Chromatids: Either of the two longitudinally adjacent threads formed when a eukaryotic chromosome replicates prior to mitosis. The chromatids are held together at the centromere. Sister chromatids are derived from the same chromosome. (Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone: Nucleoproteins, which in contrast to HISTONES, are acid insoluble. They are involved in chromosomal functions; e.g. they bind selectively to DNA, stimulate transcription resulting in tissue-specific RNA synthesis and undergo specific changes in response to various hormones or phytomitogens.Chromosome Segregation: The orderly segregation of CHROMOSOMES during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS.Sister Chromatid Exchange: An exchange of segments between the sister chromatids of a chromosome, either between the sister chromatids of a meiotic tetrad or between the sister chromatids of a duplicated somatic chromosome. Its frequency is increased by ultraviolet and ionizing radiation and other mutagenic agents and is particularly high in BLOOM SYNDROME.Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Centromere: The clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.Separase: Separase is a caspase-like cysteine protease, which plays a central role in triggering ANAPHASE by cleaving the SCC1/RAD21 subunit of the cohesin complex. Cohesin holds the sister CHROMATIDS together during METAPHASE and its cleavage results in chromosome segregation.Chromosome Pairing: The alignment of CHROMOSOMES at homologous sequences.Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Acetyltransferases: Enzymes catalyzing the transfer of an acetyl group, usually from acetyl coenzyme A, to another compound. EC 2.3.1.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Chromosomes, Fungal: Structures within the nucleus of fungal cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Anaphase: The phase of cell nucleus division following METAPHASE, in which the CHROMATIDS separate and migrate to opposite poles of the spindle.Kinetochores: Large multiprotein complexes that bind the centromeres of the chromosomes to the microtubules of the mitotic spindle during metaphase in the cell cycle.Spindle Apparatus: A microtubule structure that forms during CELL DIVISION. It consists of two SPINDLE POLES, and sets of MICROTUBULES that may include the astral microtubules, the polar microtubules, and the kinetochore microtubules.Chromosomes: In a prokaryotic cell or in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, a structure consisting of or containing DNA which carries the genetic information essential to the cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.De Lange Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by growth retardation, severe MENTAL RETARDATION, short stature, a low-pitched growling cry, brachycephaly, low-set ears, webbed neck, carp mouth, depressed nasal bridge, bushy eyebrows meeting at the midline, hirsutism, and malformations of the hands. The condition may occur sporadically or be associated with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance or duplication of the long arm of chromosome 3. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p231)Meiotic Prophase I: The prophase of the first division of MEIOSIS (in which homologous CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION occurs). It is divided into five stages: leptonema, zygonema, PACHYNEMA, diplonema, and diakinesis.S Phase: Phase of the CELL CYCLE following G1 and preceding G2 when the entire DNA content of the nucleus is replicated. It is achieved by bidirectional replication at multiple sites along each chromosome.Replication Protein C: A DNA-binding protein that consists of 5 polypeptides and plays an essential role in DNA REPLICATION in eukaryotes. It binds DNA PRIMER-template junctions and recruits PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN and DNA POLYMERASES to the site of DNA synthesis.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Metaphase: The phase of cell nucleus division following PROMETAPHASE, in which the CHROMOSOMES line up across the equatorial plane of the SPINDLE APPARATUS prior to separation.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Ectromelia: Gross hypo- or aplasia of one or more long bones of one or more limbs. The concept includes amelia, hemimelia, phocomelia, and sirenomelia.Nondisjunction, Genetic: The failure of homologous CHROMOSOMES or CHROMATIDS to segregate during MITOSIS or MEIOSIS with the result that one daughter cell has both of a pair of parental chromosomes or chromatids and the other has none.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans: Proteoglycans consisting of proteins linked to one or more CHONDROITIN SULFATE-containing oligosaccharide chains.Synaptonemal Complex: The three-part structure of ribbon-like proteinaceous material that serves to align and join the paired homologous CHROMOSOMES. It is formed during the ZYGOTENE STAGE of the first meiotic division. It is a prerequisite for CROSSING OVER.Tankyrases: A group of telomere associated proteins that interact with TRF1 PROTEIN, contain ANKYRIN REPEATS and have poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity.Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Securin: Securin is involved in the control of the metaphase-anaphase transition during MITOSIS. It promotes the onset of anaphase by blocking SEPARASE function and preventing proteolysis of cohesin and separation of sister CHROMATIDS. Overexpression of securin is associated with NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION and tumor formation.PhosphoproteinsSpermatocytes: Male germ cells derived from SPERMATOGONIA. The euploid primary spermatocytes undergo MEIOSIS and give rise to the haploid secondary spermatocytes which in turn give rise to SPERMATIDS.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Aurora Kinase B: An aurora kinase that is a component of the chromosomal passenger protein complex and is involved in the regulation of MITOSIS. It mediates proper CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION and contractile ring function during CYTOKINESIS.Prometaphase: The phase of cell nucleus division following PROPHASE, when the breakdown of the NUCLEAR ENVELOPE occurs and the MITOTIC SPINDLE APPARATUS enters the nuclear region and attaches to the KINETOCHORES.Chromatin: The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.Endopeptidases: A subclass of PEPTIDE HYDROLASES that catalyze the internal cleavage of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS.Schizosaccharomyces: A genus of ascomycetous fungi of the family Schizosaccharomycetaceae, order Schizosaccharomycetales.Aurora Kinases: A family of highly conserved serine-threonine kinases that are involved in the regulation of MITOSIS. They are involved in many aspects of cell division, including centrosome duplication, SPINDLE APPARATUS formation, chromosome alignment, attachment to the spindle, checkpoint activation, and CYTOKINESIS.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Prophase: The first phase of cell nucleus division, in which the CHROMOSOMES become visible, the CELL NUCLEUS starts to lose its identity, the SPINDLE APPARATUS appears, and the CENTRIOLES migrate toward opposite poles.Centrioles: Self-replicating, short, fibrous, rod-shaped organelles. Each centriole is a short cylinder containing nine pairs of peripheral microtubules, arranged so as to form the wall of the cylinder.G2 Phase: The period of the CELL CYCLE following DNA synthesis (S PHASE) and preceding M PHASE (cell division phase). The CHROMOSOMES are tetraploid in this point.Acetylation: Formation of an acetyl derivative. (Stedman, 25th ed)Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Hypertelorism: Abnormal increase in the interorbital distance due to overdevelopment of the lesser wings of the sphenoid.DNA Repair: The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Centrosome: The cell center, consisting of a pair of CENTRIOLES surrounded by a cloud of amorphous material called the pericentriolar region. During interphase, the centrosome nucleates microtubule outgrowth. The centrosome duplicates and, during mitosis, separates to form the two poles of the mitotic spindle (MITOTIC SPINDLE APPARATUS).DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded: Interruptions in the sugar-phosphate backbone of DNA, across both strands adjacently.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Interphase: The interval between two successive CELL DIVISIONS during which the CHROMOSOMES are not individually distinguishable. It is composed of the G phases (G1 PHASE; G0 PHASE; G2 PHASE) and S PHASE (when DNA replication occurs).Multiprotein Complexes: Macromolecular complexes formed from the association of defined protein subunits.Group Structure: The informal or formal organization of a group of people based on a network of personal relationships which is influenced by the size and composition, etc., of the group.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Anomie: A state of social disorganization and demoralization in society which is largely the result of disharmony between cultural goals and the means for attaining them. This may be reflected in the behavior of the individual in many ways - non-conformity, social withdrawal, deviant behavior, etc.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Heterochromatin: The portion of chromosome material that remains condensed and is transcriptionally inactive during INTERPHASE.Aneuploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Chromosomal Instability: An increased tendency to acquire CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS when various processes involved in chromosome replication, repair, or segregation are dysfunctional.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.Pachytene Stage: The stage in the first meiotic prophase, following ZYGOTENE STAGE, when CROSSING OVER between homologous CHROMOSOMES begins.Cell Aggregation: The phenomenon by which dissociated cells intermixed in vitro tend to group themselves with cells of their own type.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Multilevel Analysis: The statistical manipulation of hierarchically and non-hierarchically nested data. It includes clustered data, such as a sample of subjects within a group of schools. Prevalent in the social, behavioral sciences, and biomedical sciences, both linear and nonlinear regression models are applied.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.DNA Damage: Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.Myxococcales: An order of rod-shaped, gram-negative fruiting gliding bacteria found in SOIL; WATER; and HUMUS.Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes: Complexes of enzymes that catalyze the covalent attachment of UBIQUITIN to other proteins by forming a peptide bond between the C-terminal GLYCINE of UBIQUITIN and the alpha-amino groups of LYSINE residues in the protein. The complexes play an important role in mediating the selective-degradation of short-lived and abnormal proteins. The complex of enzymes can be broken down into three components that involve activation of ubiquitin (UBIQUITIN-ACTIVATING ENZYMES), conjugation of ubiquitin to the ligase complex (UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYMES), and ligation of ubiquitin to the substrate protein (UBIQUITIN-PROTEIN LIGASES).Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Anaphase-Promoting Complex-Cyclosome: An E3 ubiquitin ligase primarily involved in regulation of the metaphase-to-anaphase transition during MITOSIS through ubiquitination of specific CELL CYCLE PROTEINS. Enzyme activity is tightly regulated through subunits and cofactors, which modulate activation, inhibition, and substrate specificity. The anaphase-promoting complex, or APC-C, is also involved in tissue differentiation in the PLACENTA, CRYSTALLINE LENS, and SKELETAL MUSCLE, and in regulation of postmitotic NEURONAL PLASTICITY and excitability.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Xenopus Proteins: Proteins obtained from various species of Xenopus. Included here are proteins from the African clawed frog (XENOPUS LAEVIS). Many of these proteins have been the subject of scientific investigations in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Telomere: A terminal section of a chromosome which has a specialized structure and which is involved in chromosomal replication and stability. Its length is believed to be a few hundred base pairs.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Dictyostelium: A genus of protozoa, formerly also considered a fungus. Its natural habitat is decaying forest leaves, where it feeds on bacteria. D. discoideum is the best-known species and is widely used in biomedical research.Social Isolation: The separation of individuals or groups resulting in the lack of or minimizing of social contact and/or communication. This separation may be accomplished by physical separation, by social barriers and by psychological mechanisms. In the latter, there may be interaction but no real communication.Saccharomycetales: An order of fungi in the phylum Ascomycota that multiply by budding. They include the telomorphic ascomycetous yeasts which are found in a very wide range of habitats.Myxococcus xanthus: A species of gliding bacteria found on soil as well as in surface fresh water and coastal seawater.Genome, Fungal: The complete gene complement contained in a set of chromosomes in a fungus.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit cell production of DNA or RNA.Protein Subunits: Single chains of amino acids that are the units of multimeric PROTEINS. Multimeric proteins can be composed of identical or non-identical subunits. One or more monomeric subunits may compose a protomer which itself is a subunit structure of a larger assembly.Benomyl: A systemic agricultural fungicide used for control of certain fungal diseases of stone fruit.Oocytes: Female germ cells derived from OOGONIA and termed OOCYTES when they enter MEIOSIS. The primary oocytes begin meiosis but are arrested at the diplotene state until OVULATION at PUBERTY to give rise to haploid secondary oocytes or ova (OVUM).Tosylarginine Methyl Ester: Arginine derivative which is a substrate for many proteolytic enzymes. As a substrate for the esterase from the first component of complement, it inhibits the action of C(l) on C(4).Genes, Essential: Those genes found in an organism which are necessary for its viability and normal function.Cadherins: Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.Telomere Homeostasis: Maintenance of TELOMERE length. During DNA REPLICATION, chromosome ends loose some of their telomere sequence (TELOMERE SHORTENING.) Various cellular mechanism are involved in repairing, extending, and recapping the telomere ends.Yeasts: A general term for single-celled rounded fungi that reproduce by budding. Brewers' and bakers' yeasts are SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; therapeutic dried yeast is YEAST, DRIED.Hydroxyurea: An antineoplastic agent that inhibits DNA synthesis through the inhibition of ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Genomic Instability: An increased tendency of the GENOME to acquire MUTATIONS when various processes involved in maintaining and replicating the genome are dysfunctional.Microtubules: Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.Adenosine Triphosphatases: A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Mad2 Proteins: Mad2 is a component of the spindle-assembly checkpoint apparatus. It binds to and inhibits the Cdc20 activator subunit of the anaphase-promoting complex, preventing the onset of anaphase until all chromosomes are properly aligned at the metaphase plate. Mad2 is required for proper microtubule capture at KINETOCHORES.Desmosomes: A type of junction that attaches one cell to its neighbor. One of a number of differentiated regions which occur, for example, where the cytoplasmic membranes of adjacent epithelial cells are closely apposed. It consists of a circular region of each membrane together with associated intracellular microfilaments and an intercellular material which may include, for example, mucopolysaccharides. (From Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990; Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Surface Tension: The force acting on the surface of a liquid, tending to minimize the area of the surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Genes, Fungal: The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen: Nuclear antigen with a role in DNA synthesis, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. PCNA is required for the coordinated synthesis of both leading and lagging strands at the replication fork during DNA replication. PCNA expression correlates with the proliferation activity of several malignant and non-malignant cell types.Chromosomes, Human: Very long DNA molecules and associated proteins, HISTONES, and non-histone chromosomal proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE). Normally 46 chromosomes, including two sex chromosomes are found in the nucleus of human cells. They carry the hereditary information of the individual.Heterocyclic Compounds, 3-Ring: A class of organic compounds containing three ring structures, one of which is made up of more than one kind of atom, usually carbon plus another atom. The heterocycle may be either aromatic or nonaromaticRNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.DNA, Catenated: CIRCULAR DNA that is interlaced together as links in a chain. It is used as an assay for the activity of DNA TOPOISOMERASES. Catenated DNA is attached loop to loop in contrast to CONCATENATED DNA which is attached end to end.Integrin alpha5beta1: An integrin found in FIBROBLASTS; PLATELETS; MONOCYTES, and LYMPHOCYTES. Integrin alpha5beta1 is the classical receptor for FIBRONECTIN, but it also functions as a receptor for LAMININ and several other EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS.Nocodazole: Nocodazole is an antineoplastic agent which exerts its effect by depolymerizing microtubules.DNA Topoisomerases, Type II: DNA TOPOISOMERASES that catalyze ATP-dependent breakage of both strands of DNA, passage of the unbroken strands through the breaks, and rejoining of the broken strands. These enzymes bring about relaxation of the supercoiled DNA and resolution of a knotted circular DNA duplex.Cell Extracts: Preparations of cell constituents or subcellular materials, isolates, or substances.Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier Proteins: A class of structurally related proteins of 12-20 kDa in size. They covalently modify specific proteins in a manner analogous to UBIQUITIN.Histones: Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.CDC28 Protein Kinase, S cerevisiae: A protein kinase encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC28 gene and required for progression from the G1 PHASE to the S PHASE in the CELL CYCLE.Desmoglein 1: A desmosomal cadherin that is an autoantigen in the acquired skin disorder PEMPHIGUS FOLIACEUS.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Two-Hybrid System Techniques: Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Immunoprecipitation: The aggregation of soluble ANTIGENS with ANTIBODIES, alone or with antibody binding factors such as ANTI-ANTIBODIES or STAPHYLOCOCCAL PROTEIN A, into complexes large enough to fall out of solution.Amino Acid Transport System A: A sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter that accounts for most of the sodium-dependent neutral amino acid uptake by mammalian cells. The preferred substrates for this transporter system include ALANINE; SERINE; and GLUTAMINE.Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.G1 Phase: The period of the CELL CYCLE preceding DNA REPLICATION in S PHASE. Subphases of G1 include "competence" (to respond to growth factors), G1a (entry into G1), G1b (progression), and G1c (assembly). Progression through the G1 subphases is effected by limiting growth factors, nutrients, or inhibitors.Desmoglein 2: A CALCIUM-dependent adhesion molecule of DESMOSOMES that also plays a role in embryonic STEM CELL proliferation.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.ChicagoDiagnostic Self Evaluation: A self-evaluation of health status.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Protein Phosphatase 2: A phosphoprotein phosphatase subtype that is comprised of a catalytic subunit and two different regulatory subunits. At least two genes encode isoforms of the protein phosphatase catalytic subunit, while several isoforms of regulatory subunits exist due to the presence of multiple genes and the alternative splicing of their mRNAs. Protein phosphatase 2 acts on a broad variety of cellular proteins and may play a role as a regulator of intracellular signaling processes.Central AmericaJuvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Crossing Over, Genetic: The reciprocal exchange of segments at corresponding positions along pairs of homologous CHROMOSOMES by symmetrical breakage and crosswise rejoining forming cross-over sites (HOLLIDAY JUNCTIONS) that are resolved during CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION. Crossing-over typically occurs during MEIOSIS but it may also occur in the absence of meiosis, for example, with bacterial chromosomes, organelle chromosomes, or somatic cell nuclear chromosomes.Origin Recognition Complex: The origin recognition complex is a multi-subunit DNA-binding protein that initiates DNA REPLICATION in eukaryotes.Epidermis: The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).Xenopus: An aquatic genus of the family, Pipidae, occurring in Africa and distinguished by having black horny claws on three inner hind toes.Cytoskeletal Proteins: Major constituent of the cytoskeleton found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They form a flexible framework for the cell, provide attachment points for organelles and formed bodies, and make communication between parts of the cell possible.Immunoblotting: Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.Protein Kinases: A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Cell Communication: Any of several ways in which living cells of an organism communicate with one another, whether by direct contact between cells or by means of chemical signals carried by neurotransmitter substances, hormones, and cyclic AMP.Chromatin Immunoprecipitation: A technique for identifying specific DNA sequences that are bound, in vivo, to proteins of interest. It involves formaldehyde fixation of CHROMATIN to crosslink the DNA-BINDING PROTEINS to the DNA. After shearing the DNA into small fragments, specific DNA-protein complexes are isolated by immunoprecipitation with protein-specific ANTIBODIES. Then, the DNA isolated from the complex can be identified by PCR amplification and sequencing.Cyclin B: A cyclin subtype that is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE. It stimulates the G2/M phase transition by activating CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE.Desmoglein 3: A desmosomal cadherin that is an autoantigen in the acquired skin disorder PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS.Pemphigus: Group of chronic blistering diseases characterized histologically by ACANTHOLYSIS and blister formation within the EPIDERMIS.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins: Proteins from the nematode species CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS. The proteins from this species are the subject of scientific interest in the area of multicellular organism MORPHOGENESIS.Family Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Eukaryotic Cells: Cells of the higher organisms, containing a true nucleus bounded by a nuclear membrane.Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Antigens, Nuclear: Immunologically detectable substances found in the CELL NUCLEUS.Neuroepithelial Cells: Cells of epithelial origin possessing specialized sensory functions. They include cells that are found in the TASTE BUDS; OLFACTORY MUCOSA; COCHLEA; and NEUROEPITHELIAL BODIES.Genes, cdc: Genes that code for proteins that regulate the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. These genes form a regulatory network that culminates in the onset of MITOSIS by activating the p34cdc2 protein (PROTEIN P34CDC2).Sumoylation: A type of POST-TRANSLATIONAL PROTEIN MODIFICATION by SMALL UBIQUITIN-RELATED MODIFIER PROTEINS (also known as SUMO proteins).Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.DEAD-box RNA Helicases: A large family of RNA helicases that share a common protein motif with the single letter amino acid sequence D-E-A-D (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp). In addition to RNA helicase activity, members of the DEAD-box family participate in other aspects of RNA metabolism and regulation of RNA function.Caenorhabditis elegans: A species of nematode that is widely used in biological, biochemical, and genetic studies.Rad51 Recombinase: A Rec A recombinase found in eukaryotes. Rad51 is involved in DNA REPAIR of double-strand breaks.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing: A broad category of carrier proteins that play a role in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They generally contain several modular domains, each of which having its own binding activity, and act by forming complexes with other intracellular-signaling molecules. Signal-transducing adaptor proteins lack enzyme activity, however their activity can be modulated by other signal-transducing enzymesTemperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Silver Staining: The use of silver, usually silver nitrate, as a reagent for producing contrast or coloration in tissue specimens.Mice, Hairless: Mutant strains of mice that produce little or no hair.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.CDC2 Protein Kinase: Phosphoprotein with protein kinase activity that functions in the G2/M phase transition of the CELL CYCLE. It is the catalytic subunit of the MATURATION-PROMOTING FACTOR and complexes with both CYCLIN A and CYCLIN B in mammalian cells. The maximal activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 is achieved when it is fully dephosphorylated.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Group Processes: The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins: Proteins and peptides that are involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION within the cell. Included here are peptides and proteins that regulate the activity of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and cellular processes in response to signals from CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. Intracellular signaling peptide and proteins may be part of an enzymatic signaling cascade or act through binding to and modifying the action of other signaling factors.Micromanipulation: The performance of dissections, injections, surgery, etc., by the use of micromanipulators (attachments to a microscope) that manipulate tiny instruments.Chromosome Breakage: A type of chromosomal aberration involving DNA BREAKS. Chromosome breakage can result in CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; or SEQUENCE DELETION.Telomere-Binding Proteins: Proteins that specifically bind to TELOMERES. Proteins in this class include those that perform functions such as telomere capping, telomere maintenance and telomere stabilization.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.DNA Helicases: Proteins that catalyze the unwinding of duplex DNA during replication by binding cooperatively to single-stranded regions of DNA or to short regions of duplex DNA that are undergoing transient opening. In addition DNA helicases are DNA-dependent ATPases that harness the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate DNA strands.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.DNA Topoisomerase IV: A bacterial DNA topoisomerase II that catalyzes ATP-dependent breakage of both strands of DNA, passage of the unbroken strands through the breaks, and rejoining of the broken strands. Topoisomerase IV binds to DNA as a heterotetramer consisting 2 parC and 2 parE subunits. Topoisomerase IV is a decatenating enzyme that resolves interlinked daughter chromosomes following DNA replication.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Genes, Mating Type, Fungal: Fungal genes that mostly encode TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS. In some FUNGI they also encode PHEROMONES and PHEROMONE RECEPTORS. The transcription factors control expression of specific proteins that give a cell its mating identity. Opposite mating type identities are required for mating.
Lennard-Jones, J. E. (1931). "Cohesion". Proceedings of the Physical Society. 43 (5): 461. Bibcode:1931PPS....43..461L. doi: ...
Cohesion; Ethics; Plurals; Simplicity; Spelling; Text-tables) that present selected issues in greater detail or provide more ...
The single become the second top 40 hit from Cohesion on the ARIA Singles Chart, which peaked at No. 34 and spent a total of ... "Baby I'm Gettin' Better" is the second single from Australian alternative rock band, Gyroscope's fourth studio album, Cohesion ... Allen, Mike (10 April 2010). "Gyroscope - Cohesion". Sputnik Music. Retrieved 24 April 2015. "'Baby, I'm Gettin' Better' at ...
Relational Cohesion; Percentage of code covered by tests, etc.) CppDepend can tell you what has been changed between 2 builds ...
Relational Cohesion; Percentage of code covered by tests, etc.) Declarative code rule over LINQ query (CQLinq) JArchitect can ...
The main principles include: • Early intervention • Collaboration and service integration • Community cohesion • Sustainable ...
"Tactical Cohesion". army.mil. Retrieved 2016-05-29. "Sumrall 6th grade students welcome returning soldiers". DVIDS. Retrieved ...
"Cohesion rates". Vote Watch. 2010. Retrieved 17 February 2010. European Parliament - Work in Session Retrieved 20 May 2010 ...
Relational Cohesion; Google page rank of .NET types; Percentage of code covered by tests, etc.) Declarative code rule over LINQ ...
Cohesion Records. MANN 003. "Manfred Mann Earth Band Living Without You - Tribute (EP)". Spirit of Rock. Retrieved 3 October ...
"Community Cohesion". Equal But Different. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 1 December 2012. Cunniffe, ... "Forced Marriage, Family Cohesion and Community Engagement" (PDF). Social Work 2000. 22 May 2008. Retrieved 1 December 2012. " ... Khanum, Nazia (March 2008). Forced marriage, family cohesion and community engagement: National learning through a case study ...
"Sister chromatid cohesion". Genetics Home Reference. United States National Library of Medicine. May 15, 2011. "p + q = Solved ... which is essential for the recruitment of the cohesin complex that mediates sister chromatid cohesion after DNA replication as ...
"Karchouni "Finding Cohesion"". French Football Federation. 11 January 2013. Retrieved 29 June 2016. Ghoutia Karchouni - UEFA ...
American Heritage Science Dictionary (2010). "cohesion science definition". Retrieved 25 July 2012. "cohesion - Princeton ... However, as long as the air remains saturated, the natural force of cohesion that hold the molecules of a substance together ...
Social cohesion refers to the bonds that link societies together, deriving from the work of Émile Durkheim. Émile Durkheim's ... Dragolov, Georgi; Ignácz, Zsófia; Lorenz, Jan; Delhey, Jan; Boehnke, Klaus (2013). Social Cohesion Radar. Measuring Common ... An international Comparison of Social Cohesion. Gutersloh: Bertelsmann. Sen, Amartya (1993). "Capability and Well-being". In ... Social Cohesion, Social Inclusion, Social Empowerment; (ii) Person/human security, Social Recognition, Social Responsiveness, ...
"The Smalley Group - Rice University". cohesion.rice.edu. Retrieved 2018-01-19. "Hermann J. Muller - Guggenheim Fellows". "CV ( ...
He speaks and writes regularly on Islamic finance and on issues connected with politics and social cohesion. He was awarded an ... He writes regularly about political and community cohesion issues on the ConservativeHome website. Amin has lived in the UK ... "The Patrons". Curriculum for Cohesion. Retrieved 16 April 2017. "Birthday Honours List United Kingdom". Supplement No. 1. ... a member of the Consultative Council of the Three Faiths Forum and Chair of Donors of the Curriculum for Cohesion. ...
ISBN 978-0-582-43741-8. Halliday, M. A. K.; Hasan, Ruqaiya (1976). Cohesion in English. Pearson Education ltd. Hancock, Ian F ... Cohesion between sentences is achieved through the use of deictic pronouns as anaphora (e.g. that is exactly what I mean where ... also signal the progression of ideas between sentences and help to create cohesion. Discourse markers are often the first ...
Cohesion in English. London: Longman. Halliday, M.A.K. and Hasan, R. 1985/89. Language, context and text: Aspects of language ... in 1976, with MAK Halliday she published what remains the most comprehensive analysis of cohesion in English. In their further ...
The four properties are cohesion (water), solidity or inertia (earth), expansion or vibration (air) and heat or energy content ... Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche states that physical properties are assigned to the elements: earth is solidity; water is cohesion; ...
Cohesion in English. London: Longman Halliday, M. A. K. (2003 [2001]). Is the grammar neutral? Is the grammarian neutral? In J. ... as well as the systems of cohesion, such as Reference, Substitution, and Ellipsis. Halliday argues that the textual function is ...
To increase cohesion. Jieyang's area is 5240 square kilometers, and its population is about 6 million, such a big area and a ...
Assam Muslims: politics & cohesion. Mittal Publications, 1985. Pg 3. ...
Cohesion followed on 9 April 2010, which debuted at No. 3. Mike Allen at SputnikMusic described it as "straightforward rock ... 16 on Triple J's Hottest 100 in 2007) and the anthem, "Australia". The band's fourth album, Cohesion, was released in April ... Following a national tour supporting The Living End, Gyroscope began writing for their fourth studio album, Cohesion. The band ... Allen, Mike (10 April 2010). "Gyroscope - Cohesion (album review)". SputnikMusic. Jeremy Ferwerda. Retrieved 26 April 2015. ...
Order of National Cohesion; National Order of the Legion of Honour (French: Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur). In 1971 he ...
Tonkin ET, Wang TJ, Lisgo S, Bamshad MJ, Strachan T. NIPBL, encoding a homolog of fungal Scc2-type sister chromatid cohesion ... Cornelia de Lange syndrome, cohesion, and beyond. Clin Genet. 2009;76:303-14. ...
... establishment of cohesion 1 homolog 2) gene, which encodes a protein belonging to the Eco1/Ctf7 family of acetyltransferases ... establishment of cohesion 1 homolog 2) gene, which encodes a protein belonging to the Eco1/Ctf7 family of acetyltransferases ... involved in establishing sister chromatid cohesion during S phase. Karyotyping reveals heterochromatin repulsion characteristic ...
Cohesion may refer to: Cohesion (chemistry), the intermolecular attraction between like-molecules Cohesion (computer science), ... the bonds between members of a community or society and life Community cohesion Structural cohesion Cohesion number. ... England Cohesion (album), the fourth studio album by Australian band Gyroscope Cohesion (social policy), ... a measure of how well the lines of source code within a module work together Cohesion (geology), the part of shear strength ...
He does not, however, underrate the value of cohesion. He wrote that the loss of order and cohesion in a unit often makes even ... The concept of cohesion was originally used primarily to examine combat behavior. However, more recently models of cohesion ... "Assessing cohesion in small units" - Chapter III of Cohesion: the Human Element in Combat, Wm. Darryl Henderson, National ... This debate about the relative importance, or even need for, the concepts of social cohesion and task cohesion is exemplified ...
A policy toolkit for growth and social cohesion in Korea. Chapter 1. Overview: Why is social cohesion an urgent issue in Korea? ... OECD Home Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social AffairsStrengthening Social Cohesion in Korea Directorate for ... Chapter 4. Combined early childhood education and care measures to ensure social cohesion. Chapter 5. Moving from hospitals to ...
Gravity is working against both adhesion and cohesion, trying to pull the water drop downward. Adhesion and cohesion are ... Cohesion makes a water drop a drop. If you just look at the picture of the water drop sitting of the leaf, you might think the ... I used to wake up in a cold sweat because I could not get the concepts of water adhesion and cohesion clear in my mind. If you ... With the help of adhesion and cohesion, water can work its way all the way up to the branches and leaves. Read on to learn ...
Cooper Vialit Cohesion Pendulum CRT-VCP is a testing device to analyse the cohesion of bitumen in road construction. The ... Cooper Vialit Cohesion Pendulum CRT-VCP is a testing device to analyse the cohesion of bitumen in road construction. The ... Slurry Surfacing Cohesion Tester - Automatic - Duration: 0:49. Cooper Research Technology Ltd. 769 views ...
This report examines the effects of recent economic growth in Viet Nam on social cohesion. It finds that recent rapid economic ... Social Cohesion Policy Review of Viet Nam. This report examines the effects of recent economic growth in Viet Nam on social ... OECD Home Viet NamSocial Cohesion Policy Review of Viet Nam - en Viet Nam. ... "Fast growth has contributed to an impressive reduction in poverty but much remains to be done to preserve social cohesion in ...
In meiosis, cohesion and recombination are modified in such a way that reciprocal exchange and reductional segregation of ... Cohesion between sister chromatids is provided by protein complexes, of which some components are conserved across the kingdoms ... Recombination, sister chromatid cohesion and the relation between the two processes must be regulated differently in mitosis ... Sister chromatid cohesion and recombination in meiosis.. van Heemst D1, Heyting C. ...
"Statistical Evidence on Regional Cohesion in Italy," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di ...
In the absence of Wapl, Sororin becomes dispensable for cohesion. We propose that Sororin maintains cohesion by inhibiting ... whereas a stably DNA-bound form of cohesin is thought to mediate cohesion. In vertebrates, Sororin is essential for cohesion ... Sororin mediates sister chromatid cohesion by antagonizing Wapl.. Nishiyama T1, Ladurner R, Schmitz J, Kreidl E, Schleiffer A, ... Sister chromatid cohesion is essential for chromosome segregation and is mediated by cohesin bound to DNA. Cohesin-DNA ...
... this paper will outline the four factors that contribute to overall team cohesion. The four primary factors that will... ... Team Cohesion. 1509 Words , 7 Pages Running head: TEAM CONFLICT AND COHESION Team Conflict and Cohesion Mak Turno University of ... Task cohesion has been found to be extremely important when it comes to team cohesion. Research shows that if a team has a ... Sports Performance Increases With Team Cohesion. 1590 Words , 7 Pages As sport performance increases with team cohesion, it is ...
"Do economic models tell us anything useful about Cohesion Policy impacts? A comparison of HERMIN, QUEST and ECOMOD," Working ... "EU cohesion policy, past and present: Sustaining a prospering and fair European Union?," Kiel Working Papers 2037, Kiel ... "How does EU cohesion policy work? Evaluating its effects on fiscal outcome variables," ZEW Discussion Papers 09-051, ZEW - ... "EU cohesion policy and "conditional" effectiveness: What do cross-section regressions tell us?," Working Papers 4-2008, GEFRA ...
Latest News, World , Asia, ASEAN, Singapore,Phillipines, Malaysia , Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Taiwan, Hong Kong,China and India News Headlines. Latest on Sports, Politics, Science and Technology and other things around the globe.
The Commission made proposals for future cohesion policy. The consultation is a part of the process, analysing the views of all ... Factual summary of the public consultation on the EU long-term budget in the area of cohesion ... This consultation is open to all citizens and stakeholders interested in Cohesion policy, including beneficiaries of EU ... Cohesion; Investment, Research & Innovation, SMEs and Single Market; Migration; Security; Strategic Infrastructure; Values and ...
2.19: Cohesion Cohesion is the attraction between molecules of the same type - such as water molecules. The partially charged ... Surface tension results from cohesion. Pond skaters, also known as water striders, are insects that use this phenomenon to walk ... On a surface, when multiple water molecules come together through cohesion, a droplet is formed. Water does not typically ... Cohesion is the tendency for the same type of molecules to stick together. ...
Did it also play a part in chromatid cohesion in the worm? Once again, RNA interference showed it did. Finally, if MAU-2 has a ... These findings shed light on the mechanics of chromatid cohesion, and will be useful for further elucidating the complex means ... Exploring mechanics of chromatid cohesion. By PLoS Biology, Jul 5, 2006 - 2:52:37 PM. ...
Marc Gartenberg reveal a surprising new role for tDNAs and RNA polymerase III-associated proteins in sister chromatid cohesion. ... Sister chromatid cohesion (the binding together of the two identical copies of each chromosome that are formed during ... Sister chromatid cohesion is mediated by a multi-subunit protein complex called cohesin. Inside the cell nucleus, cohesin ... To investigate cohesion, Drs. Dubey and Gartenberg used yeast cells, where cohesin is found at the transcriptionally inactive ...
Their worries highlight once again the need for programs to support refugee inclusion and strengthen social cohesion in the ... Refugee integration programs can enhance social cohesion in Chloraka, Pafos. Ελληνικά Various articles published recently in ... colour or religion can reduce marginalization and promote social cohesion. ...
... and maintaining group cohesion (for example, to reduce predation risk). Here we experimentally disassociate cohesion-based ... Both information and social cohesion determine collective decisions in animal groups Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a ... Both information and social cohesion determine collective decisions in animal groups. Noam Miller, Simon Garnier, Andrew T. ... If individuals are not able to combine information, but do exhibit social cohesion, they should tend to remain together and ...
Many people face a challenge in building cohesion in a business - achieving the right balance between competing forces and ... Gaining greater cohesion: Bringing business analysis and business architecture into focus. Many people face a challenge in ... not more cohesion - and consequently, we can end up with some very confused and exacerbated business stakeholders who care less ... a vision of building cohesion in a business, achieving the right balance between competing forces, and bringing the business ...
Health topics Life-course approach Child and adolescent health Publications Social cohesion for mental well-being among ... on social cohesion for mental well-being among adolescents. The rationale for selection of this topic for the 2007 process is ...
... Nat Rev Cancer. 2011 Mar;11(3):199-210. doi: 10.1038/nrc3018 ...
... Rcjohnsen rcjohnsen at aol.com Wed Aug 9 16:27:13 EST 2000 * ... This suggests that TRFs are a key link in the coordination between DNA replication and sister chromatid cohesion. Trf4 and Trf5 ... Molecular Biology Sci Aug 4, 00 Pol : A DNA Polymerase Required for Sister Chromatid Cohesion Zhenghe Wang, Irene B. Castaño,* ... whereas a trf4 single mutant completes a presumably defective S phase that results in a failure of cohesion between the ...
California just received FDA approval to market the companys new CoHesion visualization module for complex electrophysiol ... The new CoHesion module imports the EnSite Systems 3D cardiac chamber model with anatomic labeling into the Sensei systems ... Press release: Hansen Medical Announces FDA Clearance for CoHesion(TM) Module…. Flashbacks: The Sensei™ Robotic Catheter System ... Cardiac Electrophysiology Goes Robotic and 3D with CoHesion™. July 3rd, 2008 Editors Cardiology ...
  • Adhesion and cohesion are important water properties that affects how water works everywhere, from plant leaves to your own body. (usgs.gov)
  • I used to wake up in a cold sweat because I could not get the concepts of water adhesion and cohesion clear in my mind. (usgs.gov)
  • Adhesion and cohesion are water properties that affect every water molecule on Earth and also the interaction of water molecules with molecules of other substances. (usgs.gov)
  • Essentially, cohesion and adhesion are the "stickiness" that water molecules have for each other and for other substances. (usgs.gov)
  • Gravity is working against both adhesion and cohesion, trying to pull the water drop downward. (usgs.gov)
  • Adhesion and cohesion are winning the battle so far, as the drops are sticking to the pine needles. (usgs.gov)
  • Learn more about adhesion, cohesion, and other water properties. (usgs.gov)
  • In addition, cell adhesion to surfaces and cell cohesion were evaluated using the packed-bead method and mechanical disruption, respectively. (hindawi.com)
  • There was no correlation between the extent of biofilm formation or biofilm components and the adhesion or cohesion abilities of the bacteria, but the efficiency of adherence to glass beads increased after biofilm depletion. (hindawi.com)
  • In conclusion, nucleic acids and proteins formed the main components of the MRSA clone t127 biofilm matrix, and there seems to be an association between adhesion and cohesion in the biofilms tested. (hindawi.com)
  • This lesson will explain the properties of cohesion and adhesion. (sophia.org)
  • To do so, we analyse cell adhesion in Xenopus embryonic tissues and determine a number of parameters, including tissue surface tension (as a measure of cohesion), cell contact fluctuation and cortical tension. (biologists.org)
  • 1.1 This test method is a laboratory procedure that determines the adhesion and cohesion performance of one-part elastomeric, solvent release sealants at high and low temperatures by the extension and compression of test specimens. (astm.org)
  • 1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measuring the cohesion/adhesion or bond strength (tensile) perpendicular to the surface of sprayed fire-resistive material (SFRM) applied to rigid backing. (astm.org)
  • Changes in the expression levels of other adhesion systems may also be required to reduce overall tumor cohesion. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In order to be successful in team sports, group cohesion is one of the most important variables that is required (Lott & Lott, 1965). (bartleby.com)
  • Furthermore, the typical experimental paradigm of assessing binary decisions, those between two mutually exclusive options, confounds two aspects common to most group decisions: minimizing uncertainty (through the use of personal and social information) and maintaining group cohesion (for example, to reduce predation risk). (pnas.org)
  • Additionally, achieving a single consensus choice is often crucial to maintaining group cohesion, and individuals that make a dissenting choice may find themselves isolated, increasing their risk of predation ( 18 ). (pnas.org)
  • In addition, our findings add to recent interdisciplinary work uncovering the precise social mechanisms by which intense group cohesion develops. (frontiersin.org)
  • The UNTFHS funded programme aims to enhance social cohesion and reduce violence amongst youth in vulnerable communities. (un.org)
  • Statistical Evidence on Regional Cohesion in Italy ," Giornale degli Economisti , GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 56(3-4), pages 211-234, December. (repec.org)
  • Subsequent direct tests involving a subset of prioritized genes also revealed significant changes in chromosome numbers with corresponding increases in moderate and severe cohesion defects within mitotic chromosome spreads. (bioportfolio.com)
  • the commitment to working together on a shared goal", since some studies conclude that unit effectiveness correlates strongly with task cohesion, not with social cohesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • This debate about the relative importance, or even need for, the concepts of social cohesion and task cohesion is exemplified by an exchange between Anthony King and Guy Siebold in the journal Armed Forces & Society in 2006-2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jesse Lehrke developed a multi-level model to facilitate the use of both social and task cohesion for examining military behavior during revolutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The resulting Child Sport Cohesion Questionnaire containing 16 items (task cohesion = 7, social cohesion = 7, negative spurious items = 2) and a 5-point Likert scale, demonstrated a strong model fit, good internal consistency values, and a moderate inter-factor correlation. (uwo.ca)
  • To understand the basic mechanics of cell rearrangements in liquid-like tissues, the relationship between tissue cohesion and viscosity needs to be clarified. (biologists.org)
  • At this site, mutations of SA2 residues that disrupt Wapl binding bypass the Sgo1 requirement in cohesion protection. (rcsb.org)
  • We examine recent trends in social cohesion and inequality, and the relationship between the two in South Africa using date from the South African Reconciliation Barometer Surveys. (afd.fr)
  • The provincial-level multivariate analysis is able to examine the relationship between a full social cohesion index and inequality in LSMs. (afd.fr)
  • These results suggest that vertical inequality in living standards is correlated with the level of social cohesion. (afd.fr)
  • Higher inequality may adversely affect social cohesion as it reduces inclusiveness. (afd.fr)
  • The overall aim of the project is to understand the relation between socio-economic structures of inequality, urbanization and territorial cohesion, as well as how territorial cohesion at different European scales affects economic growth, spatial justice and democratic capacities. (aau.dk)
  • HNSN ), a developer of robotic technology for accurate 3D control of catheter movement during cardiac procedures, has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance to market the CoHesion™ 3D Visualization Module for use in complex electrophysiology (EP) mapping procedures. (marketwired.com)
  • The water drop is composed of water molecules that like to stick together, an example of the property of cohesion. (usgs.gov)
  • Cohesion is the tendency for the same type of molecules to stick together. (jove.com)
  • Cohesion is the attraction between molecules of the same type - such as water molecules. (jove.com)
  • On a surface, when multiple water molecules come together through cohesion, a droplet is formed. (jove.com)
  • Cohesion is when water molecules are attracted to other water molecules. (sophia.org)
  • Surface tension describes the cohesion of water molecules on the very surface of the water. (sophia.org)
  • The rationale behind this approach is that SM methods are particularly well-suited for monitoring DNA cohesion and condensation where manipulation of individual DNA molecules, measurement of forces, and addition of proteins and buffer solutions can be carefully controlled. (europa.eu)
  • Therefore, the selective loss of chromosome cohesion in anaphase I could be achieved by differential degradation of the REC-8 molecules that are responsible for homologue cohesion. (rupress.org)
  • Cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions are important regulators of cohesion - a property previously demonstrated to mediate cell detachment and invasion. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Cooper Vialit Cohesion Pendulum CRT-VCP is a testing device to analyse the cohesion of bitumen in road construction. (youtube.com)
  • Here, we analyse the link between cohesion and viscosity to uncover basic mechanical principles of cell rearrangement. (biologists.org)
  • The concept of cohesion was originally used primarily to examine combat behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Terence Lee used a broad concept of cohesion to explain military behavior during events in China in 1989 and Indonesia in 1998 and, in another article, the Philippines in 1986 and Indonesia in 1998. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, more recently models of cohesion have been applied to other phenomena characterized by stress, uncertainty, and the strategic interaction of groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • Running head: TEAM CONFLICT AND COHESION Team Conflict and Cohesion Mak Turno University of Phoenix July 9, 2007 Team Conflict and Cohesion The dynamics of a team relies heavily on the interaction of team members during times of conflict not just during times of agreement. (bartleby.com)
  • While this contribution of religious networks to cooperative interaction between diverse social groups, or 'social cohesion', has been recognized, how this might operate in practice is largely unknown and the need for further research in this area has been highlighted (Putnam & Campbell, 2010). (igi-global.com)
  • The class of structural object-oriented cohesion metrics is the most in-vestigated category of cohesion metrics. (scirp.org)
  • These metrics measure cohesion on structural information extracted from the source code. (scirp.org)
  • We also used in our study three well-known structural cohesion metrics. (scirp.org)
  • The achieved results show that the new approach appears to better reflect the cohesion (and structure) of classes than traditional structural cohesion metrics. (scirp.org)
  • A. De Lucia, R. Oliveto and L. Vorraro, "Using Structural and Semantic Metrics to Improve Class Cohesion," Proceedings of the International Conference on Software Maintenance, Beijing, 28 September-4 October 2008. (scirp.org)
  • Dr Brid Quinn, Lecturer in Public Administration at the University of Limerick, also touched on the possible changes to the EU's finances, referencing comments from some EU leaders, but also considering the impact Cohesion Policy and its structural funds have had on Ireland's socio-economic development. (crossborder.ie)
  • Econometric Evaluation of EU Cohesion Policy: A Survey ," Chapters ,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Integration, Volume III, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing. (repec.org)
  • Econometric evaluation of EU Cohesion Policy: a survey ," ZEW Discussion Papers 09-052, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research. (repec.org)
  • This consultation is open to all citizens and stakeholders interested in Cohesion policy, including beneficiaries of EU programmes and funds such as national, regional and local authorities, inter-governmental and non-governmental bodies, academic institutions, civil society and enterprises. (europa.eu)
  • Cohesion policy can complement and support growth objectives in many areas. (asz.hu)
  • Special Adviser of ELIAMEP, discusses the Cohesion Policy of the EU. (eliamep.gr)
  • The motives behind cohesion policy have always been heterogeneous and may work in a complementary but also in a contradictory way. (eliamep.gr)
  • Cohesion policy can work to the detriment of some less developed areas and to the benefit of richer Member States. (eliamep.gr)
  • European integration is promoted by cohesion policy and the development and strongest political presence of the regions. (eliamep.gr)
  • As brain drain is directly triggered by existing social and economic imbalances between the EU regions, Mr Boc's opinion calls for a strong association between EU's cohesion policy, which is meant to address these imbalances and to promote a more even development across the EU, and measures envisaged to deal with brain drain. (europa.eu)
  • In parallel, EU Cohesion Policy is experiencing profound transformation. (scribd.com)
  • This framework is applied to two important case studies: the EU Cohesion Policy and the US Federal Investment Policies. (foyles.co.uk)
  • CCBS organised a seminar examining EU Cohesion Policy beyond 2020, which took place on 23rd of March in the European Commission Office in Belfast. (crossborder.ie)
  • Bringing together a number of experts, the object of this event was to reflect on discussions currently taking place in the EU and its Member States on the future shape of Cohesion Policy, its priorities and, crucially, what its budget will be for the post-2020 period. (crossborder.ie)
  • Visiting Professor of EU Regulatory Affairs at Ulster University, Hugh Quigley, began the main part of the seminar by examining past trends in the EU budget, and where Cohesion Policy has fitted within them, before going on to consider the pressures that may exist to reduce the size of the Policy's budget, which may include the effects of the UK's withdrawal from the EU. (crossborder.ie)
  • Caitlín Conneely, Assistant Director of the North West Regional Assembly, then focused on some specific examples of how Cohesion Policy and its funds had supported cross-border and transnational projects, including a number with partners in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. (crossborder.ie)
  • CCBS Deputy Director, Dr Anthony Soares, then considered how the European Commission has indicated its willingness to support the post-Brexit continuation of the INTERREG and PEACE programmes involving Northern Ireland, but he did so by highlighting some of the views of Cohesion Policy held by UK Governments and how the cross-border dimension the EU has brought needs to be highlighted. (crossborder.ie)
  • Minister for Development, Strategic Projects and Cohesion Projects Zvonko Černač and State Secretary Monika Kirbiš Rojs attended an informal videoconference of EU Cohesion Ministers for a policy debate on the role of Cohesion Policy in the economic recovery after the COVID-19 pandemic. (gov.si)
  • EU Cohesion ministers met via videoconference to discuss the proposed amendments to the Cohesion Policy legislative package and the role of Cohesion Policy for Europe's recovery. (gov.si)
  • which reinforces the role of Cohesion Policy in the EU's recovery effort. (gov.si)
  • We believe it is important to keep the long-term nature of Cohesion Policy investments which help achieve policy objectives of the EU for a better life of all EU citizens by reducing social, economic and territorial disparities between individual regions and member states. (gov.si)
  • In this context, Slovenia is pleased that additional funding will also be earmarked for Cohesion Policy and rural development programmes, which the country has been advocating throughout the negotiations on the next long-term budget. (gov.si)
  • Minister Černač nevertheless warned that it was a challenging task for the country to strike a balance between the given flexibility to cover the immediate needs and the long-term objective of Cohesion Policy when deciding on the scope of support in the context of Cohesion Policy planning and implementation. (gov.si)
  • Accordingly, down-regulation of α5 integrin by high-grade prostate cancer cells can, in principle, disrupt matrix assembly, reduce cohesion, and facilitate the detachment of tumor cells from the mass. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Coherence and cohesion is one of four major parts that IELTS examiners consider when marking IELTS writing papers. (urch.com)
  • Therefore, it is important for candidates to understand what to consider about coherence and cohesion in order to receive a high IELTS score. (urch.com)
  • Coherence and cohesion basically mean how well your writing connects or flows together. (urch.com)
  • change some words or phrases to make the coherence and cohesion better. (urch.com)
  • Given that the country's history of long-term racial and socioeconomic segregation, we use the extent of inter-racial interactions as our main approximation of social cohesion. (afd.fr)
  • As sport performance increases with team cohesion, it is important to understand the factors influencing team cohesion. (bartleby.com)
  • We show that only wild-type α5 integrin promotes aggregate compaction, increases cohesion, and reduces invasion of the more aggressive cells, and that these effects can be blocked by the 70-kDa fibronectin fragment. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This paper aims at exploring the use of hierarchical clustering techniques to improve the measurement of cohesion of classes in object-oriented systems. (scirp.org)
  • L. Sadaoui, M. Badri and L. Badri, "Improving Class Cohesion Measurement: Towards a Novel Approach Using Hierarchical Clustering," Journal of Software Engineering and Applications , Vol. 5 No. 7, 2012, pp. 449-458. (scirp.org)
  • 1.1 This test method describes the measurement of fiber cohesion as the force required to cause initial drafting in a bundle of fibers in sliver and top. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Many different metrics have been suggested in the last several years to measure the cohesion of classes in object-oriented systems. (scirp.org)
  • Y. Zhou, B. Xu, J. Zhao and H. Yang, "ICBMC: An Improved Cohesion Measure for Classes," Proceedings of the International Conference on Software Maintenance, Montréal, 3-6 October 2002. (scirp.org)
  • We present the "Group Openness and Cohesion Questionnaire" (GOCQ) as a measure to assess these two group personality dimensions in groups independent of their context. (scirp.org)
  • Individual scores were averaged across 82 census block groups, forming a neighborhood-level measure of social cohesion. (ahajournals.org)
  • The general purpose of this dissertation was to develop an inventory designed to measure cohesion in children's (ages 9-12) sport teams. (uwo.ca)
  • antibodies-online is pleased to announce that thousands of highly sought-after Cohesion Biosciences antibodies, peptides, assay kits, and accessory reagents are immediately available for purchase in our e-marketplace. (antibodies-online.com)
  • Finally, the purpose of Study 3 was to establish construct validity for the Child Sport Cohesion Questionnaire (CSCQ) with a heterogeneous sample of children (N = 290). (uwo.ca)
  • High levels of family conflict increase the risk for early smoking initiation and smoking escalation among adolescents, while high levels of warmth and cohesion in the family are protective against smoking initiation. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)