Citrus: A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. They bear the familiar citrus fruits including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes. There are many hybrids which makes the nomenclature confusing.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Common Cold: A catarrhal disorder of the upper respiratory tract, which may be viral or a mixed infection. It generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing.Candy: Sweet food products combining cane or beet sugars with other carbohydrates and chocolate, milk, eggs, and various flavorings. In the United States, candy refers to both sugar- and cocoa-based confections and is differentiated from sweetened baked goods; elsewhere the terms sugar confectionary, chocolate confectionary, and flour confectionary (meaning goods such as cakes and pastries) are used.Cymbopogon: A plant genus of the family POACEAE which is a source of citronella oil and lemongrass oil.Monoterpenes: Compounds with a core of 10 carbons generally formed via the mevalonate pathway from the combination of 3,3-dimethylallyl pyrophosphate and isopentenyl pyrophosphate. They are cyclized and oxidized in a variety of ways. Due to the low molecular weight many of them exist in the form of essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE).Verbenaceae: A plant family of the order Lamiales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The leaves are opposite or whorled. The flowers are aggregated in spikes, clusters, or racemes.Hesperidin: A flavanone glycoside found in CITRUS fruit peels.Alternaria: A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including several plant pathogens and at least one species which produces a highly phytotoxic antibiotic. Its teleomorph is Lewia.Sharks: A group of elongate elasmobranchs. Sharks are mostly marine fish, with certain species large and voracious.Lamiaceae: The mint plant family. They are characteristically aromatic, and many of them are cultivated for their oils. Most have square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped, open-mouthed, tubular corollas (united petals), with five-lobed, bell-like calyxes (united sepals).Bahamas: A chain of islands, cays, and reefs in the West Indies, lying southeast of Florida and north of Cuba. It is an independent state, called also the Commonwealth of the Bahamas or the Bahama Islands. The name likely represents the local name Guanahani, itself of uncertain origin. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p106 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p45)Leptospermum: A plant genus of the family MYRTACEAE. The common name of tea tree is also used for MELALEUCA and KUNZEA.Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Valerian: A plant genus of the family VALERIANACEAE, order Dipsacales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. It is best known for the sedative use and valepotriate content of the roots. It is sometimes called Garden Heliotrope but is unrelated to true Heliotrope (HELIOTROPIUM).Salivary Gland DiseasesCoriandrum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The leaves are the source of cilantro and the seeds are the source of coriander, both of which are used in SPICES.Sodium Pertechnetate Tc 99m: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, cardiovascular and cerebral circulation, brain, thyroid, and joints.Myrtus: A plant genus of the family MYRTACEAE. Members contain PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.Benzyl Alcohol: A colorless liquid with a sharp burning taste and slight odor. It is used as a local anesthetic and to reduce pain associated with LIDOCAINE injection. Also, it is used in the manufacture of other benzyl compounds, as a pharmaceutic aid, and in perfumery and flavoring.Salivation: The discharge of saliva from the SALIVARY GLANDS that keeps the mouth tissues moist and aids in digestion.Melaleuca: A plant genus of the family MYRTACEAE. M. alternifolia foliage is a source of TEA TREE OIL. The common name of tea tree also refers to LEPTOSPERMUM or KUNZEA. M. vindifolia is a source of niaouli oil. M. cajuputi and M. leucadendra are sources of cajuput oil.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Eucalyptus: A genus of trees of the Myrtaceae family, native to Australia, that yields gums, oils, and resins which are used as flavoring agents, astringents, and aromatics.Mineral Oil: A mixture of liquid hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum. It is used as laxative, lubricant, ointment base, and emollient.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Cold Climate: A climate characterized by COLD TEMPERATURE for a majority of the time during the year.Antimutagenic Agents: Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced mutations independently of the mechanism involved.Cyclohexenes: Six-carbon alicyclic hydrocarbons which contain one or more double bonds in the ring. The cyclohexadienes are not aromatic, in contrast to BENZOQUINONES which are sometimes called 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-diones.Scalp DermatosesFlexiviridae: A family of RNA plant viruses that infect a wide range of herbaceous and woody plant species. There are at least eight genera including POTEXVIRUS and CARLAVIRUS, both of which are highly immunogenic.Cold Ischemia: The chilling of a tissue or organ during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. Cold ischemia time during ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION begins when the organ is cooled with a cold perfusion solution after ORGAN PROCUREMENT surgery, and ends after the tissue reaches physiological temperature during implantation procedures.Nephrolithiasis: Formation of stones in the KIDNEY.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)EthylaminesFungicides, Industrial: Chemicals that kill or inhibit the growth of fungi in agricultural applications, on wood, plastics, or other materials, in swimming pools, etc.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Acclimatization: Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Proteobacteria: A phylum of bacteria consisting of the purple bacteria and their relatives which form a branch of the eubacterial tree. This group of predominantly gram-negative bacteria is classified based on homology of equivalent nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA or by hybridization of ribosomal RNA or DNA with 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA.Cold Shock Proteins and Peptides: Cellular proteins and peptides that are induced in response to cold stress. They are found in a broad variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.Thermosensing: The sensation of cold, heat, coolness, and warmth as detected by THERMORECEPTORS.Salivary Glands: Glands that secrete SALIVA in the MOUTH. There are three pairs of salivary glands (PAROTID GLAND; SUBLINGUAL GLAND; SUBMANDIBULAR GLAND).Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Cold-Shock Response: A constellation of responses that occur when an organism is exposed to excessive cold. In humans, a fall in skin temperature triggers gasping, hypertension, and hyperventilation.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.GlucuronidasePlant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Body Temperature Regulation: The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.Thermoreceptors: Cellular receptors which mediate the sense of temperature. Thermoreceptors in vertebrates are mostly located under the skin. In mammals there are separate types of thermoreceptors for cold and for warmth and NOCICEPTORS which detect cold or heat extreme enough to cause pain.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Organ Preservation Solutions: Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.Skin Temperature: The TEMPERATURE at the outer surface of the body.Menthol: An alcohol produced from mint oils or prepared synthetically.Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.Freezing: Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.Raffinose: A trisaccharide occurring in Australian manna (from Eucalyptus spp, Myrtaceae) and in cottonseed meal.Frostbite: Damage to tissues as the result of low environmental temperatures.Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Hypothermia: Lower than normal body temperature, especially in warm-blooded animals.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Nasal Decongestants: Drugs designed to treat inflammation of the nasal passages, generally the result of an infection (more often than not the common cold) or an allergy related condition, e.g., hay fever. The inflammation involves swelling of the mucous membrane that lines the nasal passages and results in inordinate mucus production. The primary class of nasal decongestants are vasoconstrictor agents. (From PharmAssist, The Family Guide to Health and Medicine, 1993)Shivering: Involuntary contraction or twitching of the muscles. It is a physiologic method of heat production in man and other mammals.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Adipose Tissue, Brown: A thermogenic form of adipose tissue composed of BROWN ADIPOCYTES. It is found in newborns of many species including humans, and in hibernating mammals. Brown fat is richly vascularized, innervated, and densely packed with MITOCHONDRIA which can generate heat directly from the stored lipids.Cryoglobulins: Abnormal immunoglobulins, especially IGG or IGM, that precipitate spontaneously when SERUM is cooled below 37 degrees Celsius. It is characteristic of CRYOGLOBULINEMIA.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Refrigeration: The mechanical process of cooling.TRPM Cation Channels: A subgroup of TRP cation channels named after melastatin protein. They have the TRP domain but lack ANKYRIN repeats. Enzyme domains in the C-terminus leads to them being called chanzymes.Agglutinins: Substances, usually of biological origin, that cause cells or other organic particles to aggregate and stick to each other. They include those ANTIBODIES which cause aggregation or agglutination of particulate or insoluble ANTIGENS.Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Thermogenesis: The generation of heat in order to maintain body temperature. The uncoupled oxidation of fatty acids contained within brown adipose tissue and SHIVERING are examples of thermogenesis in MAMMALS.Raynaud Disease: An idiopathic vascular disorder characterized by bilateral Raynaud phenomenon, the abrupt onset of digital paleness or CYANOSIS in response to cold exposure or stress.Multi-Ingredient Cold, Flu, and Allergy Medications: A broad category of multi-ingredient preparations that are marketed for the relief of upper respiratory symptoms resulting from the COMMON COLD; ALLERGIES; or HUMAN INFLUENZA. While the majority of these medications are available as OVER-THE-COUNTER DRUGS some of them contain ingredients that require them to be sold as PRESCRIPTION DRUGS or as BEHIND-THE COUNTER DRUGS.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Rhinovirus: A genus of PICORNAVIRIDAE inhabiting primarily the respiratory tract of mammalian hosts. It includes over 100 human serotypes associated with the COMMON COLD.Antitussive Agents: Agents that suppress cough. They act centrally on the medullary cough center. EXPECTORANTS, also used in the treatment of cough, act locally.Drug Storage: The process of keeping pharmaceutical products in an appropriate location.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Hypothermia, Induced: Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Extreme Cold: Below normal weather temperatures that may lead to serious health problems. Extreme cold is a dangerous situation that can bring on health emergencies in susceptible people.Tissue Preservation: The process by which a tissue or aggregate of cells is kept alive outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Allopurinol: A XANTHINE OXIDASE inhibitor that decreases URIC ACID production. It also acts as an antimetabolite on some simpler organisms.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Echinacea: A genus of perennial herbs used topically and internally. It contains echinacoside, GLYCOSIDES; INULIN; isobutyl amides, resin, and SESQUITERPENES.Heart Arrest, Induced: A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune: Acquired hemolytic anemia due to the presence of AUTOANTIBODIES which agglutinate or lyse the patient's own RED BLOOD CELLS.Nonprescription Drugs: Medicines that can be sold legally without a DRUG PRESCRIPTION.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Cryotherapy: A form of therapy consisting in the local or general use of cold. The selective destruction of tissue by extreme cold or freezing is CRYOSURGERY. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Antipruritics: Agents, usually topical, that relieve itching (pruritus).Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Transient Receptor Potential Channels: A broad group of eukaryotic six-transmembrane cation channels that are classified by sequence homology because their functional involvement with SENSATION is varied. They have only weak voltage sensitivity and ion selectivity. They are named after a DROSOPHILA mutant that displayed transient receptor potentials in response to light. A 25-amino-acid motif containing a TRP box (EWKFAR) just C-terminal to S6 is found in TRPC, TRPV and TRPM subgroups. ANKYRIN repeats are found in TRPC, TRPV & TRPN subgroups. Some are functionally associated with TYROSINE KINASE or TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES.
  • I have a couple of century plants in the basement, my wife dug dahlia bulbs that are now stored there as well, and lemon balm, and some scented geraniums. (maydreamsgardens.com)
  • Be wary of members of the mint family, including lemon balm, spearmint and peppermint, as these delightfully aromatic plants tend to be aggressive spreaders and are often best confined to containers or spaces where they cannot wander freely. (lakenewsonline.com)
  • Melissa [Gr.,=bee] officinalis, also called lemon balm, was introduced to North America from the Mediterranean area, where it has long been cultivated for its lemonlike odor and flavor and, formerly, as a curative for many ailments. (encyclopedia.com)
  • lemon balm: see bee balm . (encyclopedia.com)
  • Mint and lemon balm have many uses, but to keep them from becoming invasive pests, you should plant them in containers or well away from other garden or landscaping plants. (motherearthnews.com)
  • Lemon Balm ( Melissa officinalis ) and Spice Bush ( Lindera benzoin ) from the Lauraceae. (botanyeveryday.com)
  • Lemon Verbena (which is unrelated to lemon balm) can also be used although it will not be as strong. (growveg.com)
  • As well as the beneficial effects for stomach complaints listed above for mint, lemon balm is also slightly stimulating which can make it good to drink before working or studying. (growveg.com)
  • Lemon Balm, with its citrus like aroma, is fantastic for deterring Mosquitoes. (ebay.com)
  • In this application, you could plant the Lemon Balm in areas surrounding your outdoor space you want to keep free from mosquitoes. (ebay.com)
  • Seeds of some cold-hardy herbs such as parsley may be sown in the fall. (clemson.edu)
  • I planted a block of 'Sugar Buns' corn in my community garden plot in early June after pre-sprouting the seeds (to ensure germination in our unseasonably cold, wet soil). (heavypetal.ca)
  • I had planted a few lemon seeds (from a lemon from the grocery store) when I was a kid and they grew very well. (metafilter.com)
  • There is enough juice for several lemon pies in just one large Ponderosa lemon, and they can replace lemons measure for measure in recipes. (wikipedia.org)
  • And I don't know about you, but just a few minutes of squeezing fresh citrus to make my own juice is all the aromatherapy I need to get me through even the coldest, snowiest winter day. (thenibble.com)
  • It is not a major worry but it helps to know that lime juice and lemon juice contain a substance called psoralen, which has an extremely high absorbance for ultraviolet light. (blogspot.com)
  • So if you have an otherwise unexplained staining or skin rash, think back to see whether you may somehow have been in the sun and have spilled lime or lemon juice on your skin. (blogspot.com)
  • We ate this lovely egg salad with toasted Pain de Mie (or Pullman Bread) from Scratch Baking Company in South Portland, ME and the asparagus was steamed and cooled, served on the side, splashed with some lemon juice. (redwagonplants.com)
  • If you will substitute citrus limon for the Meyer lemon juice, it is recommended that you start with smaller amounts and test. (plantcaretoday.com)
  • Pancakes Lemon Juice Lavender Soap Natural Recipe and essential oil in the jar. (radioplock.eu)
  • Aromatherapy has a long history of use for improving libido Lemon Juice 8 oz Homemade Liquid Dishwasher Detergent: You may keep the garlic cloves for cooking or other uses. (radioplock.eu)
  • The common cold is a good example of an illness we don't have a good cure for and there are good common-sense remedies for it," said Dr. Marjorie Mau, chair of the Department of Native Hawaiian Health at the John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawaii. (go.com)
  • Health Benefits of Cinnamon Food Tea Twinings Camomile Honey & Vanilla Herbal Tea A soothing herbal tea made with camomile and the slightly health benefits and Sweet basil oil has diaphoretic Top duncan hines lemon cake mix recipes and other Edna Lucille English lemon mint dresses bar recipes vegan lemon Lavender Handmade Soap 6. (radioplock.eu)
  • Glorious gold, lemon-yellow, and snowy white blooms are often accented with contrasting trumpets or centers and vary in height from two inches to two feet with flowers in elegant proportion. (whiteflowerfarm.com)
  • According to to Ageless, the lime has cooling and astringent properties, while the lemon is aromatic and cooling with anti-inflammatory and diuretic properties. (gardenguides.com)
  • The leaves are very aromatic with a lemon scent, they are often used to make a drink or for their essential oils. (pfaf.org)
  • Yes, it has turned a wee bit more wintry of late, but contrast Monday's inauguration parade with the one 28 years earlier for Ronald Reagan, when there wasn't one because it was so cold - around zero degrees - that it was deemed too dangerous to endure. (washingtonpost.com)
  • There are alpine and weeping species and flower colours that range from white to cream, lemon, red, pink and burgundy. (limerickleader.ie)
  • October to February sowings give good results, or give 3 weeks cold treatment to germinate in 9 - 30 days, and rarely up to 6 months for some species. (jlhudsonseeds.net)
  • This herb is hardy to zone 7 and higher as it cannot live through a hard freeze. (bellaonline.com)
  • The herb is also useful as a stimulant for treating lethargy or depression whilst it is also used to treat feverish colds. (pfaf.org)
  • This is a great herb for seasoning game meat as well, and I've used it with lemon cake recipes as well. (permies.com)
  • Basil is an annual herb that is very cold-sensitive. (ndsu.edu)