blood Component Transfusion: The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Nitrilotriacetic Acid: A derivative of acetic acid, N(CH2COOH)3. It is a complexing (sequestering) agent that forms stable complexes with Zn2+. (From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed.)Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Phenylhydrazines: Diazo derivatives of aniline, used as a reagent for sugars, ketones, and aldehydes. (Dorland, 28th ed)Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Alkaline Phosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.1.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Bacteria, AerobicVaginal Smears: Collection of pooled secretions of the posterior vaginal fornix for cytologic examination.TexasOsteotomy, Le Fort: Transverse sectioning and repositioning of the maxilla. There are three types: Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement or the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort II osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort III osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures with fracture of one or more facial bones. Le Fort III is often used also to correct craniofacial dysostosis and related facial abnormalities. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1203 & p662)Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.British Columbia: A province of Canada on the Pacific coast. Its capital is Victoria. The name given in 1858 derives from the Columbia River which was named by the American captain Robert Gray for his ship Columbia which in turn was named for Columbus. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p178 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p81-2)Pursuit, Smooth: Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations: A private, voluntary, not-for-profit organization which establishes standards for the operation of health facilities and services, conducts surveys, and awards accreditation.Kinesiology, Applied: The study of muscles and the movement of the human body. In holistic medicine it is the balance of movement and the interaction of a person's energy systems. Applied kinesiology is the name given by its inventor, Dr. George Goodheart, to the system of applying muscle testing diagnostically and therapeutically to different aspects of health care. (Thorsons Introductory Guide to Kinesiology, 1992, p13)Blood Banks: Centers for collecting, characterizing and storing human blood.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Libraries, Hospital: Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Punctures: Incision of tissues for injection of medication or for other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Punctures of the skin, for example may be used for diagnostic drainage; of blood vessels for diagnostic imaging procedures.Dental Technicians: Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.Asepsis: The prevention of access by infecting organisms to the locus of potential infection.Audiology: The study of hearing and hearing impairment.
  • Hematological profiles are complete for all participants, and specified laboratory tests are performed upon each specimen based on the participant's age at time of interview and sex. (cdc.gov)
  • The study will gather data collected from diagnostic and laboratory tests the patient undergoes as part of standard medical care, including findings of medical and neurological examinations and other tests. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Note: Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin was performed at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2001 and the State of New York Department of Health in 2002. (cdc.gov)
  • At APL in Calgary, over 90% of the 4850 GDM tolerance tests per year are performed at patient phlebotomy centers where staff collect and centrifuge blood before sending it to a central lab for plasma glucose testing. (aacc.org)
  • Introduction The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) collects, analyzes, and disseminates data on the health status of U.S. residents. (cdc.gov)
  • Never in the history of emergency medicine has been an incidence when diagnostic tests are not performed yet no corporation or company had the idea of incorporating both together. (medica-tradefair.com)
  • This program is designed to include all aspects of phlebotomy, as well as an introduction to the major sections within the laboratory (for example, chemistry, hematology, microbiology, serology). (geisinger.org)
  • The phleb tells the nurse who stopped by he lab that Mary Jones in room 630, who had a blood glucose of 1200 mg/dL, must continue to have venous draws instead of performing POCT due to the high glucose level. (studystack.com)
  • Students must perform a minimum of 100 successful unaided blood draws during their externship. (bucks.edu)
  • Students will learn the technical aspects about phlebotomy and pharmacology, the proper use and administration of medications, taking and documenting vital signs, cardiology including proper lead placements and legal aspects of healthcare. (sunyjefferson.edu)
  • Students interested in studying phlebotomy in Tampa, Florida, have only a few schools to choose from. (study.com)
  • Phlebotomy (from the Greek words phlebo-, meaning "pertaining to a blood vessel", and -tomia, meaning "cutting of") is the process of making an incision in a vein with a needle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your veins have to fight gravity to return the blood to your heart, and when they are weakened with age - both the walls of the vein and the valves blocking blood from flowing backward - it may cause the blood to back up and collect in the vein. (naturalremedies.org)
  • Collect blood through the cannula is often not possible as the thin plastic tube placed in the vein will collapse when suction is applied through the syringe. (medica-tradefair.com)
  • Responsible for basic compliance knowledge as it pertains to phlebotomy, including HIPAA compliance, and Medicare requirements for Medical Necessity. (careercast.com)
  • Minute quantities of blood may be taken by fingersticks sampling and collected from infants by means of a heel stick or from scalp veins with a winged infusion needle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phlebotomy is one of the fastest growing fields, making it a lucrative option for anyone looking for a new starter career in the allied-health field . (phlebotomycertificationcenter.com)
  • The NHANES Household Questionnaire Data files contain demographic data, health indicators, and other related information collected during household interviews. (cdc.gov)
  • While physicians did perform bloodletting, it was a specialty of barber-surgeons, the primary provider of health care to most people in the medieval and early modern eras. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gander RM, Byrd L, DeCrescenzo M, Hirany S, Bowen M, Baughman J (2009) Impact of blood cultures drawn by phlebotomy on contamination rates and health care costs in a hospital emergency department. (springer.com)
  • Performed chart abstractions of healthcare information from health care providers and facilities. (postjobfree.com)
  • Detailed work histories and health information were collected in standardized interviews with each subject. (cdc.gov)
  • The Lab-in-an-Envelope program can extend select health screening tests to remote or widely dispersed populations who may have little or no convenient access to phlebotomy. (labcorp.com)