Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Extraterrestrial Environment: The environment outside the earth or its atmosphere. The environment may refer to a closed cabin (such as a space shuttle or space station) or to space itself, the moon, or other planets.Jupiter: The fifth planet in order from the sun. It is one of the five outer planets of the solar system. Its sixteen natural satellites include Callisto, Europa, Ganymede, and Io.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dry Ice: A solid form of carbon dioxide used as a refrigerant.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Saturn: The sixth planet in order from the sun. It is one of the five outer planets of the solar system. Its twelve natural satellites include Phoebe and Titan.Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.Moon: The natural satellite of the planet Earth. It includes the lunar cycles or phases, the lunar month, lunar landscapes, geography, and soil.Mars: The fourth planet in order from the sun. Its two natural satellites are Deimos and Phobos. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the solar system.Spacecraft: Devices, manned and unmanned, which are designed to be placed into an orbit about the Earth or into a trajectory to another celestial body. (NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Ice Cover: A thick mass of ICE formed over large regions of land; RIVERS; LAKES; ponds; or SEAWATER.Meteoroids: Any solid objects moving in interplanetary space that are smaller than a planet or asteroid but larger than a molecule. Meteorites are any meteoroid that has fallen to a planetary surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Planets: Celestial bodies orbiting around the sun or other stars.Flavobacteriaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family FLAVOBACTERIACEAE.Atmosphere: The gaseous envelope surrounding a planet or similar body. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Skin Temperature: The TEMPERATURE at the outer surface of the body.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Osmeriformes: An order of fish including smelts, galaxiids, and salamanderfish.Water Wells: Constructions built to access underground water.Flavobacterium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in SOIL and WATER. Its organisms are also found in raw meats, MILK and other FOOD, hospital environments, and human clinical specimens. Some species are pathogenic in humans.Spectrophotometry, Infrared: Spectrophotometry in the infrared region, usually for the purpose of chemical analysis through measurement of absorption spectra associated with rotational and vibrational energy levels of molecules. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Body Temperature Regulation: The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.Hypothermia: Lower than normal body temperature, especially in warm-blooded animals.Salmoniformes: An order of fish comprising salmons, trouts, whitefish, graylings, and other families. They are both marine and freshwater fish, found in all oceans and are quite numerous in the Northern Hemisphere. (From Nelson: Fishes of the World)Ice Cream: A frozen dairy food made from cream or butterfat, milk, sugar, and flavorings. Frozen custard and French-type ice creams also contain eggs.Shivering: Involuntary contraction or twitching of the muscles. It is a physiologic method of heat production in man and other mammals.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Common Cold: A catarrhal disorder of the upper respiratory tract, which may be viral or a mixed infection. It generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Body Water: Fluids composed mainly of water found within the body.Oncorhynchus mykiss: A large stout-bodied, sometimes anadromous, TROUT found in still and flowing waters of the Pacific coast from southern California to Alaska. It has a greenish back, a whitish belly, and pink, red, or lavender stripes on the sides, with usually a sprinkling of black dots. It is highly regarded as a sport and food fish. Its former name was Salmo gairdneri. The sea-run rainbow trouts are often called steelheads. Redband trouts refer to interior populations of rainbows.Raynaud Disease: An idiopathic vascular disorder characterized by bilateral Raynaud phenomenon, the abrupt onset of digital paleness or CYANOSIS in response to cold exposure or stress.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Dentin SensitivityAnimal Distribution: A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Mustard Gas: Severe irritant and vesicant of skin, eyes, and lungs. It may cause blindness and lethal lung edema and was formerly used as a war gas. The substance has been proposed as a cytostatic and for treatment of psoriasis. It has been listed as a known carcinogen in the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP-85-002, 1985) (Merck, 11th ed).Water Pollution: Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)Water Purification: Any of several processes in which undesirable impurities in water are removed or neutralized; for example, chlorination, filtration, primary treatment, ion exchange, and distillation. It includes treatment of WASTE WATER to provide potable and hygienic water in a controlled or closed environment as well as provision of public drinking water supplies.Ginsenosides: Dammarane type triterpene saponins based mainly on the aglycones, protopanaxadiol and protopanaxatriol.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Vibration: A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Cold Climate: A climate characterized by COLD TEMPERATURE for a majority of the time during the year.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Legionella pneumophila: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is the causative agent of LEGIONNAIRES' DISEASE. It has been isolated from numerous environmental sites as well as from human lung tissue, respiratory secretions, and blood.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.TailWater Pollutants: Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.Freezing: Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Antifreeze Proteins: Proteins that bind to ice and modify the growth of ice crystals. They perform a cryoprotective role in a variety of organisms.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Cold Ischemia: The chilling of a tissue or organ during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. Cold ischemia time during ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION begins when the organ is cooled with a cold perfusion solution after ORGAN PROCUREMENT surgery, and ends after the tissue reaches physiological temperature during implantation procedures.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Water Deprivation: The withholding of water in a structured experimental situation.Acclimatization: Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.Drinking: The consumption of liquids.Water SofteningHeart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)
  • 4) Dry ice blasting removes more algae, sea slime, and mussels on boat hulls, than water blasting, which allows the organic matter to reattach sooner. (dryiceinfo.com)
  • One system uses small rice size pellets of dry ice shooting them out of a jet nozzle with compressed air. (dryiceinfo.com)
  • When dry ice cleaning replaces hazardous chemical cleaners the disposal cost of that chemical is eliminated. (dryiceinfo.com)
  • Tinker Air Force Base has reported it eliminated hazardous waste disposal associated with 17,000 gallons of chemicals they no longer need to use each year because of dry ice cleaning. (dryiceinfo.com)
  • Cold Jet engineering provides the best performing solutions for any budget and includes the widest selection of dry ice product equipment, blasting machines and nozzles in the industry. (dryiceinfo.com)
  • We provide dry ice blast cleaning services, blaster/equipment repairs, sales and rentals for contractors, restoration companies, cleaning companies and large or small manufacturing plants. (dryiceinfo.com)
  • As I write this I do recollect many of clients that I have seen who faced kidney issues often having one of the chief lifestyle habits of drinking either ice cold water or eating frozen berries or fruits. (e-swastya.com)
  • On a blazing day, you'll ALWAYS take that one semi-frozen water bottle in the freezer. (marham.pk)
  • Or just looking around in the freezer and drinking directly from a semi-frozen ice tray. (marham.pk)
  • The deluge, on the 4900 block of North Pulaski Road, was likely caused by icy weather conditions and frozen pipes, said Bill Bresnahan, managing deputy commissioner of the city's Department of Water Management. (nbcchicago.com)
  • The glass revolving doors of the store, at 830 N. Michigan Ave., were completely iced over after a frozen pipe burst inside the building overnight. (nbcchicago.com)
  • The snow will dry the person (the water is frozen to the snow and this will dry someone) and limit the evaporation off the skin. (stackexchange.com)
  • Place the egg yolks into a mixing bowl, and once the sugar and water have been boiling for 2minutes, set the machine to medium speed. (itv.com)
  • Try this: Brew some green tea, let it cool off, then pour it into an ice cube tray and put it in your freezer. (rosacea.org)
  • Ice Cold Drinking Water & is it Harmful or Harmless? (amoils.com)
  • a foreign country and are a bit concerned about the quality of the local drinking water, the SteriPen can put your mind at ease. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • Q1: who will be affected by unsafe drinking water( be specific)? (prezi.com)
  • Drinking water can prevent dehydration, a condition that can cause unclear thinking, result in mood change, cause your body to overheat, and lead to constipation and kidney stones. (cdc.gov)
  • Learn more about drinking water in schools and early care and education settings pdf icon [PDF-3.68MB] . (cdc.gov)
  • Brine Turkey: Put salt and 2 cups very hot water in a tall 8-qt pot. (womansday.com)
  • To rub & roast turkey: About 3 1/2 to 4 hours before you want to serve the turkey, remove it from the brine and thoroughly rinse with cool water. (eatingwell.com)
  • If we assume that similar effects occur for other muscle parts, it would thus not be a good idea to join Peer Mertesacker in the ice-tub that made him world-famous after the quarter-finals of the soccer world cup, last year. (blogspot.com)
  • In 34-degree water, hypothermia would occur in minutes. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Keep in mind that most cold water deaths occur well before this point -- only those wearing a life jacket will survive longer than 10 minutes in most cases. (weather.gov)
  • And, as algal blooms are able to occur earlier in the year, animals that depend on timing their behavior to "pulses" in algal productivity may be left out in the cold. (scitechdaily.com)
  • This question ignited my own thoughts in my mind as knowingly unknowingly I have been advising many clients to avoid Ice cold water and never thought of reasoning it. (e-swastya.com)
  • You try to avoid going in the water yourself unless absolutely necessary, but the 5 options above should all be looked at in order. (stackexchange.com)
  • In addition, anyone with sensitive teeth might want to avoid ice water, which can provide an uncomfortable sensation when it hits the enamel. (livestrong.com)
  • Continuous circulation compression therapy is delivered through the unit which circulates cooled water from an insulated container through pressurized tubing into a large cooling pad which surrounds the injured joint providing compression. (paintechnology.com)
  • The large-scale conversion to 100% wind, water, and solar (WWS) power for all purposes (electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industry) is currently inhibited by a fear of grid instability and high cost due to the variability and uncertainty of wind and solar. (pnas.org)
  • This study addresses the greatest concern facing the large-scale integration of wind, water, and solar (WWS) into a power grid: the high cost of avoiding load loss caused by WWS variability and uncertainty. (pnas.org)
  • Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. (allrecipes.com)
  • Fill a large bowl with ice and cold water. (allrecipes.com)
  • Instead, changing ice conditions now allow light to penetrate large swaths of Arctic sea ice. (scitechdaily.com)
  • While the discovery marks the first direct observation of an under-ice bloom, the conditions that allow for it in the Chukchi Sea exist over a large area of the Arctic. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Place potatoes in large, wide saute pan of salted water. (twincities.com)
  • Drop the whole thing-shell and all-into a (large) pot of boiling water for about 10 to 20 seconds. (bravotv.com)
  • In the ED the Captain's core (rectal) temperature ranged from 104.4°F to 106.6°F. The Captain was hospitalized, and additional treatments for hyperthermia (cold IV fluids, fans, mist, cooling blanket, and ice packs) were administered. (cdc.gov)
  • You can get some fluids through the foods that you eat - especially foods with high water content, such as many fruits and vegetables. (cdc.gov)
  • Does Regular Post-exercise Cold Application Attenuate Trained Muscle Adaptation? (blogspot.com)