Diseases of Old World and New World monkeys. This term includes diseases of baboons but not of chimpanzees or gorillas (= APE DISEASES).
A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.
A suborder of PRIMATES consisting of six families: CEBIDAE (some New World monkeys), ATELIDAE (some New World monkeys), CERCOPITHECIDAE (Old World monkeys), HYLOBATIDAE (gibbons and siamangs), CALLITRICHINAE (marmosets and tamarins), and HOMINIDAE (humans and great apes).
A genus of the family CEBIDAE consisting of four species: S. boliviensis, S. orstedii (red-backed squirrel monkey), S. sciureus (common squirrel monkey), and S. ustus. They inhabit tropical rain forests in Central and South America. S. sciureus is used extensively in research studies.
A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of 16 species inhabiting forests of Africa, Asia, and the islands of Borneo, Philippines, and Celebes.
A genus of the family CEBIDAE, subfamily CEBINAE, consisting of four species which are divided into two groups, the tufted and untufted. C. apella has tufts of hair over the eyes and sides of the head. The remaining species are without tufts - C. capucinus, C. nigrivultatus, and C. albifrons. Cebus inhabits the forests of Central and South America.
A family of New World monkeys in the infraorder PLATYRRHINI, consisting of nine subfamilies: ALOUATTINAE; AOTINAE; Atelinae; Callicebinae; CALLIMICONINAE; CALLITRICHINAE; CEBINAE; Pithecinae; and SAIMIRINAE. They inhabit the forests of South and Central America, comprising the largest family of South American monkeys.
A species in the family AOTIDAE, inhabiting the forested regions of Central and South America (from Panama to the Amazon). Vocalizations occur primarily at night when they are active, thus they are also known as Northern night monkeys.
A species of macaque monkey that mainly inhabits the forest of southern India. They are also called bonnet macaques or bonnet monkeys.
A genus of Old World monkeys found in Africa although some species have been introduced into the West Indies. This genus is composed of at least twenty species: C. AETHIOPS, C. ascanius, C. campbelli, C. cephus, C. denti, C. diana, C. dryas, C. erythrogaster, C. erythrotis, C. hamlyni, C. lhoesti, C. mitis, C. mona, C. neglectus, C. nictitans, C. petaurista, C. pogonias, C. preussi, C. salongo, and C. wolfi.
The family of Old World monkeys and baboons consisting of two subfamilies: CERCOPITHECINAE and COLOBINAE. They are found in Africa and part of Asia.
A species of the genus MACACA which inhabits Malaya, Sumatra, and Borneo. It is one of the most arboreal species of Macaca. The tail is short and untwisted.
A family of the New World monkeys inhabiting the forests of South and Central America. There is a single genus and several species occurring in this family, including AOTUS TRIVIRGATUS (Northern night monkeys).
A genus of the subfamily CALLITRICHINAE occurring in forests of Brazil and Bolivia and containing seventeen species.
A species of the genus ERYTHROCEBUS, subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE. It inhabits the flat open arid country of Africa. It is also known as the patas monkey or the red monkey.
An infraorder of New World monkeys, comprised of the families AOTIDAE; ATELIDAE; CEBIDAE; and PITHECIIDAE. They are found exclusively in the Americas.
Performance of complex motor acts.
Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.
Marked impairments in the development of motor coordination such that the impairment interferes with activities of daily living. (From DSM-V)
The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.
Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.
An object or a situation that can serve to reinforce a response, to satisfy a motive, or to afford pleasure.
The ability to foresee what is likely to happen on the basis of past experience. It is largely a frontal lobe function.
A scheme which provides reimbursement for the health services rendered, generally by an institution, and which provides added financial rewards if certain conditions are met. Such a scheme is intended to promote and reward increased efficiency and cost containment, with better care, or at least without adverse effect on the quality of the care rendered.
Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.
Striped GRAY MATTER and WHITE MATTER consisting of the NEOSTRIATUM and paleostriatum (GLOBUS PALLIDUS). It is located in front of and lateral to the THALAMUS in each cerebral hemisphere. The gray substance is made up of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and the lentiform nucleus (the latter consisting of the GLOBUS PALLIDUS and PUTAMEN). The WHITE MATTER is the INTERNAL CAPSULE.
A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)
The geographic area of New England in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. States usually included in this region are Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.
A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.
A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.
"The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
The anterior of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of the embryonic brain arising from the NEURAL TUBE. It subdivides to form DIENCEPHALON and TELENCEPHALON. (Stedmans Medical Dictionary, 27th ed)
A neurotoxic isoxazole (similar to KAINIC ACID and MUSCIMOL) found in AMANITA mushrooms. It causes motor depression, ataxia, and changes in mood, perceptions and feelings, and is a potent excitatory amino acid agonist.
A group of nerve cells in the SUBSTANTIA INNOMINATA that has wide projections to the NEOCORTEX and is rich in ACETYLCHOLINE and CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE. In PARKINSON DISEASE and ALZHEIMER DISEASE the nucleus undergoes degeneration.
Any situation where an animal or human is trained to respond differentially to two stimuli (e.g., approach and avoidance) under reward and punishment conditions and subsequently trained under reversed reward values (i.e., the approach which was previously rewarded is punished and vice versa).
Nerve fibers liberating acetylcholine at the synapse after an impulse.
Tissue in the BASAL FOREBRAIN inferior to the anterior perforated substance, and anterior to the GLOBUS PALLIDUS and ansa lenticularis. It contains the BASAL NUCLEUS OF MEYNERT.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
An alkaloid ester extracted from the leaves of plants including coca. It is a local anesthetic and vasoconstrictor and is clinically used for that purpose, particularly in the eye, ear, nose, and throat. It also has powerful central nervous system effects similar to the amphetamines and is a drug of abuse. Cocaine, like amphetamines, acts by multiple mechanisms on brain catecholaminergic neurons; the mechanism of its reinforcing effects is thought to involve inhibition of dopamine uptake.
Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.
Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.
Small containers or pellets of a solid drug implanted in the body to achieve sustained release of the drug.
Mathematical or statistical procedures used as aids in making a decision. They are frequently used in medical decision-making.
Implants used to reconstruct and/or cosmetically enhance the female breast. They have an outer shell or envelope of silicone elastomer and are filled with either saline or silicone gel. The outer shell may be either smooth or textured.
Altered gamma activity has been observed in many mood and cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and ... One of the earliest reports of gamma wave activity was recorded from the visual cortex of awake monkeys. Subsequently, ... This brings a distributed matrix of cognitive processes together to generate a coherent, concerted cognitive act, such as ... "Delay of cognitive gamma responses in Alzheimer's disease". Neuroimage Clin. 11: 106-115. doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2016.01.015. PMC ...
The Cognitive Role of the Globus Pallidus interna; Insights from Disease States. Experimental Brain Research, 235(5), 1455-1465 ... 15: 75-93 di Figlia, M., Pasik, P., Pasik, T. (1982) A Golgi and ultrastructural study of the monkey globus pallidus. J. Comp. ...
Volumes in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease". Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders. 35 ... Brodmann area 29 Brodmann area 30 Vogt, B. A. (1976-09-01). "Retrosplenial cortex in the rhesus monkey: a cytoarchitectonic and ... is one of the first regions to undergo pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease and its prodromal phase of mild cognitive ... In humans, fMRI studies implicate the retrosplenial cortex in a wide range of cognitive functions including episodic memory, ...
Researchers have had success creating transgenic rhesus macaque monkeys with Huntington's disease and hope to breed a second ... Research programs include cognitive development and decline, childhood visual defects, organ transplantation, the behavioral ... Primate (1974) on IMDb Primate "Goodall opposes AIDS research on monkeys: Primate expert urges government to reject use of ... at laboratories to stop testing and research on animals' IDAusa.org (pdf) - 'Experiments Conducted on Macaque Monkeys: ...
... and age related cognitive decline than those monkeys who were not placed on the calorie restricted diet. Autophagy is the major ... Problems in proper autophagy processes have been linked to diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and ... "Caloric restriction delays disease onset and mortality in rhesus monkeys". Science. 325 (5937): 201-4. Bibcode:2009Sci...325.. ... Rhesus monkeys on a calorie restricted diet had significantly less chance of developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, ...
... the monkeys were trained to perform certain behavioural and cognitive tasks, then were made to repeat them after minimally ... BUAV reported that one test for Parkinson's disease involved shutting them in a small Perspex box for up to one hour at a time ... The monkeys were usually given an extra feed on Friday afternoons, but some researchers allegedly deprived the monkeys of this ... To encourage use of the limb, the monkeys were deprived of food or water for 22 out of every 24 hours for up to two and a half ...
The following diseases and disorders are linked with the putamen: Cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease Huntington's disease ... Two monkeys were trained to press a series of buttons in sequence. The methods used were designed to be able to monitor the ... Two monkeys were trained to perform tasks that involved the movement of loads. The tasks were created so that movement could be ... In Parkinson's disease the putamen plays a key role because its inputs and outputs are interconnected to the substantia nigra ...
Molecular evolution, Genomics) Rhesus macaque (or rhesus monkey) (Macaca mulatta) - used for studies on infectious disease and ... Pigeon (Columba livia domestica), studied extensively for cognitive science and animal intelligence Poecilia reticulata, the ... Nothobranchius furzeri is studied because of their extreme short-lifespan in research on aging, disease and evolution. ...
"Regional cerebral blood flow and cognitive deficits in chronic lyme disease". The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical ... Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins induce both proliferation and apoptosis in rhesus monkey astrocytes". European Journal of ... "Lyme disease rashes and look-alikes". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 21 December 2018. Archived from ... "Lyme Disease Data and surveillance". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5 February 2019. Archived from ...
... and is relatively decreased in mild cognitive impairment and in Alzheimer's Disease (reviewed by ). New research studies are ... a model of episodic memory impairment in monkeys with fornix transection". Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 6 (4): 305-320. ... Fornix transection studies in macaques have shown that the monkeys were strongly impaired on object-in-scene learning, which is ... Hasselmo, M.E. (1999). "Neuromodulation: acetylcholine and memory consolidation". Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 101 (9): 351- ...
"Mechanisms underlying cognitive enhancement and reversal of cognitive deficits in nonhuman primates by the ampakine CX717". ... One data set went to the FDA's Division of Neurology Drug Products for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, while the other ... The study found that rhesus monkeys performed faster and better after receiving the drug, and it counteracted the effects of ... However, a 2006 study funded by DARPA found that CX717 did not improve cognitive performance in humans subjected to simulated ...
... is that depriving monkeys of sleep for 30-36 hours and then injecting them with the neurochemical alleviates the cognitive ... Researchers are using this animal model of narcolepsy to study the disease.[18] Narcolepsy results in excessive daytime ... reduces the effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance in nonhuman primates". The Journal of Neuroscience. 27 (52): ...
It has been studied for the treatment of both Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, particularly the cognitive and negative ... 1996). "PET study of the M1-agonists [11C]xanomeline and [11C]butylthio-TZTP in monkey and man". Dementia. 7 (4): 187-95. PMID ... Messer WS (2002). "The utility of muscarinic agonists in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease". Journal of Molecular ...
This proves that this method is capable of controlling brain activity at a high cognitive level. It is clear that shorter waves ... Scientists continue to test a variety of mammals such as humans, monkeys and mice on positively affecting the treatment of ... epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, coma, dystonia, psychoses and depression by applying safe, low-intensity, TPU. ... Low-intensity focused ultrasound modulates monkey visuomotor behavior. Current Biology, 23(23), 2430-2433 [1] Dillow, Clay. " ...
Monkey infants and children are for a very long time dependent on parental help. Love has therefore been seen as a mechanism to ... Their work builds on previous studies of the importance of physical contact and affection in social and cognitive development, ... Another is that sexually transmitted diseases may cause, among other effects, permanently reduced fertility, injury to the ... Miller described evolutionary psychology as a starting place for further research: "Cognitive neuroscience could try to ...
1967 - Ulric Neisser founded cognitive psychology. 1968 - George Cotzias developed the L-Dopa treatment for Parkinson's disease ... about his research on mental abilities of monkeys, introducing the term theory of mind. 1978 - The term cognitive neuroscience ... Beck AT, Rush AJ, Shaw BF, Emery G (1979). Cognitive Therapy of Depression. New York: Guilford Press. p. 8. ISBN 978-0-89862- ... 1978 - John O'Keefe and Lynn Nadel published The Hippocampus as a Cognitive Map. 1978 - E.O. Wilson published On Human Nature, ...
In Foundations of Cognitive Science, ed. MI Posner, pp. 683-725. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press Hemmer, Pernille; Steyvers, Mark ( ... The source and type of confabulations differ for each type of disease or area of traumatic damage. Selective memory involves ... monkeys, and humans" (PDF). Psychol. Rev. 99 (2): 195-231. doi:10.1037/0033-295x.99.2.195. PMID 1594723. Schacter DL. 1989. ... Reconstructive memory is a theory of memory recall, in which the act of remembering is influenced by various other cognitive ...
Huntington's disease or Parkinson's disease. Huntington's and Parkinson's disease involve both motor deficits and cognitive ... Lesions to the amygdalae in monkeys have been shown to impair motivation, as well as the processing of emotions. Pavlovian ... Parkinson's disease involves both damage to the basal ganglia and certain memory dysfunctions, suggesting that the basal ... People with Parkinson's disease display working memory impairment during sequence tasks and tasks involving events in time. ...
Barnes research spans 4 decades aiming to better understand the aging of the brain in relation to cognitive diseases. Barnes ... Her results showed that older monkeys performed better on object recognition with this interference than younger monkeys. Thus ... "Experiments in macaque monkeys provide critical insights into age-associated changes in cognitive and sensory function". ... At the BIO5 institute she works with students addressing Alzheimer's disease and other age-related brain diseases. Barnes also ...
One of her goals has been to elucidate the role of the hippocampus in the development of cognitive maps and other forms of ... Monkeys subjected to lesions caused by ischemic damage, stereotaxic radio-frequency waves, or selective neurotoxins, like ... Other work on memory function aims is to identify how changes associated with aging or disease can interfere with memory ... Some of Buffalo and her colleagues' work used lesion techniques with monkeys to better understand the role of the hippocampus ...
... the monkeys undergo extensive training before being placed with an individual needing assistance. Around the house, the monkeys ... A miniature horse can be trained to guide the blind, to pull wheelchairs, or as support for persons with Parkinson's disease. A ... or cognitive functioning Working animal-an animal that is trained to engage in productive tasks Guide horse-assistance animal ... A helper monkey is a type of assistance animal, that is specially trained to help people with quadriplegia, severe spinal cord ...
Zimmer, Carl (December 13, 2005). "Children Learn by Monkey See, Monkey Do. Chimps Don't". The New York Times. Howard, Maureen ... Bandura's "social cognitive theory" is one example of a transformational theory. Associative, or sometimes referred to as " ... Of course, the higher the severity of the disease, the lower the activity in the mirror neuron system is. Scientists debate ... Japanese monkeys have been seen to spontaneously begin washing potatoes after seeing humans washing them. Research has been ...
In humans, such lesions can also diminish some of the effects of Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Quinolinic acid ... Lesions in the pallidum can suppress effects of quinolinic acid in monkeys injected with quinolinic acid into their striatum. ... Similar to HIV patients, this increased quinolinic acid concentration correlates with cognitive and motor dysfunction. When ... of Parkinson's disease patients. SN degeneration is one of the key characteristics of Parkinson's disease. Microglia associated ...
In A. Tröster (Ed.), Memory in neurodegenerative disease (pp. 3-20). New York: Cambridge University Press.. ... or whose cognitive skills may be minimal. Comparative neuropsychology contrasts with the traditional approach of using tasks ... focused on the importance of the inferior temporal neocortex in visual discrimination learning and memory in macaque monkeys, ... Oscar-Berman, M., & Bardenhagen, F. (1998). Nonhuman primate models of memory dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease: ...
Dumas L, Sikela JM (2009). "DUF1220 domains, cognitive disease, and human brain evolution". Cold Spring Harb. Symp. Quant. Biol ... monkey: 30 locations; mouse: 1 location). It appears that the DUF1220-locations on 1q21.1 are in areas that are related to the ... Based on research on apes and other mammals, it is assumed that DUF1220 is related to cognitive development (man: 212 locations ... GJA5 has been identified as the gene that is responsible for the phenotypes observed with congenital heart diseases on the ...
... s show alterations with age and disease, such as Alzheimer's disease, which may be involved in a decrease of memory ... They have been found in a variety of animals, including rodents, bats, monkeys and humans. Place cell firing patterns are often ... Place cells are thought, collectively, to act as a cognitive representation of a specific location in space, known as a ... "What Is a Cognitive Map? Organizing Knowledge for Flexible Behavior". Neuron. 100 (2): 490-509. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2018.10. ...
Diseases[edit]. Main article: Central nervous system disease. There are many CNS diseases and conditions, including infections ... The area of the neocortex of mice is only about 1/100 that of monkeys, and that of monkeys is only about 1/10 that of humans.[ ... Apart from this the cerebral hemispheres stand for the cognitive capabilities of the brain.[8] ... late-onset neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and essential tremor, autoimmune and ...
Hippocampus Mediates Cognitive Decline in Huntingtons Disease: Study. Huntingtons disease is a neurodegenerative disorder ... A drug that would be the first to target the cause of Huntingtons disease (HD) -- a rare, hereditary disease -- has been found ... Huntingtons disease is passed from parent to child through a mutation in the HTT gene. The mutation results in the production ... Everyone who inherits the mutated gene would eventually develop the disease. In the study, IONIS-HTTRx was found to be well- ...
Declines in fine motor skills and cognitive function are well known features of human aging. Yet, the relationship between age- ... Voytko ML (1998) Nonhuman primates as models for aging and Alzheimers disease. Lab Anim Sci 48:611-617 ... Relationships among cognitive function, fine motor speed and age in the rhesus monkey. *Agnès Lacreuse. 1,2. , ... Rhesus monkeys, like humans, show marked decline in cognitive and fine motor function with age and are excellent models to ...
... in neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic problems occur long before the onset of neuronal death and cognitive impairment (50, ... 2012) Neuronal and morphological bases of cognitive decline in aged rhesus monkeys. Age (Dordr) 34(5):1051-1073. ... None of the monkeys had prior invasive or pharmacological manipulations expected to influence the cognitive or neurobiological ... 2003) Cyclic estrogen replacement improves cognitive function in aged ovariectomized rhesus monkeys. J Neurosci 23(13):5708- ...
These findings speak against structural and nonmodifiable decline in cognitive control functions, and emphasize the remedial ... These findings speak against structural and nonmodifiable decline in cognitive control functions, and emphasize the remedial ... and even more in individuals with Parkinsons disease (PD). Here we examine whether healthy seniors and PD patients are able to ... and even more in individuals with Parkinsons disease (PD). Here we examine whether healthy seniors and PD patients are able to ...
Scientists highlight the intersection of heart disease and breast cancer. * News. White House doctor: No concerns about ... Roaming Florida monkeys excrete virus that can kill you, study finds. * News ... Trumps cognitive ability. * News. Polar bears could face extinction faster than thought, study says. ...
Monkeys have also contributed a great deal to our understanding of the visual system - they were the subjects in many of the ... The term "cognitive map" was first used in a landmark 1948 paper, in which the behavioural psychologist Edward Tolman described ... Some people experience little change or none at all, while others go on to develop Alzheimers Disease or other forms of… ... Research performed on monkeys in the past 30 years or so has, for example, been invaluable in the development of brain-machine ...
"Replicating Parkinsons disease brains in the laboratory" and "Mapping brain function of monkey". ... This renders it impossible to understand cognitive processes of NHPs in a natural setting. The team led by Kondo, developed a ... skyfront-research-highlights-replicating-parkinsons-disease-brains-in-the-laboratory-and-mapping-brain-function-of-monkey- ... Replicating Parkinsons disease brains in the laboratory. Stem cell technology finds its application in elucidating Parkinsons ...
... responsible for some of the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimers disease (AD). Although memory deficits are associated ... To evaluate the effects of BFCS lesions on cognitive processes in monkeys, we have systematically investigated the behavioral ... and nucleus basalis of Meynert in cynomolgus monkeys, using a large series of cognitive tasks that examined different mnemonic ... Cognitive impairments in humans and animals have been linked to dysfunction of neurons in the basal forebrain cholinergic ...
Seay, B., & Harlow, H. F. (1965). Maternal separation in the rhesus monkey. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 140, 434. ... Watkins, J. T., & Rush, A. J. (1983). The Cognitive Response Test. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 7, 425-436.CrossRefGoogle ... Taylor, F. G., & Marshall, W. L. (1977). Experimental analysis of a cognitive behavioral therapy for depression. Cognitive ... Development of an instrument to measure Becks cognitive triad: The Cognitive Triad Inventory. Journal of Consulting and ...
Are abnormal intestinal microorganisms a risk factor for developing cognitive impairment? Researchers at Rush University ... "One of the biggest challenges facing Alzheimers disease is that the disease process begins more than a decade before the onset ... Chinese researchers add human brain-related gene to monkey genome in controversial experiment. Apr 11, 2019 ... Eating away at cognitive decline: MIND diet may slow brain from aging by 7.5 years. Aug 04, 2015 ...
HealthDay)-Cognitive disability is the most prevalent disability type among young adults, while middle-aged and older adults ... 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. ... Chinese researchers add human brain-related gene to monkey genome in controversial experiment. Apr 11, 2019 ... HealthDay)-Cognitive disability is the most prevalent disability type among young adults, while middle-aged and older adults ...
... polarization is known to influence cognitive function and has therefore become a main player in neurodegenerative diseases ... As the life span of human beings increases, so does the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction. Thus, therapeutic strategies aimed ... As the life span of human beings increases, so does the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction. Thus, therapeutic strategies aimed ... polarization is known to influence cognitive function and has therefore become a main player in neurodegenerative diseases ...
"Sheep can perform executive cognitive tasks that have never been shown to exist in any other large animals apart from monkeys. ... "This means they have great potential for studying cognitive function as well as being a model of Huntingtons Disease." ... When she swapped the food into a different coloured bucket the sheep then adapted in the same amount of time as monkeys and ... The sheep learned this in about the same space of time it takes monkeys and humans to conquer comparable tests - after about ...
... is part a series of tests given to the sheep to monitor their cognitive abilities. ... Huntingtons disease affects more than 6,700 people in the UK. It is an incurable neurodegenerative disease that typically ... "Sheep are long-lived and have brains that are similar in size and complexity to those of some monkeys. That means they can be ... is part a series of tests given to the sheep to monitor their cognitive abilities. Because of the relatively large size of ...
Comparing with the pathological hallmark granulo-vacuolar degenerations in Alzheimers disease, the postischemic monkey ... 2003) Silent brain infarcts and the risk of dementia and cognitive decline. N Engl J Med 348: 1215-1222. ... Monkey experiments: After an anesthetic overdose, the monkeys were intracardially perfused with 0.5 L of saline followed by 2 L ... Monkeys: On day 3 after transient whole brain ischemia, the CA1 neurons showed shrinkage of the cell body and pyknosis of the ...
A variety of established behavioral and cognitive tests are used to assess the monkeys. One such test is the HD primate model ... The new monkey models put HD research on the cusp of major breakthroughs for both understanding and treating the disease. ... For these reasons, monkeys will probably be better models for monitoring disease progression and the effectiveness of ... Though the research is unpublished, the new group of monkeys model HD even better, reflecting a delayed onset of the disease ...
Active Recombinant rhesus monkey IL-4 protein (Active) is an Escherichia coli Full length protein 25 to 153 aa range, 1.000 Eu/ ... Involvement in disease. Genetic variations in IL4 may be a cause of susceptibility to ischemic stroke (ISCHSTR) [MIM:601367]; ... sensory and/or cognitive function. Ischemic strokes, resulting from vascular occlusion, is considered to be a highly complex ... Recombinant rhesus monkey IL-4 protein (Active). See all IL-4 proteins and peptides. ...
Researchers have used a neural implant to recapture a lost decision-making process in monkeys-demonstrating that a neural ... While the results of todays study may take many years to translate into humans, they suggest that even cognitive processes, ... implants could one day be used to recover specific brain functions in patients with brain injuries or localized brain disease. ... The five monkeys in the study were trained to play a matching game in which they were shown an image on a screen and then had ...
Shorter telomeres are linked to higher risks for heart disease, obesity, cognitive decline, diabetes, mental illness and poor ... Is the Will to Work Out Genetically Determined? First monkeys with customized mutations born. Niu et al., Cell Twin cynomolgus ... And, while we might feel sorry for the little lab mice, these little creatures are helping us better understand disease so we ... For years, scientists relied on animals as models for human disease. Initially, we used fruit flies and roundworms as models ...
Altered gamma activity has been observed in many mood and cognitive disorders such as Alzheimers disease, epilepsy, and ... One of the earliest reports of gamma wave activity was recorded from the visual cortex of awake monkeys. Subsequently, ... This brings a distributed matrix of cognitive processes together to generate a coherent, concerted cognitive act, such as ... "Delay of cognitive gamma responses in Alzheimers disease". Neuroimage Clin. 11: 106-115. doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2016.01.015. PMC ...
Therapeutic uses of cognitive enhancers in rat and monkey models of drug addiction. Bríd Á Nic Dhonnchadha, Boston Univ.. ... Sleep apnea as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. T. Douglas Bradley, Univ. of Toronto/Mount Sinai Hosp.. Sleep apnea ... Targets for cognitive-enhancing pharmacotherapy. Joseph G. Wettstein, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.. Translational approaches to ... Cognitive enhancers for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Boston Convention Center, Room 108. 9:30 AM - Noon. ...
The investigators are now studying the onset of the disease and its behavioral and cognitive effects, with the goal of using ... First Transgenic Monkey Model of Huntingtons Disease. May 19th, 2008 Editors News ... More from the NIH press release: Researchers Develop First Transgenic Monkey Model of Huntingtons Disease…. Abstract: Towards ... The Emory research team developed this transgenic monkey model by introducing altered forms of the Huntington gene into monkey ...
... vaccination with Alzheimers Abeta might reduce senile plaque load and stabilize cognitive decline in human Alzheimers disease ... rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were vaccinated with aggregated Abeta(1-42). Immunized monkeys developed anti-Abeta titers ... rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were vaccinated with aggregated Abeta(1-42). Immunized monkeys developed anti-Abeta titers ... vaccination with Alzheimers Abeta might reduce senile plaque load and stabilize cognitive decline in human Alzheimers disease ...
The Cognitive Role of the Globus Pallidus interna; Insights from Disease States. Experimental Brain Research, 235(5), 1455-1465 ... 15: 75-93 di Figlia, M., Pasik, P., Pasik, T. (1982) A Golgi and ultrastructural study of the monkey globus pallidus. J. Comp. ...
The monkey trials are expected to last two years, and the goal is to get to a stage where they are able to test the vaccine on ... So it is vital that we develop low-cost, large-scale strategies to protect people against this devastating disease. ... Alzheimers is the worlds most common cognitive disorder and it already affects 35.6 million people. ... Over at the Telegraph we find the news that Brazilian scientists are to test an AIDS vaccine on monkeys. ...
Automated Computer Based Cognitive Testing. We have a suite of four testing chambers in which monkeys are behaviorally assessed ... and neurotransmitter correlates of cognitive decline in aging and age-related disease (e.g. hypertension and stroke), the ... aged human and monkey. Binding patterns for alpha-1 receptors in the pre-frontal cortex of a young and aged rhesus monkey. ... 2017). Microglia activation and phagocytosis: relationship with aging and cognitive impairment in the rhesus monkey. ...
... phase of Parkinsons disease. I will show evidence for evolution in feedback potentials that are not related to cognitive ... developing our understanding of cognitive control and its neurophysiological markers using electrophysiology in macaque monkeys ... What are the neurophysiological markers of cognitive control, and can they be used to indicate the early stage of a ... Flexibility and efficiency of behaviour involves monitoring performance and changing levels of cognitive control in order to ...
Caloric restriction delays disease onset and mortality in rhesus monkeys. Science. 2009;325:201-4 pubmed publisher ... A key to healthy longevity is the prevention, postponement, and potential recovery from physical and cognitive deficits at ... One simple reason why a single drug is indicated for so many age-related diseases is that it inhibits the aging process. .. ... Synergistic effects of GDNF and VEGF on lifespan and disease progression in a familial ALS rat model. Mol Ther. 2013;21:1602-10 ...
98) reported on the cognitive and motor impairments of a group of monkeys infected with SIV. Prior to infection, the monkeys ... Induction of AIDS-like disease in macaque monkeys with T-cell tropic retrovirus STLV-III. Science 230:71-73. ... Cognitive and motor impairments associated with SIV infection in rhesus monkeys. Science 255:1246-1249. ... The SIV-infected rhesus monkey model for HIV-associated dementia and implications for neurological disease. J. Leukoc. Biol. 65 ...
Also as in humans, monkeys lose bone mass during aging. In its most extreme form, this constitutes the disease osteoporosis. ... Estrogens may also protect, to some extent, against memory (cognitive) loss in many primate species. Menopausal monkeys have ... All anthropoids (monkeys, apes and humans) are diurnal with one exception: the owl monkey from South America. Monkeys occur in ... Spider monkeys, marmosets, and capuchins are examples of New World monkeys.. Apes-the group of primates most closely related to ...
  • Camicioli R, Howieson D, Oken B et al (1998) Motor slowing precedes cognitive impairment in the oldest old. (springer.com)
  • Aged ovariectomized monkeys treated with vehicle displayed significant working memory impairment and a concomitant 44% increase in presynaptic donut-shaped mitochondria, both of which were reversed with cyclic estradiol treatment. (pnas.org)
  • Are abnormal intestinal microorganisms a risk factor for developing cognitive impairment? (medicalxpress.com)
  • Microglial inflammatory dysfunction, also linked to microglial senescence, has been extensively demonstrated and associated with cognitive impairment in neuropathological conditions related to aging. (frontiersin.org)
  • Here we review recent data on these approaches and propose that their combination could have a synergistic effect to counteract cognitive aging impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD) through immunomodulation of microglia polarization, i.e., by driving the shift of activated microglia from the pro-inflammatory M1 to the neuroprotective M2 phenotype. (frontiersin.org)
  • The purpose of this paper is to review recent work on the effects of masticatory impairment on cognitive functions both in experimental animals and humans. (medsci.org)
  • In this paper, we review investigations of the relationship between masticatory capacity and age-related cognitive impairment. (medsci.org)
  • Although the impairment of self-recognition in patients implies the existence of cognitive/neurological deficits in self-processing brain mechanisms, our finding raised the possibility that such deficits might be remedied via training," they write. (phys.org)
  • Florbetapir appears useful for predicting whether seniors with mild cognitive impairment were likely to decline further, as reported in a separate talk at ICAD by Reisa Sperling of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. (alzforum.org)
  • Dementia is a general term to describe the impairment of cognitive functions such as memory, thinking, and communication. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an early stage of dementia, but some people with MCI do not develop Alzheimer's disease . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Here, we review animal models relevant to vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Mental agility in women deteriorates at twice the rate of that in men, according to a study of people with mild cognitive impairment. (the-scientist.com)
  • Small, New World monkeys called marmosets can mimic the sleep disturbances, changes in circadian rhythm, and cognitive impairment people with Parkinson's disease develop, according to a new study by scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute. (brightsurf.com)
  • And Davies's colleague Amanda Hornsby found that, in a study of 28 volunteers, people with Parkinson's dementia - cognitive impairment caused by Parkinson's disease - have lower levels of ghrelin in their blood than people who don't have the condition. (newscientist.com)
  • Back home in New Jersey, I read through dozens of human and animal studies published over the past five years showing that nicotine-freed of its noxious host, tobacco, and delivered instead by chewing gum or transdermal patch-may prove to be a weirdly, improbably effective cognitive enhancer and treatment for relieving or preventing a variety of neurological disorders, including Parkinson's, mild cognitive impairment, ADHD, Tourette's, and schizophrenia. (scientificamerican.com)
  • These three letters stand for "mild cognitive impairment," believed to be an early stage of Alzheimer's disease. (aafp.org)
  • Sturm's team scanned the brains of 237 older people: 62 with mild cognitive impairment (a precursor to Alzheimer's), 64 with Alzheimer's disease, and 111 healthy controls. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Neuropsychological Findings Preceding Alzheimer's dementia in English Individuals with Cognitive Impairment. (bio.net)
  • Degeneration of these cells may be, in part, responsible for some of the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). (jneurosci.org)
  • Although memory deficits are associated with lesions of the BFCS in rats, impairments in memory have been more subtle following similar lesions in monkeys. (jneurosci.org)
  • Explore in this one-day symposium new scientific understanding related to the neurobiology of mental illnesses - including talks on historical perspectives, patient-derived brain-based mechanistic studies, guided therapeutic target selection, mechanisms of motivational and cognitive deficits, clinical staging in psychiatry, the genetic architecture of psychiatric disorders, and more. (nyas.org)
  • I will show evidence for evolution in feedback potentials that are not related to cognitive deficits, and evidence for changes in beta oscillatory patterns that appear to be linked to motivation and attentional effort. (ugent.be)
  • We show that several mechanisms may be involved in the cognitive deficits associated with masticatory deficiency. (medsci.org)
  • The present study provides additional support for the use of subtype-selective nAChR ligands as a potential therapy for the symptomatic treatment of specific cognitive deficits (such as attention/working memory deficits) associated with aging and neurological diseases. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Furthermore, as with any animal model for dementia, the behavioural-cognitive phenotype of any given model can never fully represent human cognitive deficits. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, it is largely unknown how neuronal mechanisms in these structures provide a physiological basis for the deficits occurring in human diseases and in experimentally lesioned animals. (europa.eu)
  • However, it remains unknown how these alterations are related to cognitive deficits in individuals, as such graphs are restricted to group-level analysis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We seek to develop embryonic stem cell based therapies so as to reverse the effects of brain lesions leading to the motor and cognitive deficits found in neurological disease including Parkinson's. (sbri.fr)
  • Yet, the relationship between age-related impairments in motor and cognitive function remains unclear. (springer.com)
  • Emborg ME, Ma SY, Mufson EJ et al (1998) Age-related declines in nigral neuronal function correlate with motor impairments in rhesus monkeys. (springer.com)
  • Cognitive impairments in humans and animals have been linked to dysfunction of neurons in the basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS). (jneurosci.org)
  • Initially, the disease affects motor coordination, mood, personality and memory, as well as other complex symptoms including impairments in recognising facial emotion. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Macaques develop age-associated cognitive/memory impairments as well as brain abnormalities (particularly senile plaques) similar to those occurring in the brains of older humans and individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). (springer.com)
  • Monkeys are initially behaviorally tested to assess their memory and cognitive functions, after which the brains are examined to determine the structural, neurochemical and functional changes that may account for age-related cognitive impairments. (wisc.edu)
  • It can also be used for the prevention and treatment of cognitive impairments associated with Alzheimer's disease or schizophrenia. (addicusbooks.com)
  • These disease states manifest in a spectrum of cognitive impairments. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Researchers from the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered that the activation of brain cells called microglia likely contributes to the memory loss and other cognitive impairments suffered by many patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). (brightsurf.com)
  • Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, currently afflicting an estimated 5.7 million people in the United States, and has the highest drug/treatment failure rate of any disease. (medicalxpress.com)
  • In fact, microglia polarization is known to influence cognitive function and has therefore become a main player in neurodegenerative diseases leading to dementia. (frontiersin.org)
  • Professor Morton, whose research is published in the journal Public Library of Science One, was studying sheep intelligence in the hope that they may be useful as an animal model of Huntington's Disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to dementia and affects muscle control. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • This dementia, known as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) or AIDS dementia complex, is characterized by a progressive deterioration of affective, cognitive, and motor skills. (asm.org)
  • Background Dementia is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) but measures that track cognitive change in PD are lacking. (bmj.com)
  • Dementia affects up to 50% of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) 1 but patients vary in the timing and severity of cognitive involvement and useful quantitative tools to track cognitive change in PD are required. (bmj.com)
  • The tracks can no longer stay straight, and this leads to not only dementia , but numerous other neurodegenerative diseases - including progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The cognitive decline associated with dementia is progressive, and people may go through different stages. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Doctors diagnose dementia in around 10 million people every year, and 60-70% of these new diagnoses detect Alzheimer's disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Several cognitive tests can assess dementia, but recently, researchers have been exploring the potential of new technologies to monitor the condition. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Despite decades of study, there is to date no disease-modifying therapy against AD in particular or dementia in general. (j-alz.com)
  • The investigators studied the effects of specifically killing cholinergic neurons in the well-differentiated prefrontal cortex of rhesus monkeys, providing an approximation of the effects of reduced acetylcholine in human Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. (sciencemag.org)
  • explains why other forms of dementia with greater cholinergic neuron loss, such as Lewy body disease, are associated with working memory dysfunction. (sciencemag.org)
  • Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the aged population and is accompanied by extensive neuron loss, particularly in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, with concomitant progressive cognitive decline. (aspetjournals.org)
  • In fact, people with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), caused by degeneration in the brain's frontal lobe, seem to change in the opposite direction, becoming more aloof as the disease progresses. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • A drug that was initially used as an antihistamine in Russia in the 1980s and went on to show promise -- but then failure -- as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease, might have an anti-dementia role after all. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Researchers at Rush University Medical Center are trying to answer that question with a new, National Institute on Aging-funded study that will explore how the intestinal microbiota-the bacteria in the intestine-influence the progression of cognitive decline and the development of Alzheimer's disease. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Therefore, a dietary intervention provides a perfect platform to study how alterations in the intestinal microbiome influence the aging brain, cognition, and Alzheimer's disease development. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The proposed research is significant because it will, for the first time, provide a mechanistic understanding of how the microbiome contributes to preclinical Alzheimer's disease. (medicalxpress.com)
  • There is a substantial body of literature suggesting that a healthy diet is beneficial for Alzheimer's disease prevention. (medicalxpress.com)
  • This study will be the first that seeks to provide evidence pointing to diet-induced effects on the microbiome as a critical factor that influences age-associated cognitive decline and the development of Alzheimer's disease. (medicalxpress.com)
  • One of the biggest challenges facing Alzheimer's disease is that the disease process begins more than a decade before the onset of clinically detectable symptoms. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Altered gamma activity has been observed in many mood and cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comparing with the pathological hallmark 'granulo-vacuolar degenerations' in Alzheimer's disease , the postischemic monkey neurons were carefully observed with microscope. (omicsonline.org)
  • Recent preliminary data suggest that vaccination with Alzheimer's Abeta might reduce senile plaque load and stabilize cognitive decline in human Alzheimer's disease. (uzh.ch)
  • Accumulation of the protein tau directly correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease and other primary tauopathies. (sciencemag.org)
  • We examined serum and erythrocyte lead and manganese levels in the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Flagship Study of Ageing (AIBL), which contains over 1000 registrants including over 200 cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 100 mildly cognitively impaired (MCI) individuals. (rsc.org)
  • 6 However, the proposed mechanism of manganese neurotoxicity stems from its ability to induce heightened oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, 7 which is not necessarily specific to the degenerating dopaminergic neurons common to Parkinson's disease and may be involved in other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). (rsc.org)
  • Bahmanyar S, Higgins GA, Goldgaber D, Lewis DA, Morrison JH, Wilson MC, Shankar SK, Gajdusek DC (1987) Localization of amyloid β-protein messenger RNA in brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease. (springer.com)
  • Cork LC, Sternberger NH, Sternberger LA, Casanova MF, Strubie RG, Price DL (1986) Phosphorylated neurofilament antigens in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. (springer.com)
  • Glenner GG (1983) Alzheimer's disease: multiple cerebral amyloidosis. (springer.com)
  • Biological aspects of Alzheimer's disease. (springer.com)
  • Goedert M (1987) Neuronal localization of amyloid beta protein precursor mRNA in normal human brain and in Alzheimer's disease. (springer.com)
  • Goldgaber D, Lerman MI, McBride OW, Saffiotti U, Gajdusek DC (1987) Characterization and chromosomal localization of a cDNA encoding brain amyloid of Alzheimer's disease. (springer.com)
  • Next steps, according to Berger and Deadwyler, will be attempts to duplicate the rat results in primates (monkeys), with the aim of eventually creating prostheses that might help the human victims of Alzheimer's disease, stroke or injury recover function. (eurekalert.org)
  • Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative illness that affects millions of people in the United States. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Alzheimer's disease affects more than 5 million U.S. adults, according to the National Institute on Aging. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This indicates that they functioned better socially, cognitively, and had superior motor skills - functions that are frequently impaired in people with Alzheimer's disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The epidemiological data suggest a positive correlation between masticatory deficit and Alzheimer's disease. (medsci.org)
  • The findings in monkeys come as hopeful news for people who are unable to recognize themselves in the mirror due to brain disorders such as mental retardation, autism, schizophrenia, or Alzheimer's disease, the researchers say. (phys.org)
  • Even the skies of Honolulu, which hosts the Alzheimer's Association's International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease (ICAD) from 10-15 July 2010, could not have been sunnier than the presentation of Phase 3 histopathology data reported Sunday by Christopher Clark of Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (alzforum.org)
  • Remember Rember®-the blue dye that made headlines in 2008 when Phase 2 clinical trial data suggested it slowed decline in people with Alzheimer's disease (see ARF related news story )? (alzforum.org)
  • Brain scans of people with a genetic mutation that causes early onset Alzheimer's disease. (sciencemag.org)
  • Solanezumab failed to slow cognitive decline in two trials with more than 2000 people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. (sciencemag.org)
  • However, the company said in a statement, a secondary analysis that combined data from both trials indicated that the drug did slow cognitive decline in people with mild Alzheimer's disease. (sciencemag.org)
  • We give an overview of past and ongoing research relating to healthy subjects as well as different categories of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, brain tumours, epilepsy and schizophrenia and refer to other relevant websites, papers and books. (kpn.nl)
  • This pattern has been demonstrated in disorders like Alzheimer's disease, brain tumours and schizophrenia. (kpn.nl)
  • In Alzheimer's disease the key nodes of the network the so-called "hubs", are affected more severely than other parts. (kpn.nl)
  • Perhaps Alzheimer's disease is a hub disorder? (kpn.nl)
  • New research that aimed to highlight the potential of new technologies to diagnose disease has suggested that virtual reality may play a crucial role in monitoring Alzheimer's disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • it is also one of the first regions of the brain that Alzheimer's disease damages. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • To look for biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in people with MCI, the researchers took samples of their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • These results suggest a VR test of navigation may be better at identifying early Alzheimer's disease than tests we use at present in the clinic and in research studies," says Dennis Chan, Ph.D., who led the team. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • We live in a world where mobile devices are almost ubiquitous, and so app-based approaches have the potential to diagnose Alzheimer's disease at minimal extra cost and at a scale way beyond that of brain scanning and other current diagnostic approaches. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The compound was further evaluated (in μg/kg-low mg/kg doses) along with nicotine (as a reference compound) and the Alzheimer's disease treatment donepezil in a distractor version of a delayed match to sample task (DMTS-D) in aged monkeys (mean age = 21.8 years). (nih.gov)
  • Preclinical and clinical data have suggested the potential use of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands for treating cognitive dysfunction associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and it is one of the greatest health-care challenges of the 21st century. (j-alz.com)
  • These findings have implications for the pharmacologic treatment of Alzheimer's disease by suggesting that the increase of acetylcholine in the prefrontal cortex can only be expected to improve working memory rather than all of the diverse cognitive functions of that brain region. (sciencemag.org)
  • This finding highlights the need to identify other neurotransmitter systems that mediate cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease so that a multimodal pharmacologic approach can be developed. (sciencemag.org)
  • In Alzheimer's disease its production is diminish. (ukessays.com)
  • Methods of treating Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies are disclosed. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • In particular, the invention relates to methods of treating Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies with inhibitors of microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK). (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Hyperphosphorylation of tau by MARK is associated with the pathogenic deposition of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and loss of synaptic markers, dendritic spines, and synapses during progression of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Single-subject grey matter graphs in Alzheimer's disease. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Coordinated patterns of cortical morphology have been described as structural graphs and previous research has demonstrated that properties of such graphs are altered in Alzheimer's disease (AD). (biomedsearch.com)
  • Beta amyloid protein, believed by many to cause Alzheimer's disease, halted nerve damage in animal models of multiple sclerosis. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Experiments in the lab of Lawrence Steinman, MD, at Stanford University showed that the protein - considered by many scientists to cause Alzheimer's disease - altered immune cell activity in the mice. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Researchers led by Sam Gandy, MD, PhD, of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, found that mice bred to develop early Alzheimer's disease treated with latrepirdine (also known as dimebon) had an arrest in behavioral decline, improvements in learning behaviors, and no progression of neuropathology. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Although initial clinical studies with the drug in Alzheimer's disease were encouraging, a phase III trial in the U.S. showed no effect. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that results in involuntary spastic movement and loss control of voluntary motor function and the patients also exhibit a decline in cognitive ability. (medindia.net)
  • Rhesus monkeys, like humans, show marked decline in cognitive and fine motor function with age and are excellent models to investigate potential interactions between age-related declines in cognitive and motor functioning. (springer.com)
  • These findings speak against structural and non-modifiable decline in cognitive control functions, and emphasize the remedial potential of motivational incentive mechanisms in healthy as well as pathological aging. (frontiersin.org)
  • Healthy aging is characterized by a gradual decline in cognitive function. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Medical treatment for endometriosis is useful and commonly a feeling of well-being in the liver and eliminated mainly by a decline in cognitive psychology, controlled processing, discrete processing, distributed cognition, making purposeful communication possible as a disease is not able to reliably discriminate between speech and writing. (bigsurlandtrust.org)
  • To evaluate the effects of BFCS lesions on cognitive processes in monkeys, we have systematically investigated the behavioral effects of ibotenic acid injections in the medial septum, nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca, and nucleus basalis of Meynert in cynomolgus monkeys, using a large series of cognitive tasks that examined different mnemonic and attentional abilities. (jneurosci.org)
  • A variety of established behavioral and cognitive tests are used to assess the monkeys. (stanford.edu)
  • The investigators are now studying the onset of the disease and its behavioral and cognitive effects, with the goal of using the monkey model to better understand disease mechanisms and to design therapies. (medgadget.com)
  • Research programs include cognitive development and decline, childhood visual defects, organ transplantation, the behavioral effects of hormone replacement therapy and social behaviors of primates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Behavioral assessment in the African green monkey after MPTP Administration. (yale.edu)
  • The Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences (BCS) of the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences supports research to develop and advance scientific knowledge on human cognition, language, social behavior and culture, as well as research on the interactions between human societies and the physical environment. (nsf.gov)
  • Given the greater genetic similarity to humans than other model organisms such as a mouse, the vervet is a great genetic model for studying high-level cognitive/behavioral traits, such as novelty-seeking, intruder avoidance, and also primate-specific diseases, such as simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). (globus.org)
  • A new drug IONIS-HTTRx was found to be well-tolerated without any dose-limiting side effects, in the experiments conducted on rodents and monkeys. (medindia.net)
  • For example, changes in the intestinal microbiota can influence anxiety- and depression-like symptoms in rodents and can promote brain pathology in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Scientists at the University of Cambridge have found that the creatures have the brainpower to equal rodents, monkeys and, in some tests, even humans. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • When we then changed the rules they still performed as well as monkeys and better than rodents. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • When she swapped the food into a different coloured bucket the sheep then adapted in the same amount of time as monkeys and rodents typically do. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Monkeys are more genetically similar to humans than rodents. (stanford.edu)
  • Monkeys have larger brains than rodents, so neural changes can be monitored more accurately. (stanford.edu)
  • The use of monkeys in research sparks public interest more than rodents, which can bring both positive and negative attention to transgenic primate research and HD animal model research in general. (stanford.edu)
  • SIB-1553A, (±)-4-{[2-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)ethyl]thio}phenol hydrochloride, a novel nAChR ligand with predominant agonist subtype selectivity for β4 subunit-containing human neuronal nAChRs, was tested in a variety of cognitive paradigms in aged rodents and nonhuman primates after acute and repeated administration. (aspetjournals.org)
  • CMV also can infect animals, including rodents and rhesus macaque monkeys and other non-human primates. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Most of the early studies in Parkinson's have been conducted with rodents," Dr. Daadi explained, "but there are some complex aspects of this disease you simply cannot investigate using rodents in a way that is relevant to human patients. (txbiomed.org)
  • It's a rudimentary imitation skill, present not only in adults but newborn babies, who cry in response to cries of other babies, as well as monkeys, rodents, and birds. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • CMV is related to the herpes viruses that cause chicken pox and mononucleosis, and in most people, it results in mild to no symptoms of disease when they acquire an infection. (healthcanal.com)
  • Braver TS, Barch DM, Cohen JD (2002) The role of prefrontal cortex in normal and disordered cognitive control: a cognitive neuroscience perspective. (springer.com)
  • The first cohort of five gene-edited monkey clones made from fibroblasts of a monkey with disease phenotypes were born recently at the Institute of Neuroscience (ION) of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in Shanghai. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • We investigated the relationships among cognition, motor function and age in 30 male and female rhesus monkeys, 5-28 years of age, tested on a battery of cognitive tasks [acquisition of the delayed non-matching-to-sample (DNMS), DNMS-120s, DNMS-600s, acquisition of delayed recognition span test (DRST), spatial-DRST and object-DRST] and a fine motor task (Lifesaver test). (springer.com)
  • Chen G-H, Wang Y-J, Zhang L-Q et al (2004) Age- and sex-related disturbance in a battery of sensorimotor and cognitive tasks in Kunming mice. (springer.com)
  • Impaired cognitive anticipation has been observed in several cognitive control tasks such as the antisaccade task and in task switching tasks. (frontiersin.org)
  • In our tests they performed at a level very similar to monkeys and humans in the initial learning tasks. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Sheep can perform executive cognitive tasks that have never been shown to exist in any other large animals apart from monkeys. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Deadwyler suspects that a generalized pattern for particular tasks could be generated even in humans (as has been demonstrated in rats), so that an injured patient could receive an implant encoded with a cognitive mathematical model that was previously derived from healthy brains. (nextbigfuture.com)
  • We have a suite of four testing chambers in which monkeys are behaviorally assessed on a wide range of cognitive tasks that parallel those used in humans. (bu.edu)
  • A-582941 bound with nanomolar affinity to rat and human α7 receptors and showed positive effects on several behavior tasks that tested cognitive performance in mice, rats, and monkeys. (jneurosci.org)
  • Heart rate number and the area of pupil were measured in the monkey on the above-mentioned tasks, but any special findings were not obtained. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Atomoxetine (depending on the dose) improved accuracy (sustained attention) as well as behaviors related to impulsivity, compulsivity and cognitive inflexibility in both the vSD and vITI tasks and it improved spatial reference memory in the RAM. (nih.gov)
  • Animal studies have found that a little daily stress may enhance neuronal and synaptic function, promote neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and improve cognitive performance in certain tasks [13]. (j-alz.com)
  • This issue will be investigated by behavioural experiments, by neurophysiological recordings in behaving animals during specific learning situations, by imaging studies of humans performing learning tasks, and by neuropsychological investigations of human patients suffering from basal ganglia diseases. (europa.eu)
  • The experiments will be done with lesions of specific nuclei of the basal ganglia of rats and monkeys which learn and perform specific tasks involving basal ganglia mechanisms of reward processing and procedural motor and habit learning. (europa.eu)
  • In addition, scientists videotaped the animals to monitor their ability to perform certain tasks and how those abilities were impacted over time by the disease. (txbiomed.org)
  • Chudasama Y, Robbins TW (2006) Functions of frontostriatal systems in cognition: comparative neuropsychopharmacological studies in rats, monkeys and humans. (springer.com)
  • The term "cognitive map" was first used in a landmark 1948 paper, in which the behavioural psychologist Edward Tolman described his now famous studies of rats in mazes. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Where non clinical pharmacokinetic testing done in rat, dogs and monkey by IV and oral administration, show good bioavailability approximately 1oo% in rats, 55% in dogs and 70% in monkey half life was 6 hour in rats and 10 hour in monkey. (ukessays.com)
  • For example, healthy older humans, monkeys and rats all show poorer spatial, recognition and working memory, than do their younger counterparts. (gatech.edu)
  • Rats and monkeys do not develop age-related pathology such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases, which makes them good models for assessing functional alterations associated with normal aging in humans. (gatech.edu)
  • I will explain how we are developing our understanding of cognitive control and its neurophysiological markers using electrophysiology in macaque monkeys. (ugent.be)
  • citation needed] Researchers have had success creating transgenic rhesus macaque monkeys with Huntington's disease and hope to breed a second generation of macaques with the genetic disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • This major advance, reported on-line in two articles in the journal National Science Review on January 24, demonstrates that a population of customized gene-edited macaque monkeys with uniform genetic background will soon be available for biomedical research. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • In an earlier study, coauthor Peter Barry of the University California at Davis found that infection of a macaque fetus directly through the abdomen resulted in a similar disease to that in humans. (healthcanal.com)
  • The researchers recorded the electric activity of single neurons both in humans and in macaque monkeys in two regions: the pre-frontal cortex, where higher functions like decision making and rational thinking occur, and the amygdala, a more evolutionarily ancient region that is responsible for the "fight or flight" basic survival functions, as well as emotions. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • As the second Old World Monkey sequenced (the first being Rhesus macaque), vervets, unlike the great apes who are mostly in near-extinction status, are widely available* for biomedical research. (globus.org)
  • Macaque monkeys have the anatomy for human speech, so why can't they speak? (kurzweilai.net)
  • In addition to physical tests, non-invasive fMRI procedures are used to monitor neurodegeneration , and intranuclear huntingtin inclusions , as well as other features of the disease at the neural level. (stanford.edu)
  • These stem cells can be coaxed into becoming neurons , which could then demonstrate the neural symptoms of the disease. (stanford.edu)
  • Ethical concerns have prevented the development of a similar human germline, so the transgenic rhesus monkeys provide both an in vivo and in vitro avenue to study the neural progression of HD. (stanford.edu)
  • A stroke is an acute neurologic event leading to death of neural tissue of the brain and resulting in loss of motor, sensory and/or cognitive function. (abcam.com)
  • Technology Review - Researchers have used a neural implant to recapture a lost decision-making process in monkeys-demonstrating that a neural prosthetic can recover cognitive function in a primate brain. (nextbigfuture.com)
  • The results suggest that neural implants could one day be used to recover specific brain functions in patients with brain injuries or localized brain disease. (nextbigfuture.com)
  • These integrated experimental modeling studies show for the first time that with sufficient information about the neural coding of memories, a neural prosthesis capable of real-time identification and manipulation of the encoding process can restore and even enhance cognitive mnemonic processes," says the paper. (eurekalert.org)
  • The discovery in monkeys sheds light on the neural basis of self-awareness in humans and other animals. (phys.org)
  • The findings of this research provided support for the "washing machine" theory of brain evolution: The neural code in the "more evolved" pre-frontal cortex is more efficient than the amygdala, both in humans and monkeys. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • It is probable that the combination of long lifespan and high neural activity makes humans particularly vulnerable to neurodegenerative disease," said Mario Caceres, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow now at Emory University and lead investigator on the study. (innovations-report.com)
  • Lead author Anthony Chan, who is also associate professor of human genetics at Emory University School of Medicine, said: 'It was important to recapitulate progressive changes in clinical measurements, such as cognitive behaviors and neural anatomical changes as the Huntington's disease monkeys age. (barchester.com)
  • He is also recognized for his work in the neurobiology of cognitive aging and was Program Director for 15 years of a long-standing NIH Program Project studying the neural bases of cognitive decline using the rhesus monkey as a model of normal human aging. (bu.edu)
  • Because information is represented by activity patterns across large populations of neurons, an understanding of the neural basis of cognitive changes in aging requires the examination of the dynamics of behaviorally-driven neural networks. (gatech.edu)
  • Arnsten AF, Goldman-Rakic PS (1985) Alpha 2-adrenergic mechanisms in prefrontal cortex associated with cognitive decline in aged nonhuman primates. (springer.com)
  • Human and nonhuman primates are vulnerable to age- and menopause-related decline in working memory, a cognitive function reliant on the energy-demanding excitation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons. (pnas.org)
  • Humans and nonhuman primates are vulnerable to age- and menopause-related decline in working memory, a cognitive function reliant on the energy-demanding recurrent excitation of neurons within Brodmann's Area 46 of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). (pnas.org)
  • Non-human primates (NHP) have very similar social and cognitive processing to humans. (websitegear.com)
  • The Laboratory of Cognitive Neurobiology focuses its research efforts on the neurobiological bases of learning and memory in non-human primates. (bu.edu)
  • The second suborder, the Haplorhini, comprises the primates of the remaining three taxa, which exhibit predominantly diurnal habits (with the exception of tarsiers and one monkey species), enhanced vision and visual communication, and comparatively more continuous (less seasonal) sexual activity and reproduction. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Because of metabolic implications of body size, folivory is more common among larger primates (greater than or equal to 13.5 pounds), such as the Old World " leaf monkeys " (Colobinae), neotropical woolly spider monkeys, and mountain gorillas. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Conversely, insects are generally consumed in higher proportions by small primates (less than or equal to 3.5 pounds), such as the nocturnal strepsirhines, tarsiers, and neotropical marmosets, tamarins, and squirrel monkeys. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Research interests and ongoing projects include the study of cell replacement and gene therapies for Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, other neurodegenerative diseases, and spinal cord injuries, and the study of plasticity and function of central catecholaminergic systems in primates and humans. (yale.edu)
  • Besides the unnecessary testing on primates for a mostly human caused preventable disease being immoral and void of compassion, Physicians Committee of Responsible Medicine has proven that there are kinder alternatives. (change.org)
  • A research team from the Salk Institute, the Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University and the University of California - Los Angeles (UCLA), has identified genes in the cerebral cortex that differ in levels of activity between humans and nonhuman primates, including chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys. (innovations-report.com)
  • This finding may help explain why humans have the potential to live decades longer than other primates, but also why humans are especially vulnerable to age-related, neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer s disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • Despite the frequent use of nonhuman primates in biologic studies, few electrocardiographic studies of Japanese monkeys (Macaca fusucata) have been reported, and no reference data are available for this species. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Here, we tested the hypothesis that the number and morphology (straight, curved, or donut-shaped) of mitochondria in dlPFC presynaptic boutons are altered with aging and menopause in rhesus monkeys ( Macaca mulatta ) and that these metrics correlate with delayed response (DR) accuracy, a well-characterized measure of dlPFC-dependent working memory. (pnas.org)
  • Alzheimer's Abeta vaccination of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). (uzh.ch)
  • To examine the mechanisms and consequences of anti-Abeta-antibody formation in a species more closely related to humans, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were vaccinated with aggregated Abeta(1-42). (uzh.ch)
  • Standard Electrocardiographic Data of Young Japanese Monkeys (Macaca fusucata). (biomedsearch.com)
  • Bachevalier J, Mishkin M (1994) Effects of selective neonatal temporal lobe lesions on visual recognition memory in rhesus monkeys. (springer.com)
  • We show that poor working memory in rhesus monkeys is associated with a higher incidence of presynaptic boutons harboring malformed, donut-shaped mitochondria that form abnormally small synaptic contacts. (pnas.org)
  • He is co-director for the Laboratory of Cognitive Neurobiology with Dr. Mark Moss. (bu.edu)
  • Because of the relatively large size of their brains and their longevity, sheep are a good animal model for studying neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Sheep are long-lived and have brains that are similar in size and complexity to those of some monkeys. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Computer scientist Tom Mitchell and cognitive neuroscientist Marcel Just, both of Carnegie Mellon University, are closer to knowing how specific thoughts activate our brains. (nsf.gov)
  • The tradeoff in human brains (top) and monkey brains (bottom). (neurosciencenews.com)
  • This pattern of connectivity is characteristic of "small-world" networks and has now been demonstrated in brains of animals, ranging from C. elegans to cats and monkeys, as well as humans. (kpn.nl)
  • The monkey brains were examined through MRI systems throughout the entire study. (barchester.com)
  • Researchers network the brains of three monkeys to create a "living computer" that can steer an image of a robotic arm toward a target. (the-scientist.com)
  • These prions were the infectious agents hiding in the brains of the Fore people's dead ancestors and are ultimately the cause of their deadly disease. (bigthink.com)
  • Scientists refer to this condition as prion disease, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) due to the sponge-like appearance of the affected brains. (bigthink.com)
  • The new drug, called IONIS-HTTRx, is an anti-sense drug that acts as a "gene silencer" to inhibit the production of Huntingtin (HTT) protein in people with Huntington's disease that can cause uncontrolled movements, loss of intellectual abilities, emotional problems and eventually death. (medindia.net)
  • The study, published today in the journal Royal Society: Open Science , is part a series of tests given to the sheep to monitor their cognitive abilities. (cam.ac.uk)
  • That means they can be useful models to help us understand disorders of the brain, such as Huntington's disease, that develop over a long time and affect cognitive abilities. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Our study gives us another way to monitor how these abilities change, particularly in sheep who carry the gene mutation that causes Huntington's disease. (cam.ac.uk)
  • It may be concluded that chewing has important implications for the mechanisms underlying certain cognitive abilities. (medsci.org)
  • Rhesus Macaques have demonstrated a variety of complex cognitive abilities, including the ability to make same-different judgments, understand simple rules, and monitor their own mental states. (change.org)
  • These findings, which appear in the online journal of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may provide essential clues to the unusual cognitive abilities of humans. (innovations-report.com)
  • The changes in gene activity in the cortex suggest increases in the rate of brain activity, providing a basis for the evolution of the enhanced cognitive abilities in humans. (innovations-report.com)
  • This pattern is under strong genetic control, and strongly determines our cognitive abilities. (kpn.nl)
  • Some who try it have said it also improves their cognitive abilities, although this is controversial - some studies have suggested it impairs people's mental abilities. (newscientist.com)
  • A drug that would be the first to target the cause of Huntington's disease (HD) -- a rare, hereditary disease -- has been found effective and safe when tested in mice and monkeys. (medindia.net)
  • Huntington's disease is passed from parent to child through a mutation in the HTT gene. (medindia.net)
  • These newly identified mutant proteins kill neurons and build up in regions of the brain that are most affected by the Huntington's disease. (medindia.net)
  • Researchers in Australia have created a genetically-modified sheep that displays symptoms similar to Huntington's Disease in humans, but it is unclear whether the animals would undergo the same cognitive decline that would make them useful for testing potential treatments. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Mice are mainly used in Huntington's Disease research but they are short lived animals and don't show the kind of decline we see in humans," added Professor Morton. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • This means they have great potential for studying cognitive function as well as being a model of Huntington's Disease. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Professor Morton's team recently began studying sheep that have been genetically modified to carry the mutation that causes Huntington's disease. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Huntington's disease affects more than 6,700 people in the UK. (cam.ac.uk)
  • This article will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using transgenic monkeys to model Huntington's disease (HD). (stanford.edu)
  • New findings by the Yerkes National Primate Research Center at Emory University have shown similarities between humans and monkeys, both with Huntington's disease, especially in regards to the decline in motor control. (barchester.com)
  • Our finding of similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys suggests monkeys could become a preclinical, large animal model for the development of new treatments. (barchester.com)
  • We routinely use this technique to measure conduction velocity and other parameters of neuronal conduction across or within the cerebral hemisphere to supplement our study of the neurobiological basis of altered cognitive function in the primate. (bu.edu)
  • However, 3 years ago, researchers revealed in Science (10 July 2009, p. 201 ) that the other group of hungry monkeys-at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center in Madison-did live longer on their reduced diets. (sciencemag.org)
  • They also may help researchers understand why humans have a longer lifespan than other primate species and yet are so vulnerable to age-related, neurodegenerative diseases. (innovations-report.com)
  • Using gene chips to compare samples of the cerebral cortex of humans, chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys, the research team at the Salk, the Yerkes Center and UCLA identified 91 genes that are expressed in different amounts in humans compared to the other primate species. (innovations-report.com)
  • Currently he is principal investigator or co-investigator on several other NIH grants that study various aspects of aging and age-related disease in primate models. (bu.edu)
  • BFCS lesions increased sensitivity to injections of the cholinergic antagonist scopolamine in a delayed nonmatching-to-sample task, indicating that the central cholinergic system was compromised in these monkeys. (jneurosci.org)
  • Of note, the monkeys with prefrontal cholinergic lesions showed no deficit in a model of human episodic memory. (sciencemag.org)
  • GNM relies on lesions, not Cognitive Trigger Events. (oneradionetwork.com)
  • Monkeys have also contributed a great deal to our understanding of the visual system - they were the subjects in many of the classic experiments of Hubel and Wiesel, which showed that the primary visual cortex contains neurons that are responsive to edges and bars moving in specific orientations. (scienceblogs.com)
  • T-type Calcium Channels Determine the Vulnerability of Dopaminergic Neurons to Mitochondrial Stress in Familial Parkinson Disease. (websitegear.com)
  • The researchers used an array of electrodes to record the electrical activity of neurons in the prefrontal cortex of monkeys while they performed a memory task. (nextbigfuture.com)
  • Cohen ML, Go1de TE, Usiak MF, Younkin LH, Younkin SG (1988) In situ hybridization of nucleus basalis neurons shows increased β -amyloid mRNA in Alzheimer disease. (springer.com)
  • AAV2-mediated gene transfer of GDNF to the striatum of MPTP monkeys enhances the survival and outgrowth of co-implanted fetal dopamine neurons. (yale.edu)
  • Croxson and colleagues have now identified more precisely the cognitive dysfunction resulting from loss of cholinergic neurons. (sciencemag.org)
  • Depletion of cholinergic neurons in the prefrontal cortex causes loss of a specific memory function in rhesus monkeys. (sciencemag.org)
  • The researchers will put the study participants onto the MIND diet or a control diet for three years, and they will collect cognitive and biological data from participants every year. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The researchers found that cognitive disability was the most prevalent type among young adults (10.6 percent), while mobility disability was most prevalent among middle-aged and older adults (18.1 and 26.9 percent, respectively). (medicalxpress.com)
  • Researchers in China successfully used CRISPR gene editing to produce five monkey clones from the fibroblasts of a donor monkey with disease phenotypes. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • Now researchers at Duke Medicine have discovered that rhesus monkeys can, in fact, transmit the virus across the placenta to their unborn offspring. (healthcanal.com)
  • Now, researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in Missouri have studied the behaviour of the tau protein in both mice and monkeys, as well as the possible ways of reducing it. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Researchers used laser light to show that that rhesus monkeys can learn to recognize themselves in the mirror. (phys.org)
  • When researchers marked the monkeys' faces and presented them with mirrors, they didn't touch or examine the spot or show any other self-directed behaviors in front of those mirrors in the way that even a very young person would do. (phys.org)
  • Alzheimer's researchers are used to getting bad news from clinical trials, as one promising drug after another has failed to slow cognitive declines. (sciencemag.org)
  • But because amyloid begins accumulating in the brain decades before memory loss and other symptoms appear, many researchers believe trials have failed because the drugs were given to patients whose disease was already too advanced. (sciencemag.org)
  • This week in Nature , researchers report that the monkeys at the National Institutes of Health Animal Center in Dickerson, Maryland, did reap some benefits, such as reduced triglycerides in the blood and a lower cancer rate. (sciencemag.org)
  • As current cognitive tests are available are unable to test for navigation difficulties, a team of researchers at the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge - in collaboration with Prof. Neil Burgess at UCL - developed a VR navigation test. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Researchers believe that one individual in the Fore people likely developed Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease spontaneously. (bigthink.com)
  • As the life span of human beings increases, so does the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction. (frontiersin.org)
  • AB123 clinical indication is amelioration of cognitive dysfunction associate with Alzheimer disease. (ukessays.com)
  • The Laboratory for Cognitive Neurobiology is focused on understanding the neurological basis in health and disease of higher cognitive functions including learning, memory and executive system functions. (wisc.edu)
  • Being so closely related to our own species, monkeys serve as important model organisms, and have provided many insights into the workings of the human brain. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Research performed on monkeys in the past 30 years or so has, for example, been invaluable in the development of brain-machine interfaces. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Our ability to do so depends upon cognitive maps, mental representations of the surrounding spaces, which are constructed by the brain and are used by it to calculate one's present location, based on landmarks in the environment and on our movements within it, and to plan future movements. (scienceblogs.com)
  • The study will recruit 300 volunteers from another study, the Chicago MIND cohort, which aims to show whether a dietary intervention can prevent cognitive decline and age-associated changes in the brain. (medicalxpress.com)
  • These outcomes will be correlated with cognitive outcomes and brain structure information obtained via MRI exams. (medicalxpress.com)
  • In fact, the concept that activated microglia can shift into the M1 pro-inflammatory or M2 neuroprotective phenotypes, depending on brain microenvironment, has completely changed the understanding of microglia in brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases. (frontiersin.org)
  • Gamma rhythms are correlated with large scale brain network activity and cognitive phenomena such as working memory, attention, and perceptual grouping, and can be increased in amplitude via meditation or neurostimulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Accordingly, using the monkey brain tissues after in-vivo and in-vitro oxidative stresses , we studied molecular modifications of Hsp70.1 and its counterpart bis(monoacylglycero) phosphate (BMP), because these molecules are closely related to the lysosomal membrane stability by regulating acid sphingomyelinase. (omicsonline.org)
  • Regardless of the brain regions studied, the normal monkey brain tissues showed calpain-mediated cleavage of Hsp70.1 after in-vitro oxidative stress. (omicsonline.org)
  • While the results of today's study may take many years to translate into humans, they suggest that even cognitive processes, such as deciding whether or not to grab a cup of coffee or remembering where you left your keys, could one day be augmented by brain chips. (nextbigfuture.com)
  • The monkeys have to find out where the image is and then select the kind of movement to move the cursor there," says Sam Deadwyler, a brain scientist at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and a senior author on the study. (nextbigfuture.com)
  • We have particular interest in the structural, physiological, and neurotransmitter correlates of cognitive decline in aging and age-related disease (e.g. hypertension and stroke), the separate and interactive roles of the prefrontal cortices and hippocampal complex in executive function and declarative memory, and the structural and functional changes in the brain as a consequence of prenatal malnutrition. (bu.edu)
  • In monkeys, tau ASOs reduced tau in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. (sciencemag.org)
  • Abraham CR, Selkoe DJ, Potter H, Price DL, Cork LC (1989) α l -Antichymotrypsin is present together with the β -protein in monkey brain amyloid deposits. (springer.com)
  • Conclusions Brain tissue iron, measured using QSM, can track cognitive involvement in PD. (bmj.com)
  • 3 Techniques sensitive to brain tissue microstructure are better suited to detect brain changes linked to cognitive involvement in PD. (bmj.com)
  • The trial revealed that, in monkeys too, the oligonucleotide reduces both tau RNA and tau protein in the brain. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Several studies have demonstrated that chewing helps to maintain cognitive functions in brain regions including the hippocampus, a central nervous system (CNS) region vital for memory and learning. (medsci.org)
  • Spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during fetal monkey brain development. (yale.edu)
  • Our findings suggest that the monkey brain has the basic 'hardware' [for mirror self-recognition], but they need appropriate training to acquire the 'software' to achieve self-recognition," says Neng Gong of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. (phys.org)
  • Usually brain disease manifests itself as a kind of regression from a "small-world" network towards a more random network. (kpn.nl)
  • Through brain imaging, signs of neurodegeneration were seen as quickly as 24 months, allowing scientists to monitor disease progression over a lengthy period. (barchester.com)
  • How did it come about that stimulating the brain with electrical current could alleviate symptoms of disease? (speakingofresearch.com)
  • Using animals such as cats and monkeys (Walter Rudolf) and a famous bull ( Jose Delgado ), scientists went on to develop the technique of implanting electrodes into the brain permanently to stimulate deep brain structures. (speakingofresearch.com)
  • This brought the technique out of the confines of the surgical theatre and opened the door for the possibility of using chronic, deep brain stimulation to treat humans with disease. (speakingofresearch.com)
  • The work may also have implications for treating neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson's disease, which is caused by a loss of a type of brain cell. (newscientist.com)
  • In further experiments, Davies's team found that ghrelin protects brain cells in a dish from dying when they are encouraged to mimic Parkinson's disease. (newscientist.com)
  • v) Given our knowledge on normal basal ganglia functions in animal and human motivation, how are the behavioural processes and brain mechanisms altered in human patients suffering from a number of basal ganglia diseases that constitute an important portion of brain pathologies and a serious challenge for human health and welfare? (europa.eu)
  • What was it about tobacco that ravages the heart, lungs, teeth, and skin but somehow guards against a disease of the brain? (scientificamerican.com)
  • By developing an effective animal model that can emulate both the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, scientists have a better chance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of the neuro-circuitry responsible for changes in the brain during the course of the disease. (txbiomed.org)
  • This image depicts a cow's brain affected by mad cow disease, a kind of prion disease. (bigthink.com)
  • These cognitive symptoms of the degenerative brain disease are devastating, and so it makes sense that they get the most attention in the media and scientific community. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • And as the disease progresses, destroying more brain cells and cognitive skills, this emotional empathy gets stronger, allowing patients to become more sensitive - and more vulnerable - to the feelings, words, and behaviors of other people. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Proficiency in cognitive control involves a wide range of processes that are relevant for personal independence in everyday task performance. (frontiersin.org)
  • This renders it impossible to understand cognitive processes of NHPs in a natural setting. (websitegear.com)
  • Due perhaps to deterioration in dopaminergic striatal circuitry, goal-directed oculomotor control is subject to decline in healthy seniors, and even more in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). (frontiersin.org)
  • Healthy elderly adults and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are generally less proficient in the cognitive control of goal-directed actions than healthy young adults. (frontiersin.org)
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, implicating 10 million people worldwide but has no cure at present. (websitegear.com)
  • Hence we are studying whether these markers can be used to indicate the early stages of a dopaminergic lesion, the best-known example of which is the pre-motor phase of Parkinson's disease. (ugent.be)
  • I will then describe a project to follow the changes in these markers during the evolution of a slow progressive DA lesion designed to be an analogue of the pre-diagnosis (pre-motor-symptomatic) phase of Parkinson's disease. (ugent.be)
  • Much attention has been paid to manganism, a Parkinson's disease-like condition that is highly prevalent in cases of occupational exposure. (rsc.org)
  • Methods We assessed 100 patients with early-stage to mid-stage PD, and 37 age-matched controls using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), a validated clinical algorithm for risk of cognitive decline in PD, measures of visuoperceptual function and the Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part 3 (UPDRS-III). (bmj.com)
  • Aged monkeys as a partial model for Parkinson's disease. (yale.edu)
  • To receive news and publication updates for Parkinson's Disease, enter your email address in the box below. (hindawi.com)
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common disorder of middle-aged and elderly people in which degeneration of the extrapyramidal motor system causes significant movement problems. (hindawi.com)
  • Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder affecting middle aged and elderly people. (hindawi.com)
  • Visual signs and symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). (hindawi.com)
  • Previous research, including some by Davies's team, has found that ghrelin can help protect animals from developing a form of Parkinson's disease. (newscientist.com)
  • But amid the lineup of usual sus-pects, one oddball jumped out: Parkinson's disease. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Parkinson's disease affects a million people in the United States and 10 million people worldwide. (txbiomed.org)
  • Neuroimaging measures sensitive to PD cognition are important to track change in clinical trials and detect early neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive involvement. (bmj.com)
  • Our findings suggest that hormone replacement therapy benefits cognitive aging, in part, by promoting mitochondrial and synaptic health in the PFC. (pnas.org)
  • Overview of Advances Articulated in Nanomedical Device and Systems Design: Challenges, Possibilities, Visions (2013) [1] This article provides an overview of the research findings related to cognitive enhancement that are presented in Nanomedical Device and Systems Design: Challenges, Possibilities, Visions (2013), an encyclopedic textbook chronicling a plethora of recent advances in myriad areas of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. (ieet.org)
  • Most notable of the work based on the findings of Galvani, is the work around the same time, of Luigi Rolando, Pierre Flourens in humans and Eduard Hitzig , Gustav Fritsch and David Ferrier in dogs and monkeys. (speakingofresearch.com)
  • The prefrontal cortex is involved in decision making and directs many types of cognitive responses associated with memory or other types of information processing. (nextbigfuture.com)
  • Loss of asymmetric spine synapses in prefrontal cortex of motor-asymptomatic, dopamine-depleted, cognitively impaired MPTP-treated monkeys. (yale.edu)
  • A s-N, d-P potential (CNV-like potential) was recorded in the parietal cortex as well as the prefrontal, premotor, motor and somatosensory cortices in the monkey during the CNV task. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The study by Croxson and colleagues clarifies the role of prefrontal acetylcholine in cognitive function by pinpointing working memory-as opposed to episodic memory and executive function-as the most susceptible to reduced acetylcholine transmission. (sciencemag.org)
  • The constraints and labor involved in natural and artificial reproduction make the cost of transgenic monkeys significantly higher than transgenic mice. (stanford.edu)
  • The Emory research team developed this transgenic monkey model by introducing altered forms of the Huntington gene into monkey eggs using a viral vector. (medgadget.com)
  • As the Attending Veterinarian for the Pittsburgh Facility for Infectious Disease Research from 1998-2001, Dr. Capuano provided veterinary care for a large colony of macaques (200) and acted as collaborator and co-investigator on numerous protocols involving a variety of infectious agents (e.g., simian immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus, human influenza virus, mycobacterium tuberculosis, listeria monocytogenes, pneumocystis carinii, and trypanosoma cruzi) and transgenic vectors. (nap.edu)
  • Study conduct in mouse, rat, dog and monkey AB123 enhance LPT in rat and transgenic mouse model of AD rat and monkey with entrohinal cortex damage showed improvement in learning and memory performance compare to control animal. (ukessays.com)
  • In Llinás & Ribary (1993), the authors propose that the specific loops give the content of cognition, and that a nonspecific loop gives the temporal binding required for the unity of cognitive experience. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because macaques and marmosets are similar to humans in terms of emotions, cognition , and behavior, the use of monkeys in lab research raises more ethical concerns and media interest than other animal models . (stanford.edu)
  • Ischemic strokes, resulting from vascular occlusion, is considered to be a highly complex disease consisting of a group of heterogeneous disorders with multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. (abcam.com)
  • A Canadian research team led by professor Brendan Frey has developed the first method for 'ranking' genetic mutations based on how living cells 'read' DNA, revealing how likely any given alteration is to cause disease. (pearltrees.com)
  • The large pedigree of vervet monkeys housed in the Vervet Research Colony (VRC) in North Carolina provides a direct genetic resource to study various phenotypes in a controlled environment. (globus.org)
  • The Center's current focus is to sequence a large number of VRC monkeys with well-characterized and highly heritable phenotypes, and to carry out genetic mapping to find the genetic loci underlying these phenotypes. (globus.org)
  • However, in the MCI group, a greater proportion of amyloid-positive subjects progressed to AD than did amyloid-negative MCI patients, suggesting that amyloid imaging using florbetapir may help identify those at risk for progressive cognitive decline. (alzforum.org)
  • For years, scientists relied on animals as models for human disease. (pearltrees.com)
  • In the decade since the genome was sequenced in 2003, scientists and doctors have struggled to answer an all-consuming question: Which DNA mutations cause disease? (pearltrees.com)
  • Over at the Telegraph we find the news that Brazilian scientists are to test an AIDS vaccine on monkeys . (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • In earlier studies, scientists had offered monkeys mirrors of different sizes and shapes for years, even beginning at a young age, Gong explains. (phys.org)
  • Yerkes scientists are on the forefront of developing vaccines for AIDS and malaria, and treatments for cocaine addiction and Parkinson s disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • Clinician-scientists have since extended this to human patients with dystonia and indeed, are finding similar sensory abnormalities in humans with dystonia as those seen in monkeys with learning-induced dystonia. (speakingofresearch.com)
  • There is no known cure for the disease, only ways to manage the symptoms. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Because monkeys display HD symptoms several years after they are born, these costs for monkeys are exponentially greater than those for mice. (stanford.edu)
  • These symptoms become more pronounced in patients with end-stage disease, often progressing to memory loss, apathy, personality changes, and social withdrawal. (asm.org)
  • While most of these children will not develop symptoms or problems, about 1 of every 5 children with congenital CMV infection - a total of 5,000 children each year - will develop hearing loss or developmental disabilities due to the infection, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (ucdavis.edu)
  • Epstein -Barr virus and Herpes Simplex virus) into target cells and increase infectivity and worsen disease symptoms. (abundanthope.net)
  • In the case of the tiny monkeys, investigators wanted to see if the marmosets with induced classic Parkinson's motor symptoms - like tremors - could also serve as an effective model for non-motor symptoms. (txbiomed.org)
  • Most of the trained monkeys-five out of seven-showed typical mirror-induced self-directed behaviors, such as touching the mark on the face or ear and then looking and/or smelling at their fingers as if they were thinking something like, "Hey, what's that there on my face? (phys.org)
  • Carnivory (predation) occurs at significant rates only among baboons ( Papio species), neotropical capuchin monkeys ( Cebus species), and most notably chimpanzees ( Pan troglodytes ), the latter of which prey heavily upon red colobus monkeys. (encyclopedia.com)
  • However, the CMV species found in animals differs from human CMV and has not been reported to cause human disease. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Neuropsychological experiments will investigate the motivational and cognitive alterations in these patients. (europa.eu)
  • This may be useful to detect signs of early cognitive change to stratify groups for clinical trials and monitor disease progression. (bmj.com)
  • The FTD field is excited to finally have an agent worthy of a clinical trial as a potential disease-modifying agent. (alzforum.org)
  • Disease models are useful for prospective studies of pathology, identification of molecular and cellular mechanisms, pre-clinical testing of interventions, and validation of clinical biomarkers. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As with some other animals such as dogs and monkeys, sheep are social animals that can recognise other sheep as well as familiar humans. (cam.ac.uk)
  • For these reasons, monkeys will probably be better models for monitoring disease progression and the effectiveness of experimental drugs. (stanford.edu)
  • Synergistic effects of GDNF and VEGF on lifespan and disease progression in a familial ALS rat model. (labome.org)
  • Declines in fine motor skills and cognitive function are well known features of human aging. (springer.com)
  • Figures one (I) through ten (I0) graphically illustrate that in North America, Europe, and the South Pacific, major declines in life-threatening infectious diseases occurred historically either without, or far in advance of public immunization efforts for specific diseases as listed. (abundanthope.net)
  • The five monkeys in the study were trained to play a matching game in which they were shown an image on a screen and then had to use hand movements to steer a cursor to that same image out of two to seven others that they were shown anywhere from one to 90 seconds later. (nextbigfuture.com)
  • The expression of BMAL1, a core circadian regulatory transcription factor, was knockout in the donor monkey using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing at the embryo stage, and the fibroblasts of the donor monkey were used to clone five monkeys using the method of somatic cell nuclear transfer, the same method that generated Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua, the first two cloned monkeys, last year. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • Arnsten AF, Cai JX, Murphy BL et al (1994) Dopamine D1 receptor mechanisms in the cognitive performance of young adult and aged monkeys. (springer.com)
  • Publications] Gemba H: 'Differential central nervous mechanisms in audio-initiated vocalizations from audioinitiated hand movements in the monkey. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Nevertheless, several studies have shown an association between chewing and cognitive functions [ 6 - 10 ] . (medsci.org)
  • Using electrophysiological methods in the monkeys, the investigators found that the representation of the fingers in the somatosensory cortex was much more disorganized in the dystonic animals after the repetition training than before. (speakingofresearch.com)
  • Intermittent fasting or fasting‐mimicking diets (FMDs) promote multi‐tissue regeneration, enhance cognitive performance, and extend healthspan in mice (Brandhorst et al. (longecity.org)
  • Safe and effective cognitive enhancers might benefit both the individual and society as we are shifting into a world of increased human lifespan and workspan. (ieet.org)
  • Most HD animal research utilizes mouse models of the disease. (stanford.edu)
  • While there is much that we can learn from mice, animals that are more similar to humans, such as monkeys, could offer more pertinent insights into HD and serve as brand new and promising avenues for HD research. (stanford.edu)
  • Yerkes' proposal to do AIDS-related research on endangered sooty mangabey monkeys drew opposition from numerous primatologists, including Jane Goodall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Texas Biomedical Research Institute) Promising experimental cancer chemotherapy drugs may help knock out another life-threatening disease: tuberculosis (TB). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Cognitive psychologist Amy Shelton of Johns Hopkins University is doing research that might help us keep track of ourselves, as well as our things. (nsf.gov)
  • A more recent research interest is the neurobiological bases and facilitation of recovery of fine motor function after cortical stroke in the rhesus monkey with his colleague Dr. Tara L Moore. (bu.edu)
  • Work in our laboratories was funded by the project NORTE-01-0145-FEDER-000008-Porto Neurosciences and Neurologic Disease Research Initiative at I3S, supported by Norte Portugal Regional Operational Programme (NORTE 2020), under the PORTUGAL 2020 Partnership Agreement, through the European Regional Development Fund (FEDER). (springer.com)
  • The Center for Vaccine Research in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania confirms that "Vaccine induced enhancement of infection and disease has been reported for a number of viral pathogens. (abundanthope.net)
  • I understand that smoking is bad," said Maryka Quik, director of the Neurodegenerative Diseases Program at SRI International, a nonprofit research institute based in California's Silicon Valley. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The research has the potential to help millions of people who are paralyzed or have neurodegenerative diseases. (kurzweilai.net)
  • A trend toward enlargement of the cerebral cortex, especially in monkeys and apes. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cass WA, Grondin R, Andersen AH et al (2006) Iron accumulation in the striatum predicts aging-related decline in motor function in rhesus monkeys. (springer.com)
  • This symposium will highlight the latest data on the function and regulation of bioactive lipids across a variety of cardiometabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, Type-II Diabetes, fatty liver disease and obesity, with the aim of identifying common pathways that present novel drug targets. (nyas.org)
  • Enhancing cognitive function through better chemistry is not a new idea but is still a topic of considerable import. (jneurosci.org)
  • The SIB-1553A-induced cognitive improvement may be in part related to an increase in cholinergic function. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Definition of neurology: a science involved in the study of the nervous systems, especially of the diseases and disorders affecting them. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • Human amyloidosis, Alzheimer disease and related disorders. (springer.com)
  • Pinpointing the origin of anxiety brings psychiatric professionals closer to understanding anxiety disorders, the most common class of psychiatric disease. (nsf.gov)
  • Several studies [ 6 - 10 ] have shown that some systemic factors, such as cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, nutritional changes, diabetes, postural abnormalities, osteoporosis, etc. may interfere with the stomatognathic system. (medsci.org)
  • AD inevitably leads to death, although patients frequently die of the complications of other chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory disease, and diabetes [1, 3]. (j-alz.com)
  • Also, epidemiological studies report an association between elevated exposure to BPA and cardiovascular disease and diabetes. (diva-portal.org)
  • We have therefore suggested that FK960 acts on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus through activation of somatostatinergic neurotransmission to exert its cognitive facilitating effects. (aspetjournals.org)