Motivational state produced by inconsistencies between simultaneously held cognitions or between a cognition and behavior; e.g., smoking enjoyment and believing smoking is harmful are dissonant.
A defense mechanism operating unconsciously, in which the individual attempts to justify or make consciously tolerable, by plausible means, feelings, behavior, and motives that would otherwise be intolerable.
Disorders of hearing or auditory perception due to pathological processes of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. These include CENTRAL HEARING LOSS and AUDITORY PERCEPTUAL DISORDERS.
Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.
Hearing loss due to disease of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS (in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM) which originate in the COCHLEAR NUCLEI of the PONS and then ascend bilaterally to the MIDBRAIN, the THALAMUS, and then the AUDITORY CORTEX in the TEMPORAL LOBE. Bilateral lesions of the auditory pathways are usually required to cause central hearing loss. Cortical deafness refers to loss of hearing due to bilateral auditory cortex lesions. Unilateral BRAIN STEM lesions involving the cochlear nuclei may result in unilateral hearing loss.
A defense mechanism, operating unconsciously, whereby that which is emotionally unacceptable in the self is rejected and attributed (projected) to others.
Description of pattern of recurrent functions or procedures frequently found in organizational processes, such as notification, decision, and action.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.
Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.

Personal review: Helicobacter pylori, NSAIDs and cognitive dissonance. (1/41)

Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) each cause peptic ulcers but by different mechanisms. As a result, the effect of both of these risk factors together is not a synergistic enhancement of injury, ulceration or rates of complications. Indeed, there are circumstances under which patients infected with H. pylori are less prone to NSAID-induced ulcers than those who are not infected or who have undergone eradication treatment. This may be because of opposite effects on gastric mucosal prostaglandin synthesis or for other reasons. Reluctance to accept that there may be specific circumstances where H. pylori is beneficial may arise because of the psychological process of cognitive dissonance.  (+info)

Conflict of intentions due to callosal disconnection. (2/41)

OBJECTIVES: Three patients with callosal syndrome manifested a peculiar symptom in that they were unable to perform intended whole body actions because another intention emerged in competition with the original one. Attempts were made to clarify the symptomatology of this manifestation and its possible mechanism is discussed. METHODS: The three patients are described and previous reports on patients with callosal damage were reviewed. Four additional patients with similar symptoms were found and the clinical features common to all seven patients were examined. RESULTS: This symptom could not be attributed to unilateral movement disorders such as unilateral apraxia, intermanual conflict, or compulsive manipulation of tools. The manifestations included marked hesitation in initiating actions, interruption of actions, repetitive actions, and performance of unintended actions with difficulty in correcting them. All patients, except one, had a lesion in the posterior half of the body of the corpus callosum, and there was no significant involvement of the cerebral cortex. The symptom became manifest later than 4 weeks after callosal damage. It occurred during spontaneous actions, but not during well automated actions nor when following instructions. CONCLUSION: This symptom, tentatively named "conflict of intentions", can be regarded as a fragment of diagonistic dyspraxia originally described by Akelaitis, although it can occur independently of intermanual conflict. Normally, the right and left cerebral hemispheres may be complementarily modifying automated whole body actions in order to adapt behaviour to changes of the environment as well as to the intention. Partial callosal disconnection without significant cortical involvement would exaggerate the disparity between the role of each hemisphere through the reorganisation of neural systems after callosal damage. Such double, often contrary, behavioural tendencies may sometimes simultaneously enter the patient's awareness.  (+info)

Cannabis and psychosis. (3/41)

BACKGROUND: Cannabis use is commonly identified in people who present with psychosis. OBJECTIVE: This case study aims to provide a practical approach for general practitioners seeing patients with comorbid cannabis and mental health concerns. DISCUSSION: Cannabis related comorbidity is commonly seen in general practice. General practitioners can manage most presentations and help to reduce the likely occurrence of cannabis induced psychosis through the use of psychosocial support, brief interventions and harm minimisation.  (+info)

Money for consent--psychological consideration. (4/41)

CONTEXT: Regarding the increasing gap between demand and supply of donor organs the question is increasingly discussed, if families of organ donors should receive a financial incentive for consenting to organ donation. However, little attention has been paid to the psychological consequences of such incentives. OBJECTIVE: We discuss the question of financial incentives for families of presumed organ donors in the light of relevant psychological theories. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: Overview of the psychological literature. Only well established theories were included. CONCLUSIONS: We summarise, that financial benefits for consent to organ donoation could affect adversely the public opinion toward organ donation and the whole process of transplantation and thus could counterproductively influence the consent rates.  (+info)

What we regret most... and why. (5/41)

Which domains in life produce the greatest potential for regret, and what features of those life domains explain why? Using archival and laboratory evidence, the authors show that greater perceived opportunity within life domains evokes more intense regret. This pattern is consistent with previous publications demonstrating greater regret stemming from high rather than low opportunity or choice. A meta-analysis of 11 regret ranking studies revealed that the top six biggest regrets in life center on (in descending order) education, career, romance, parenting, the self, and leisure. Study Set 2 provided new laboratory evidence that directly linked the regret ranking to perceived opportunity. Study Set 3 ruled out an alternative interpretation involving framing effects. Overall, these findings show that people's biggest regrets are a reflection of where in life they see their largest opportunities; that is, where they see tangible prospects for change, growth, and renewal.  (+info)

Avoiding versus seeking: the relationship of information seeking to avoidance, blunting, coping, dissonance, and related concepts. (6/41)

QUESTION: How have theorists and empirical researchers treated the human tendency to avoid discomforting information? DATA SOURCES: A historical review (1890-2004) of theory literature in communication and information studies, coupled with searches of recent studies on uptake of genetic testing and on coping strategies of cancer patients, was performed. STUDY SELECTION: The authors' review of the recent literature included searches of the MEDLINE, PsychInfo, and CINAHL databases between 1992 and summer of 2004 and selective, manual searches of earlier literature. Search strategies included the following subject headings and key words: MeSH headings: Genetic Screening/psychology, Decision Making, Neoplasms/diagnosis/genetics/psychology; CINAHL headings: Genetic Screening, Genetic Counseling, Anxiety, Decision Making, Decision Making/Patient; additional key words: avoidance, worry, monitoring, blunting, cancer. The "Related Articles" function in MEDLINE was used to perform additional "citation pearl" searching. MAIN RESULTS: The assumption that individuals actively seek information underlies much of psychological theory and communication practice, as well as most models of the information-seeking process. However, much research has also noted that sometimes people avoid information, if paying attention to it will cause mental discomfort or dissonance. Cancer information in general and genetic screening for cancer in particular are discussed as examples to illustrate this pattern. CONCLUSION: That some patients avoid knowledge of imminent disease makes avoidance behavior an important area for social and psychological research, particularly with regard to genetic testing.  (+info)

Dissonance and healthy weight eating disorder prevention programs: a randomized efficacy trial. (7/41)

In this trial, adolescent girls with body dissatisfaction (N = 481, M age = 17 years) were randomized to an eating disorder prevention program involving dissonance-inducing activities that reduce thin-ideal internalization, a prevention program promoting healthy weight management, an expressive writing control condition, or an assessment-only control condition. Dissonance participants showed significantly greater reductions in eating disorder risk factors and bulimic symptoms than healthy weight, expressive writing, and assessment-only participants, and healthy weight participants showed significantly greater reductions in risk factors and symptoms than expressive writing and assessment-only participants from pretest to posttest. Although these effects faded over 6-month and 12-month follow-ups, dissonance and healthy weight participants showed significantly lower binge eating and obesity onset and reduced service utilization through 12-month follow-up, suggesting that both interventions have public health potential.  (+info)

Overcoming denial and increasing the intention to use condoms through the induction of hypocrisy. (8/41)

Feelings of hypocrisy were induced in college students to increase condom use. Hypocrisy was created by making subjects mindful of their past failure to use condoms and then having them persuade others about the importance of condoms for AIDS prevention. The induction of hypocrisy decreased denial and led to greater intent to improve condom use relative to the control conditions. The implications of these findings for AIDS prevention are discussed.  (+info)

Cognitive dissonance is a term used in psychology to describe the uncomfortable feeling or stress that results from holding two or more contradictory beliefs, values, or attitudes at the same time, or from engaging in behavior that conflicts with one's beliefs or values. This discrepancy can also occur when a person's actions do not align with their expectations or goals.

The theory of cognitive dissonance was first introduced by Leon Festinger in 1957. According to Festinger, people strive for internal consistency and will go to great lengths to reduce the discomfort caused by inconsistency. When faced with cognitive dissonance, individuals may change their beliefs, attitudes, or behaviors to bring them into alignment, or they may justify their behavior by creating new rationalizations or excuses.

For example, a person who values being environmentally friendly might experience cognitive dissonance if they purchase a gas-guzzling car. To reduce the discomfort caused by this inconsistency, they might try to justify their decision by convincing themselves that they need the car for work or family reasons, or they might decide to offset their carbon emissions by engaging in other environmentally friendly behaviors.

Cognitive dissonance can have significant implications for health and well-being, as it has been linked to stress, anxiety, and depression. It is also an important concept in the field of psychology because it helps to explain how people change their attitudes and behaviors over time.

In the context of psychology and psychiatry, "rationalization" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it is a psychological concept that is often used in medical settings. Rationalization refers to the process of creating logical explanations or justifications for behaviors, emotions, or beliefs that may actually be driven by unconscious desires or motives.

Rationalization can serve as a defense mechanism that allows individuals to avoid acknowledging unpleasant or uncomfortable feelings, thoughts, or impulses. By providing a rational explanation for their behavior, individuals can maintain a positive self-image and avoid feeling anxious, guilty, or threatened.

For example, a person who engages in excessive spending may rationalize their behavior by telling themselves that they deserve to treat themselves or that they need the items they are purchasing. In reality, their overspending may be driven by deeper emotional issues such as low self-esteem or a fear of missing out.

While rationalization is not a medical term per se, it is an important concept in understanding human behavior and motivation, and it can have implications for mental health treatment. Therapists may help individuals identify instances of rationalization and explore the underlying emotions and motivations that are driving their behavior. By gaining insight into these unconscious processes, individuals can develop more adaptive coping mechanisms and make more informed choices about their actions and decisions.

Central auditory diseases refer to a group of disorders that affect the processing of auditory information in the central nervous system, specifically in the brainstem and cortex. These disorders can result from various causes, such as head injuries, infections, tumors, or degenerative conditions. They can cause difficulties with understanding speech, locating the source of sounds, and perceiving complex or rapidly changing auditory stimuli.

Central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) is a common type of central auditory disease. It is a hearing problem that affects about 5% of school-aged children. Kids with CAPD can't process what they hear in the same way other kids do because their ears and brain don't fully coordinate. Something interferes with the way the brain recognizes and interprets sounds, especially speech.

CAPD is not a hearing loss or an intelligence problem. Children with CAPD have normal structural hearing and can often hear sounds that are presented to them individually. However, they may struggle to understand speech in noisy environments, follow complex directions, or distinguish similar sounds from one another.

Central auditory diseases are typically diagnosed through a series of tests that assess different aspects of auditory processing, such as speech recognition in noise, temporal processing, and binaural integration. Treatment for these disorders may include auditory training, assistive listening devices, and environmental modifications to help compensate for the processing difficulties.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "music" is not a term that has a medical definition. Music is a form of art that uses sound organized in time. It may include elements such as melody, harmony, rhythm, and dynamics. While music can have various psychological and physiological effects on individuals, it is not considered a medical term with a specific diagnosis or treatment application. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Central hearing loss is a type of hearing disorder that occurs due to damage or dysfunction in the central auditory pathways of the brain, rather than in the ear itself. This condition can result from various causes, such as stroke, tumors, trauma, infection, or degenerative diseases affecting the brain.

In central hearing loss, the person may have difficulty understanding and processing speech, even when they can hear sounds at normal levels. They might experience problems with sound localization, discriminating between similar sounds, and comprehending complex auditory signals. This type of hearing loss is different from sensorineural or conductive hearing loss, which are related to issues in the outer, middle, or inner ear.

In the context of psychology and psychiatry, "projection" is a psychological defense mechanism where individuals attribute their own unacceptable thoughts, feelings, or impulses to others. Instead of acknowledging and dealing with their own emotions or behaviors, they externalize them by perceiving them in someone else. This can help reduce anxiety or discomfort associated with those thoughts or feelings, but it can also lead to misunderstandings, conflicts, and negative judgments about others.

It is important to note that "projection" has no widely accepted medical definition within the field of medicine outside of mental health contexts.

I'm happy to help, but I need to clarify that "workflow" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in many fields, including healthcare, to describe a series of steps or tasks that are necessary to complete a process or task. In the context of healthcare, workflows often refer to the processes and procedures involved in delivering care to patients.

A medical definition of "workflow" might be:

The sequence of tasks or activities involved in providing clinical care to patients, including assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, intervention, monitoring, and follow-up. Workflows may involve multiple healthcare providers, such as physicians, nurses, therapists, and other staff members, and may be supported by technology, such as electronic health records (EHRs) or other clinical information systems. Effective workflow design is critical to ensuring safe, timely, and efficient care delivery.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

MedlinePlus is not a medical term, but rather a consumer health website that provides high-quality, accurate, and reliable health information, written in easy-to-understand language. It is produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine, the world's largest medical library, and is widely recognized as a trusted source of health information.

MedlinePlus offers information on various health topics, including conditions, diseases, tests, treatments, and wellness. It also provides access to drug information, medical dictionary, and encyclopedia, as well as links to clinical trials, medical news, and patient organizations. The website is available in both English and Spanish and can be accessed for free.

Cognition refers to the mental processes involved in acquiring, processing, and utilizing information. These processes include perception, attention, memory, language, problem-solving, and decision-making. Cognitive functions allow us to interact with our environment, understand and respond to stimuli, learn new skills, and remember experiences.

In a medical context, cognitive function is often assessed as part of a neurological or psychiatric evaluation. Impairments in cognition can be caused by various factors, such as brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease), infections, toxins, and mental health conditions. Assessing cognitive function helps healthcare professionals diagnose conditions, monitor disease progression, and develop treatment plans.

This Body Project (BP) is rooted in the theory of cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance occurs when a discrepancy emerges ... "Cognitive Dissonance & Post-Purchase Process". study.com. Retrieved 2021-10-08. "Cognitive Dissonance Theory , Simply ... Audio help · More spoken articles) Wikiquote has quotations related to Cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance entry in The ... This was described as an example of Trump supporters experiencing cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance theory of ...
Like personal cognitive dissonance, vicarious cognitive dissonance can lead to changes in the observer's attitudes and behavior ... Chong, J.; Cooper, J. (2007). Cognitive dissonance and vicarious cognitive dissonance in East Asia: Can I feel your discomfort ... Vicarious dissonance has also been shown to have effects in a collectivist setting while personal cognitive dissonance did not ... Vicarious cognitive dissonance (also vicarious dissonance) is the state of negative arousal in an individual from observing a ...
Understanding that cognitive dissonance works as a motivator towards states of affairs, the individual suffering the dissonance ... comes cognitive dissonance, according to many theorists, the first of which being Leon Festinger. When developing his Cognitive ... Festinger, L (1962). "Cognitive Dissonance". Scientific American. 207 (4): 93-106. Bibcode:1962SciAm.207d..93F. doi:10.1038/ ... doi:10.1016/0022-1031(65)90026-0. Miller C., (1995). A reflection paper on the theories of cognitive dissonance and self- ...
Festinger, L. (1962). "Cognitive dissonance". Scientific American. 207 (4): 93-107. Bibcode:1962SciAm.207d..93F. doi:10.1038/ ... Asch conformity experiments - Study of if and how individuals yielded to or defied a majority group Cognitive dissonance - ... Festinger, L. (1957). A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. California: Stanford University Press. Kleinmuntz, B., ed. (1968). ... and A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (1957), Festinger proposed that human beings strive for internal psychological consistency ...
cognitive dissonance. While this may be the case, evidentialists admit, evidentialism is only meant to separate justified ... "cognitive capacities of an individual or upon the cognitive processes or information-gatherings practices that lead to an ...
Elliot AJ, Devine PG (September 1994). "On the motivational nature of cognitive dissonance: Dissonance as psychological ... Cognitive dissonance theory refers to a situation involving conflicting attitudes, beliefs or behaviors that cause arousal ... Festinger L (October 1962). "Cognitive dissonance". Scientific American. 207 (4): 93-102. Bibcode:1962SciAm.207d..93F. doi: ... "Decision Making as a Function of Locus of Control and Cognitive Dissonance". Psychological Reports. 44 (2): 499-502. doi: ...
"Cognitive Dissonance". Simply Psychology. Festinger, Leon; Carlsmith, James M. (1959). "Cognitive consequences of forced ... In Leon Festinger's cognitive dissonance experiment, participants were divided into two groups and were asked to perform a ... In the 1960s, there was growing interest in topics such as cognitive dissonance, bystander intervention, and aggression. In the ... This led them to experience dissonance, or discomfort and internal conflict. They could only overcome that dissonance by ...
Major solo and group exhibitions include the following: Cognitive Dissonance at the Spartanburg Art Museum in 2016; Psyched at ... "Spartanburg Art Museum , Cognitive Dissonance". www.spartanburgartmuseum.org. Retrieved 2017-03-14. "Psyched" (PDF) (Press ...
"Cognitive Dissonance". McLeod, Saul (2008). "Social Psychology Attitude". (Orphaned articles from April 2015, All orphaned ...
This conflict often creates a psychological tension, known as cognitive dissonance, as the individual tries to maintain a sense ... Retrieved 2014-12-20.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) Festinger, L. (1962). Cognitive Dissonance. ... The study suggested that paralinguistic cognitive complexity cues, among the factors examined, provide the most comprehensive ...
Michael D. Bates (25 April 2007). "Cognitive Dissonance, Personified". Urban Tulsa Weekly. Archived from the original on 2012- ...
Cognitive dissonance is powerful when it relates to competition and self-concept. The most famous example of how cognitive ... "Cognitive Dissonance Theory". Simply Psychology. Retrieved 30 April 2014. Petty; Cacioppo (1986). "The elaboration likelihood ... Leon Festinger originally proposed the theory of cognitive dissonance in 1957. He theorized that human beings constantly strive ... cognitive dissonance, reattribution, (increasing salience of) antecedents A typical instantiations of these techniques in ...
... "motivation to resolve cognitive dissonance affects the visual perception of physical environments." Cognitive dissonance occurs ... "Cognitive Dissonance Theory , Simply Psychology". www.simplypsychology.org. Retrieved 2017-11-12. Social Perception Action and ... Her research article with David Dunning Cognitive Dissonance and the Perception of Natural Environments examined the way in ... In Balcetis and Dunning's study, participants were given the choice of performing a task that induced cognitive dissonance, ...
PI theory is an extension of Cognitive Dissonance Theory. Cognitive Dissonance Theory is a psychological concept that explains ... This could also be seen engaging in as a form of cognitive dissonance. Communication is seen as a medium of problematic ... Festinger, L. (1957). A theory of cognitive dissonance. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Hines, S.C., Babrow, A.S., ... We can differentiate between the two theories by thinking about Cognitive Dissonance Theory as a theory that focuses ...
According to cognitive dissonance theory, there are three types of cognitive relationships: consonant relationships, dissonant ... cognitive dissonance is considered a drive state that generates motivation to achieve consonance and reduce dissonance. An ... The theory of cognitive dissonance, part of the cybernetic tradition, argues that humans are consistency seekers and attempt to ... They may experience dissonance between their beliefs and their actions. If there is a significant amount of dissonance, they ...
Siddique, Ashik (May 16, 2017). "Cognitive Dissonance on Climate". Resilience.org. Post Carbon Institute. Archived from the ... Global warming portal Anti-environmentalism Cognitive dissonance Environmental skepticism False consciousness Fear, uncertainty ... Soft denial is akin to cognitive dissonance: despite understanding and accepting the scientific consensus on climate change as ... "Confirmation of pre-existing worldview" - Because of cognitive inertia, people may fail to integrate the significance or scale ...
... a cognitive dissonance is created between the expectations and reality and people seek to reduce this dissonance by ... Festinger's other well-known theory of cognitive dissonance, proposed in 1957 offers further evidence for why such a process ... Festinger, L. (1957). A Theory of cognitive dissonance. Evanstone, Illinois:Row, Peterson. Thoits, P.A. (1984). Coping, social ... people would be expected to communicate the event with others in order to help reduce their cognitive dissonance. An article by ...
Festinger described the basic hypotheses of cognitive dissonance as follows: 1. The existence of dissonance [or inconsistency ... Theories like cognitive dissonance could not be explained in behaviorist terms. For example, liking was simply a function of ... Greenwald, A. G., & Ronis, D. L. (1978). Twenty years of cognitive dissonance: Case study of the evolution of a theory. ... Festinger, L. (1962). Cognitive dissonance. Scientific American, 207(4), 93-107. Festinger, L. (1964). Behavioral support for ...
"Cognitive Dissonance by Rick Poynor". "Complete Hero, Creative Review". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. "Sky ... "Cognitive Dissonance by Rick Pynor". "Projections at the National Gallery: London Mayoral Office Press Release". The Guardian, ...
This is probably because cognitive dissonance would arise if great effort is made to achieve something that is subsequently ... Aronson and Mills interpreted their result in terms of cognitive dissonance. According to Aronson and Mills, to resolve the ... This resembles the need to justify one's efforts in accordance with the cognitive dissonance theory but there is evidence ... Daryl Bem (1965) proposed an alternative to the cognitive dissonance theory in explaining how attitudes are shaped. The self- ...
Leon Festinger also focused on cognitive processes in developing cognitive dissonance theory, which Elliot Aronson and other ... Festinger, L. (1957) Cognitive dissonance. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press. Aronson, Elliot; Mills, Judson (1959 ... The cognitive revolution in psychology in the 1950s and 60s led researchers to study how cognitive biases and heuristics ... During and after the cognitive revolution, intergroup relations researchers began to study cognitive biases, heuristics, and ...
"Festinger's Cognitive Dissonance Theory and Research Examples". 2012-04-22. Retrieved 5 Mar 2014.[dead link] The core statement ... In Aronson's Theories of Cognitive Consistency (1973), he states: "Dissonance theory does not rest upon the assumption that man ... Aronson's interests and research have paid particular attention to the theory of cognitive dissonance. Aronson refined the ... Festinger, L. (1957). A theory of cognitive dissonance. Evanston, IL: Row, Peterson. Aronson advanced Festinger's theory by ...
Cognitive dissonance Jovchelovitch, Sandra (2002). Re-thinking the diversity of knowledge : cognitive polyphasia, belief and ... determines a state of cognitive polyphasia". Cognitive systems do not habitually develop towards a state of consistency. ... Cognitive polyphasia is where different kinds of knowledge, possessing different rationalities live side by side in the same ... Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, p. 175 Provencher, C., Arthi, & Wagner, W. (2012). Cognitive polyphasia. Papers on ...
This theory stems from the concept of cognitive dissonance. When the brain holds two conflicting beliefs at the same time, it ... Gestalt psychology and cognitive dissonance theories of illusions have been criticised for their unsatisfactory explanations of ... Festinger, L (1957). A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. California: Stanford University Press. Pylyshyn, P (1999). "Is vision ... Cognitive interpretations of a physical stimulus are constructed from the expectations of what we know, rather than what we ...
The theory of cognitive dissonance proposes that people have a motivational drive to reduce dissonance. Choice-supportive bias ... as postdecisional dissonance. Within the context of cognitive dissonance, choice-supportive bias would be seen as reducing the ... Choice Cognitive dissonance Confabulation Confirmation bias Decision making Escalation of commitment List of cognitive biases ... It is part of cognitive science, and is a distinct cognitive bias that occurs once a decision is made. For example, if a person ...
Affective forecasting Cognitive dissonance Know thyself Memory Phenomenology Self-awareness Self-categorization theory Self- ... Psychological Enquiry, 3, 345-346 Festinger, L. (1957). A theory of cognitive dissonance. Evanston, IL: Row Peterson Swann, W. ... such as cognitive dissonance theory. This theory was put forward by William Swann of the University of Texas at Austin in 1983 ... for this reason the cognitive self is also referred to as the known self. The cognitive self is made up of everything we know ( ...
Festinger, L. (1957). A theory of cognitive dissonance. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Knobloch, S. (2006). Mood ... When a person holds two cognitions that are incompatible, dissonance is produced. But such dissonance can be reduced through ... cognitive dissonance theory. Festinger notes that the human organism tries to establish internal congruity among cognitions ... It deals with all conceivable moods rather than a single, specific affective state, such as dissonance (Zillman, 1988b). Based ...
Cooper & Fazio's (1984) have also added that cognitive dissonance does not arise from any simple cognitive inconsistency, but ... A theory of cognitive dissonance. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Cooper J, Fazio RH. 1984. A new look at dissonance ... as well as by the individual's motivation to maintain cognitive consistency when cognitive dissonance occurs-when two attitudes ... Cognitive dissonance, a theory originally developed by Festinger (1957), is the idea that people experience a sense of guilt or ...
Festinger, L. (1957). A theory of cognitive dissonance. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Freyd, J. J. (1994). Betrayal- ... Johnson-Laird, P. N. (1983). Mental Models: Towards a Cognitive Science of Language, Inference, and Consciousness. Cambridge: ...
... comes from the unpleasant feeling called cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance is a state of tension that occurs whenever ... To reduce their cognitive dissonance, students who did cheat altered their thoughts on cheating: e.g., "Cheating isn't that bad ... One major claim of social psychology is that we experience cognitive dissonance every time we make a decision; in an attempt to ... Self-justification describes how, when a person encounters cognitive dissonance, or a situation in which a person's behavior is ...
This Body Project (BP) is rooted in the theory of cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance occurs when a discrepancy emerges ... "Cognitive Dissonance & Post-Purchase Process". study.com. Retrieved 2021-10-08. "Cognitive Dissonance Theory , Simply ... Audio help · More spoken articles) Wikiquote has quotations related to Cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance entry in The ... This was described as an example of Trump supporters experiencing cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance theory of ...
1 Examples of cognitive dissonance. *2 Signs of cognitive dissonance in a person engaged in a discussion/argument *2.1 ... Signs of cognitive dissonance in a person engaged in a discussion/argument. Below are signs of cognitive dissonance in a person ... Responses to cognitive dissonance. People respond to the uncomfortable feelings associated with cognitive dissonance in a ... Examples of cognitive dissonance. * A mother, who believes that her son is a good boy, learns that he has committed a serious ...
Cognitive Dissonance 50 Years of a Classic Theory. *Joel Cooper - Princeton University, USA, The University of Utah, USA, Red ... Cognitive dissonance has been an important and influential theory since Leon Festinger published his classic work in 1957. It ... Political analysts as well as psychologists will be interested in the specific conditions that elicit cognitive dissonance.". - ... "Cooper (Princeton) does a superb job summarizing research on the concept of cognitive dissonance since it was first elucidated ...
Cognitive Dissonance is a term used in psychology to represent a state of mind in which we attempt to simultaneously hold on to ... Cognitive Dissonance attempts to embody this conflict in musical and aesthetic terms. Scored for baritone, trumpet, trombone ... As Mary Shelleys novel represents the Sibyls prophecies, my conceit in Cognitive Dissonance is to be the mouthpiece for Mary ... creating a musical analogue to the idea of cognitive dissonance. It is my attempt to represent the deep contradiction we all ...
SEBASTIAN CURRIER Cognitive Dissonance (World Premiere). CHAYA CZERNOWIN Irrational. , Further information on Work: Cognitive ... On June 13, Sebastian Curriers Cognitive Dissonance for voice, chamber ensemble, and electronics receives its world premiere ... June 13: Sebastian Currier, Cognitive Dissonance (World Premiere). The pieces title refers to the psychological term, ... Sebastian Curriers new chamber work Cognitive Dissonance debuts with loadbang in June. ...
Christian Cultural Cognitive Dissonance. Maybe the Benedict Option is a bad idea. So what else you got? ...
Research, examples, reducing dissonance, arguments against, and more. ... Strategies for Reducing Cognitive Dissonance As the foregoing discussion highlights, cognitive dissonance is an unpleasant ... Cognitive dissonance theory was first proposed by Leon Festinger. He defined cognitive dissonance as the psychological tension ... cognitive dissonance. Some people are more prone to experiencing dissonance than others, and some can tolerate more dissonance ...
Cognitive Dissonance: The State of Americas Iran Policy by Reuel Marc Gerecht ...
Find cognitive Dissonance course notes, answered questions, and cognitive Dissonance tutors 24/7. ... Course Hero has thousands of cognitive Dissonance study resources to help you. ... Most Recent Cognitive Dissonance Documents Uploaded All Recent Cognitive Dissonance Study Resources Documents * 12 Pages ... Cognitive Dissonance Homework Help View All Cognitive Dissonance Study Resources Homework Help * 2 Pages ...
Learn how cognitive dissonance affects us at HowStuffWorks. ... Thats cognitive dissonance at play.. Cognitive dissonance is ... But cognitive dissonance doesnt just apply to minor choices - it rears its head in larger, societal matters, too. Enter ... In this way, the ban indicates cognitive dissonance among its enactors and supporters: They are justifying a ban that aims to ... We search for information that is consistent with our beliefs and follow like-minded news sources to avoid cognitive dissonance ...
Snippets The cognitive dissonance over The tools will save youedition. Joe Gregorio 14 Aug 2003. The tools may or may not save ...
Recognizing ones own cognitive dissonance can be tricky because it means admitting either that your beliefs are wrong or that ... What does cognitive dissonance look like?. All humans are guilty of cognitive dissonance sometimes. Its simply too easy to ... How does one recognize destructive cognitive dissonance within themselves?. Recognizing ones own cognitive dissonance can be ... But heres a clue you can use to recognize when youre having a moment of cognitive dissonance: If youre in a situation where ...
Have you seen the consequences of such a gamble failing? This is also sounds like cognitive dissonance to me. Its not as ... In the meantime, Ill say to smallchristian that I doubt there were many who didnt show cognitive dissonance because to do ... I am pro-life myself, although I have dissonance with this issue as well. I really dont like the idea of a human life being ... I am pro-life myself, although I have dissonance with this issue as well. I really dont like the idea of a human life being ...
Looking through the lens of cognitive dissonance theory, this research proposes a five-step theoretical framework and derives ... We argue that the cognitive dissonance generated by persuasive techniques influences phishing susceptibility. We also argue for ... the mediating mechanism of preference for cognitive consistency and mindful attention awareness. This research contributes to ... Phishing Susceptibility - a Cognitive Dissonance Persuasion View. Phishing remains the most commonly employed technique for ...
When information which properly belongs to the public is systematically withheld by those in power, the people soon become ignorant of their own affairs, distrustful of those who manage them, and - eventually - incapable of determining their own destinies.. The answer: Richard Milhouse Nixon. This gem from Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong by James W. Loewen, Simon & Schuster, 1995. The occasion was a 1972 presidential proclamation to strengthen the Freedom of Information Act (see Tim Weiner, The Cold War Freezer Keeps Historians Out, New York Times, May 23, 1993.). ...
The cognitive dissonance would be laughable, if it werent putting all of our lives at stake. ...
The susceptibility to such nostrums to heal the deformities of the Muslim soul constitutes cognitive dissonance on a massive ... Englands Cognitive Dissonance. by Jonathan Rosenblum. Yated Neeman. September 6, 2006. https://www.jewishmediaresources.com/ ...
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People Are Sharing The Worst Examples Of Cognitive Dissonance Theyve Ever Seen, And My Mind Is Blown At A Few Of These. ... Voting to kick out foreigners without realizing that they are the foreigners is peak cognitive dissonance.. -u/No-Village-6781 ... U/Independent_Ad_3915 recently asked the people of Reddit, Whats the worst example of cognitive dissonance youve seen in ... Oxford Reference defines cognitive dissonance as The state of having inconsistent thoughts, beliefs, perceptions (i.e., ...
THE ENTIRE WESTERN WORLD LIVES IN COGNITIVE DISSONANCE. *Posted by Central Scrutinizer on June 23, 2018 at 9:32am ... Are we experiencing a mass psychosis form of cognitive dissonance?. We now move to the second example: Washingtons withdrawal ...
... by Eric W. Dolan ... They were also questioned about their use of strategies to reduce cognitive dissonance, such as trivializing infidelity or ... The study, "Justify my love: Cognitive dissonance reduction among perpetrators of online and offline infidelity", was published ... Alexopoulos noted that future research could collect additional data about the cognitive states associated with committing ...
Review , The cognitive dissonance in adoring pets while eating meat and ignoring wildlife extinction explored in Henry Mances ... His aim is to highlight the cognitive dissonance that makes these incongruities possible. In this, he is especially effective ...
Cognitive dissonance - in the parasha and at the protests (31) Aug 10, 2023, 12:43 PM ... This isnt constructive cognitive dissonance, like the example I began with that might encourage us to work towards eradicating ... But this week I read about cognitive dissonance in a negative context. In a Substack post called Israels national security ... The four axes of cognitive dissonance Tooze mentions in his post are Israel versus Palestine; the occupation versus Israels ...
Cognitive Dissonance in Spades + RECAP. Director of National Intelligence et al (IC) Share 0 Tweet 0. Share ...
Cognitive Dissonance (Box Set) / CD Boxed Set / Electronic / 882951730225 ...
I received a double dose of cognitive dissonance I received a double dose of cognitive dissonance ...
Cognitive dissonance in evidence‐based sustainability policy? Reflections based on governance. Haupttitel: Cognitive dissonance ... What are the reasons for such collective cognitive dissonance? Is it because the costs of unwise decisions will be often later ... Cognitive dissonance in evidence‐based sustainability policy? Reflections based on governance. *Einloggen ... acknowledge the normative dimension of governance practices and propose mechanisms for dealing with normative and cognitive ...
This is thought to result from cognitive dissonance as an effort to reconcile our choices and preferences. It has been argued ... Does cognitive dissonance depend on self-concept? 2-year-old children, but not 1-year-olds, show blind choice-induced ... This is thought to result from cognitive dissonance as an effort to reconcile our choices and preferences. It has been argued ... Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. UC Merced. Submit. ...
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