An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.
Proteins which are synthesized in eukaryotic organisms and bacteria in response to hyperthermia and other environmental stresses. They increase thermal tolerance and perform functions essential to cell survival under these conditions.
Cellular proteins and peptides that are induced in response to cold stress. They are found in a broad variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.
A constellation of responses that occur when an organism is exposed to excessive heat. Responses include synthesis of new proteins and regulation of others.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.
A class of MOLECULAR CHAPERONES found in both prokaryotes and in several compartments of eukaryotic cells. These proteins can interact with polypeptides during a variety of assembly processes in such a way as to prevent the formation of nonfunctional structures.
A constellation of responses that occur when an organism is exposed to excessive cold. In humans, a fall in skin temperature triggers gasping, hypertension, and hyperventilation.
Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.
A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.
Stress-inducible members of the heat-shock proteins 70 family. HSP72 heat shock proteins function with other MOLECULAR CHAPERONES to mediate PROTEIN FOLDING and to stabilize pre-existent proteins against aggregation.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
A class of MOLECULAR CHAPERONES whose members act in the mechanism of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION by STEROID RECEPTORS.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
A catarrhal disorder of the upper respiratory tract, which may be viral or a mixed infection. It generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing.
Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.
A family of cellular proteins that mediate the correct assembly or disassembly of polypeptides and their associated ligands. Although they take part in the assembly process, molecular chaperones are not components of the final structures.
A protein which is a subunit of RNA polymerase. It effects initiation of specific RNA chains from DNA.
The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.
A genus of cone-nosed bugs of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Its species are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
A group I chaperonin protein that forms the barrel-like structure of the chaperonin complex. It is an oligomeric protein with a distinctive structure of fourteen subunits, arranged in two rings of seven subunits each. The protein was originally studied in BACTERIA where it is commonly referred to as GroEL protein.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
LACTAMS forming compounds with a ring size of approximately 1-3 dozen atoms.
Electrophoresis in which a second perpendicular electrophoretic transport is performed on the separate components resulting from the first electrophoresis. This technique is usually performed on polyacrylamide gels.
A family of heat-shock proteins that contain a 70 amino-acid consensus sequence known as the J domain. The J domain of HSP40 heat shock proteins interacts with HSP70 HEAT-SHOCK PROTEINS. HSP40 heat-shock proteins play a role in regulating the ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATASES activity of HSP70 heat-shock proteins.
Benzene rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.
A subfamily of small heat-shock proteins found in a wide variety of organisms.
Disorders caused by imbalances in the protein homeostasis network - synthesis, folding, and transport of proteins; post-translational modifications; and degradation or clearance of misfolded proteins.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
A family of multisubunit protein complexes that form into large cylindrical structures which bind to and encapsulate non-native proteins. Chaperonins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to enhance the efficiency of PROTEIN FOLDING reactions and thereby help proteins reach their functional conformation. The family of chaperonins is split into GROUP I CHAPERONINS, and GROUP II CHAPERONINS, with each group having its own repertoire of protein subunits and subcellular preferences.
A subfamily of small heat-shock proteins that function as molecular chaperones that aid in refolding of non-native proteins. They play a protective role that increases cellular survival during times of stress.
Shock resulting from diminution of cardiac output in heart disease.
Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.
A species of gram-positive bacteria that is a common soil and water saprophyte.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
A group I chaperonin protein that forms a lid-like structure which encloses the non-polar cavity of the chaperonin complex. The protein was originally studied in BACTERIA where it is commonly referred to as GroES protein.
Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.
The sensation of cold, heat, coolness, and warmth as detected by THERMORECEPTORS.
Y-box-binding protein 1 was originally identified as a DNA-binding protein that interacts with Y-box PROMOTER REGIONS of MHC CLASS II GENES. It is a highly conserved transcription factor that regulates expression of a wide variety of GENES.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A plant family of the order Celastrales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida.
An order of extremely thermophilic, sulfate-reducing archaea, in the kingdom EURYARCHAEOTA. The single family Archaeoglobaceae contains one genus ARCHAEOGLOBUS.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
The smallest of the three prokaryotic initiation factors with a molecular size of approximately 8 kD. It binds near the A-site of the 30S subunit of RIBOSOMES and may play a role in preventing premature addition of aminoacyl-tRNA-linked PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTOR TU to the ribosome during the initiation of a peptide chain (PEPTIDE CHAIN INITIATION, TRANSLATIONAL).
Inorganic salts or organic esters of arsenious acid.
A climate characterized by COLD TEMPERATURE for a majority of the time during the year.
The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
Strains of VIBRIO CHOLERAE containing O ANTIGENS group 139. This strain emerged in India in 1992 and caused a CHOLERA epidemic.
Shock produced as a result of trauma.
Slender tubular or hairlike excretory structures found in insects. They emerge from the alimentary canal between the mesenteron (midgut) and the proctodeum (hindgut).
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Arctiin (LIGNANS) is in the seed.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.
The chilling of a tissue or organ during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. Cold ischemia time during ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION begins when the organ is cooled with a cold perfusion solution after ORGAN PROCUREMENT surgery, and ends after the tissue reaches physiological temperature during implantation procedures.
Proteins that bind to RNA molecules. Included here are RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS and other proteins whose function is to bind specifically to RNA.
Inorganic compounds that contain sodium as an integral part of the molecule.
An enzyme of the transferase class that catalyzes the reaction RNA(n+1) and orthophosphate to yield RNA(n) and a nucleoside diphosphate, or the reverse reaction. ADP, IDP, GDP, UDP, and CDP can act as donors in the latter case. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 2.7.7.8.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent that is less effective than equal doses of ASPIRIN in relieving pain and reducing fever. However, individuals who are hypersensitive to ASPIRIN may tolerate sodium salicylate. In general, this salicylate produces the same adverse reactions as ASPIRIN, but there is less occult gastrointestinal bleeding. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p120)
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.
Proteases that contain proteolytic core domains and ATPase-containing regulatory domains. They are usually comprised of large multi-subunit assemblies. The domains can occur within a single peptide chain or on distinct subunits.
An antibiotic first isolated from cultures of Streptomyces venequelae in 1947 but now produced synthetically. It has a relatively simple structure and was the first broad-spectrum antibiotic to be discovered. It acts by interfering with bacterial protein synthesis and is mainly bacteriostatic. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 29th ed, p106)
Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in archaea.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
The in vitro fusion of GENES by RECOMBINANT DNA techniques to analyze protein behavior or GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, or to merge protein functions for specific medical or industrial uses.
Ergostane derivatives of 28 carbons with oxygens at C1, C22, and C26 positions and the side chain cyclized. They are found in WITHANIA plant genus and have cytotoxic and other effects.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
A group of conditions that develop due to overexposure or overexertion in excessive environmental heat.
A family of proteins that promote unwinding of RNA during splicing and translation.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.
In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.
Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
High-amplitude compression waves, across which density, pressure, and particle velocity change drastically. The mechanical force from these shock waves can be used for mechanically disrupting tissues and deposits.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The mucous lining of the LARYNX, consisting of various types of epithelial cells ranging from stratified squamous EPITHELIUM in the upper larynx to ciliated columnar epithelium in the rest of the larynx, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A colorless liquid with a sharp burning taste and slight odor. It is used as a local anesthetic and to reduce pain associated with LIDOCAINE injection. Also, it is used in the manufacture of other benzyl compounds, as a pharmaceutic aid, and in perfumery and flavoring.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
The process by which semen is kept viable outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
A family of enzymes that catalyze the exonucleolytic cleavage of RNA. It includes EC 3.1.13.-, EC 3.1.14.-, EC 3.1.15.-, and EC 3.1.16.-. EC 3.1.-
A rod-shaped bacterium surrounded by a sheath-like structure which protrudes balloon-like beyond the ends of the cell. It is thermophilic, with growth occurring at temperatures as high as 90 degrees C. It is isolated from geothermally heated marine sediments or hot springs. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
In eukaryotes, a genetic unit consisting of a noncontiguous group of genes under the control of a single regulator gene. In bacteria, regulons are global regulatory systems involved in the interplay of pleiotropic regulatory domains and consist of several OPERONS.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Disruption of the non-covalent bonds and/or disulfide bonds responsible for maintaining the three-dimensional shape and activity of the native protein.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and the stems, leafs, and roots of plants. Some biotypes are pathogenic and cause the formation of PLANT TUMORS in a wide variety of higher plants. The species is a major research tool in biotechnology.
Gram-negative aerobic cocci of low virulence that colonize the nasopharynx and occasionally cause MENINGITIS; BACTEREMIA; EMPYEMA; PERICARDITIS; and PNEUMONIA.
Movement characteristics of SPERMATOZOA in a fresh specimen. It is measured as the percentage of sperms that are moving, and as the percentage of sperms with productive flagellar motion such as rapid, linear, and forward progression.
An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
Hydrocarbon rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Transcription factors that were originally identified as site-specific DNA-binding proteins essential for DNA REPLICATION by ADENOVIRUSES. They play important roles in MAMMARY GLAND function and development.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
The degree of similarity between sequences. Studies of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY and NUCLEIC ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY provide useful information about the genetic relatedness of genes, gene products, and species.
A photoprotein isolated from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea. It emits visible light by an intramolecular reaction when a trace amount of calcium ion is added. The light-emitting moiety in the bioluminescence reaction is believed to be 2-amino-3-benzyl-5-(p-hydroxyphenyl)pyrazine (AF-350).

Oxidative stress in cold-induced hyperthyroid state. (1/56)

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Effect of P2 receptor blockade with pyridoxine on sympathetic response to exercise pressor reflex in humans. (2/56)

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Knocking down expression of Hsp22 and Hsp23 by RNA interference affects recovery from chill coma in Drosophila melanogaster. (3/56)

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2010 Carl Ludwig Distinguished Lectureship of the APS Neural Control and Autonomic Regulation Section: Central neural pathways for thermoregulatory cold defense. (4/56)

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Inactivation of the mitochondrial carrier SLC25A25 (ATP-Mg2+/Pi transporter) reduces physical endurance and metabolic efficiency in mice. (5/56)

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Manipulations of AMP metabolic genes increase growth rate and cold tolerance in Escherichia coli: implications for psychrophilic evolution. (6/56)

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Rapid growth reduces cold resistance: evidence from latitudinal variation in growth rate, cold resistance and stress proteins. (7/56)

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Brainstem serotonin deficiency in the neonatal period: autonomic dysregulation during mild cold stress. (8/56)

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For 3-minutes, the cryo chamber will cool the surface of your skin by 30-50°F using gasified nitrogen to activate the bodys powerfully healing cold-shock response. During the session, blood rushes to your core, your body burns 400-800 calories to stay warm and once the sessions is over, the blood returns to the extremities carrying newly released neurotransmitters and cold-shock proteins that dramatically lower inflammation, heal injuries, increase collagen levels, boost your mood, accelerate recovery, increase focus and leave you feeling vibrant and full of energy.. ...
Dynamics of ribosome-ligands interactions in the early phases of mRNA translation; gene regulation following bacterial temperature and nutritional stress; design, construction and validation of high content screening tests to detect novel anti-infectives; mechanism of action of new antibiotics; H-NS - DNA interactions for the architectural organization of the nucleoid and select transcriptional repression; DNA chips for water quality evaluation.. Keywords: Translation initiation in prokaryotes / bacterial nucleoid / cold-shock response / transcriptional & post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression / antibiotics. Subject area(s): Microbiology, Virology & Pathogens , Proteins & Biochemistry , RNA. ...
The majority of these functions deal with the degradation and modification of RNA. I am struggling to figure out how to differentiate between up-regulated and down-regulated genes based on geneontology website or the data given, but considering that the t15, t30, t60, t90 are up-regulated, while only t-120 is down-regulated, it would probably be reasonable to assume that these functions are mostly up-regulated. This would mean that due to cold-shock, cells primarily increase the breakdown of RNA,and mores specifically non-coding RNA, as suggested by the GO terms. This suggests that cold-shock induces translation in order to produce specific proteins involved in stress response ...
The majority of these functions deal with the degradation and modification of RNA. I am struggling to figure out how to differentiate between up-regulated and down-regulated genes based on geneontology website or the data given, but considering that the t15, t30, t60, t90 are up-regulated, while only t-120 is down-regulated, it would probably be reasonable to assume that these functions are mostly up-regulated. This would mean that due to cold-shock, cells primarily increase the breakdown of RNA,and mores specifically non-coding RNA, as suggested by the GO terms. This suggests that cold-shock induces translation in order to produce specific proteins involved in stress response ...
Veterinarska zbornica Slovenije je samostojna in neodvisna poklicna organizacija doktorjev veterinarske medicine na območju Republike Slovenije, ki zastopa in uveljavlja poklicne, ekonomske in socialne interese svojih članov.
Four diploid inbred B. distachyon lines, Bd3-1, Bd21-1, Bd1-1, and Bd29-1 were used to characterize cold induced IRIP gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The seeds were kindly provided by Dr. David Garvin, University of Minnesota, USA. Bd3-1 and Bd21-1 originate from Iraq and are spring genotypes that do not require vernalization to induce flowering. Bd1-1 and Bd29-1 originate from northern Turkey and the Ukraine, respectively, and are winter genotypes which require long vernalization periods (six and 12 weeks respectively) to flower (http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/person/1931/GarvinLabCoreBrachypodiumdistachyonLineSet(2).pdf) [34, 35]. For the microarray gene expression experiments only Bd21-1 was used.. In the qRT-PCR experiment 7 weeks old plants were used which had been established from seeds using the following growth conditions: 20/16°C day/night temperature and 16 h photoperiod with a photon flux density of 150 μmol m-2 s-1. Half of the ...
Osmoadaptation of four L. monocytogenes strains, possessing different tolerances to NaCl, revealed a clear pattern in terms of genomic expression. Prolonged exposure to high levels of NaCl was coupled with activation of genes associated with the bacterial cell envelope, DNA repair and protein synthesis. Repression of genes associated with carbohydrate up-take and metabolism was evident in osmo-adapted cells reflecting the overall suppression of cellular metabolism characterised by reduced growth rate of these cells. In addition the initial stage of osmo-adaptation, was examined in strain ATCC 19115 (serotype 4b) post short exposure to 10.0% (w/v) NaCl to investigate continuous spectrum of gene expression in response to osmotic stress in this organism. Gene enrichment analysis revealed a prominent, almost reverse gene expression profile in response to shock, compared to the adaptive response to the same concentration of NaCl. This study is the first to strongly highlight such distinction in gene ...
A common physiological response of organisms to environmental stresses is the increase in expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps). In insects, this process has been widely examined for heat stress, but the response to cold stress has been far less studied. In the present study, we focused on 11 Dro …
Lin28 cold-shock domain complex. Computer model showing the structure of a Lin28 cold-shock domain (purple) complexed with the single-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) fragment heptathymidine (yellow). - Stock Image C035/5941
Benzyl alcohol and ethanol were found to exhibit an opposite effect on cold adaptation ofBacillus subtilis. The growth lag induced in bacteria by temperature shift-down was reduced in the presence of benzyl alcohol from 80 to 58 min, whereas ethanol prolonged this interval up to 102 min. In parallel, the physical state of the cytoplasmic membrane in intact bacteria was examined with the help of steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene. Benzyl alcohol decreased the anisotropy as a consequence of membrane fluidization whereas ethanol increased its value, suggesting membrane rigidization. The correlation of growth and fluorescence data indicates that the control of membrane structure represents an important part of bacterial adaptation to cold.
Upon entrance into the insect from ingesting an infected humans blood, the so called stumpy form of T. brucei enters and must adjust itself to survive within the environment of the fly. This initial transformation is composed of a variety of chemical transformations that are not yet fully understood. It is assumed that proteases that exist within the insects midgut ignite a response to the new environment. [9] Beyond this idea, some believe that the microbe posses a cold-shock response that appears as the microbe travels from the warm-blooded human to the exothermic fly. Despite the controversy of this transformation, the stumpy form of the trypanosome remodels into the first form, the procyclic form. [9] This form only lasts a very short period of time before it transforms again. The microbe attaches itself onto the cells within the gut of the fly, a space referred to as the ecto peritrophic space. The connection to the cells within this space allows the form to change into one more ...
Ambient particulate matters and temperature were reported to have additive effects over the respiratory disease hospital admissions and deaths. The purpose of this study is to discuss the interactive pulmonary toxicities of cold stress and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure by estimating inflammation and oxidative stress responses. 48 Wistar male rats, matched by weight and age, were randomly assigned to six groups, which were treated with cold stress alone (0 degrees C, 10 degrees C, and 20 degrees C (Normal control)) and cold stresses plus PM2.5 exposures respectively. Cold stress alone groups were intratracheal instillation of 0.25 mL normal saline, while cold stress plus PM2.5 exposure groups were intratracheal instillation of 8 mg/0.25 mL PM2.5. These procedures were carried out for three times with an interval of 48 hours for each treatment. All rats were sacrificed after 48 hours of the third treatment. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected for analyzing inflammatory ...
Plants experience a wide range of abiotic stresses due to their sessile nature. These stresses range from cold and draught to salinity and osmotic factors to which plants have evolved many biochemical responses. Significant research has revealed a complex network of genes that work together during stress conditions. A key player in the abiotic stress response in Arabidopsis is DREB1 (Dehydration Response Element Binding Protein) a family of three related (A, B, C) transcription factors that bind to DRE (Dehydration Response Element), a cis-acting element that functions in ABA-independent gene expression, specifically as an up regulator of rd29A. Researchers have demonstrated that rd29A is up regulated in response to salt, drought and cold conditions (Shinozaki, 1998).. Plant cold stress responses in Arabidopsis have been studied and shown to contain several pathways that are specific to abiotic stresses. The DREB1 family has been shown to be most strongly expressed in response to cold stress, ...
The EEG scored according to the ACNS terminology is the best among those looked at for the prediction of short-term clinical improvement in patients with DoC and represents a useful instrumental test, complementary to clinical evaluation at admission, to be added in post-acute neurological prognosti …
Growing peas in a greenhouse allows you to have fresh peas all year round. Peas are well suited to wintering in a greenhouse, as they are much more cold-tolerant than other types of vegetables. In fact, warm weather often adversely affects pea pod production, so save the summer garden space for warm-weather plants ...
Amsterdam. This year Amsterdam are hosting the regional conference, so its good to se them represented as a new team as well. They are working on making E. Coli that will grow at temperatures far below normal limits. They also aimed to make coli better at resisting frost. Apparently they have had some success in making the cold resistance work. If you want to read more check our post!. Bilkent_UNAM-Turkey. This team is working on using microalgae for biodegradation. Now this use of microorganisms has been a returning theme for many years, but algae are still somewhat new on the iGEM scene. Bilkent_UNAM are specifically working on degrading TNT. Apparently they didnt get to test their constructs against. Copenhagen. Its good to see a new Danish team in the competition. Copenhagen are working with cytochrome P450 hydroxylases to rid the world of evil. They want to use E. coli expressing two different CYPs to bring death to fungi and environmental estrogens. They seem to have had a bumpy ride ...
Colds and flu tend to show up with dreary regularity. Learn which ones might actually help, and which are nothing but charming folktale.
As a representative warm-season grass, Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.] is widely used in turf systems. However, low temperature remarkably limits its growth and distribution. ABA is a crucial phytohormone that has been reported to regulate much important physiological and biochemical processes in plants under abiotic stress. Therefore, the objective of this study was to figure out the effects of ABA on the cold-sensitive (S) and cold-resistant (R) Bermudagrass genotypes response to cold stress. In this study, the plants were treated with 100 µM ABA solution and exposed to 4°C temperature. After 7 days of cold treatment, the electrolyte leakage (EL), malonaldehyde (MDA) and H2O2 content were significantly increased in both genotypes compared with control condition, and these values were higher in R genotype than those of S genotype, respectively. By contrast, exogenous ABA application decreased the electrolyte leakage (EL), malonaldehyde (MDA) and H2O2 content in both genotypes compared with
T. fasciatus (Takifugu fasciatus) faces the same problem as most warm water fish: the water temperature falls far below the optimal growth temperature in winter, causing a massive death of T. fasciatus and large economic losses. Understanding of the cold-tolerance mechanisms of this species is still limited. Integrated application of multi-omics research can provide a wealth of information to help us improve our understanding of low-temperature tolerance in fish. To gain a comprehensive and unbiased molecular understanding of cold-tolerance in T. fasciatus, we characterized mRNA-seq and metabolomics of T. fasciatus livers using Illumina HiSeq 2500 and UHPLC-Q-TOF MS. We identified 2544 up-regulated and 2622 down-regulated genes in the liver of T. fasciatus. A total of 40 differential metabolites were identified, including 9 down-regulated and 31 up-regulated metabolites. In combination with previous studies on proteomics, we have established an mRNA-protein-metabolite interaction network. There are 17
Plants experience a wide range of abiotic stresses due to their sessile nature. Plants have evolved many biochemical responses to stresses that range from cold and drought to salinity and osmotic factors. Substantial research has revealed a complex network of genes that work together during stress conditions. A key player in the abiotic stress response in Arabidopsis is DREB1 (Dehydration Response Element Binding Protein) a family of three related (A, B, C) transcription factors that bind to DRE (Dehydration Response Element), a cis-acting element that functions in ABA-independent gene expression, specifically as an up regulator of rd29A. Researchers have demonstrated that rd29A is up regulated in response to salt, drought and cold conditions (Shinozaki, 1998).. Plant cold stress responses in Arabidopsis have been shown to contain several pathways that are specific to abiotic stresses. The DREB1 family has been shown to be most strongly expressed in response to cold stress, salinity, osmotic, ...
Conclusions: Flies reared at constant benign temperatures were more fecund at all acclimationtemperatures. In contrast, flies reared under fluctuating natural or laboratory conditions weremore successful in locating food under cool conditions in the field, while constant cool rearingconditions led to high cold resistance. The fluctuating- and low-temperature rearing conditionsresulted in a similar metabolic profile, while the 24C rearing profile was distinct and showeda lack of plasticity. The effects of developmental acclimation on performance are thereforecomplex and cannot be captured through experimental comparisons of constant environments ...
The paliavana parent is P. tenuiflora, the best of the paliavanas. The hybrid does a better job of retaining its foliage than most paliavanas. The sinningia parent is S. conspicua, from which the hybrid acquires the generally white corolla color, the markings and yellow in the throat, and fragrance that can be detected at certain times. The plant has a tuber, an inheritance from its sinningia parent. Paliavana tenuiflora is much more vulnerable to cold than Sinningia conspicua. The hybrid seems to have the latters cold resistance. ...
Making accurate prognoses for patients in coma is notoriously difficult, and we need your help! By signing up for this study you allow us to learn from your story and provide us with data that can help improve the way coma patients are cared for and how doctors determine their prognosis. Enrollment is simple and straightforward and you can withdraw from the study at any time and for any reason.. Take a moment to look through the consent form, available here. In order to understand each case of coma, we need access to the protected medical records from the hospitalization in question. For that we need your signed permission. We also need your consent to participate in a research study, in which the information we learn can be analyzed and used to draw conclusions about how to make prognostication in coma better and more accurate. Feel free to contact us with any questions about the consent form or the study itself before you sign.. You can email the form as an attachment to: [email protected] ...
When blood sugar levels become very high or low, a diabetic coma can result. This is a medical emergency, but with rapid treatment, a person can usually recovery quickly.
Bacillus alvei NRC-14, a soil bacterial isolate, was found to exhibit multiple-adaptive response when exposed to abiotic stress factors. In the present study, chemical and flocculation properties of a viscous biopolymer flocculant produced by the strain under cold-shock stress are investigated.
If you are drawn to really deep red lettuces, consider Hyper Red. Selecting from a cross between Valeria, a very red cold-tolerant lollo rossa, and Wavy Red Cos, an undulating savoyed red romaine, Frank Morton bred Hyper Red to accentuate pigmentation and ruffling. You can hear him talking about the breeding of this variety on OSSIs Free The Seed! Podcast. The striking result tastes good with a pleasing texture. Holds for a while in July before succumbing to heat. Good cold tolerance. No warm-temperature germination tolerance. Independent Breeder.
Id hazard a reasonable guess that what puts people off real cold water swimming is not what I write so much about, that is, hypothermia and cold exposure over long periods. Instead Id postulate that it is the thoughts and fear of the initial cold shock and of the difficulty and pain involved with immersing…
Childrens cough and colds treatment plan by Dr Simone Kooke, womens and childrens Health GP. We sit down and discuss a treatment plan for kids cough and colds.
Two people have died in Louisiana in recent months from a rare brain-eating amoeba that health officials have traced to a common cold treatment.
URBANA, Ill. - Winters in eastern Russia are intensely cold, with air temperatures regularly reaching -30 degrees Fahrenheit in some locations. It is a seemingly inhospitable climate, but native plants have found ways to thrive there. University of Illinois plant geneticist Erik Sacks suspected one of these plants may hold the key to breeding cold-tolerant food and biomass crops. To find out, the modern-day botanical explorer set off across eastern Russia with colleagues from the N. I. Vavilov All-Russian Institute of Plant Genetic Resources (VIR) to collect specimens of the perennial grass Miscanthus sacchariflorus.. Miscanthus is part of a tribe of grasses, the Andropogoneae, that includes sorghum, sugarcane, and corn, Sacks explains. Because it is found so far north, this population of Miscanthus sacchariflorus is likely the most cold-hardy of that group. If we want to improve cold hardiness in this very important group of plants, this is going to be best population to study.. Sacks and ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Skin temperature and photoelectric plethysmography recovery characteristics during mild cold challenge testing in normal subjects. AU - Allen, John. AU - Montague, C. AU - Murray, A. PY - 1999/12/1. Y1 - 1999/12/1. M3 - Conference article. VL - 36. SP - 327. JO - Journal of Vascular Research. JF - Journal of Vascular Research. ER - ...
Among all cereals, rice is highly sensitive to cold stress, especially at the germination stage, which adversely impacts its germination ability, seed vigor, crop stand establishment, and, ultimately, grain yield. The dissection of novel quantitative trait loci (QTLs) or genes conferring a low-temperature germination (LTG) ability can significantly accelerate cold-tolerant rice breeding to ensure the wide application of rice cultivation through the direct seeding method. In this study, we identified 11 QTLs for LTG using 144 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between a cold-tolerant variety, Lijiangxintuanheigu (LTH), and a cold-sensitive variety, Shennong265 (SN265). By resequencing two parents and RIL lines, a high-density bin map, including 2,828 bin markers, was constructed using 123,859 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between two parents. The total genetic distance corresponding to all 12 chromosome linkage maps was 2,840.12 cm. Adjacent markers were marked by an average
In this study, hematopoietic cells from mice pretreated with CVE and exposed to acute cold/restraint stress were stimulated in the presence of growth factors to form colonies, thus providing accurate information about the modulation of the green algae of the stress-induced changes in the hematopoietic response. Our results demonstrated that exposure to acute stress affected hematopoiesis. Mice exposed for a 2.5-hour time period of cold and restraint presented diminished clonal capacity for CFU-GM content per femur, which was decreased by as much as 50% compared with that in control mice, in spite of the significant increase in serum colony-stimulating activity (CSA). Treatment with 50 mg/kg CVE for 5 days, previously to the stress regimen, attenuates the effects of the stress, since comparable levels of myeloid progenitors were found in the bone marrow of both CVE/stress and control mice. Moreover, the sera from stressed mice pretreated with CVE further increased the CFU-GM formation. On the ...
Common Cold Treatment in Sterling,VA. Struggling with a persistent cold? We can help with providing a common cold cure and boost immune system for further resistance.
Common Cold Treatment in Leesburg,VA. Struggling with a persistent cold? We can help with providing a common cold cure and boost immune system for further resistance.
Lauxmann, M.; Borsani, J.; Osorio, S.; Lombardo, V. A.; Budde, C. O.; Bustamante, C. A.; Monti, L. L.; Andreo, C. S.; Fernie, A. R.; Drincovich, M. F. et al.; Lara, M. V.: Deciphering the metabolic pathways influencing heat and cold responses during post-harvest physiology of peach fruit. Plant, Cell and Environment 37 (3), S. 601 - 616 (2013 ...
Low temperature adversely affects crop yields by restraining plant growth and productivity. Most temperate plants have the potential to increase their freezing tolerance upon exposure to low but nonfreezing temperatures, a process known as cold acclimation. Various physiological, molecular, and metabolic changes occur during cold acclimation, which suggests that the plant cold stress response is a complex, vital phenomenon that involves more than one pathway. The C-Repeat Binding Factor (CBF) pathway is the most important and well-studied cold regulatory pathway that imparts freezing tolerance to plants. The regulation of freezing tolerance involves the action of phytochromes, which play an important role in light-mediated signalling to activate cold-induced gene expression through the CBF pathway. Under normal temperature conditions, CBF expression is regulated by the circadian clock through the action of a central oscillator and also day length (photoperiod). The phytochrome and phytochrome
TY - JOUR. T1 - Metabolic regulatory network alterations in response to acute cold stress and ginsenoside intervention. AU - Wang, Xiaoyan. AU - Su, Mingming. AU - Qiu, Yunping. AU - Ni, Yan. AU - Zhao, Tie. AU - Zhou, Mingmei. AU - Zhao, Aihua. AU - Yang, Shengli. AU - Zhao, Liping. AU - Jia, Wei. N1 - Copyright: Copyright 2008 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.. PY - 2007/9. Y1 - 2007/9. N2 - Acute stress may trigger systemic biochemical and physiological changes in living organisms, leading to a rapid loss of homeostasis, which can be gradually reinstated by self-regulatory mechanisms and/or drug intervention strategy. However, such a sophisticated metabolic regulatory process has so far been poorly understood, especially from a holistic view. Urinary metabolite profiling of Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to cold temperature (-10°C) for 2 h using GC/MS in conjunction with modern multivariate statistical techniques revealed drastic biochemical changes as evidenced by fluctuations of urinary ...
Does Esoteric Connective Tissue Therapy ( ECTT) have Efficacy and Long Term Benefits Treating People with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain. PubMed, SCI, Scopus, ESCI, PMC indexed
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators responding to acute environmental stresses in both plants and animals. By modulating gene expression, miRNAs either restore or reconstitute a new expression program to enhance cell tolerance to stresses. Cold shock is one of the stresses that can induce acute physiological responses and transcriptional changes in aquatic creatures. Previous genomic studies have revealed many cold-affected genes in fish larvae and adults, however, the role of miRNAs in acute cold response is still ambiguous. To elucidate the regulatory roles of miRNAs in the cold-inducible responses, we performed small RNA-seq and RNA-seq analyses and found potential cold regulatory miRNAs and genes. We further investigated their interactions and involvements in cold tolerance. Small RNA-seq and RNA-seq identified 29 up-/26 down-regulated miRNAs and 908 up-/468 down-regulated genes, respectively, in responding to cold shock for 4 h at 18 °C. miRNA and transcriptomic analyses showed these miRNAs
Significant differences in responses to intraperitoneally injected tyramine or cold exposure (-10 degrees C) were observed in young (3-4 mo) male Sprague-Dawley (S-D) and Fischer 344 (F344) rats cold-acclimated (CA) or non-cold-acclimated (non-CA). Non-CA S-D and F344 rats respond to tyramine by increased O2 uptake and elevation of colonic temperature, but, as we had reported previously, the optimal doses of tyramine required was significantly different for these two strains, i.e., 2 mg/kg for F344 vs. 20 mg/kg for S-D. The response to tyramine was significantly potentiated by cold acclimation in both strains of rats. Despite the different dosages of tyramine given to the animals, similar increases in O2 uptakes and colonic temperatures were observed. Differences between these two strains were also evident in their responses to a cold challenge (3 h, -10 degrees C). The ranking for cold tolerance (-10 degrees C) was as follows: CA F344 greater than non-CA F344 greater than CA S-D greater than ...
PhD Project - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Microwave Radiometry (MR) Based Measurement of the Efficacy of Hot and Cold Treatments at University of Edinburgh, listed on FindAPhD.com
Larvae and adults of A. aegypti are clearly capable of cold acclimation when presented with a change in larval or adult acclimation temperature. In the present study, we compared the effects of development or adult acclimation at only two temperatures (15 and 25°C), but demonstrate that this difference of 10°C was sufficient to substantially alter chill tolerance in this important vector of disease. Cold-acclimated larvae and adults more rapidly recovered from chill coma following cold stress, and had significantly higher survival following chronic cold. After 12-16 h at 2°C, very few larvae acclimated to 15°C showed any signs of chilling injury while ∼30% of larvae acclimated to 25°C were clearly suffering from neuromuscular injury that prevented them moving in a coordinated manner (Fig. 2B).. Chilling injury has been repeatedly associated with a systemic loss of ion balance in several terrestrial insects, including members of Hemiptera, Diptera, Blattodea, Lepidoptera and Orthoptera ...
Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is the fifth most important cereal crop world-wide as well as an important source of feed, fiber and biofuel. It is a C4 plant and is well adapted to environments subject to high temperature and water limitation. Despite these agronomic qualities, it suffers from limitations of sensitivity to low temperature and the grain has drawbacks in relation to functionality and digestibility. The objectives of this study are: 1. To promote seed germination at low temperature and to enhance the seedling cold tolerance. 2. To enhance the grain digestibility and functionality. In an attempt to augment cold tolerance, we introduced the glycine rich RNA binding protein gene atRZ-1a from Arabidopsis, Bcl-2 mRNA sequence 725-1428 representing the 3 non coding region of the gene from humans and rice Ca-dependent protein kinase 7 (OsCDPK7), all of which are known to improve the cold tolerance of plants. None of these genes resulted in the improvement of cold tolerance in sorghum. On
Königer, Annabella (2019): The molecular basis of cold tolerance in Drosophila ananassae. Dissertation, LMU München: Faculty of Biology ...
David R. Foster1. Four great ice ages covered large parts of the upper northern hemisphere under solid ice as thick as one mile. The last glacier began to retreat from the future northeastern United States around 10,000 B.C.E., leaving a changed landscape with deeper valleys and huge inland seas. The residual glacial till, gravel, sand, and clay gradually broke down to create soil that allowed creeping, cold-tolerant plants to form a cover of tundra. The climate slowly warmed, and trees took root; a boreal forest of spruce and fir grew first. Pine and hemlock followed, joined later by hardwoods- maple, beech, and birch, then hickory, oak, and ash. This forest would continually change in response to climate, fire, new species, wind, disease, and human activity.. With the increasing vegetation, including nutritious plants that supported a variety of animals, predecessors of the Algonquin and Iroquois arrived. They lived here for thousands of years as hunter-gatherers, moving periodically to take ...
Hailie covered in goo, gauge miraculous hardcore coma recovery yanine nipples. I love these teen novels that center around high school and first time everything. Also, the boys had their own destinct characters causing them to be easily identified Drawbacks: Young Adult.
List of 71 causes for Cold hands and Cold sensitivity, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
When I came back I tentatively mentioned it to Mike, perhaps expecting a sort of a cold response, but he didnt! He was immediately enthusiastic about the idea and we had to verify a few things. First we needed to make sure that he could apply for an unpaid leave of absence and get back to his job an salary (check!) and that I could on the other hand keep my salary or it would have been a serious problem (check!!). Mike was so on board that he even said maybe I can also do some work in some lab.. wow!! I immediately emailed the colleague in Davis and I mean, who wouldnt want a very experience, hands on post doc for free? He got back within minutes saying his colleagues would be fighting over him, no question! Apparently Davis is extremely family oriented and if Mike works then we have to look into childcare, but should not be a major issue. I would hope that my parents will spend maybe even a month there and could help. Renting somewhere should also be very very easy, Im assuming renting a ...
well this is what i did. i had a few cakes and i crumbled them into a pan and cased with wet verm. waited a few days and a few spots started colonizing. now should i go ahead and cold shock now,
Encodes a WD-40 protein involved in histone deacetylation in response to abiotic stress.Identified in a screen for mutations with altered expression of stress induced genes. Functions as a repressor of cold tolerance induced genes. Loss of function mutants are hypersensitive to freezing ...
Cold shock response is the initial reaction to immersion in cold water. It generally starts with a gasp reflex in response to ... Cold shock response - Physiological response to sudden exposure to cold. * Bradycardia - Heart rate that is below the normal ... Thermal balance responses[edit]. The unprotected human body responds to cold water immersion in a progression from a stress ... Bradycardia is the response to facial contact with cold water: the human heart rate slows down ten to twenty-five percent.[7] ...
Uncontrolled rate breathing makes swimming impossible due to the cold shock response. Work had neen carried out with the ... So-called 'dry drowning' is caused by the shock of cold water. A possible cause is cold water causing the larynx to spasm. ... Admiral Frank Golden in the 1990s thought that the deaths were linked to the gasp reflex as found in cold showers. There is a ... Animals have a 'diving response', but humans hyperventilate, and the heart beats too quickly due to a chemical imbalance. ...
Cryonics Cold shock response Cold compression therapy Freeze spray Cryotherapy at eMedicine "OpenAthens / Sign in". search. ... cold water is just as effective as a hyper-cold cryosauna. Bleakley, Chris; Bieuzen, Francois; Davison, Gareth; Costello, ... If the cold temperatures are produced by evaporating liquid nitrogen, there is the risk of inert gas asphyxiation as well as ... If the cold temperatures are produced by evaporating liquid nitrogen, there is the risk of inert gas asphyxiation as well as ...
After submersion in cold water the cold shock response will occur, causing an uncontrollable gasp for air. This is followed by ... The cold shock response and cardiac arrest are the most common causes of death related to cold water immersion. Winter swimming ... Through conditioning, experienced winter swimmers have a greater resistance to effects of the cold shock response. Hypothermia ... "Exercise in the cold, Part II. A physiological trip through cold water exposure". The Science of Sport. Retrieved 23 April 2010 ...
They are expressed under stress conditions such as cold shock, iron depletion, onset of the SOS response and sugar stress. The ... DsrA levels are increased in response to low temperatures and osmotic stress, and RprA levels are increased in response to ... The expression of OmpC and OmpF is regulated by the sRNAs MicC and MicF in response to stress conditions. The outer membrane ... In E. coli the sRNA MicA depletes OmpA levels, in Vibrio cholerae the sRNA VrrA represses synthesis of OmpA in response to ...
Many notothenoids have lost the nearly universal heat shock response (HSR) due to evolution at cold and stable temperatures. ... Bilyk, KT, Vargas-Chacoff, L, and Cheng CHC (2018). "Evolution in chronic cold: varied loss of cellular response to heat in ... At cold temperatures, the oxygen solubility of water is enhanced. The loss of hemoglobin is partially compensated in these ... This period marked the cooling of the Southern Ocean, resulting in the stable, ice-cold conditions that have persisted to the ...
"Characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus heat shock, cold shock, stringent, and SOS responses and their effects on log- ... for example RsaC was induced by cold shock and RsaA is induced in response to osmotic stress. RsaE and RsaF genes overlap in S. ...
Exposure to cold water can result in the harmful cold shock response, the helpful diving reflex and excessive loss of body heat ... "Exercise in the Cold: Part II - A physiological trip through cold water exposure". The science of sport. www.sportsscientists. ... "4 Phases of Cold Water Immersion". Beyond Cold Water Bootcamp. Canadian Safe Boating Council. Retrieved 8 November 2013. " ... Somers, Lee H. (1987). Lang, Michael A; Mitchell, Charles T. (eds.). Training scientific divers for work in cold water and ...
Cold shock response is the physiological response of organisms to sudden cold, especially cold water, and is a common cause of ... Exposure to cold water can result in the harmful cold shock response, the helpful diving reflex and excessive loss of body heat ... The immediate shock of the cold causes involuntary inhalation, which if underwater can result in drowning. The cold water can ... "Exercise in the Cold: Part II - A physiological trip through cold water exposure". The science of sport. www.sportsscientists. ...
Exposure to cold water can result in the harmful cold shock response, the helpful diving reflex and excessive loss of body heat ... "Exercise in the Cold: Part II - A physiological trip through cold water exposure". The science of sport. www.sportsscientists. ... "4 Phases of Cold Water Immersion". Beyond Cold Water Bootcamp. Canadian Safe Boating Council. Retrieved 8 November 2013. " ... Kollias, James; Van Derveer, Dena; Dorchak, Karen J.; Greenleaf, John E. (February 1976). "Physiologic responses to water ...
2010). "Protein Folding in the Cytoplasm and the Heat Shock Response". Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2 (12): a004390. doi: ... One theoretical mechanism for this approach includes upregulating the heat shock response response to rescue proteins from ... This response acts locally in a cell autonomous fashion but can also extend to intercellular signaling to protect the organism ... The unfolded protein response in the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) is activated by imbalances of unfolded proteins inside the ER ...
... cold shock response, and telomere maintenance. The immunoglobulin domain (InterPro: IPR013783) consists of a beta-sheet ...
cspA mRNA 5' UTR is the untranslated region of the cspA gene, which is important in the cold shock response in ... Yamanaka K, Mitta M, Inouye M (October 1999). "Mutation analysis of the 5' untranslated region of the cold shock cspA mRNA of ... Goldstein J, Pollitt NS, Inouye M (January 1990). "Major cold shock protein of Escherichia coli". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A ... Brandi A, Spurio R, Gualerzi CO, Pon CL (March 1999). "Massive presence of the Escherichia coli 'major cold-shock protein' CspA ...
Morimoto, RI (2011). "The heat shock response: systems biology of proteotoxic stress in aging and disease". Cold Spring Harb ... Morimoto, R.I. (1998). "Regulation of the Heat Shock Transcriptional Response: Crosstalk between a Family of Heat Shock Factors ... "Attenuation of the heat shock response in HeLa cells is mediated by the release of bound heat shock transcription factor and is ... over 250 papers and three monographs including two books on the Heat Shock Response and Molecular Chaperones from Cold Spring ...
Lee, RE; Czajka, MC (1990). "A rapid cold-hardening response protecting against cold shock injury in Drosophila melanogaster". ... Rapid cold hardening (RCH) is one of the fastest cold temperature responses recorded. This process allows an insect to ... Rapid cold hardening can be experienced during short periods of undesirable temperatures, such as cold shock in environment ... The insects use rapid cold hardening to protect against cold shock during overwintering periods.Overwintering insects stay ...
... s often regulate genes required during either a heat shock or cold shock response, but have been implicated in ... Mega R, Manzoku M, Shinkai A, Nakagawa N, Kuramitsu S, Masui R (August 2010). "Very rapid induction of a cold shock protein by ... Shamovsky I, Ivannikov M, Kandel ES, Gershon D, Nudler E (March 2006). "RNA-mediated response to heat shock in mammalian cells ... Though typically associated with heat-induced protein expression, RNA thermometers can also regulate cold-shock proteins. For ...
... its genome it has several heat and cold shock proteins that are most likely involved in metabolic regulation and response to ...
There is also a risk from the body's acute cold shock response, which may affect the arm muscles while swimming and can lead to ... Cold exposure therapy: "There is some science behind Mr Hof's claims... However, cold-water swimming can be very dangerous - ... "The Goop Lab Netflix On The Wim Hof Method & Cold Therapy". Goop. Retrieved April 3, 2020. "The Goop Lab Netflix On The Wim Hof ... In The Goop Lab, Gwyneth Paltrow and her colleagues try out energy healing, psychedelics and cold therapy. But plenty of ...
... failure of another stress response involving 'cold shock' proteins, which they have successfully harnessed for neuroprotection ... Using mouse models, they described the pathogenic role of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in neurodegeneration, which led ...
... controlled mainly by the sigma factor sigma E and the Cpx two-component system Cold shock response, which governs expression of ... In bacteria some other important stress response systems are: Heat shock response, controlled by the sigma factor sigma 32 ... This response is less understood, but it can be activated by different pathways and stimuli, and is a general response to most ... Stress response systems can play an important role in the virulence of pathogenic organisms. Their stress response systems, ...
A set of written rules which specifies how people working in a particular occupation should behave Cold shock response - ... Physiological response to sudden exposure to cold Comando Raggruppamento Subacquei e Incursori Teseo Tesei - Italian special ... The physiological responses to immersion of air-breathing vertebrates Diving regulator - Mechanism that controls the pressure ... The physiological responses to immersion of air-breathing vertebrates Physiology of decompression - The physiological basis for ...
Sudden immersion into freezing water does not typically cause death by hypothermia, but rather from the cold shock response, ... "Monday's medical myth: you can catch a cold by getting cold". The Conversation. e. "Feeling cold causing colds? - Scientific ... The common cold is caused by germs, not cold temperature, although cold temperature may somewhat weaken the immune system. ... If taken daily, it may slightly reduce the duration and severity of colds, but it has no effect if taken after the cold starts ...
Cold shock response is the physiological response of organisms to sudden cold, especially cold water, and is a common cause of ... The immediate shock of the cold causes involuntary inhalation, which if underwater can result in drowning. The cold water can ... "Exercise in the Cold: Part II - A physiological trip through cold water exposure". The science of sport. sportsscientists.com. ... "4 Phases of Cold Water Immersion". Beyond Cold Water Bootcamp. Canadian Safe Boating Council. Retrieved 8 November 2013. ...
Cold shock response - Physiological response to sudden exposure to cold Dead space (physiology) - The volume of inhaled air ... Watertight clothing that seals the wearer from cold and hazardous liquids Hot water suit - A wetsuit with a supply of heated ... Authoritative document of how things should be done in an organisation Emergency response plan Evacuation plan - Removal of ... Underwater firearm developed by the United States during the Cold War Powerhead (firearm) - Specialized firearm used underwater ...
... with the exception of not forming a response to cold shock. It is thought UspA is especially important to the recovery of E. ... It's important to note the USP responses are independent of many other stress responses seen in bacteria such as rpoS. The ... These responses have been suggested to be involved in the protection of DNA. As a result, UspA aids Salmonella to resist ... In response to drought, there is a reduction in photosynthetic carbon production as well as a reduction in energy metabolism. ...
... where the universe dies in the cold Death by hypothermia Death by cold shock response death, in impersonal circumstances, in ... the cold of death Lonely death All pages with titles beginning with Cold death All pages with titles containing Cold death Heat ... Cold Death (comic book), a 2003 volume of Brit (comics) "Cold Death" (novella), a 1955 short story by Barrington J. Bayley Cold ... loneliness, by a stone cold killer without passion "A Cold Death" (episode), a 2019 TV episode of Primal (TV series) "Cold ...
Cold shock response Donath-Landsteiner hemolytic anemia List of hematologic conditions Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria Warm ... No cold drinks; all drinks should be at room temperature (or above). Requires heater to maintain temperature in cold places. ... Symptoms of cold agglutinin disease (CAD) are often triggered or made worse by cold temperatures or a viral infection. ... In people with cold agglutinin disease, the Coombs test is almost always positive for immunoglobulin M (IgM). Avoid cold ...
... due to a high spinal cord injury disrupting the sympathetic nervous system Cold shock response of organisms to sudden cold, ... Thermal shock Shock (economics), an unpredicted event that affects an economy Demand shock Supply shock Culture shock, in ... a sudden acceleration or deceleration Shock absorber Shock mount Shock wave Oblique shock Shock (fluid dynamics), an abrupt ... especially cold water Electric shock Defibrillation, electric shock to restore heart rhythm Electroconvulsive therapy or shock ...
... response to cold and involved in anti-pathogen responses. In addition, they are also involved in morphogenesis, since MPK4 ... MAPKs are involved in directing cellular responses to a diverse array of stimuli, such as mitogens, osmotic stress, heat shock ... MPK4 and MPK6 kinases of Arabidopsis thaliana are key mediators of responses to osmotic shock, oxidative stress, ... Terrestrial plants contain four groups of classical MAPKs (MAPK-A, MAPK-B, MAPK-C and MAPK-D) that are involved in response to ...
Cold-shock proteins are synthesized to overcome the deleterious effects of cold shock. CspA, the major cold-shock protein of ... Cold-shock response and cold-shock proteins.. Phadtare S1, Alsina J, Inouye M. ... Both prokaryotes and eukaryotes exhibit a cold-shock response upon an abrupt temperature downshift. ... existence of multiple families in many organisms suggest that these proteins are indispensable for survival during cold-shock ...
Cold shock response is a series of cardio-respiratory responses caused by sudden immersion in cold water. In cold water ... cold shock response is perhaps the most common cause of death, such as by falling through thin ice. The immediate shock of the ... Conditioning against the cold shock response is an effective and cost efficient way to prevent drowning. Those who benefit the ... It is possible to undergo physiological conditioning to reduce the cold shock response, and some people are naturally better ...
... subtilis and the gene is induced severalfold by cold shock, null mutant strains show no defect in their cold shock response ... the cold shock proteins and the cold acclimatization proteins, respectively, with the cold shock proteins thought to play a ... subtilis to survive cold shock from 37 to 15°C. Cold shock experiments with strain JH642 revealed a cold-protective function ... Cold shock in the absence of isoleucine (●) abolished growth. The addition of 100 μM isoleucine prior to cold shock (■) permits ...
... cold shock responses, in addition to the cold adaptation response, and that these three cellular responses involve very ... The early shock response.The early cold shock response seen within 1 to 2 h of shifting to 72°C is characterized by the up- ... RbfA, a 30S ribosomal binding factor, is a cold-shock protein whose absence triggers the cold-shock response. Mol. Microbiol. ... if these organisms possess a cold shock response, it is novel and distinct from the previously characterized cold shock ...
Cold Shock Response is the physiological response of organisms to sudden cold, in this case humans and cold water. ... Cold Shock Response , Dangers and Training. Cold Shock Response is the physiological response of organisms to sudden cold-in ... Cold Shock Response, Condition, Death, Education, News, Practice, Response, Safety, Safety First, Save, Shock, Study, Train ... Some humans are better capable of surviving Cold Shock Response than others depending on body fat and physical fitness. Cold ...
All stress factors but cold shock resulted in a decrease of lifespan proportional to the dose of treatment. However, stress- ... and cold shock (+4, 0 and -4°C) on an organisms viability indicators (survival and locomotor activity) and transcriptome ... The molecular mechanisms that determine the organisms response to a variety of doses and modalities of stress factors are not ... affect the organisms viability and lead to different changes of both general and specific cellular stress response mechanisms. ...
Benzyl alcohol and ethanol were found to exhibit an opposite effect on cold adaptation ofBacillus subtilis. The growth lag ... fluorescence data indicates that the control of membrane structure represents an important part of bacterial adaptation to cold ... Effect of benzyl alcohol and ethanol on cold-shock response ofBacillus subtilis. Author. J. Svobodová, I. Konopásek, F. ... Benzyl alcohol and ethanol were found to exhibit an opposite effect on cold adaptation ofBacillus subtilis. The growth lag ...
In cold-water, sudden skin cooling triggers the life-threatening cold shock response (CSR). The CSR comprises tachycardia, ... Acute anxiety predicts components of the cold shock response on cold water immersion: Toward an integrated psychophysiological ... Some CSR components can be reduced by habituation (i.e. reduced response to stimulus of same magnitude) induced by 3-5 short ... Methods: Forty-eight unhabituated participants completed one (CON1) seven-minute immersion in to cold water (15°C). Of that ...
Role of the ribosome-associated protein PY in the cold-shock response ofEscherichia coli. ... Role of the ribosome-associated protein PY in the cold-shock response ofEscherichia coli ... cold shock and to reconcile the inhibition caused by PY with the active translation observed for some mRNAs during cold shock. ... cold shock and to reconcile the inhibition caused by PY with the active translation observed for some mRNAs during cold shock. ...
The first 3 stages of sudden, cold water immersion are cold shock response, cold incapacitation, and hypothermia.Footnote 38 ... Stage 1: Cold shock response (0 to 2 minutes). Immersion is immediately followed by an initial large gasp and subsequent ... They were therefore subjected to cold water immersion and associated cold water shock. ... Appendix E - Physical responses to cold water immersion. Water conducts heat away from the body much faster than air does at ...
Microbial response to stress; Response to pH stress; Heat- and cold shock response; Response to osmotic shock; Response to high ... Dose-response assessment; Dose-response models; Dose and infection; Risk Characterization; Production of a formal report; ...
Jones PG, Inouye M (March 1994). "The cold-shock response--a hot topic". Mol. Microbiol. 11 (5): 811-8. doi:10.1111/j.1365- ... which contain cold shock domains is increased 2-10 fold. These so-called cold shock proteins are thought to help the cell to ... In molecular biology, the cold-shock domain (CSD) is a protein domain of about 70 amino acids which has been found in ... Landsman D (June 1992). "RNP-1, an RNA-binding motif is conserved in the DNA-binding cold shock domain". Nucleic Acids Res. 20 ...
Team GeorgiaTech: Inducing a Thermogenic Response to Cold-shock in Bacteria. Alternative Oxidase (AOX) is a terminal oxidase ... Engineering a controlled thermogenic response in bacteria could lead to improved bacterial functioning in cold shock ... 31 Team GeorgiaTech: Inducing a Thermogenic Response to Cold-shock in Bacteria ... coli to induce a thermogenic response to a cold-shock, and 2) calculating a theoretical rate of heat production per bacterial ...
Team GeorgiaTech: Inducing a Thermogenic Response to Cold-shock in Bacteria. Alternative Oxidase (AOX) is a terminal oxidase ... Engineering a controlled thermogenic response in bacteria could lead to improved bacterial functioning in cold shock ... Engineering a controlled thermogenic response in bacteria could lead to improved bacterial functioning in cold shock ... 31 Team GeorgiaTech: Inducing a Thermogenic Response to Cold-shock in Bacteria ...
... with acute epigenetic changes that may contribute to cold-induced expression in BAT. We conclude that these findings indicate ... Vaspin expression was analyzed in isolated white and brown adipocytes during adipogenesis and in response to adrenergic stimuli ... While obesogenic diets also upregulated hepatic vaspin mRNA levels, cold exposure tended to increase vaspin gene expression of ... Methods: We analyzed the effects of obesogenic diets and cold exposure on vaspin expression in liver and white and brown ...
... triggering the activation of cold-defence responses and mobilizing substrates to fuel the thermogenic processes. Although these ... Cold exposure stimulates the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), ... Cold-Shock Response* * Glucose / metabolism * Humans * ... Abstract: Cold exposure stimulates the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), triggering the activation of cold-defence responses ... acute cold exposure designed to minimize shivering response in 12 lean healthy men. Cold-induced increase in whole-body oxygen ...
Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) triggers inflammatory responses in hemorrhagic shock and sepsis. In: Nature Medicine ... Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) triggers inflammatory responses in hemorrhagic shock and sepsis. Nature Medicine. ... Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) triggers inflammatory responses in hemorrhagic shock and sepsis. / Qiang, Xiaoling; ... title = "Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) triggers inflammatory responses in hemorrhagic shock and sepsis", ...
Cold shock response is the initial reaction to immersion in cold water. It generally starts with a gasp reflex in response to ... Cold shock response - Physiological response to sudden exposure to cold. * Bradycardia - Heart rate that is below the normal ... Thermal balance responses[edit]. The unprotected human body responds to cold water immersion in a progression from a stress ... Bradycardia is the response to facial contact with cold water: the human heart rate slows down ten to twenty-five percent.[7] ...
Many bacteria produce small cold shock proteins (Csp) as a response to rapid temperature downshift (cold shock). During cold ... as a response to rapid temperature downshift (cold shock). During cold shock, the cell membrane fluidity and enzyme activity ... However, some Csps are non-cold inducible and they are reported to be involved in various cellular processes to promote normal ... However, some Csps are non-cold inducible and they are reported to be involved in various cellular processes to promote normal ...
To accomplish this, 166 L. monocytogenes isolates were sequenced and evaluated for their ability to grow in cold (4°C), salt (6 ... Specifically, a number of cold and desiccation sensitive isolates contained PMSCs in σB regulator genes (rsbS, rsbU, rsbV). ... Isolates with full length inlA exhibited significantly (p,0.001) enhanced cold tolerance relative to those harboring a ... To accomplish this, 166 L. monocytogenes isolates were sequenced and evaluated for their ability to grow in cold (4°C), salt (6 ...
Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) triggers inflammatory responses in hemorrhagic shock and sepsis. Nat Med 2013;19:1489 ... Cold shock response in mammalian cells. J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 1999;1:243-55. ... We assessed the involvement of stress response protein cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (Cirp) in the development of ... was originally identified in the testis as the first mammalian cold shock protein (17) and is suggested to mediate the ...
Cold Shock Response in Microorganisms Ricardo Cavicchioli, School of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of New South ... Heat-Shock Response in Thermophilic Microorganisms Mosè Rossi, Instituto di Biochemica Delle Proteine ed Enzimologia, CNR; ... Heterologous Gene Expression in Cold-Adapted Microorganisms A. Duilio, Department of Organic and Biological Chemistry, ...
Matz, J.M., Lavoi K.P., Epstein, P.N. & Blake, M.J. (1996a). Thermoregulatory and heat-shock protein response deficits in cold- ... The heat-shock response and expression of heat-shock proteins in wheat under diurnal heat stress and field conditions. Aust. J ... hence the name heat shock (Ritossa 1962). However, it was not until 1973 that the heat shock response was found to coincide ... A purine-type heat shock protein 90 inhibitor promotes the heat shock response in Arabidopsis , Plant Biotechnology Reports, ...
Cold Shock Proteins and Low-Temperature Response of Streptococcus thermophilus CNRZ302. Default journal. ... Cold Shock Proteins of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 Are Involved in Cryoprotection and in the Production of Cold-Induced Proteins ... Wouters, J. A., Rombouts, F. M., Kuipers, O. P., Vos, W. M. D., & Abee, T. (2000). The Role of Cold-Shock Proteins in Low- ... Analysis of the role of 7 kDa cold-shock proteins of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 in cryoprotection. Default journal. ...
Rui Xiao, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Florida: Cold-Shock Proteins (CSPs) in stress response and lifespan ... Administration of cytokines and pattern recognition to improve the aged immune response. Min-Dian Li, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow ...
Transcriptionally regulated by DesR/DesK in response to cold shock.2 Publications. Manual assertion based on experiment ini ... "A Bacillus subtilis gene induced by cold shock encodes a membrane phospholipid desaturase.". Aguilar P.S., Cronan J.E. Jr., de ... "A Bacillus subtilis gene induced by cold shock encodes a membrane phospholipid desaturase.". Aguilar P.S., Cronan J.E. Jr., de ...
A Stress Response that Monitors and Regulates mRNA Structure Is Central to Cold Shock Adaptation. ... Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2018 Jul 23. pii: a032698. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a032698. [Epub ahead of print] ... Exploration of Benzothiazole Rhodacyanines as Allosteric Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interactions with Heat Shock Protein 70 ...
2010). Protein folding in the cytoplasm and the heat shock response. Cold Spring Harb. Perspect. Biol. 2, a004390. ... 2011). The heat shock response: systems biology of proteotoxic stress in aging and disease. Cold Spring Harb. Symp. Quant. Biol ... We compare UPRmt with the extensively characterized cytosolic heat shock response (HSR) and the unfolded protein response in ... While the unfolded protein response in the endoplasmic reticulum (UPRER) and the cytosolic heat shock response (HSR) have been ...
The responses of mammalian cells to heat stress are well... ... Cold-shock Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein Promoters ... Underhill, M. F., & Smales, C. M. (2007). The cold-shock response in mammalian cells: Investigating the HeLa cell cold-shock ... Al-Fageeh, M. B., & Smales, C. M. (2006). Control and regulation of the cellular responses to cold shock: The responses in ... The cold-shock response in cultured mammalian cells: Harnessing the response for the improvement of recombinant protein ...
Coping with the cold: the cold shock response in the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. ... Role of Cold Shock Proteins in Growth of Listeria monocytogenes under Cold and Osmotic Stress Conditions. Barbara Schmid, ... Recent developments in bacterial cold-shock response. Curr. Issues Mol. Biol.6:125-136. ... Role of Cold Shock Proteins in Growth of Listeria monocytogenes under Cold and Osmotic Stress Conditions ...
  • Cold-shock response and cold-shock proteins. (nih.gov)
  • Cold-shock proteins are synthesized to overcome the deleterious effects of cold shock. (nih.gov)
  • Widespread distribution, ancient origin, involvement in the protein translational machinery of the cell and the existence of multiple families in many organisms suggest that these proteins are indispensable for survival during cold-shock acclimation and that they are probably also important for growth under optimal conditions. (nih.gov)
  • Bacteria express a well-defined set of proteins after a rapid decrease in temperature, which differs from those expressed under heat shock conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cold shock proteins may include helicases, nucleases, and ribosome-associated components that interact with DNA and RNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each of these phases can be characterized by a special set of cold-induced proteins, the cold shock proteins and the cold acclimatization proteins, respectively, with the cold shock proteins thought to play a major, not yet fully understood regulatory role in the mechanism of cold adaptation ( 12-15 , 46 ). (asm.org)
  • Two major membrane proteins were evident after one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel analysis of cold-adapted cells, and staining revealed them to be glycoproteins. (asm.org)
  • These proteins are also related phylogenetically to some cold-responsive genes recently identified in certain bacteria. (asm.org)
  • The Cip proteins may represent a general prokaryotic-type cold response mechanism that is present even in hyperthermophilic archaea. (asm.org)
  • A decrease in temperature results in a temporary halt in protein synthesis, but a small subset of so-called cold shock proteins are induced during an acclimation phase ( 24 ). (asm.org)
  • After a lag phase of several hours, general protein synthesis and cell growth resume at a much slower rate, and production of most of the cold shock proteins decreases to a basal level. (asm.org)
  • Other cold-inducible proteins in E. coli include initiation factor 2 (IF2) ( 7 , 13 ), ribosomal binding factor A (RbfA) ( 22 ), and DEAD-box RNA helicase ( 4 , 23 , 37 ), all of which associate with the ribosome and are believed to play a role in protein synthesis. (asm.org)
  • In molecular biology, the cold-shock domain (CSD) is a protein domain of about 70 amino acids which has been found in prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the lag phase, the expression of around 13 proteins, which contain cold shock domains is increased 2-10 fold. (wikipedia.org)
  • These so-called 'cold shock' proteins are thought to help the cell to survive in temperatures lower than optimum growth temperature, by contrast with heat shock proteins, which help the cell to survive in temperatures greater than the optimum, possibly by condensation of the chromosome and organisation of the prokaryotic nucleoid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many bacteria produce small cold shock proteins (Csp) as a response to rapid temperature downshift (cold shock). (frontiersin.org)
  • Most heat shock proteins (Hsp) function as molecular chaperones that help organisms to cope with stress of both an internal and external nature. (wiley.com)
  • It is known that up-regulation of the Hsps is a common cellular response to increased levels of non-native proteins that facilitates correct protein folding/refolding or degradation of non-functional proteins. (wiley.com)
  • Heat shock genes are a subset of a larger group of genes coding for molecular chaperones, i.e. proteins that are involved in 'house-keeping' functions in the cell. (wiley.com)
  • In this review, we will focus on the ecological and evolutionary roles of stress-inducible heat shock proteins (Hsps), especially on Hsp70, one of the major heat shock proteins that has been intensively studied in model organisms and in naturally occurring populations. (wiley.com)
  • Bacterial cold-shock proteins. (springer.com)
  • All three Csps are dispensable for growth at optimal temperature (37°C). These proteins are, however, required for efficient cold and osmotic stress tolerance of this bacterium. (asm.org)
  • The cold shock protein (Csp) family consists of small, highly conserved, and structurally related nucleic acid binding proteins that presumably have important roles in regulation of various microbial physiological processes ( 8 ). (asm.org)
  • The CspC and CspE proteins have been implicated in chromosomal condensation and cell division and in the regulation of RpoS and UspA stress response proteins ( 2 , 17 , 19 , 30 , 43 ). (asm.org)
  • Genes coding for functional responses to environmental stress (exopolysaccharides, cold shock proteins, and membrane modifications) were found in all of the metagenomes. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Extreme cold is an overarching stress in the polar regions because it drastically modifies the physical-chemical environment of living cells, with effects on biochemical reaction rates, substrate transport, membrane fluidity, and conformation of macromolecules, such as DNA and proteins ( 45 , 61 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Heterotrophic Bacteria and Archaea isolated from polar environments appear to be true psychrophiles in that they show evidence of cold adaptation strategies, synthesizing common stress proteins (cold shock proteins, chaperone proteins, and antifreeze proteins) and producing cryoprotection substances, including exopolysaccharides (EPS), all of which may enable their optimal growth at low temperatures ( 40 , 60 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Our proteomic analysis of flax revealed that at least 4 proteins are involved in the rapid response to mechanical stimuli, 7 to a cold shock and 3 to irradiation at 0.9 GHz. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • One of the proteins modified in response to cold shock was identified as saccharopine dehydrogenase. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • We therefore resorted to the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, where we found 4 proteins affected both by cold shock and by irradiation for 2 h at 0.9 GHz, and 2 other proteins only affected by the irradiation. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • For instance, the heat shock response elicits the transient expression of cytoprotective proteins, mitigating a multitude of harmful effects ranging from changes in cell morphology to alteration in protein structure and function ( 1 ⇓ - 3 ). (pnas.org)
  • The network of molecular chaperones mediates the folding and translocation of the many proteins encoded in the genome of eukaryotic organisms, as well as a response to stress. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The proteins upregulated under these stressing conditions were implicated, among other functions, in stress response, metabolism, and protein refolding. (hindawi.com)
  • Excessive heat denatures enzymes and other proteins, while extreme cold freezes intracellular water. (jove.com)
  • Heat stress can also cause plant cells to synthesize large quantities of special proteins called heat shock proteins. (jove.com)
  • Systematic identification and characterization of stress-inducible heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis). (fbn-dummerstorf.de)
  • In addition, the sav1322 mutant displays altered expression of proteins involved in carbohydrate/energy metabolism, cell wall metabolism, and stress or heat shock response, as well as other metabolic processes including lipid metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, purine or pyrimidine metabolism, transcription, and protein biosynthesis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The cold shock response of the psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas fragi involves four low-molecular-mass nucleic acid-binding proteins. (pseudomonas.com)
  • This paper proposes that the rapid decrease in quantity of most normal proteins occurring in the heat-shock response would have provided a sufficient selective force for the margin of safety to have evolved. (queensu.ca)
  • A simpler enzyme kinetic model presented here provides a better basis for understanding the possible role of heat-shock proteins in the evolution of dominance. (queensu.ca)
  • CspA, the major cold-shock protein of Escherichia coli, has recently been studied with respect to its structure, function and regulation at the level of transcription, translation and mRNA stability. (nih.gov)
  • While the archaea do not contain members of the bacterial cold shock protein (Csp) family, they all contain homologs of CipA and CipB. (asm.org)
  • The first major cold shock protein to be characterized was CspA of Escherichia coli ( 21 ). (asm.org)
  • It was shown that stress conditions led to enhanced transcriptional activity of general genes involved in free radical detoxification, heat shock response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response, immunity, circadian rhythm regulation, and reproduction. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We analyzed the effects of entomopathogenic fungus, ionizing radiation, starvation, and cold shock on survival, age dynamics of locomotor activity, expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter of stress response genes (i.e. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Protein Y (PY) is an Escherichia coli cold-shock protein which has been proposed to be responsible for the repression of bulk protein synthesis during cold adaptation. (unicam.it)
  • Deletion of yfiA, the gene encoding protein PY, demonstrates that this protein is dispensable for cold adaptation and is not responsible for the shutdown of bulk protein synthesis at the onset of the stress, although it is able to partially inhibit translation. (unicam.it)
  • The transistor will be based on a protein sequestration pathway that uses leucine zippers (bZIPs) Fos and Jun alongside synthetically designed dominant negatives thereof, eliciting a response dynamic similar to a signal titration. (igem.org)
  • Our results demonstrate a strong induction of vaspin mRNA and protein expression specifically in BAT of both cold-exposed and high-fat (HF) or high-sugar (HS) fed mice. (nih.gov)
  • Here we report increased levels of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) in the blood of individuals admitted to the surgical intensive care unit with hemorrhagic shock. (elsevier.com)
  • In addition, the efficiency of transcription and translation is reduced due to stabilization of the secondary structures of DNA and RNA, protein folding is inefficient, and ribosomes need to be adapted to cold before they can function properly ( Phadtare, 2004 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • We assessed the involvement of stress response protein cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (Cirp) in the development of intestinal inflammation and CAC. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Complex response mechanisms have evolved to deal with unfolded protein stress in different subcellular compartments and their moderate activation translates into positive effects on health. (biologists.org)
  • In this review, we focus on the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR mt ), a response to proteotoxic stress specifically in mitochondria, an organelle with a wide array of fundamental functions, most notably the harvesting of energy from food and the control of cell death. (biologists.org)
  • We compare UPR mt with the extensively characterized cytosolic heat shock response (HSR) and the unfolded protein response in endoplasmic reticulum (UPR ER ), and discuss the current knowledge about UPR mt signaling pathways as well as their potential involvement in physiology. (biologists.org)
  • Complex pathways to ensure proteostasis in different subcellular compartments, defined as unfolded protein responses (UPRs), have evolved in the cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which are finely coordinated and require a close communication with the nucleus. (biologists.org)
  • Walter and Ron, 2011 ), the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR mt ) was more recently discovered and sheds light on the complex relationships between this organelle and the nucleus ( Haynes and Ron, 2010 ). (biologists.org)
  • The cold-shock response in cultured mammalian cells: Harnessing the response for the improvement of recombinant protein production. (springer.com)
  • It possesses three small, highly homologous protein members of the cold shock protein (Csp) family. (asm.org)
  • Furthermore, the CspD protein of this organism has been suggested to regulate nutrient and stationary-phase stress adaptation responses ( 42 ). (asm.org)
  • The unique fraction of marine archaeal genes included, among others, those for a predicted RNA-binding protein of the bacterial cold shock family and a eukaryote-type Zn finger protein. (asm.org)
  • QAC's like glycinebetaine in low concentration can improve salt and cold stress tolerance, possibly by protecting photosynthetic protein complexes (Holmstrom et al. (scribd.com)
  • NbCSPR underlies age-dependent immune responses to bacterial cold shock protein in Nicotiana benthamiana . (tsl.ac.uk)
  • Lazarus1, a DUF300 protein, contributes to programmed cell death associated with Arabidopsis acd11 and the hypersensitive response. (tsl.ac.uk)
  • Ribosome binding factor A (RbfA) is a bacterial cold shock response protein, required for an efficient processing of the 5' end of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) during assembly of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit. (rcsb.org)
  • Cold shock response is a series of cardio-respiratory responses caused by sudden immersion in cold water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immersion in cold water is a hazard for anyone who participates in recreational, commercial or military activities in the oceans, lakes, and streams of all but the tropical regions of the world. (experts.com)
  • Sudden immersion in cold water results in an immediate decline in skin temperature which, in turn, initiates shivering thermogenesis with increases in metabolism (VO2), ventilation (VE), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and mean arterial pressure (MAP). (experts.com)
  • Immersion in cold water results in a 'cold-shock' response: gasping, hyperventilation, increased heart rate, release of stress (sympathoadrenal) hormones," explains Tipton. (vogue.co.uk)
  • Without flotation, victims can drown within minutes after immersion in cold water from cold-shock responses and limited swimming ability. (cdc.gov)
  • This research project aims to engineer Escherichia coli cells to generate heat in response to a cold-shock. (gatech.edu)
  • In order to gain further insight into the nature of elevated pressure as a stress, the response of Escherichia coli to pressure has been examined. (asmscience.org)
  • In cold-water, sudden skin cooling triggers the life-threatening cold shock response (CSR). (leedstrinity.ac.uk)
  • The shock of cold water against the skin triggers a fight-or-flight response. (harvard.edu)
  • When you submerge yourself to neck level, it triggers the body's cold shock response, instantly causing you to hyperventilate. (menshealth.com)
  • It triggers a shock response. (signalscv.com)
  • It is generally accepted that the cold stress response consists of two phases: an immediate, transient shock response and the subsequent delayed acclimatization response. (asm.org)
  • On the effect of transient expression of mutated eIF2alpha and eIF4E eukaryotic translation initiation factors on reporter gene expression in mammalian cells upon cold-shock. (springer.com)
  • Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves. (nih.gov)
  • Rapid skin cooling initiates an immediate gasp response, the inability to breath-hold, and hyperventilation. (experts.com)
  • According to Associate Professor Button, the response is brought on by rapid cooling of the skin and is characterised by a gasp response, followed by rapid hyperventilation. (medicalxpress.com)
  • A fall in skin temperature elicits a powerful cardiorespiratory response, termed "cold shock," comprising an initial gasp, hypertension, and hyperventilation despite a profound hypocapnia. (physiology.org)
  • Understanding the transcriptional response to cold stress in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae . (openwetware.org)
  • Processes such as cold signal perception, membrane adaptation, and the modification of the translation apparatus are involved. (wikipedia.org)
  • The detection of general and specific stress response genes may contribute to revealing the mechanisms of organism's adaptation to adverse conditions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Benzyl alcohol and ethanol were found to exhibit an opposite effect on cold adaptation ofBacillus subtilis. (naver.com)
  • The correlation of growth and fluorescence data indicates that the control of membrane structure represents an important part of bacterial adaptation to cold. (naver.com)
  • However, some Csps are non-cold inducible and they are reported to be involved in various cellular processes to promote normal growth and stress adaptation responses. (frontiersin.org)
  • The concept that stress responses and the aging process share common mechanisms arose initially from studies in model organisms, where the identification of molecular pathways that regulate aging - insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF), sirtuins, target of rapamycin (TOR), AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) - highlighted that intrinsic induction of stress defense programs and the resulting adaptation can increase life expectancy ( Haigis and Yankner, 2010 ). (biologists.org)
  • We used gene expression analysis and a set of mutants with single, double, and triple deletions of the csp genes to evaluate the roles of CspA, CspB, and CspD in the cold and osmotic (NaCl) stress adaptation responses of L. monocytogenes . (asm.org)
  • The fact that Csps are promoting L. monocytogenes adaptation against both cold and NaCl stress has significant implications in view of practical food microbial control measures. (asm.org)
  • Nine Csps (CspA to CspI) are found in E. coli , and five (CspA, CspB, CspE, CspG, and CspI) have been linked to modulation of cold adaptation functions ( 12 , 23 , 26 , 38 ). (asm.org)
  • In B. subtilis , three Csps (CspA, CspB, and CspD) have been described and have been associated with regulation of both normal growth and cold and stationary-phase stress adaptation responses ( 14 , 39 ). (asm.org)
  • The plant starts the adaptation by exposure to cold yet still not freezing temperatures. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study underscores the presence of diverse mechanisms of adaptation to cold and other stresses in polar mats, consistent with the proportional representation of major bacterial groups. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • But now, I kinda want to move away from that thread and begin a new one focussing in specifically on the area of cold adaptation and its benefits. (freetheanimal.com)
  • Now onto the cold adaptation itself. (freetheanimal.com)
  • Both prokaryotes and eukaryotes exhibit a cold-shock response upon an abrupt temperature downshift. (nih.gov)
  • In cold water immersions, cold shock response is perhaps the most common cause of death, such as by falling through thin ice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some people are much better able to survive swimming in very cold water due to body or mental conditioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is possible to undergo physiological conditioning to reduce the cold shock response, and some people are naturally better suited to swimming in very cold water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nevertheless, the human organism is not suited to freezing water: the struggle to maintain blood temperature (by swimming or conditioned metabolic response) produces great fatigue after thirty minutes or less. (wikipedia.org)
  • Those who benefit the most from the habituation of a cold shock response are athletes, soldiers and those who are at risk of cold water immersion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cold Shock Response is the physiological response of organisms to sudden cold-in this case humans and cold water. (bigswings.com)
  • Cold water swimmers are known to train for cold water shock by exposing themselves to ten degree celsius waters in the shower for three-minute periods. (bigswings.com)
  • A person would literally need to be in the water for thirty minutes to die of hypothermia induced from water immersion, no matter how cold the water is. (bigswings.com)
  • Some CSR components can be reduced by habituation (i.e. reduced response to stimulus of same magnitude) induced by 3-5 short cold-water immersions (CWI). (leedstrinity.ac.uk)
  • Methods: Forty-eight unhabituated participants completed one (CON1) seven-minute immersion in to cold water (15°C). Of that cohort, twenty-five completed four further CWIs that would ordinarily induce CSR habituation. (leedstrinity.ac.uk)
  • In humans, the diving reflex is not induced when limbs are introduced to cold water. (wikipedia.org)
  • [8] [9] When breathing with the face submerged, the diving response increases proportionally to decreasing water temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bradycardia is the response to facial contact with cold water: the human heart rate slows down ten to twenty-five percent. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is what it can be like to warm up in cold water. (usms.org)
  • Gradually getting colder gets your nervous system used to the cold water. (usms.org)
  • For open water swimmers, it's to prevent the cold-water shock response. (usms.org)
  • If it's cold, no one wants to get into the water, but this is exactly what you should do. (usms.org)
  • If that first cold splash to exposed body parts is at the race start, the chances of cold-water shock are much higher. (usms.org)
  • If you show up to your race and learn that the water is cold, you have no way to turn back time and do a proper acclimatization. (usms.org)
  • Cold increases cell membrane permeability and makes the cell shrink, as water is drawn out when ice is formed in the extracellular matrix between cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the intracellular water freezes, the cell will expand, and without cold hardening the cell would rupture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mail Online reports local media claims that the individuals - aged 70, 62 and 75 - had dived into the water at the beach of Marseillan Plage, near Montpellier, before being struck with cold shock. (express.co.uk)
  • Cold shock is described as the response of organisms to sudden cold, especially cold water. (express.co.uk)
  • In humans, cold shock response is the most common cause of death from immersion in very cold water. (express.co.uk)
  • So, if you find yourself unexpectedly in the water, relax and float for up to 90 seconds - the duration it takes for cold water shock to disappear. (express.co.uk)
  • Because they operated where the water is cold (less than 60 degrees most of the year), I asked them my favorite question: "If you go overboard in January wearing street clothes when the water is just above 33 degrees Fahrenheit, how long until you become hypothermic? (soundingsonline.com)
  • To understand the dangers of cold water, you have to stop focusing on hypothermia. (soundingsonline.com)
  • Cold water kills, but hypothermia is just one cause of fatalities. (soundingsonline.com)
  • Four things happen to the body when it's immersed in cold water. (soundingsonline.com)
  • In fact, of all the people who die in cold water, it is estimated that 20 percent die in the first two minutes. (soundingsonline.com)
  • The second stage of cold water immersion is called cold incapacitation. (soundingsonline.com)
  • Without some form of flotation, even the best swimmer will drown in cold water, and in less than 30 minutes. (soundingsonline.com)
  • More than 50 percent of the people who die in cold water drown following cold incapacitation, often without ever experiencing a drop in core temperature. (soundingsonline.com)
  • As for hypothermia, which is the third phase of cold water immersion, it can kill. (soundingsonline.com)
  • But that only happens in about 15 percent of cold water deaths. (soundingsonline.com)
  • Over the years, I've rescued a number of people from cold water. (soundingsonline.com)
  • The final phase of cold water immersion is circum-rescue collapse. (soundingsonline.com)
  • Shortly before, during or after rescue-sometimes hours after-victims of cold water immersion may pass out, experience ventricular fibrillation or go into full cardiac arrest. (soundingsonline.com)
  • When working on deck in cold-water environments (water less than 60 degrees), always wear a flotation device. (soundingsonline.com)
  • And ahead of planned dips on Christmas Eve, Boxing Day or New Year's Day across the region, the RNLI is issuing advice on cold water shock. (hartlepoolmail.co.uk)
  • Of course we want people to enjoy the water, but also remember it is winter when the sea is at its coldest! (hartlepoolmail.co.uk)
  • Before going in, we urge people to remember the risks of cold water shock and what to do if it happens to them. (hartlepoolmail.co.uk)
  • If you run straight into cold water you are more likely to suffer from cold water shock. (hartlepoolmail.co.uk)
  • Cold water shock is a physiological response, which causes uncontrollable gasping. (hartlepoolmail.co.uk)
  • The RNLI's national drowning prevention campaign, Respect the Water, aims to raise awareness of key hazards like cold water shock, and lifesaving skills like floating, to support the charity's drive to halve the number of accidental coastal deaths by 2024. (hartlepoolmail.co.uk)
  • Abridged from Cold-Water Immersion. (experts.com)
  • In addition, use of a snowmobile, although not technically a water sport can involve cold-water exposure due to accidental entry into lakes and streams. (experts.com)
  • Army, Air Force and Marine Corps forces, as well, may encounter cold-water exposure during winter operations on land. (experts.com)
  • The definition of cold water is variable. (experts.com)
  • For practical purposes, significant risk of immersion hypothermia usually begins in water colder than 25° C. Using 25° C as the definition of cold water, the risk of immersion hypothermia in North America is nearly universal during most of the year. (experts.com)
  • Cold water immersion is associated with two significant medical emergencies: near drowning and hypothermia. (experts.com)
  • The cold shock response occurs within the first 1-4 minutes of cold water immersion and is dependent on the extent and rate of skin cooling. (experts.com)
  • The gasp response may cause drowning if the head is submersed during the initial entry into cold water. (experts.com)
  • Of course, the best prevention is to take all measures necessary to avoid capsizing your boat or falling into cold water in the first place. (boat-ed.com)
  • Focus on floating with your head above water until the cold shock response abates. (boat-ed.com)
  • Even though you may feel colder out of the water, the rate of heat loss will be slower than if immersed in water. (boat-ed.com)
  • More swimmers are embracing the idea of doing laps in freezing-cold water as an actual sport. (menshealth.com)
  • The RNLI's drowning prevention campaign, Respect the Water , aims to raise awareness of key hazards like cold water shock, and lifesaving skills like floating. (afloat.ie)
  • Find out more about how to float and about cold water shock by visiting RespectTheWater.com . (afloat.ie)
  • Ask the doctor: Is swimming in cold water okay for my heart? (harvard.edu)
  • The water is cold (55 F) but I don't mind. (harvard.edu)
  • Are my cold-water swims okay for my heart? (harvard.edu)
  • If you enjoy swimming in cold water and have been doing it for some time with no ill effects, it's probably fine for you. (harvard.edu)
  • Cold water is my other concern. (harvard.edu)
  • In addition, the cooler the water, the greater the diving response, potentially leading to a lower heart rate and higher blood pressure. (harvard.edu)
  • Some people respond so strongly to cold water that just putting their face in a bowl of cool water can make them pass out from a low heart rate. (harvard.edu)
  • You seem to be doing fine with your cold-water swimming, so I'm not going to rain on your parade and tell you to stop. (harvard.edu)
  • Awash with physical and mental health benefits, cold-water swimming is making big waves in the wellness industry. (menshealth.com)
  • Most people who drown in cold water do so because they panic," says Jeremy Laming, founder of Selkie Swim Co, an open-water apparel brand and my cold-water swimming mentor. (menshealth.com)
  • Wetsuits aren't worn by cold-water zealots. (menshealth.com)
  • Walking in is the safest way to enter cold water. (menshealth.com)
  • The moment I push forward and start swimming, I'm hit by the cold-water shock. (menshealth.com)
  • A cold-water savant. (menshealth.com)
  • Laming and Vastiau, both storied cold-water swimmers, are also wracked with shakes. (menshealth.com)
  • The fantastic thing about cold-water swimming is that it doesn't matter how good you are at swimming," says Vastiau, through chattering teeth. (menshealth.com)
  • Everyone in a white coat seems solid on the fact that cold water has significant benefits for your physical health. (menshealth.com)
  • A 2018 study in the British Medical Journal found that regular cold-water immersion can fight depression, through a process called habituation. (menshealth.com)
  • There are increasingly loud calls for open- and cold-water swimming to be prescribed by GPs for lower-level anxiety or stress issues. (menshealth.com)
  • The article says the water was 4 degrees C. That is cold enough that you can recover fully. (ycombinator.com)
  • Despite the research, the experience, and all the data, I still hear "experts" - touting as wisdom - completely false information about cold water and what happens to people who get in it. (lightningclass.org)
  • With another season of really cold water approaching, I feel compelled to get these points across in a way that will change the way mariners behave out there on (or near) the water. (lightningclass.org)
  • What follows is the truth about cold water and cold water immersion. (lightningclass.org)
  • When the water is cold (say under 50 degrees F) there are significant physiological reactions that occur, in order, almost always. (lightningclass.org)
  • They drown, they panic, they take on water in that first uncontrolled gasp, if they have heart problems - the cold shock may trigger a heart attack. (lightningclass.org)
  • I swam for a living for the better part of my adult life, and when the water is cold - none of us can swim for very long. (lightningclass.org)
  • Without ever experiencing a drop in core temperature (at all) over 50% of the people who die in cold water, die from drowning perpetuated by cold incapacitation. (lightningclass.org)
  • If you have ever heard the phrase, "That water is so cold, you will die from hypothermia within ten minutes. (lightningclass.org)
  • In most cases, in water of say 40 degrees (all variables to one side), it typically takes a full hour to approach unconsciousness from hypothermia, the third stage of cold water immersion. (lightningclass.org)
  • I had a rule - if they came from a cold water environment - they laid down and stayed down until the doctors in the E.R. said they could stand. (lightningclass.org)
  • Because the final killer of cold water immersion is post-rescue collapse . (lightningclass.org)
  • According to Tipton, wild swimming can help: "There are physiologically-based hypotheses that suggest that swimming regularly in cold water results in a cross-adaptive anti-inflammatory response. (vogue.co.uk)
  • Repeated cold water immersion allows acclimatisation, including a reduction in the cold-shock response - a reduction in the level of the stress hormones (noradrenaline, cortisol, ACTH). (vogue.co.uk)
  • Post-exercise cold-water immersion (CWI) is used extensively in exercise training as a means to minimise fatigue and expedite recovery between sessions. (springer.com)
  • Physiological response to water immersion: a method for sport recovery? (springer.com)
  • Influence of cold-water immersion on indices of muscle damage following prolonged intermittent shuttle running. (springer.com)
  • Vaile J, Halson S, Gill N, Dawson B. Effect of cold water immersion on repeat cycling performance and thermoregulation in the heat. (springer.com)
  • Effect of a 5-min cold-water immersion recovery on exercise performance in the heat. (springer.com)
  • Leeder J, Gissane C, van Someren K, Gregson W, Howatson G. Cold water immersion and recovery from strenuous exercise: a meta-analysis. (springer.com)
  • Eston R, Peters D. Effects of cold water immersion on the symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage. (springer.com)
  • Dr. Robert Pozos and Dr. Larry Wittmers, director of the lab, hooked up Hof to heart rate and core temperature monitors to evaluate his body's response after being submerged in an extremely cold water tank. (go.com)
  • New University of Otago research has found that many drowning deaths could be prevented if people learned to wait out the body's initial shock response to cold water. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Associate Professor Chris Button of the School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences and his colleagues, with the support of Water Safety New Zealand, have been testing the body's response to sudden cold water immersion . (medicalxpress.com)
  • Study participants who were plunged into 10 degree water in the School's flume (pool) recovered from the cold shock response in two to three minutes. (medicalxpress.com)
  • After a week or so of repeated immersions, coupled with mental skills training, and basic suggestions to improve their treading water technique, the participants were much calmer in the cold water. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Drowning is the third highest cause of unintentional death in this country, with 81 deaths recorded last year.The majority of drownings are thought to occur in the first few minutes after falling into the water - with the body's shock response to cold water to blame. (medicalxpress.com)
  • They include remaining calm, waiting the cold water shock response out, and not making any hasty decisions. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Associate Professor Button says he would one day like to see a survival component included in all swimming programmes, which taught people what to do in sudden cold water situations. (medicalxpress.com)
  • With better education about the cold shock response and experiencing how you as an individual respond to cold water immersion it may be possible to significantly reduce New Zealand's awful drowning statistics. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The ventilatory responses to immersion in thermoneutral water are a direct result of the high density of water compared with air and the consequent differential hydrostatic pressure over the immersed body. (physiology.org)
  • The increase in pulmonary capillary blood volume seen on immersion in 34° and 40°C water, as a result of increased hydrostatic pressure, is not significantly increased on immersion in water at 25°C, suggesting that cold-induced vasoconstriction does not augment the blood volume shifts caused by hydrostatic pressure ( 11 ). (physiology.org)
  • According to Wikipedia, cold shock response is probably the most common cause of death when a human is suddenly submerged in very cold water. (perceptivetravel.com)
  • Accessioning of these bacterial isolates in microbial culture collections is a cautious effort for their availability to conduct advanced research on these cold-adapted bacteria in future. (springer.com)
  • I think that's the best place to be when things appear reasonable (the Leptin Reset and Cold Thermogenesis…NOT injecting staph bacteria) and one doesn't know for sure, one way or the other. (freetheanimal.com)
  • Hypothermia does things besides making everything colder. (lightningclass.org)
  • When he didn't experience frostbite or hypothermia, the body's usual reactions to extreme cold, his extraordinary ability started to get the attention of doctors who specialize in extreme medicine. (go.com)
  • At the hypothermia lab at the University of Minnesota in Duluth, scientists who've studied the cold for years say they've never seen anything like it. (go.com)
  • For those who survive the hazardous initial responses to immersion and superficial cooling, hypothermia becomes an increasing risk, particularly for those in remote areas, or when search and rescue capabilities are limited, such as at times of conflict. (physiology.org)
  • citation needed] In these ways, winter swimmers can survive both the initial shock and prolonged exposure. (wikipedia.org)
  • In previous studies, the gene expression changes under normal Drosophila aging as well as after stress treatments including heat and cold shock, ionizing radiation exposure, oxidative stress (hyperoxia and hydrogen peroxide), heavy metal stress (cadmium, zinc, copper), and starvation were investigated using microarrays. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We analyzed the effects of obesogenic diets and cold exposure on vaspin expression in liver and white and brown adipose tissue (AT) and plasma levels. (nih.gov)
  • DNA-methylation within the vaspin promoter was analyzed to investigate acute epigenetic changes after cold-exposure in BAT. (nih.gov)
  • While obesogenic diets also upregulated hepatic vaspin mRNA levels, cold exposure tended to increase vaspin gene expression of inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) depots. (nih.gov)
  • Analysis of vaspin promoter methylation in AT revealed lowest methylation levels in BAT, which were acutely reduced after cold exposure. (nih.gov)
  • Both brown adipose tissue (BAT) and skeletal muscle activation contribute to the metabolic response of acute cold exposure in healthy men even under minimal shivering. (nih.gov)
  • Activation of adipose tissue intracellular lipolysis is associated with BAT metabolic response upon acute cold exposure in healthy men. (nih.gov)
  • Although BAT glucose uptake per volume of tissue is important, the bulk of glucose turnover during cold exposure is mediated by skeletal muscle metabolic activation even when shivering is minimized. (nih.gov)
  • Cold exposure stimulates the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), triggering the activation of cold-defence responses and mobilizing substrates to fuel the thermogenic processes. (nih.gov)
  • Using [U-(13)C]-palmitate and [3-(3)H]-glucose tracer methodologies coupled with positron emission tomography using (11)C-acetate and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose, we examined the relationship between whole body sympathetically induced white adipose tissue (WAT) lipolysis and brown adipose tissue (BAT) metabolism and mapped the skeletal muscle shivering and metabolic activation pattern during a mild, acute cold exposure designed to minimize shivering response in 12 lean healthy men. (nih.gov)
  • Glucose uptake demonstrated that deeper, centrally located muscles of the neck, back and inner thigh were the greatest contributors of muscle glucose uptake during cold exposure due to their more important shivering response. (nih.gov)
  • In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that the increase in plasma NEFA appearance from WAT lipolysis is closely associated with BAT metabolic activation upon acute cold exposure in healthy men. (nih.gov)
  • In humans, muscle glucose utilization during shivering contributes to a much greater extent than BAT to systemic glucose utilization during acute cold exposure. (nih.gov)
  • The combined or sequential exposure of L. monocytogenes cells to these two stresses in food environments might inadvertently induce cross-protection responses. (asm.org)
  • In response to a brief cold exposure, the flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis , increases glycerol and sorbitol levels, as well as free amino acids of alanine and glutamine ( Michaud and Denlinger, 2007 ). (biologists.org)
  • After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered.After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes.Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. (nih.gov)
  • Here, we review the recent evidence of the relationship between stress resistance and inducible Hsp expression, including a characterization of factors that induce the heat shock response and a discussion of the associated costs. (wiley.com)
  • Lack or failure of heat shock response leads to cell cycle arrest, or sometimes cell death ( 4 ⇓ - 6 ). (pnas.org)
  • The author has proposed elsewhere that the heat-shock response evolved very early as part of an intracellular system for self/not-self discrimination. (queensu.ca)
  • A systemic inflammatory response is observed in patients undergoing hemorrhagic shock and sepsis. (elsevier.com)
  • Thus, CIRP is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule that promotes inflammatory responses in shock and sepsis. (elsevier.com)
  • Dr. Wang also plays an active role in international conferences by serving as a co-moderator and invited speaker at several international shock and sepsis conferences. (feinsteininstitute.org)
  • Severe sepsis is an overwhelming systemic inflammatory response to infection, claiming approximately 225,000 victims annually in the U.S. alone. (feinsteininstitute.org)
  • Studied doses of stress treatments deleteriously affect the organism's viability and lead to different changes of both general and specific cellular stress response mechanisms. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In this review we discuss the complex molecular mechanisms of proteotoxic stress responses in different cellular compartments with a focus on the UPR mt and its role in health and life-span regulation. (biologists.org)
  • Control and regulation of the cellular responses to cold shock: The responses in yeast and mammalian systems. (springer.com)
  • Cold hardening is a process in which a plant undergoes physiological changes to avoid, or mitigate cellular injuries caused by sub-zero temperatures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Monitoring calcium dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution is therefore critically important to understand how this ubiquitous second messenger can control diverse cellular responses. (wiley.com)
  • 14 Both characteristics seem to be related to the cellular wall and its capacity to resist cold shock. (aasv.org)
  • This review explores current evidence regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which CWI may alter cellular signalling and the long-term adaptive response to exercise in human skeletal muscle. (springer.com)
  • 1999). It has been unequivocally involved in linking stress perception and evocation of various adaptive cellular responses (Torrecilla et al. (scribd.com)
  • These agents were named biological response modifiers (BRMs) because they regulated certain cellular components of the immune system. (hindawi.com)
  • The immediate shock of the cold causes involuntary inhalation, which, if underwater, can result in drowning. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diving reflex , also known as the diving response and mammalian diving reflex , is a set of physiological responses to immersion that overrides the basic homeostatic reflexes , and is found in all air-breathing vertebrates studied to date. (wikipedia.org)
  • Temperature shifts are easy to simulate in the laboratory, and the physiological and molecular response to cold stress gained our interest ( 15 ). (asm.org)
  • The molecular mechanisms that determine the organism's response to a variety of doses and modalities of stress factors are not well understood. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Thus, the advancements in transcriptomics have allowed for the possibility to study molecular mechanisms underlying the organism's response to various stress factors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This paper aims to reveal gene pathways involved in the response to various stress types and to study the molecular mechanisms determining the organism's reactions to stress factors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Improvement of food safety measures taken against this pathogen will depend on further insights gained into molecular cell response mechanisms underlying the various stress resistance phenotypes displayed by these organisms. (asm.org)
  • Recent developments in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing the adaptive response to exercise in human skeletal muscle have provided potential mechanistic insight into the effects of CWI on training adaptations. (springer.com)
  • Response of these molecular mechanisms to dehydration-stress provides insights on the ability of invasive perennial weeds to adapt and survive under harsh environments, which will be beneficial for addressing future management practices. (deepdyve.com)
  • Here, we report on the importance of isoleucine for B. subtilis to survive cold shock from 37 to 15°C. Cold shock experiments with strain JH642 revealed a cold-protective function for all intermediates of anteiso-branched fatty acid biosynthesis. (asm.org)
  • Plants that originated in the tropics, like tomato or maize, don't go through cold hardening and are unable to survive freezing temperatures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your brain knows it's too cold to survive. (signalscv.com)
  • This cytokine induces inflammation by promoting the production of IL1β and IL6, expression of adhesion molecules, proliferation of fibroblasts, activation of procoagulant factors, and cytotoxicity of the acute phase response ( 4 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Whether suffering from a virus or stress, our immune system's natural response is inflammation. (vogue.co.uk)
  • Dr. Wang currently serves as a referee for 40 journals, and editorial board member for five scientific journals (including Shock, Inflammation & Allergy - Drug target, SOJ Immunology, and Military Medical Research). (feinsteininstitute.org)
  • To be able to efficiently control psychrotrophic Yersinia during food production and storage, it is essential to understand the functions and roles of Csps in stress response of enteropathogenic Yersinia . (frontiersin.org)
  • Some humans are better capable of surviving Cold Shock Response than others depending on body fat and physical fitness. (bigswings.com)
  • CspA/CspB in response to NaCl salt osmotic stress. (asm.org)
  • Calcium Transients in Response to Salinity and Osmotic Stress in the Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. (deepdyve.com)
  • Our data demonstrate a novel BAT-specific regulation of vaspin gene expression upon physiological stimuli in vivo with acute epigenetic changes that may contribute to cold-induced expression in BAT. (nih.gov)
  • Hof claims that he can influence his autonomic nervous system and thereby suppress his immune response through concentration and meditation. (freetheanimal.com)
  • Cold-induced increase in whole-body oxygen consumption was not independently associated with BAT volume of activity, BAT oxidative metabolism, or muscle metabolism or shivering intensity, but depended on the sum of responses of these two metabolic tissues. (nih.gov)
  • Cold-induced increase in non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) appearance rate was strongly associated with the volume of metabolically active BAT (r = 0.80, P = 0.005), total BAT oxidative metabolism (r = 0.70, P = 0.004) and BAT glucose uptake (r = 0.80, P = 0.005), but not muscle glucose metabolism. (nih.gov)
  • The responses are generally those affecting the respiratory system and those affecting the heart and the body's metabolism. (experts.com)
  • More recently, Li and Denlinger demonstrated a complex response of RCH, which was accompanied by changes in energy metabolism and cytoskeletal factors through analysis of brain proteomics, in response to a low temperature ( Li and Denlinger, 2008 ). (biologists.org)
  • Vaspin expression was analyzed in isolated white and brown adipocytes during adipogenesis and in response to adrenergic stimuli. (nih.gov)
  • A key role in the perception of these stimuli is played by changes in the concentration of free calcium in different intracellular compartments as well as by signal transduction systems that depend on kinases to transmit information to the nucleus where a specific response is generated. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • Chez le lin, le modèle de la production de méristèmes épidermiques hypocotylaires nous a permis d'analyser les effets des différents stimuli en l'absence ou en présence d'inhibiteurs de canaux calciques et de chélateur du calcium. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • We studied effects of ionizing radiation (144, 360 and 864 Gy), entomopathogenic fungus (10 and 100 CFU), starvation (16 h), and cold shock (+4, 0 and -4°C) on an organism's viability indicators (survival and locomotor activity) and transcriptome changes in the Drosophila melanogaster model. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Bacillus subtilis functional genomics: Global characterization of the stringent response by proteome and transcriptome analysis. (currentprotocols.com)
  • Recombinant CIRP stimulates the release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and HMGB1 from macrophages and induces inflammatory responses and causes tissue injury when injected in vivo. (elsevier.com)
  • Its high mortality is in part mediated by dysregulated inflammatory responses manifested by the excessive accumulation of various pro-inflammatory cytokines. (feinsteininstitute.org)
  • In particular, the transcriptional mechanisms that lead to enhanced gene-specific expression upon cold stress have yet to be elucidated. (springer.com)
  • Biochemical insights into the mechanisms central to the response of mammalian cells to cold-stress and subsequent rewarming. (springer.com)
  • Light doesn't control the onset of cold hardening directly, but shortening of daylight is associated with fall, and starts production of reactive oxygen species and excitation of photosystem 2, which influences low-temp signal transduction mechanisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adaptive mechanisms in response to heat and cold stress help maintain homeostasis and ensure the survival of plants. (jove.com)
  • The physiological response results in temporary breathlessness and vasoconstriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • [2] Although aquatic animals have evolved profound physiological adaptations to conserve oxygen during submersion, the apnea and its duration, bradycardia , vasoconstriction , and redistribution of cardiac output occur also in terrestrial animals as a neural response, but the effects are more profound in natural divers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vasoconstriction is your body's self-protection system, hoarding warm blood in your core to keep your vital organs toasty when extreme cold threatens. (menshealth.com)
  • This organism contains eight CspA homologs (CspB to -I), although only four (CspA, -B, -G, and -I) are cold inducible ( 54 ). (asm.org)
  • Plants with compromised perception of day length have compromised cold acclimation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Towards Understanding the Mechanistic Basis of Plant Cold Acclimation. (mpg.de)
  • Natural genetic variation of sub-zero cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana. (mpg.de)
  • Opposing effects on two phases of defense responses from concerted actions of HSC70 and BON1 in Arabidopsis. (tsl.ac.uk)
  • Microbial mats dominated by cyanobacteria are commonly found in extreme environments, such as geothermal springs, hypersaline basins, ultraoligotrophic ponds, and hot and cold desert soils ( 10 , 14 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • One of the classic responses of mesophilic microbial cells to growth-permissive elevated pressure is the impairment of cell division. (asmscience.org)
  • During cold shock, the cell membrane fluidity and enzyme activity decrease, and the efficiency of transcription and translation is reduced due to stabilization of nucleic acid secondary structures. (frontiersin.org)
  • Temperatures above 0°C are usually associated with an adaptive response, whereas subzero temperatures cause a block of metabolic activity and cell growth for most organisms ( 37 , 38 ). (asm.org)
  • Using this toolkit, we identified temporally distinct responses to external ATP at the plasma membrane, in the cytosol and in the nucleus of neighbouring root cells. (wiley.com)
  • Plants adjust the lipid composition of their cell membranes to maintain integrity and optimal membrane fluidity in response to heat and cold stress. (jove.com)
  • In response, the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in the membranes increases to reduce membrane rigidity and maintain optimal fluidity. (jove.com)
  • The switch to a fatty acid profile dominated by anteiso-C 15:0 and C 17:0 at low temperatures and the cold-sensitive phenotype of isoleucine-deficient strains in the absence of isoleucine focused our attention on the critical role of anteiso-branched fatty acids in the growth of B. subtilis in the cold. (asm.org)
  • Rapid cold hardening can be experienced during short periods of undesirable temperatures, such as cold shock in environment temperature, as well as the common cold months. (wikipedia.org)
  • He said this product did not require to be maintained at cold temperatures! (globaldialysis.com)
  • Fatty acid profiles of different B. subtilis wild-type strains proved the altered branching pattern by an increase in the anteiso-branched fatty acid content and a concomitant decrease of iso-branched species during cold shock. (asm.org)
  • Bacillus subtilis tolerance of moderate concentrations of rifampin involves the sigma(B)‐dependent general and multiple stress response. (currentprotocols.com)
  • Coping with the cold: the cold shock response in the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis - Discussion. (mpg.de)
  • The histidine kinase/response regulator SAV1321/SAV1322 in the S. aureus shares considerable homology with the TCRS DesKR in Bacillus subtilis . (biomedcentral.com)
  • Identification of genes involved in cold-shock response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). (fbn-dummerstorf.de)
  • However, Hsps play an important role in the cell's response to a wide range of damaging (stressful) conditions and are important for recovery and survival of organisms ( Lindquist 1986 ). (wiley.com)
  • This article is meant to educate the Cliff Jumping Community about the symptoms of Cold Shock Response and how to combat these deadly effects. (bigswings.com)
  • Lasting anywhere from 30 seconds to a few minutes, the cold shock response can be deadly on its own. (soundingsonline.com)
  • But the RNLI reminds anyone planning for a seaside swim next week that the sea is at its coldest, and potentially most deadly. (afloat.ie)
  • Lasting anywhere from 30 seconds to a couple of minutes depending on a number of factors, the cold shock response can be deadly all by itself. (lightningclass.org)
  • 0.001) enhanced cold tolerance relative to those harboring a premature stop codon (PMSC) in this gene. (frontiersin.org)
  • Better tolerance to cold? (freetheanimal.com)