An amino acid-specifying codon that has been converted to a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR) by mutation. Its occurance is abnormal causing premature termination of protein translation and results in production of truncated and non-functional proteins. A nonsense mutation is one that converts an amino acid-specific codon to a stop codon.
A set of three nucleotides in a protein coding sequence that specifies individual amino acids or a termination signal (CODON, TERMINATOR). Most codons are universal, but some organisms do not produce the transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER) complementary to all codons. These codons are referred to as unassigned codons (CODONS, NONSENSE).
Any codon that signals the termination of genetic translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC). PEPTIDE TERMINATION FACTORS bind to the stop codon and trigger the hydrolysis of the aminoacyl bond connecting the completed polypeptide to the tRNA. Terminator codons do not specify amino acids.
A codon that directs initiation of protein translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) by stimulating the binding of initiator tRNA (RNA, TRANSFER, MET). In prokaryotes, the codons AUG or GUG can act as initiators while in eukaryotes, AUG is the only initiator codon.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Mutation process that restores the wild-type PHENOTYPE in an organism possessing a mutationally altered GENOTYPE. The second "suppressor" mutation may be on a different gene, on the same gene but located at a distance from the site of the primary mutation, or in extrachromosomal genes (EXTRACHROMOSOMAL INHERITANCE).
Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.
The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.
The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.
A type of mutation in which a number of NUCLEOTIDES deleted from or inserted into a protein coding sequence is not divisible by three, thereby causing an alteration in the READING FRAMES of the entire coding sequence downstream of the mutation. These mutations may be induced by certain types of MUTAGENS or may occur spontaneously.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.
The meaning ascribed to the BASE SEQUENCE with respect to how it is translated into AMINO ACID SEQUENCE. The start, stop, and order of amino acids of a protein is specified by consecutive triplets of nucleotides called codons (CODON).
A process of GENETIC TRANSLATION whereby the terminal amino acid is added to a lengthening polypeptide. This termination process is signaled from the MESSENGER RNA, by one of three termination codons (CODON, TERMINATOR) that immediately follows the last amino acid-specifying CODON.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.
A mutation in which a codon is mutated to one directing the incorporation of a different amino acid. This substitution may result in an inactive or unstable product. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, King & Stansfield, 5th ed)
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The small RNA molecules, 73-80 nucleotides long, that function during translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) to align AMINO ACIDS at the RIBOSOMES in a sequence determined by the mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). There are about 30 different transfer RNAs. Each recognizes a specific CODON set on the mRNA through its own ANTICODON and as aminoacyl tRNAs (RNA, TRANSFER, AMINO ACYL), each carries a specific amino acid to the ribosome to add to the elongating peptide chains.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.
Proteins that are involved in the peptide chain termination reaction (PEPTIDE CHAIN TERMINATION, TRANSLATIONAL) on RIBOSOMES. They include codon-specific class-I release factors, which recognize stop signals (TERMINATOR CODON) in the MESSENGER RNA; and codon-nonspecific class-II release factors.
Variation in a population's DNA sequence that is detected by determining alterations in the conformation of denatured DNA fragments. Denatured DNA fragments are allowed to renature under conditions that prevent the formation of double-stranded DNA and allow secondary structure to form in single stranded fragments. These fragments are then run through polyacrylamide gels to detect variations in the secondary structure that is manifested as an alteration in migration through the gels.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
Sequences of DNA in the genes that are located between the EXONS. They are transcribed along with the exons but are removed from the primary gene transcript by RNA SPLICING to leave mature RNA. Some introns code for separate genes.
The sequential set of three nucleotides in TRANSFER RNA that interacts with its complement in MESSENGER RNA, the CODON, during translation in the ribosome.
An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.
The magnitude of INBREEDING in humans.
The ultimate exclusion of nonsense sequences or intervening sequences (introns) before the final RNA transcript is sent to the cytoplasm.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
Deletion of sequences of nucleic acids from the genetic material of an individual.
An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the conversion of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to dihydroxyacetone phosphate. A deficiency in humans causes nonspherocytic hemolytic disease (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC, CONGENITAL NONSPHEROCYTIC). EC 5.3.1.1.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Multicomponent ribonucleoprotein structures found in the CYTOPLASM of all cells, and in MITOCHONDRIA, and PLASTIDS. They function in PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS via GENETIC TRANSLATION.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
A process of GENETIC TRANSLATION whereby the formation of a peptide chain is started. It includes assembly of the RIBOSOME components, the MESSENGER RNA coding for the polypeptide to be made, INITIATOR TRNA, and PEPTIDE INITIATION FACTORS; and placement of the first amino acid in the peptide chain. The details and components of this process are unique for prokaryotic protein biosynthesis and eukaryotic protein biosynthesis.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
An oligosaccharide antibiotic produced by various STREPTOMYCES.
The three possible sequences of CODONS by which GENETIC TRANSLATION may occur from one nucleotide sequence. A segment of mRNA 5'AUCCGA3' could be translated as 5'AUC.. or 5'UCC.. or 5'CCG.., depending on the location of the START CODON.
Genes that have a suppressor allele or suppressor mutation (SUPPRESSION, GENETIC) which cancels the effect of a previous mutation, enabling the wild-type phenotype to be maintained or partially restored. For example, amber suppressors cancel the effect of an AMBER NONSENSE MUTATION.
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying serine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying tryptophan to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
Nucleotide sequences located at the ends of EXONS and recognized in pre-messenger RNA by SPLICEOSOMES. They are joined during the RNA SPLICING reaction, forming the junctions between exons.
A process whereby multiple RNA transcripts are generated from a single gene. Alternative splicing involves the splicing together of other possible sets of EXONS during the processing of some, but not all, transcripts of the gene. Thus a particular exon may be connected to any one of several alternative exons to form a mature RNA. The alternative forms of mature MESSENGER RNA produce PROTEIN ISOFORMS in which one part of the isoforms is common while the other parts are different.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
DNA sequences recognized as signals to end GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
A directed change in translational READING FRAMES that allows the production of a single protein from two or more OVERLAPPING GENES. The process is programmed by the nucleotide sequence of the MRNA and is sometimes also affected by the secondary or tertiary mRNA structure. It has been described mainly in VIRUSES (especially RETROVIRUSES); RETROTRANSPOSONS; and bacterial insertion elements but also in some cellular genes.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Intermediates in protein biosynthesis. The compounds are formed from amino acids, ATP and transfer RNA, a reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase. They are key compounds in the genetic translation process.
That part of the genome that corresponds to the complete complement of EXONS of an organism or cell.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
Oxadiazoles are heterocyclic organic compounds consisting of a five-membered ring containing two carbon atoms, one nitrogen atom, and two oxygen atoms (one as a part of the oxadiazole ring and the other as a substituent or part of a larger molecule), which can exist in various isomeric forms and are known for their versatile biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, and antitumor properties.
Any detectable and heritable alteration in the lineage of germ cells. Mutations in these cells (i.e., "generative" cells ancestral to the gametes) are transmitted to progeny while those in somatic cells are not.
The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.
A characteristic symptom complex.
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying glutamine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (ras) originally isolated from Harvey (H-ras, Ha-ras, rasH) and Kirsten (K-ras, Ki-ras, rasK) murine sarcoma viruses. Ras genes are widely conserved among animal species and sequences corresponding to both H-ras and K-ras genes have been detected in human, avian, murine, and non-vertebrate genomes. The closely related N-ras gene has been detected in human neuroblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. All genes of the family have a similar exon-intron structure and each encodes a p21 protein.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
Glycosylated compounds in which there is an amino substituent on the glycoside. Some of them are clinically important ANTIBIOTICS.
A congenital abnormality in which there is only a rudimentary iris. This is due to the failure of the optic cup to grow. Aniridia also occurs in a hereditary form, usually autosomal dominant.
A family of proteins that promote unwinding of RNA during splicing and translation.
A clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary conditions characterized by malformed DENTAL ENAMEL, usually involving DENTAL ENAMEL HYPOPLASIA and/or TOOTH HYPOMINERALIZATION.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Ribonucleic acid in fungi having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
A superfamily of proteins containing the globin fold which is composed of 6-8 alpha helices arranged in a characterstic HEME enclosing structure.
A group of hereditary hemolytic anemias in which there is decreased synthesis of one or more hemoglobin polypeptide chains. There are several genetic types with clinical pictures ranging from barely detectable hematologic abnormality to severe and fatal anemia.
The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.
The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.
Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.
In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Synthetic or natural oligonucleotides used in hybridization studies in order to identify and study specific nucleic acid fragments, e.g., DNA segments near or within a specific gene locus or gene. The probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
A complex of closely related aminoglycosides obtained from MICROMONOSPORA purpurea and related species. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, but may cause ear and kidney damage. They act to inhibit PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS.
A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.
'Abnormalities, Multiple' is a broad term referring to the presence of two or more structural or functional anomalies in an individual, which may be genetic or environmental in origin, and can affect various systems and organs of the body.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Genetic diseases that are linked to gene mutations on the X CHROMOSOME in humans (X CHROMOSOME, HUMAN) or the X CHROMOSOME in other species. Included here are animal models of human X-linked diseases.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.
Agents which are destructive to amebae, especially the parasitic species causing AMEBIASIS in man and animal.
Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.
Post-transcriptional biological modification of messenger, transfer, or ribosomal RNAs or their precursors. It includes cleavage, methylation, thiolation, isopentenylation, pseudouridine formation, conformational changes, and association with ribosomal protein.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Pseudouridine is a modified nucleoside, where the uracil component of a uridine residue in RNA molecules is linked to ribose through a carbon-carbon bond rather than the usual nitrogen-glycosidic bond, which can contribute to structural stability and functional diversity in RNA.
Proteins found in any species of virus.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Proteins found in any species of fungus.
Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.
A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.
'Eye proteins' are structural or functional proteins, such as crystallins, opsins, and collagens, located in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, lens, retina, and aqueous humor, that contribute to maintaining transparency, refractive power, phototransduction, and overall integrity of the visual system.
Identification of genetic carriers for a given trait.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.
Genes bearing close resemblance to known genes at different loci, but rendered non-functional by additions or deletions in structure that prevent normal transcription or translation. When lacking introns and containing a poly-A segment near the downstream end (as a result of reverse copying from processed nuclear RNA into double-stranded DNA), they are called processed genes.
A method (first developed by E.M. Southern) for detection of DNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.
The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Conditions with abnormally low levels of BETA-LIPOPROTEINS (low density lipoproteins or LDL) in the blood. It is defined as LDL values equal to or less than the 5th percentile for the population. They include the autosomal dominant form involving mutation of the APOLIPOPROTEINS B gene, and the autosomal recessive form involving mutation of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein. All are characterized by low LDL and dietary fat malabsorption.
A process of GENETIC TRANSLATION, when an amino acid is transferred from its cognate TRANSFER RNA to the lengthening chain of PEPTIDES.
A copy number variation that results in reduced GENE DOSAGE due to any loss-of-function mutation. The loss of heterozygosity is associated with abnormal phenotypes or diseased states because the remaining gene is insufficient.
Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero.
Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.
Hereditary, progressive degeneration of the neuroepithelium of the retina characterized by night blindness and progressive contraction of the visual field.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
A subclass of enzymes that aminoacylate AMINO ACID-SPECIFIC TRANSFER RNA with their corresponding AMINO ACIDS.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying glutamic acid to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)
The presence of apparently similar characters for which the genetic evidence indicates that different genes or different genetic mechanisms are involved in different pedigrees. In clinical settings genetic heterogeneity refers to the presence of a variety of genetic defects which cause the same disease, often due to mutations at different loci on the same gene, a finding common to many human diseases including ALZHEIMER DISEASE; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY, FAMILIAL; and POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES. (Rieger, et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
A nitrosourea compound with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the southeastern and eastern areas of the Asian continent.
Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)
N(6)-[delta(3)-isopentenyl]adenosine. Isopentenyl derivative of adenosine which is a member of the cytokinin family of plant growth regulators.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying arginine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.
The analysis of a sequence such as a region of a chromosome, a haplotype, a gene, or an allele for its involvement in controlling the phenotype of a specific trait, metabolic pathway, or disease.
Biologically active DNA which has been formed by the in vitro joining of segments of DNA from different sources. It includes the recombination joint or edge of a heteroduplex region where two recombining DNA molecules are connected.
RNA transcripts of the DNA that are in some unfinished stage of post-transcriptional processing (RNA PROCESSING, POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL) required for function. RNA precursors may undergo several steps of RNA SPLICING during which the phosphodiester bonds at exon-intron boundaries are cleaved and the introns are excised. Consequently a new bond is formed between the ends of the exons. Resulting mature RNAs can then be used; for example, mature mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER) is used as a template for protein production.
An mRNA metabolic process that distinguishes a normal STOP CODON from a premature stop codon (NONSENSE CODON) and facilitates rapid degradation of aberrant mRNAs containing premature stop codons.
A class of genetic disorders resulting in INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY that is associated either with mutations of GENES located on the X CHROMOSOME or aberrations in the structure of the X chromosome (SEX CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS).
Polymers made up of a few (2-20) nucleotides. In molecular genetics, they refer to a short sequence synthesized to match a region where a mutation is known to occur, and then used as a probe (OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES). (Dorland, 28th ed)
Tumor suppressor genes located in the 5q21 region on the long arm of human chromosome 5. The mutation of these genes is associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS COLI) and GARDNER SYNDROME, as well as some sporadic colorectal cancers.
Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.
A group of deoxyribonucleotides (up to 12) in which the phosphate residues of each deoxyribonucleotide act as bridges in forming diester linkages between the deoxyribose moieties.
Errors in metabolic processes resulting from inborn genetic mutations that are inherited or acquired in utero.
A group of transfer RNAs which are specific for carrying each one of the 20 amino acids to the ribosome in preparation for protein synthesis.
Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying tyrosine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.
An essential amino acid that is physiologically active in the L-form.
A muscle protein localized in surface membranes which is the product of the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy gene. Individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy usually lack dystrophin completely while those with Becker muscular dystrophy have dystrophin of an altered size. It shares features with other cytoskeletal proteins such as SPECTRIN and alpha-actinin but the precise function of dystrophin is not clear. One possible role might be to preserve the integrity and alignment of the plasma membrane to the myofibrils during muscle contraction and relaxation. MW 400 kDa.
Form of epidermolysis bullosa having onset at birth or during the neonatal period and transmitted through autosomal recessive inheritance. It is characterized by generalized blister formation, extensive denudation, and separation and cleavage of the basal cell plasma membranes from the basement membrane.
Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
Transmission of gene defects or chromosomal aberrations/abnormalities which are expressed in extreme variation in the structure or function of the eye. These may be evident at birth, but may be manifested later with progression of the disorder.
The sequential location of genes on a chromosome.

Infrequent translation of a nonsense codon is sufficient to decrease mRNA level. (1/1486)

In many organisms nonsense mutations decrease the level of mRNA. In the case of mammalian cells, it is still controversial whether translation is required for this nonsense-mediated RNA decrease (NMD). Although previous analyzes have shown that conditions that impede translation termination at nonsense codons also prevent NMD, the residual level of termination was unknown in these experiments. Moreover, the conditions used to impede termination might also have interfered with NMD in other ways. Because of these uncertainties, we have tested the effects of limiting translation of a nonsense codon in a different way, using two mutations in the immunoglobulin mu heavy chain gene. For this purpose we exploited an exceptional nonsense mutation at codon 3, which efficiently terminates translation but nonetheless maintains a high level of mu mRNA. We have shown 1) that translation of Ter462 in the double mutant occurs at only approximately 4% the normal frequency, and 2) that Ter462 in cis with Ter3 can induce NMD. That is, translation of Ter462 at this low (4%) frequency is sufficient to induce NMD.  (+info)

Genetic heterogeneity in propionic acidemia patients with alpha-subunit defects. Identification of five novel mutations, one of them causing instability of the protein. (2/1486)

The inherited metabolic disease propionic acidemia (PA) can result from mutations in either of the genes PCCA or PCCB, which encode the alpha and beta subunits, respectively, of the mitochondrial enzyme propionyl CoA-carboxylase. In this work we have analyzed the molecular basis of PCCA gene defects, studying mRNA levels and identifying putative disease causing mutations. A total of 10 different mutations, none predominant, are present in a sample of 24 mutant alleles studied. Five novel mutations are reported here for the first time. A neutral polymorphism and a variant allele present in the general population were also detected. To examine the effect of a point mutation (M348K) involving a highly conserved residue, we have carried out in vitro expression of normal and mutant PCCA cDNA and analyzed the mitochondrial import and stability of the resulting proteins. Both wild-type and mutant proteins were imported into mitochondria and processed into the mature form with similar efficiency, but the mature mutant M348K protein decayed more rapidly than did the wild-type, indicating a reduced stability, which is probably the disease-causing mechanism.  (+info)

Facile characterization of translation initiation via nonsense codon suppression. (3/1486)

A new strategy for studying the mechanism of translation initiation in eukaryotes has been developed. The strategy involves the use of an in vitro translation system to incorporate a non-natural fluorescent amino acid into a protein from a suppressor tRNAPheCUA misacylated with that amino acid. It is thereby possible to monitor translation initiation efficiency at an AUG codon in different contexts; this is illustrated for three constructs encoding Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase mRNA with different translation initiation regions. Fluorescence measurements after in vitro translation of the mRNAs in rabbit reticulocyte lysate reflected differences in the position and efficiency of translation initiation and, therefore, can be used for characterization of the translation initiation process.  (+info)

A newly identified patient with clinical xeroderma pigmentosum phenotype has a non-sense mutation in the DDB2 gene and incomplete repair in (6-4) photoproducts. (4/1486)

We report here a patient (Ops1) with clinical photosensitivity, including pigmented or depigmented macules and patches, and multiple skin neoplasias (malignant melanomas, basal cell carcinomas, and squamous cell carcinomas in situ) in sun-exposed areas. These clinical features are reminiscent of xeroderma pigmentosum. As cells from Ops1 showed normal levels in DNA repair synthesis in vivo (unscheduled DNA synthesis and recovery of RNA synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation), we performed a postreplication repair assay and recovery of replicative DNA synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation to investigate if Ops1 cells belonged to a xeroderma pigmentosum variant pattern. Ops1 cells were normal, but there was an incomplete pattern repair in (6-4) photoproducts in contrast to a normal pattern repair in cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by repair kinetics using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, Ops1 cells were defective in a damage-specific DNA binding protein and carried a non-sense mutation in the DDB2 gene. These results suggest that (i) the DDB2 gene is somewhat related to skin carcinogenesis, photoaging skin, and the removal of (6-4) photoproducts; (ii) although it is believed that cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the principal mutagenic lesion and (6-4) photoproducts are less likely to contribute to ultraviolet-induced mutations in mammals, Ops1 is one of the ultraviolet-induced mutagenic models induced by (6-4) photoproducts.  (+info)

Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in health and disease. (5/1486)

All eukaryotes possess the ability to detect and degrade transcripts harboring premature signals for the termination of translation. Despite the ubiquitous nature of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and its demonstrated role in the modulation of phenotypes resulting from selected nonsense alleles, very little is known regarding its basic mechanism or the selective pressure for complete evolutionary conservation of this function. This review will present the current models of NMD that have been generated during the study of model organisms and mammalian cells. The physiological burden of nonsense transcripts and the emerging view that NMD plays a broad and critical role in the regulation of gene expression will also be discussed. Such issues are relevant to the proposal that pharmacological manipulation of NMD will find therapeutic application.  (+info)

Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of 19 Wolfram syndrome kindreds demonstrating a wide spectrum of mutations in WFS1. (6/1486)

Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy. mtDNA deletions have been described, and a gene (WFS1) recently has been identified, on chromosome 4p16, encoding a predicted 890 amino acid transmembrane protein. Direct DNA sequencing was done to screen the entire coding region of the WFS1 gene in 30 patients from 19 British kindreds with Wolfram syndrome. DNA was also screened for structural rearrangements (deletions and duplications) and point mutations in mtDNA. No pathogenic mtDNA mutations were found in our cohort. We identified 24 mutations in the WFS1 gene: 8 nonsense mutations, 8 missense mutations, 3 in-frame deletions, 1 in-frame insertion, and 4 frameshift mutations. Of these, 23 were novel mutations, and most occurred in exon 8. The majority of patients were compound heterozygotes for two mutations, and there was no common founder mutation. The data were also analyzed for genotype-phenotype relationships. Although some interesting cases were noted, consideration of the small sample size and frequency of each mutation indicated no clear-cut correlations between any of the observed mutations and disease severity. There were no obvious mutation hot spots or clusters. Hence, molecular screening for Wolfram syndrome in affected families and for Wolfram syndrome-carrier status in subjects with psychiatric disorders or diabetes mellitus will require complete analysis of exon 8 and upstream exons.  (+info)

Mutations in VPS16 and MRT1 stabilize mRNAs by activating an inhibitor of the decapping enzyme. (7/1486)

Decapping is a rate-limiting step in the decay of many yeast mRNAs; the activity of the decapping enzyme therefore plays a significant role in determining RNA stability. Using an in vitro decapping assay, we have identified a factor, Vps16p, that regulates the activity of the yeast decapping enzyme, Dcp1p. Mutations in the VPS16 gene result in a reduction of decapping activity in vitro and in the stabilization of both wild-type and nonsense-codon-containing mRNAs in vivo. The mrt1-3 allele, previously shown to affect the turnover of wild-type mRNAs, results in a similar in vitro phenotype. Extracts from both vps16 and mrt1 mutant strains inhibit the activity of purified Flag-Dcp1p. We have identified a 70-kDa protein which copurifies with Flag-Dcp1p as the abundant Hsp70 family member Ssa1p/2p. Intriguingly, the interaction with Ssa1p/2p is enhanced in strains with mutations in vps16 or mrt1. We propose that Hsp70s may be involved in the regulation of mRNA decapping.  (+info)

An internal open reading frame triggers nonsense-mediated decay of the yeast SPT10 mRNA. (8/1486)

Yeast cells containing a temperature-sensitive mutation in the PRT1 gene were found to selectively stabilize mRNAs harboring early nonsense codons. The similarities between the mRNA decay phenotypes of prt1-1 cells and those lacking the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) factor Upf1p led us to determine whether both types of mutations cause the accumulation of the same mRNAs. Differential display analysis and mRNA half-life measurements demonstrated that the HHF2 mRNA increased in abundance in prt1-1 and upf1Delta cells, but did not manifest a change in decay rate. In both mutant strains this increase was attributable to stabilization of the SPT10 transcript, an mRNA encoding a transcriptional regulator of HHF2. Analyses of chimeric mRNAs used to identify the cis-acting basis for NMD of the SPT10 mRNA indicated that ribosomes scan beyond its initiator AUG and initiate at the next downstream AUG, resulting in premature translation termination. By searching a yeast database for transcripts with sequence features similar to those of the SPT10 mRNA, other transcripts that decay by the NMD pathway were identified. Our results demonstrate that mRNAs undergoing leaky scanning are a new class of endogenous NMD substrate, and suggest the existence of a novel cellular regulatory circuit.  (+info)

A nonsense codon is a sequence of three nucleotides in DNA or RNA that does not code for an amino acid. Instead, it signals the end of the protein-coding region of a gene and triggers the termination of translation, the process by which the genetic code is translated into a protein.

In DNA, the nonsense codons are UAA, UAG, and UGA, which are also known as "stop codons." When these codons are encountered during translation, they cause the release of the newly synthesized polypeptide chain from the ribosome, bringing the process of protein synthesis to a halt.

Nonsense mutations are changes in the DNA sequence that result in the appearance of a nonsense codon where an amino acid-coding codon used to be. These types of mutations can lead to premature termination of translation and the production of truncated, nonfunctional proteins, which can cause genetic diseases or contribute to cancer development.

A codon is a sequence of three adjacent nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies the insertion of a particular amino acid during protein synthesis, or signals the beginning or end of translation. In DNA, these triplets are read during transcription to produce a complementary mRNA molecule, which is then translated into a polypeptide chain during translation. There are 64 possible codons in the standard genetic code, with 61 encoding for specific amino acids and three serving as stop codons that signal the termination of protein synthesis.

A codon is a sequence of three adjacent nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies a particular amino acid during the process of protein synthesis, or codes for the termination of translation. In DNA, these triplets are read in a 5' to 3' direction, while in mRNA, they are read in a 5' to 3' direction as well. There are 64 possible codons (4^3) in the genetic code, and 61 of them specify amino acids. The remaining three codons, UAA, UAG, and UGA, are terminator or stop codons that signal the end of protein synthesis.

Terminator codons, also known as nonsense codons, do not code for any amino acids. Instead, they cause the release of the newly synthesized polypeptide chain from the ribosome, which is the complex machinery responsible for translating the genetic code into a protein. This process is called termination or translation termination.

In prokaryotic cells, termination occurs when a release factor recognizes and binds to the stop codon in the A site of the ribosome. This triggers the hydrolysis of the peptidyl-tRNA bond, releasing the completed polypeptide chain from the tRNA and the ribosome. In eukaryotic cells, a similar process occurs, but it involves different release factors and additional steps to ensure accurate termination.

In summary, a codon is a sequence of three adjacent nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies an amino acid or signals the end of protein synthesis. Terminator codons are specific codons that do not code for any amino acids and instead signal the end of translation, leading to the release of the newly synthesized polypeptide chain from the ribosome.

A codon is a sequence of three nucleotides in DNA or RNA that specifies a particular amino acid or signals the start or stop of protein synthesis. In the context of protein synthesis, an initiator codon is the specific codon that signifies the beginning of the translation process and sets the reading frame for the mRNA sequence.

The most common initiator codon in DNA and RNA is AUG, which encodes the amino acid methionine. In some cases, however, alternative initiation codons such as GUG (valine) or UUG (leucine) may be used. It's worth noting that the use of these alternative initiator codons can vary depending on the organism and the specific gene in question.

Once the initiator codon is recognized by the ribosome, the translation machinery begins to assemble and begin synthesizing the protein according to the genetic code specified by the mRNA sequence.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Genetic suppression is a concept in genetics that refers to the phenomenon where the expression or function of one gene is reduced or silenced by another gene. This can occur through various mechanisms such as:

* Allelic exclusion: When only one allele (version) of a gene is expressed, while the other is suppressed.
* Epigenetic modifications: Chemical changes to the DNA or histone proteins that package DNA can result in the suppression of gene expression.
* RNA interference: Small RNAs can bind to and degrade specific mRNAs (messenger RNAs), preventing their translation into proteins.
* Transcriptional repression: Proteins called transcription factors can bind to DNA and prevent the recruitment of RNA polymerase, which is necessary for gene transcription.

Genetic suppression plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression and maintaining proper cellular function. It can also contribute to diseases such as cancer when genes that suppress tumor growth are suppressed themselves.

DNA Mutational Analysis is a laboratory test used to identify genetic variations or changes (mutations) in the DNA sequence of a gene. This type of analysis can be used to diagnose genetic disorders, predict the risk of developing certain diseases, determine the most effective treatment for cancer, or assess the likelihood of passing on an inherited condition to offspring.

The test involves extracting DNA from a patient's sample (such as blood, saliva, or tissue), amplifying specific regions of interest using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and then sequencing those regions to determine the precise order of nucleotide bases in the DNA molecule. The resulting sequence is then compared to reference sequences to identify any variations or mutations that may be present.

DNA Mutational Analysis can detect a wide range of genetic changes, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions, deletions, duplications, and rearrangements. The test is often used in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical evaluations to provide a comprehensive assessment of a patient's genetic profile.

It is important to note that not all mutations are pathogenic or associated with disease, and the interpretation of DNA Mutational Analysis results requires careful consideration of the patient's medical history, family history, and other relevant factors.

Exons are the coding regions of DNA that remain in the mature, processed mRNA after the removal of non-coding intronic sequences during RNA splicing. These exons contain the information necessary to encode proteins, as they specify the sequence of amino acids within a polypeptide chain. The arrangement and order of exons can vary between different genes and even between different versions of the same gene (alternative splicing), allowing for the generation of multiple protein isoforms from a single gene. This complexity in exon structure and usage significantly contributes to the diversity and functionality of the proteome.

I must clarify that the term "pedigree" is not typically used in medical definitions. Instead, it is often employed in genetics and breeding, where it refers to the recorded ancestry of an individual or a family, tracing the inheritance of specific traits or diseases. In human genetics, a pedigree can help illustrate the pattern of genetic inheritance in families over multiple generations. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical definition.

A frameshift mutation is a type of genetic mutation that occurs when the addition or deletion of nucleotides in a DNA sequence is not divisible by three. Since DNA is read in groups of three nucleotides (codons), which each specify an amino acid, this can shift the "reading frame," leading to the insertion or deletion of one or more amino acids in the resulting protein. This can cause a protein to be significantly different from the normal protein, often resulting in a nonfunctional protein and potentially causing disease. Frameshift mutations are typically caused by insertions or deletions of nucleotides, but they can also result from more complex genetic rearrangements.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Protein biosynthesis is the process by which cells generate new proteins. It involves two major steps: transcription and translation. Transcription is the process of creating a complementary RNA copy of a sequence of DNA. This RNA copy, or messenger RNA (mRNA), carries the genetic information to the site of protein synthesis, the ribosome. During translation, the mRNA is read by transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, which bring specific amino acids to the ribosome based on the sequence of nucleotides in the mRNA. The ribosome then links these amino acids together in the correct order to form a polypeptide chain, which may then fold into a functional protein. Protein biosynthesis is essential for the growth and maintenance of all living organisms.

The genetic code is the set of rules that dictates how DNA and RNA sequences are translated into proteins. It consists of a 64-unit "alphabet" formed by all possible combinations of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) in DNA or uracil (U) in RNA. These triplets, also known as codons, specify the addition of specific amino acids during protein synthesis or signal the start or stop of translation. This code is universal across all known organisms, with only a few exceptions.

Peptide chain termination, translational, refers to the process in protein synthesis where the addition of new amino acids to a growing peptide chain is stopped. This event occurs when a special type of transfer RNA (tRNA), carrying a specific termination codon (UAA, UAG, or UGA) instead of an amino acid, binds to the corresponding stop codon at the ribosome.

This interaction recruits release factors, which hydrolyze the bond between the last amino acid and the tRNA, releasing the completed polypeptide chain from the ribosome. The process of peptide chain termination is essential for accurate protein synthesis and preventing errors during translation. Dysregulation or mutations in this process can lead to various genetic disorders and diseases.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

A point mutation is a type of genetic mutation where a single nucleotide base (A, T, C, or G) in DNA is altered, deleted, or substituted with another nucleotide. Point mutations can have various effects on the organism, depending on the location of the mutation and whether it affects the function of any genes. Some point mutations may not have any noticeable effect, while others might lead to changes in the amino acids that make up proteins, potentially causing diseases or altering traits. Point mutations can occur spontaneously due to errors during DNA replication or be inherited from parents.

A missense mutation is a type of point mutation in which a single nucleotide change results in the substitution of a different amino acid in the protein that is encoded by the affected gene. This occurs when the altered codon (a sequence of three nucleotides that corresponds to a specific amino acid) specifies a different amino acid than the original one. The function and/or stability of the resulting protein may be affected, depending on the type and location of the missense mutation. Missense mutations can have various effects, ranging from benign to severe, depending on the importance of the changed amino acid for the protein's structure or function.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis, the process by which cells create proteins. In protein synthesis, tRNAs serve as adaptors, translating the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA) into the corresponding amino acids required to build a protein.

Each tRNA molecule has a distinct structure, consisting of approximately 70-90 nucleotides arranged in a cloverleaf shape with several loops and stems. The most important feature of a tRNA is its anticodon, a sequence of three nucleotides located in one of the loops. This anticodon base-pairs with a complementary codon on the mRNA during translation, ensuring that the correct amino acid is added to the growing polypeptide chain.

Before tRNAs can participate in protein synthesis, they must be charged with their specific amino acids through an enzymatic process involving aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. These enzymes recognize and bind to both the tRNA and its corresponding amino acid, forming a covalent bond between them. Once charged, the aminoacyl-tRNA complex is ready to engage in translation and contribute to protein formation.

In summary, transfer RNA (tRNA) is a small RNA molecule that facilitates protein synthesis by translating genetic information from messenger RNA into specific amino acids, ultimately leading to the creation of functional proteins within cells.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

An allele is a variant form of a gene that is located at a specific position on a specific chromosome. Alleles are alternative forms of the same gene that arise by mutation and are found at the same locus or position on homologous chromosomes.

Each person typically inherits two copies of each gene, one from each parent. If the two alleles are identical, a person is said to be homozygous for that trait. If the alleles are different, the person is heterozygous.

For example, the ABO blood group system has three alleles, A, B, and O, which determine a person's blood type. If a person inherits two A alleles, they will have type A blood; if they inherit one A and one B allele, they will have type AB blood; if they inherit two B alleles, they will have type B blood; and if they inherit two O alleles, they will have type O blood.

Alleles can also influence traits such as eye color, hair color, height, and other physical characteristics. Some alleles are dominant, meaning that only one copy of the allele is needed to express the trait, while others are recessive, meaning that two copies of the allele are needed to express the trait.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

A homozygote is an individual who has inherited the same allele (version of a gene) from both parents and therefore possesses two identical copies of that allele at a specific genetic locus. This can result in either having two dominant alleles (homozygous dominant) or two recessive alleles (homozygous recessive). In contrast, a heterozygote has inherited different alleles from each parent for a particular gene.

The term "homozygote" is used in genetics to describe the genetic makeup of an individual at a specific locus on their chromosomes. Homozygosity can play a significant role in determining an individual's phenotype (observable traits), as having two identical alleles can strengthen the expression of certain characteristics compared to having just one dominant and one recessive allele.

Peptide termination factors, also known as release factors, are proteins involved in the process of protein biosynthesis in cells. Specifically, they play a crucial role in the termination step of translation, which is the process by which the genetic code in messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into a specific sequence of amino acids to form a protein.

During translation, ribosomes move along the mRNA and read the codons (three-nucleotide sequences) to add the corresponding amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain. When the ribosome encounters a stop codon (UAA, UAG, or UGA), peptide termination factors recognize it and bind to the ribosome. The specific factor that recognizes each stop codon is called a class 1 release factor.

In eukaryotic cells, there are two main class 1 release factors: eRF1 (eukaryotic release factor 1) and eRF3. eRF1 recognizes all three stop codons and promotes the hydrolysis of the peptidyl-tRNA bond, releasing the completed polypeptide chain from the ribosome. eRF3 acts as a GTPase and interacts with eRF1 to facilitate its binding to the ribosome.

Once the polypeptide is released, the ribosome dissociates from the mRNA, allowing for another round of translation or degradation of the mRNA. Peptide termination factors are essential for accurate protein synthesis and preventing errors due to premature termination or readthrough of stop codons.

Single-Stranded Conformational Polymorphism (SSCP) is not a medical condition but rather a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and genetics. It refers to the phenomenon where a single-stranded DNA or RNA molecule can adopt different conformations or shapes based on its nucleotide sequence, even if the difference in the sequence is as small as a single base pair change. This property is used in SSCP analysis to detect mutations or variations in DNA or RNA sequences.

In SSCP analysis, the denatured single-stranded DNA or RNA sample is subjected to electrophoresis on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. The different conformations of the single-stranded molecules migrate at different rates in the gel, creating multiple bands that can be visualized by staining or other detection methods. The presence of additional bands or shifts in band patterns can indicate the presence of a sequence variant or mutation.

SSCP analysis is often used as a screening tool for genetic diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases to identify genetic variations associated with these conditions. However, it has largely been replaced by more sensitive and accurate methods such as next-generation sequencing.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Recessive genes refer to the alleles (versions of a gene) that will only be expressed when an individual has two copies of that particular allele, one inherited from each parent. If an individual inherits one recessive allele and one dominant allele for a particular gene, the dominant allele will be expressed and the recessive allele will have no effect on the individual's phenotype (observable traits).

Recessive genes can still play a role in determining an individual's genetic makeup and can be passed down through generations even if they are not expressed. If two carriers of a recessive gene have children, there is a 25% chance that their offspring will inherit two copies of the recessive allele and exhibit the associated recessive trait.

Examples of genetic disorders caused by recessive genes include cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia, and albinism.

A gene is a specific sequence of nucleotides in DNA that carries genetic information. Genes are the fundamental units of heredity and are responsible for the development and function of all living organisms. They code for proteins or RNA molecules, which carry out various functions within cells and are essential for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs.

Each gene has a specific location on a chromosome, and each person inherits two copies of every gene, one from each parent. Variations in the sequence of nucleotides in a gene can lead to differences in traits between individuals, including physical characteristics, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental factors.

Medical genetics is the study of genes and their role in health and disease. It involves understanding how genes contribute to the development and progression of various medical conditions, as well as identifying genetic risk factors and developing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Introns are non-coding sequences of DNA that are present within the genes of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, animals, and humans. Introns are removed during the process of RNA splicing, in which the initial RNA transcript is cut and reconnected to form a mature, functional RNA molecule.

After the intron sequences are removed, the remaining coding sequences, known as exons, are joined together to create a continuous stretch of genetic information that can be translated into a protein or used to produce non-coding RNAs with specific functions. The removal of introns allows for greater flexibility in gene expression and regulation, enabling the generation of multiple proteins from a single gene through alternative splicing.

In summary, introns are non-coding DNA sequences within genes that are removed during RNA processing to create functional RNA molecules or proteins.

An anticodon is a sequence of three ribonucleotides (RNA bases) in a transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule that pair with a complementary codon in a messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule during protein synthesis. This interaction occurs within the ribosome during translation, where the genetic code in the mRNA is translated into an amino acid sequence in a polypeptide. Specifically, each tRNA carries a specific amino acid that corresponds to its anticodon sequence, allowing for the accurate and systematic addition of amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain.

In summary, an anticodon is a crucial component of the translation machinery, facilitating the precise decoding of genetic information and enabling the synthesis of proteins according to the instructions encoded in mRNA molecules.

A heterozygote is an individual who has inherited two different alleles (versions) of a particular gene, one from each parent. This means that the individual's genotype for that gene contains both a dominant and a recessive allele. The dominant allele will be expressed phenotypically (outwardly visible), while the recessive allele may or may not have any effect on the individual's observable traits, depending on the specific gene and its function. Heterozygotes are often represented as 'Aa', where 'A' is the dominant allele and 'a' is the recessive allele.

Consanguinity is a medical and genetic term that refers to the degree of genetic relationship between two individuals who share common ancestors. Consanguineous relationships exist when people are related by blood, through a common ancestor or siblings who have children together. The closer the relationship between the two individuals, the higher the degree of consanguinity.

The degree of consanguinity is typically expressed as a percentage or fraction, with higher values indicating a closer genetic relationship. For example, first-degree relatives, such as parents and children or full siblings, share approximately 50% of their genes and have a consanguinity coefficient of 0.25 (or 25%).

Consanguinity can increase the risk of certain genetic disorders and birth defects in offspring due to the increased likelihood of sharing harmful recessive genes. The risks depend on the degree of consanguinity, with closer relationships carrying higher risks. It is important for individuals who are planning to have children and have a history of consanguinity to consider genetic counseling and testing to assess their risk of passing on genetic disorders.

RNA splicing is a post-transcriptional modification process in which the non-coding sequences (introns) are removed and the coding sequences (exons) are joined together in a messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule. This results in a continuous mRNA sequence that can be translated into a single protein. Alternative splicing, where different combinations of exons are included or excluded, allows for the creation of multiple proteins from a single gene.

Genotype, in genetics, refers to the complete heritable genetic makeup of an individual organism, including all of its genes. It is the set of instructions contained in an organism's DNA for the development and function of that organism. The genotype is the basis for an individual's inherited traits, and it can be contrasted with an individual's phenotype, which refers to the observable physical or biochemical characteristics of an organism that result from the expression of its genes in combination with environmental influences.

It is important to note that an individual's genotype is not necessarily identical to their genetic sequence. Some genes have multiple forms called alleles, and an individual may inherit different alleles for a given gene from each parent. The combination of alleles that an individual inherits for a particular gene is known as their genotype for that gene.

Understanding an individual's genotype can provide important information about their susceptibility to certain diseases, their response to drugs and other treatments, and their risk of passing on inherited genetic disorders to their offspring.

A sequence deletion in a genetic context refers to the removal or absence of one or more nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA or RNA) from a specific region in a DNA or RNA molecule. This type of mutation can lead to the loss of genetic information, potentially resulting in changes in the function or expression of a gene. If the deletion involves a critical portion of the gene, it can cause diseases, depending on the role of that gene in the body. The size of the deleted sequence can vary, ranging from a single nucleotide to a large segment of DNA.

Triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI) is a crucial enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, which is a metabolic process that converts glucose into pyruvate, producing ATP and NADH as energy currency for the cell. TPI specifically catalyzes the reversible interconversion of the triose phosphates dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P). This interconversion is a vital step in maintaining the balance of metabolites in the glycolytic pathway.

The reaction catalyzed by TPI is as follows:

Dihydroxyacetone phosphate ↔ Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate

Deficiency or mutations in the gene encoding triose-phosphate isomerase can lead to a severe autosomal recessive disorder known as Triose Phosphate Isomerase Deficiency (TID). This condition is characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, neuromuscular symptoms, and shortened lifespan.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

Ribosomes are complex macromolecular structures composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proteins that play a crucial role in protein synthesis within cells. They serve as the site for translation, where messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into a specific sequence of amino acids to create a polypeptide chain, which eventually folds into a functional protein.

Ribosomes consist of two subunits: a smaller subunit and a larger subunit. These subunits are composed of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) molecules and proteins. In eukaryotic cells, the smaller subunit is denoted as the 40S subunit, while the larger subunit is referred to as the 60S subunit. In prokaryotic cells, these subunits are named the 30S and 50S subunits, respectively. The ribosome's overall structure resembles a "doughnut" or a "cotton reel," with grooves and binding sites for various factors involved in protein synthesis.

Ribosomes can be found floating freely within the cytoplasm of cells or attached to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, forming part of the rough ER. Membrane-bound ribosomes are responsible for synthesizing proteins that will be transported across the ER and ultimately secreted from the cell or inserted into the membrane. In contrast, cytoplasmic ribosomes synthesize proteins destined for use within the cytoplasm or organelles.

In summary, ribosomes are essential components of cells that facilitate protein synthesis by translating mRNA into functional polypeptide chains. They can be found in various cellular locations and exist as either free-floating entities or membrane-bound structures.

A bacterial gene is a segment of DNA (or RNA in some viruses) that contains the genetic information necessary for the synthesis of a functional bacterial protein or RNA molecule. These genes are responsible for encoding various characteristics and functions of bacteria such as metabolism, reproduction, and resistance to antibiotics. They can be transmitted between bacteria through horizontal gene transfer mechanisms like conjugation, transformation, and transduction. Bacterial genes are often organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that the term "bacterial gene" is used to describe genetic elements found in bacteria, but not all genetic elements in bacteria are considered genes. For example, some DNA sequences may not encode functional products and are therefore not considered genes. Additionally, some bacterial genes may be plasmid-borne or phage-borne, rather than being located on the bacterial chromosome.

Chromosome mapping, also known as physical mapping, is the process of determining the location and order of specific genes or genetic markers on a chromosome. This is typically done by using various laboratory techniques to identify landmarks along the chromosome, such as restriction enzyme cutting sites or patterns of DNA sequence repeats. The resulting map provides important information about the organization and structure of the genome, and can be used for a variety of purposes, including identifying the location of genes associated with genetic diseases, studying evolutionary relationships between organisms, and developing genetic markers for use in breeding or forensic applications.

Genetic polymorphism refers to the occurrence of multiple forms (called alleles) of a particular gene within a population. These variations in the DNA sequence do not generally affect the function or survival of the organism, but they can contribute to differences in traits among individuals. Genetic polymorphisms can be caused by single nucleotide changes (SNPs), insertions or deletions of DNA segments, or other types of genetic rearrangements. They are important for understanding genetic diversity and evolution, as well as for identifying genetic factors that may contribute to disease susceptibility in humans.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

Peptide chain initiation in translational terms refers to the process by which the synthesis of a protein begins on a ribosome. This is the first step in translation, where the small ribosomal subunit binds to an mRNA molecule at the start codon (usually AUG), bringing with it the initiator tRNA charged with a specific amino acid (often N-formylmethionine in prokaryotes or methionine in eukaryotes). The large ribosomal subunit then joins this complex, forming a functional initiation complex. This marks the beginning of the elongation phase, where subsequent amino acids are added to the growing peptide chain until termination is reached.

A plasmid is a small, circular, double-stranded DNA molecule that is separate from the chromosomal DNA of a bacterium or other organism. Plasmids are typically not essential for the survival of the organism, but they can confer beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance or the ability to degrade certain types of pollutants.

Plasmids are capable of replicating independently of the chromosomal DNA and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation. They often contain genes that provide resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals, and other environmental stressors. Plasmids have also been engineered for use in molecular biology as cloning vectors, allowing scientists to replicate and manipulate specific DNA sequences.

Plasmids are important tools in genetic engineering and biotechnology because they can be easily manipulated and transferred between organisms. They have been used to produce vaccines, diagnostic tests, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for various applications, including agriculture, medicine, and industry.

Base composition in genetics refers to the relative proportion of the four nucleotide bases (adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, so the base composition is often expressed in terms of the ratio of adenine + thymine (A-T) to guanine + cytosine (G-C). This ratio can vary between species and even between different regions of the same genome. The base composition can provide important clues about the function, evolution, and structure of genetic material.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Paromomycin is an antiprotozoal medication, which belongs to the class of aminoglycoside antibiotics. It is primarily used to treat various intestinal infectious diseases caused by protozoa, such as amebiasis (an infection caused by Entamoeba histolytica) and giardiasis (an infection caused by Giardia lamblia). Paromomycin works by inhibiting the protein synthesis in the parasites, leading to their death. It is not typically used to treat bacterial infections in humans, as other aminoglycosides are.

It's important to note that paromomycin has limited systemic absorption and is primarily active within the gastrointestinal tract when taken orally. This makes it a valuable option for treating intestinal parasitic infections without causing significant harm to the beneficial bacteria in the gut or systemically affecting other organs.

Paromomycin is also used in veterinary medicine to treat various protozoal infections in animals, including leishmaniasis in dogs. The medication is available in different forms, such as tablets, capsules, and powder for oral suspension. As with any medication, paromomycin should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare professional, and its use may be subject to specific dosage, frequency, and duration guidelines.

A "reading frame" in genetics refers to the way nucleotides in DNA or RNA are grouped and read in multiples of three to form amino acids during protein synthesis. In other words, it is a continuous sequence of codons that starts with an initiation codon (usually AUG) and ends with a termination codon (UAA, UAG, or UGA).

There are three possible reading frames for every DNA or RNA sequence: one forward frame and two backward frames. In the forward frame, the sequence is read from the 5' end to the 3' end, while in the two backward frames, the sequence is read from the 3' end to the 5' end, but in a different register.

It is important to note that the genetic code is degenerate, meaning that most amino acids can be encoded by more than one codon. This means that a single change in the nucleotide sequence can shift the reading frame and result in a completely different protein sequence or even a premature stop codon, leading to truncated or nonfunctional proteins.

A gene suppressor, also known as a tumor suppressor gene, is a type of gene that regulates cell growth and division by producing proteins to prevent uncontrolled cell proliferation. When these genes are mutated or deleted, they can lose their ability to regulate cell growth, leading to the development of cancer.

Tumor suppressor genes work to repair damaged DNA, regulate the cell cycle, and promote programmed cell death (apoptosis) when necessary. Some examples of tumor suppressor genes include TP53, BRCA1, and BRCA2. Mutations in these genes have been linked to an increased risk of developing various types of cancer, such as breast, ovarian, and colon cancer.

In contrast to oncogenes, which promote cell growth and division when mutated, tumor suppressor genes typically act to inhibit or slow down cell growth and division. Both types of genes play crucial roles in maintaining the proper functioning of cells and preventing the development of cancer.

Nucleic acid conformation refers to the three-dimensional structure that nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) adopt as a result of the bonding patterns between the atoms within the molecule. The primary structure of nucleic acids is determined by the sequence of nucleotides, while the conformation is influenced by factors such as the sugar-phosphate backbone, base stacking, and hydrogen bonding.

Two common conformations of DNA are the B-form and the A-form. The B-form is a right-handed helix with a diameter of about 20 Å and a pitch of 34 Å, while the A-form has a smaller diameter (about 18 Å) and a shorter pitch (about 25 Å). RNA typically adopts an A-form conformation.

The conformation of nucleic acids can have significant implications for their function, as it can affect their ability to interact with other molecules such as proteins or drugs. Understanding the conformational properties of nucleic acids is therefore an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Restriction mapping is a technique used in molecular biology to identify the location and arrangement of specific restriction endonuclease recognition sites within a DNA molecule. Restriction endonucleases are enzymes that cut double-stranded DNA at specific sequences, producing fragments of various lengths. By digesting the DNA with different combinations of these enzymes and analyzing the resulting fragment sizes through techniques such as agarose gel electrophoresis, researchers can generate a restriction map - a visual representation of the locations and distances between recognition sites on the DNA molecule. This information is crucial for various applications, including cloning, genome analysis, and genetic engineering.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis in the cell. It carries and transfers specific amino acids to the growing polypeptide chain during translation, the process by which the genetic code in mRNA is translated into a protein sequence.

tRNAs have a characteristic cloverleaf-like secondary structure and a stem-loop tertiary structure, which allows them to bind both to specific amino acids and to complementary codon sequences on the messenger RNA (mRNA) through anticodons. This enables the precise matching of the correct amino acid to its corresponding codon in the mRNA during protein synthesis.

Ser, or serine, is one of the 20 standard amino acids that make up proteins. It is encoded by six different codons (UCU, UCC, UCA, UCG, AGU, and AGC) in the genetic code. The corresponding tRNA molecule that carries serine during protein synthesis is called tRNASer. There are multiple tRNASer isoacceptors, each with a different anticodon sequence but all carrying the same amino acid, serine.

Dominant genes refer to the alleles (versions of a gene) that are fully expressed in an individual's phenotype, even if only one copy of the gene is present. In dominant inheritance patterns, an individual needs only to receive one dominant allele from either parent to express the associated trait. This is in contrast to recessive genes, where both copies of the gene must be the recessive allele for the trait to be expressed. Dominant genes are represented by uppercase letters (e.g., 'A') and recessive genes by lowercase letters (e.g., 'a'). If an individual inherits one dominant allele (A) from either parent, they will express the dominant trait (A).

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) for tryptophan (Trp) is a specific type of tRNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. In the process of translation, genetic information from messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into a corresponding sequence of amino acids to form a protein.

Tryptophan is one of the twenty standard amino acids found in proteins. Each tRNA molecule carries a specific amino acid that corresponds to a particular codon (a sequence of three nucleotides) on the mRNA. The tRNA with tryptophan attached to it recognizes and binds to the mRNA codon UGG, which is the only codon that specifies tryptophan in the genetic code.

The tRNA molecule has a characteristic cloverleaf-like structure, composed of a stem region made up of base pairs and loop regions containing unpaired nucleotides. The anticodon loop contains the complementary sequence to the mRNA codon, allowing for specific recognition and binding. The other end of the tRNA molecule carries the amino acid, in this case tryptophan, which is attached via an ester linkage to a specific nucleotide called the 3'-end of the tRNA.

In summary, tRNA (Trp) is a key player in protein synthesis, responsible for delivering tryptophan to the ribosome during translation, where it can be incorporated into the growing polypeptide chain according to the genetic information encoded in mRNA.

RNA splice sites are specific sequences on the pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) molecule where the splicing process occurs during gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The pre-mRNA contains introns and exons, which are non-coding and coding regions of the RNA, respectively.

The splicing process removes the introns and joins together the exons to form a mature mRNA molecule that can be translated into a protein. The splice sites are recognized by the spliceosome, a complex of proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) that catalyze the splicing reaction.

There are two main types of splice sites: the 5' splice site and the 3' splice site. The 5' splice site is located at the junction between the 5' end of the intron and the 3' end of the exon, while the 3' splice site is located at the junction between the 3' end of the intron and the 5' end of the exon.

The 5' splice site contains a conserved GU sequence, while the 3' splice site contains a conserved AG sequence. These sequences are recognized by the snRNAs in the spliceosome, which bind to them and facilitate the splicing reaction.

Mutations or variations in RNA splice sites can lead to abnormal splicing and result in diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and genetic disorders.

Alternative splicing is a process in molecular biology that occurs during the post-transcriptional modification of pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) molecules. It involves the removal of non-coding sequences, known as introns, and the joining together of coding sequences, or exons, to form a mature messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule that can be translated into a protein.

In alternative splicing, different combinations of exons are selected and joined together to create multiple distinct mRNA transcripts from a single pre-mRNA template. This process increases the diversity of proteins that can be produced from a limited number of genes, allowing for greater functional complexity in organisms.

Alternative splicing is regulated by various cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors that bind to specific sequences in the pre-mRNA molecule and influence which exons are included or excluded during splicing. Abnormal alternative splicing has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Genetic models are theoretical frameworks used in genetics to describe and explain the inheritance patterns and genetic architecture of traits, diseases, or phenomena. These models are based on mathematical equations and statistical methods that incorporate information about gene frequencies, modes of inheritance, and the effects of environmental factors. They can be used to predict the probability of certain genetic outcomes, to understand the genetic basis of complex traits, and to inform medical management and treatment decisions.

There are several types of genetic models, including:

1. Mendelian models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of simple genetic traits that follow Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment. Examples include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked inheritance.
2. Complex trait models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of complex traits that are influenced by multiple genes and environmental factors. Examples include heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
3. Population genetics models: These models describe the distribution and frequency of genetic variants within populations over time. They can be used to study evolutionary processes, such as natural selection and genetic drift.
4. Quantitative genetics models: These models describe the relationship between genetic variation and phenotypic variation in continuous traits, such as height or IQ. They can be used to estimate heritability and to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to trait variation.
5. Statistical genetics models: These models use statistical methods to analyze genetic data and infer the presence of genetic associations or linkage. They can be used to identify genetic risk factors for diseases or traits.

Overall, genetic models are essential tools in genetics research and medical genetics, as they allow researchers to make predictions about genetic outcomes, test hypotheses about the genetic basis of traits and diseases, and develop strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

"Terminator regions" is a term used in molecular biology and genetics to describe specific sequences within DNA that control the termination of transcription, which is the process of creating an RNA copy of a sequence of DNA. These regions are also sometimes referred to as "transcription termination sites."

In the context of genetic terminators, the term "terminator" refers to the sequence of nucleotides that signals the end of the gene and the beginning of the termination process. The terminator region typically contains a specific sequence of nucleotides that recruits proteins called termination factors, which help to disrupt the transcription bubble and release the newly synthesized RNA molecule from the DNA template.

It's important to note that there are different types of terminators in genetics, including "Rho-dependent" and "Rho-independent" terminators, which differ in their mechanisms for terminating transcription. Rho-dependent terminators rely on the action of a protein called Rho, while Rho-independent terminators form a stable hairpin structure that causes the transcription machinery to stall and release the RNA.

In summary, "Terminator regions" in genetics are specific sequences within DNA that control the termination of transcription by signaling the end of the gene and recruiting proteins or forming structures that disrupt the transcription bubble and release the newly synthesized RNA molecule.

A genetic complementation test is a laboratory procedure used in molecular genetics to determine whether two mutated genes can complement each other's function, indicating that they are located at different loci and represent separate alleles. This test involves introducing a normal or wild-type copy of one gene into a cell containing a mutant version of the same gene, and then observing whether the presence of the normal gene restores the normal function of the mutated gene. If the introduction of the normal gene results in the restoration of the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at different loci and can complement each other's function. However, if the introduction of the normal gene does not restore the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at the same locus and represent different alleles of the same gene. This test is commonly used to map genes and identify genetic interactions in a variety of organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and animals.

'Frameshifting, ribosomal' refers to a type of genetic modification that occurs during translation, the process by which messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into a protein. Specifically, frameshifting is a type of error or programmed change in the reading frame of the mRNA as it is being translated by the ribosome.

In ribosomal frameshifting, the ribosome shifts the reading frame of the mRNA by one or two nucleotides, resulting in an entirely different sequence of amino acids being incorporated into the growing polypeptide chain. This can lead to the production of a truncated or elongated protein, or a completely different protein altogether.

There are two types of ribosomal frameshifting: programmed -1 frameshifting and programmed +1 frameshifting. Programmed -1 frameshifting involves a -1 shift in the reading frame, resulting in the incorporation of a different set of three nucleotides (a codon) into the polypeptide chain. Programmed +1 frameshifting involves a +1 shift in the reading frame, with similar consequences.

Ribosomal frameshifting is a tightly regulated process that plays an important role in gene expression and can have significant consequences for protein function and cellular physiology. It is also implicated in certain genetic diseases and viral infections.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. It serves as the adaptor molecule that translates the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA) into the corresponding amino acids, which are then linked together to form a polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

Aminoacyl tRNA is a specific type of tRNA molecule that has been charged or activated with an amino acid. This process is called aminoacylation and is carried out by enzymes called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Each synthetase specifically recognizes and attaches a particular amino acid to its corresponding tRNA, ensuring the fidelity of protein synthesis. Once an amino acid is attached to a tRNA, it forms an aminoacyl-tRNA complex, which can then participate in translation and contribute to the formation of a new protein.

The exome is the part of the genome that contains all the protein-coding regions. It represents less than 2% of the human genome but accounts for about 85% of disease-causing mutations. Exome sequencing, therefore, is a cost-effective and efficient method to identify genetic variants associated with various diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and inherited genetic conditions.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

Oxadiazoles are heterocyclic compounds containing a five-membered ring consisting of two carbon atoms, one nitrogen atom, and two oxygen atoms in an alternating sequence. There are three possible isomers of oxadiazole, depending on the position of the nitrogen atom: 1,2,3-oxadiazole, 1,2,4-oxadiazole, and 1,3,4-oxadiazole. These compounds have significant interest in medicinal chemistry due to their diverse biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer properties. Some oxadiazoles also exhibit potential as contrast agents for medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT).

A germ-line mutation is a genetic change that occurs in the egg or sperm cells (gametes), and thus can be passed down from parents to their offspring. These mutations are present throughout the entire body of the offspring, as they are incorporated into the DNA of every cell during embryonic development.

Germ-line mutations differ from somatic mutations, which occur in other cells of the body that are not involved in reproduction. While somatic mutations can contribute to the development of cancer and other diseases within an individual, they are not passed down to future generations.

It's important to note that germ-line mutations can have significant implications for medical genetics and inherited diseases. For example, if a parent has a germ-line mutation in a gene associated with a particular disease, their offspring may have an increased risk of developing that disease as well.

Genetic linkage is the phenomenon where two or more genetic loci (locations on a chromosome) tend to be inherited together because they are close to each other on the same chromosome. This occurs during the process of sexual reproduction, where homologous chromosomes pair up and exchange genetic material through a process called crossing over.

The closer two loci are to each other on a chromosome, the lower the probability that they will be separated by a crossover event. As a result, they are more likely to be inherited together and are said to be linked. The degree of linkage between two loci can be measured by their recombination frequency, which is the percentage of meiotic events in which a crossover occurs between them.

Linkage analysis is an important tool in genetic research, as it allows researchers to identify and map genes that are associated with specific traits or diseases. By analyzing patterns of linkage between markers (identifiable DNA sequences) and phenotypes (observable traits), researchers can infer the location of genes that contribute to those traits or diseases on chromosomes.

A syndrome, in medical terms, is a set of symptoms that collectively indicate or characterize a disease, disorder, or underlying pathological process. It's essentially a collection of signs and/or symptoms that frequently occur together and can suggest a particular cause or condition, even though the exact physiological mechanisms might not be fully understood.

For example, Down syndrome is characterized by specific physical features, cognitive delays, and other developmental issues resulting from an extra copy of chromosome 21. Similarly, metabolic syndromes like diabetes mellitus type 2 involve a group of risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that collectively increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

It's important to note that a syndrome is not a specific diagnosis; rather, it's a pattern of symptoms that can help guide further diagnostic evaluation and management.

Sequence homology in nucleic acids refers to the similarity or identity between the nucleotide sequences of two or more DNA or RNA molecules. It is often used as a measure of biological relationship between genes, organisms, or populations. High sequence homology suggests a recent common ancestry or functional constraint, while low sequence homology may indicate a more distant relationship or different functions.

Nucleic acid sequence homology can be determined by various methods such as pairwise alignment, multiple sequence alignment, and statistical analysis. The degree of homology is typically expressed as a percentage of identical or similar nucleotides in a given window of comparison.

It's important to note that the interpretation of sequence homology depends on the biological context and the evolutionary distance between the sequences compared. Therefore, functional and experimental validation is often necessary to confirm the significance of sequence homology.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) that carries glutamine (Gln) is a type of RNA molecule involved in protein synthesis. Glutamine is one of the twenty standard amino acids used by cells to construct proteins. During protein synthesis, tRNAs serve as adaptors between the mRNA code and the corresponding amino acids. Specifically, the tRNA with the anticodon complementary to the mRNA codon for glutamine (CAA or CAG) binds to glutamine and delivers it to the growing polypeptide chain during translation. This particular tRNA is referred to as 'tRNA Gln' or 'tRNA for Gln'.

An amino acid substitution is a type of mutation in which one amino acid in a protein is replaced by another. This occurs when there is a change in the DNA sequence that codes for a particular amino acid in a protein. The genetic code is redundant, meaning that most amino acids are encoded by more than one codon (a sequence of three nucleotides). As a result, a single base pair change in the DNA sequence may not necessarily lead to an amino acid substitution. However, if a change does occur, it can have a variety of effects on the protein's structure and function, depending on the nature of the substituted amino acids. Some substitutions may be harmless, while others may alter the protein's activity or stability, leading to disease.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

Ras genes are a group of genes that encode for proteins involved in cell signaling pathways that regulate cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Mutations in Ras genes have been associated with various types of cancer, as well as other diseases such as developmental disorders and autoimmune diseases. The Ras protein family includes H-Ras, K-Ras, and N-Ras, which are activated by growth factor receptors and other signals to activate downstream effectors involved in cell proliferation and survival. Abnormal activation of Ras signaling due to mutations or dysregulation can contribute to tumor development and progression.

Gene deletion is a type of mutation where a segment of DNA, containing one or more genes, is permanently lost or removed from a chromosome. This can occur due to various genetic mechanisms such as homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, or other types of genomic rearrangements.

The deletion of a gene can have varying effects on the organism, depending on the function of the deleted gene and its importance for normal physiological processes. If the deleted gene is essential for survival, the deletion may result in embryonic lethality or developmental abnormalities. However, if the gene is non-essential or has redundant functions, the deletion may not have any noticeable effects on the organism's phenotype.

Gene deletions can also be used as a tool in genetic research to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes. For example, researchers may use gene deletion techniques to create genetically modified animal models to investigate the impact of gene deletion on disease progression or development.

Genetic selection, also known as natural selection, is a fundamental mechanism of evolution. It refers to the process by which certain heritable traits become more or less common in a population over successive generations due to differential reproduction of organisms with those traits.

In genetic selection, traits that increase an individual's fitness (its ability to survive and reproduce) are more likely to be passed on to the next generation, while traits that decrease fitness are less likely to be passed on. This results in a gradual change in the distribution of traits within a population over time, leading to adaptation to the environment and potentially speciation.

Genetic selection can occur through various mechanisms, including viability selection (differential survival), fecundity selection (differences in reproductive success), and sexual selection (choices made by individuals during mating). The process of genetic selection is driven by environmental pressures, such as predation, competition for resources, and changes in the availability of food or habitat.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a protein responsible for controlling cell growth and division. The p53 protein plays a crucial role in preventing the development of cancer by regulating the cell cycle and activating DNA repair processes when genetic damage is detected. If the damage is too severe to be repaired, p53 can trigger apoptosis, or programmed cell death, to prevent the propagation of potentially cancerous cells. Mutations in the TP53 gene, which encodes the p53 protein, are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers and are often associated with a poor prognosis.

Mutagenesis is the process by which the genetic material (DNA or RNA) of an organism is changed in a way that can alter its phenotype, or observable traits. These changes, known as mutations, can be caused by various factors such as chemicals, radiation, or viruses. Some mutations may have no effect on the organism, while others can cause harm, including diseases and cancer. Mutagenesis is a crucial area of study in genetics and molecular biology, with implications for understanding evolution, genetic disorders, and the development of new medical treatments.

Fungal genes refer to the genetic material present in fungi, which are eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as larger organisms like mushrooms. The genetic material of fungi is composed of DNA, just like in other eukaryotes, and is organized into chromosomes located in the nucleus of the cell.

Fungal genes are segments of DNA that contain the information necessary to produce proteins and RNA molecules required for various cellular functions. These genes are transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, which are then translated into proteins by ribosomes in the cytoplasm.

Fungal genomes have been sequenced for many species, revealing a diverse range of genes that encode proteins involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and regulation. Comparative genomic analyses have also provided insights into the evolutionary relationships among different fungal lineages and have helped to identify unique genetic features that distinguish fungi from other eukaryotes.

Understanding fungal genes and their functions is essential for advancing our knowledge of fungal biology, as well as for developing new strategies to control fungal pathogens that can cause diseases in humans, animals, and plants.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a molecular biology technique used to introduce specific and targeted changes to a specific DNA sequence. This process involves creating a new variant of a gene or a specific region of interest within a DNA molecule by introducing a planned, deliberate change, or mutation, at a predetermined site within the DNA sequence.

The methodology typically involves the use of molecular tools such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, and/or ligases to introduce the desired mutation(s) into a plasmid or other vector containing the target DNA sequence. The resulting modified DNA molecule can then be used to transform host cells, allowing for the production of large quantities of the mutated gene or protein for further study.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a valuable tool in basic research, drug discovery, and biotechnology applications where specific changes to a DNA sequence are required to understand gene function, investigate protein structure/function relationships, or engineer novel biological properties into existing genes or proteins.

Aminoglycosides are a class of antibiotics that are derived from bacteria and are used to treat various types of infections caused by gram-negative and some gram-positive bacteria. These antibiotics work by binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, which inhibits protein synthesis and ultimately leads to bacterial cell death.

Some examples of aminoglycosides include gentamicin, tobramycin, neomycin, and streptomycin. These antibiotics are often used in combination with other antibiotics to treat severe infections, such as sepsis, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections.

Aminoglycosides can have serious side effects, including kidney damage and hearing loss, so they are typically reserved for use in serious infections that cannot be treated with other antibiotics. They are also used topically to treat skin infections and prevent wound infections after surgery.

It's important to note that aminoglycosides should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as improper use can lead to antibiotic resistance and further health complications.

Aniridia is a genetic condition that affects the development of the eye. The most notable feature of aniridia is the partial or complete absence of the colored part of the eye, called the iris. This gives the appearance of a larger than normal pupil and can lead to sensitivity to light (photophobia). Aniridia is usually present at birth and can affect one or both eyes.

The condition is caused by mutations in the PAX6 gene, which plays a crucial role in the early development of the eye. In addition to the iris abnormalities, people with aniridia may also have other eye problems such as cloudy corneas, cataracts, glaucoma, and degeneration of the retina. These complications can lead to decreased vision or blindness if not properly managed.

Aniridia is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a child has a 50% chance of inheriting the condition if one parent has it. However, approximately two-thirds of aniridia cases are sporadic, occurring due to new mutations in the PAX6 gene and not inherited from a parent.

It is essential to monitor and manage aniridia-related complications through regular eye examinations and appropriate treatments to preserve vision as much as possible. Some individuals with aniridia may also benefit from low-vision aids, such as magnifiers or telescopic lenses, to help maximize their remaining visual function.

RNA helicases are a class of enzymes that are capable of unwinding RNA secondary structures using the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. They play crucial roles in various cellular processes involving RNA, such as transcription, splicing, translation, ribosome biogenesis, and RNA degradation. RNA helicases can be divided into several superfamilies based on their sequence and structural similarities, with the two largest being superfamily 1 (SF1) and superfamily 2 (SF2). These enzymes typically contain conserved motifs that are involved in ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as RNA binding. By unwinding RNA structures, RNA helicases facilitate the access of other proteins to their target RNAs, thereby enabling the coordinated regulation of RNA metabolism.

Amelogenesis Imperfecta is a group of inherited dental disorders that affect the structure and appearance of tooth enamel. It is caused by mutations in various genes involved in the development and formation of enamel. The condition can be characterized by small, discolored, and poorly formed teeth that are prone to rapid wear, decay, and sensitivity. There are several types of Amelogenesis Imperfecta, which vary in their severity and the specific symptoms they present. Treatment typically focuses on managing the symptoms and improving the appearance and function of the teeth through restorative dental procedures.

Genetic variation refers to the differences in DNA sequences among individuals and populations. These variations can result from mutations, genetic recombination, or gene flow between populations. Genetic variation is essential for evolution by providing the raw material upon which natural selection acts. It can occur within a single gene, between different genes, or at larger scales, such as differences in the number of chromosomes or entire sets of chromosomes. The study of genetic variation is crucial in understanding the genetic basis of diseases and traits, as well as the evolutionary history and relationships among species.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a type of nucleic acid that plays a crucial role in the process of gene expression. There are several types of RNA molecules, including messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). These RNA molecules help to transcribe DNA into mRNA, which is then translated into proteins by the ribosomes.

Fungi are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as larger organisms like mushrooms. Like other eukaryotes, fungi contain DNA and RNA as part of their genetic material. The RNA in fungi is similar to the RNA found in other organisms, including humans, and plays a role in gene expression and protein synthesis.

A specific medical definition of "RNA, fungal" does not exist, as RNA is a fundamental component of all living organisms, including fungi. However, RNA can be used as a target for antifungal drugs, as certain enzymes involved in RNA synthesis and processing are unique to fungi and can be inhibited by these drugs. For example, the antifungal drug flucytosine is converted into a toxic metabolite that inhibits fungal RNA and DNA synthesis.

Globins are a group of proteins that contain a heme prosthetic group, which binds and transports oxygen in the blood. The most well-known globin is hemoglobin, which is found in red blood cells and is responsible for carrying oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues. Other members of the globin family include myoglobin, which is found in muscle tissue and stores oxygen, and neuroglobin and cytoglobin, which are found in the brain and other organs and may have roles in protecting against oxidative stress and hypoxia (low oxygen levels). Globins share a similar structure, with a folded protein surrounding a central heme group. Mutations in globin genes can lead to various diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia.

Thalassemia is a group of inherited genetic disorders that affect the production of hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. The disorder results in less efficient or abnormal hemoglobin, which can lead to anemia, an insufficient supply of oxygen-rich red blood cells.

There are two main types of Thalassemia: alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia occurs when there is a problem with the alpha globin chain production, while beta thalassemia results from issues in beta globin chain synthesis. These disorders can range from mild to severe, depending on the number of genes affected and their specific mutations.

Severe forms of Thalassemia may require regular blood transfusions, iron chelation therapy, or even a bone marrow transplant to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

A haplotype is a group of genes or DNA sequences that are inherited together from a single parent. It refers to a combination of alleles (variant forms of a gene) that are located on the same chromosome and are usually transmitted as a unit. Haplotypes can be useful in tracing genetic ancestry, understanding the genetic basis of diseases, and developing personalized medical treatments.

In population genetics, haplotypes are often used to study patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. By comparing haplotype frequencies across populations, researchers can infer historical events such as migrations, population expansions, and bottlenecks. Additionally, haplotypes can provide information about the evolutionary history of genes and genomic regions.

In clinical genetics, haplotypes can be used to identify genetic risk factors for diseases or to predict an individual's response to certain medications. For example, specific haplotypes in the HLA gene region have been associated with increased susceptibility to certain autoimmune diseases, while other haplotypes in the CYP450 gene family can affect how individuals metabolize drugs.

Overall, haplotypes provide a powerful tool for understanding the genetic basis of complex traits and diseases, as well as for developing personalized medical treatments based on an individual's genetic makeup.

Viral genes refer to the genetic material present in viruses that contains the information necessary for their replication and the production of viral proteins. In DNA viruses, the genetic material is composed of double-stranded or single-stranded DNA, while in RNA viruses, it is composed of single-stranded or double-stranded RNA.

Viral genes can be classified into three categories: early, late, and structural. Early genes encode proteins involved in the replication of the viral genome, modulation of host cell processes, and regulation of viral gene expression. Late genes encode structural proteins that make up the viral capsid or envelope. Some viruses also have structural genes that are expressed throughout their replication cycle.

Understanding the genetic makeup of viruses is crucial for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines. By targeting specific viral genes, researchers can develop drugs that inhibit viral replication and reduce the severity of viral infections. Additionally, knowledge of viral gene sequences can inform the development of vaccines that stimulate an immune response to specific viral proteins.

Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) is a term used in molecular biology and genetics. It refers to the presence of variations in DNA sequences among individuals, which can be detected by restriction enzymes. These enzymes cut DNA at specific sites, creating fragments of different lengths.

In RFLP analysis, DNA is isolated from an individual and treated with a specific restriction enzyme that cuts the DNA at particular recognition sites. The resulting fragments are then separated by size using gel electrophoresis, creating a pattern unique to that individual's DNA. If there are variations in the DNA sequence between individuals, the restriction enzyme may cut the DNA at different sites, leading to differences in the length of the fragments and thus, a different pattern on the gel.

These variations can be used for various purposes, such as identifying individuals, diagnosing genetic diseases, or studying evolutionary relationships between species. However, RFLP analysis has largely been replaced by more modern techniques like polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods and DNA sequencing, which offer higher resolution and throughput.

An operon is a genetic unit in prokaryotic organisms (like bacteria) consisting of a cluster of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule, which then undergoes translation to produce multiple proteins. This genetic organization allows for the coordinated regulation of genes that are involved in the same metabolic pathway or functional process. The unit typically includes promoter and operator regions that control the transcription of the operon, as well as structural genes encoding the proteins. Operons were first discovered in bacteria, but similar genetic organizations have been found in some eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast.

Amino acids are organic compounds that serve as the building blocks of proteins. They consist of a central carbon atom, also known as the alpha carbon, which is bonded to an amino group (-NH2), a carboxyl group (-COOH), a hydrogen atom (H), and a variable side chain (R group). The R group can be composed of various combinations of atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon, which determine the unique properties of each amino acid.

There are 20 standard amino acids that are encoded by the genetic code and incorporated into proteins during translation. These include:

1. Alanine (Ala)
2. Arginine (Arg)
3. Asparagine (Asn)
4. Aspartic acid (Asp)
5. Cysteine (Cys)
6. Glutamine (Gln)
7. Glutamic acid (Glu)
8. Glycine (Gly)
9. Histidine (His)
10. Isoleucine (Ile)
11. Leucine (Leu)
12. Lysine (Lys)
13. Methionine (Met)
14. Phenylalanine (Phe)
15. Proline (Pro)
16. Serine (Ser)
17. Threonine (Thr)
18. Tryptophan (Trp)
19. Tyrosine (Tyr)
20. Valine (Val)

Additionally, there are several non-standard or modified amino acids that can be incorporated into proteins through post-translational modifications, such as hydroxylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. These modifications expand the functional diversity of proteins and play crucial roles in various cellular processes.

Amino acids are essential for numerous biological functions, including protein synthesis, enzyme catalysis, neurotransmitter production, energy metabolism, and immune response regulation. Some amino acids can be synthesized by the human body (non-essential), while others must be obtained through dietary sources (essential).

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

An oligonucleotide probe is a short, single-stranded DNA or RNA molecule that contains a specific sequence of nucleotides designed to hybridize with a complementary sequence in a target nucleic acid (DNA or RNA). These probes are typically 15-50 nucleotides long and are used in various molecular biology techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, microarray analysis, and blotting methods.

Oligonucleotide probes can be labeled with various reporter molecules, like fluorescent dyes or radioactive isotopes, to enable the detection of hybridized targets. The high specificity of oligonucleotide probes allows for the precise identification and quantification of target nucleic acids in complex biological samples, making them valuable tools in diagnostic, research, and forensic applications.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Bacterial RNA refers to the genetic material present in bacteria that is composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Unlike higher organisms, bacteria contain a single circular chromosome made up of DNA, along with smaller circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. These bacterial genetic materials contain the information necessary for the growth and reproduction of the organism.

Bacterial RNA can be divided into three main categories: messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). mRNA carries genetic information copied from DNA, which is then translated into proteins by the rRNA and tRNA molecules. rRNA is a structural component of the ribosome, where protein synthesis occurs, while tRNA acts as an adapter that brings amino acids to the ribosome during protein synthesis.

Bacterial RNA plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including gene expression, protein synthesis, and regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding the structure and function of bacterial RNA is essential for developing new antibiotics and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) is a type of genetic variation that occurs when a single nucleotide (A, T, C, or G) in the DNA sequence is altered. This alteration must occur in at least 1% of the population to be considered a SNP. These variations can help explain why some people are more susceptible to certain diseases than others and can also influence how an individual responds to certain medications. SNPs can serve as biological markers, helping scientists locate genes that are associated with disease. They can also provide information about an individual's ancestry and ethnic background.

Proteins are complex, large molecules that play critical roles in the body's functions. They are made up of amino acids, which are organic compounds that are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs. They are essential for the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues, and they play a crucial role in many biological processes, including metabolism, immune response, and cellular signaling. Proteins can be classified into different types based on their structure and function, such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, and structural proteins. They are found in various foods, especially animal-derived products like meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like beans, nuts, and grains.

Gentamicin is an antibiotic that belongs to the class of aminoglycosides. It is used to treat various types of bacterial infections, including:

* Gram-negative bacterial infections, such as those caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis
* Certain Gram-positive bacterial infections, such as those caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes

Gentamicin works by binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, which inhibits protein synthesis and ultimately leads to bacterial cell death. It is typically given via injection (intramuscularly or intravenously) and is often used in combination with other antibiotics to treat serious infections.

Like all aminoglycosides, gentamicin can cause kidney damage and hearing loss, especially when used for long periods of time or at high doses. Therefore, monitoring of drug levels and renal function is recommended during treatment.

Genetic predisposition to disease refers to an increased susceptibility or vulnerability to develop a particular illness or condition due to inheriting specific genetic variations or mutations from one's parents. These genetic factors can make it more likely for an individual to develop a certain disease, but it does not guarantee that the person will definitely get the disease. Environmental factors, lifestyle choices, and interactions between genes also play crucial roles in determining if a genetically predisposed person will actually develop the disease. It is essential to understand that having a genetic predisposition only implies a higher risk, not an inevitable outcome.

'Abnormalities, Multiple' is a broad term that refers to the presence of two or more structural or functional anomalies in an individual. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or can develop later in life (acquired). They can affect various organs and systems of the body and can vary greatly in severity and impact on a person's health and well-being.

Multiple abnormalities can occur due to genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. Chromosomal abnormalities, gene mutations, exposure to teratogens (substances that cause birth defects), and maternal infections during pregnancy are some of the common causes of multiple congenital abnormalities.

Examples of multiple congenital abnormalities include Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, and VATER/VACTERL association. Acquired multiple abnormalities can result from conditions such as trauma, infection, degenerative diseases, or cancer.

The medical evaluation and management of individuals with multiple abnormalities depend on the specific abnormalities present and their impact on the individual's health and functioning. A multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals is often involved in the care of these individuals to address their complex needs.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

X-linked genetic diseases refer to a group of disorders caused by mutations in genes located on the X chromosome. These conditions primarily affect males since they have only one X chromosome and therefore don't have a second normal copy of the gene to compensate for the mutated one. Females, who have two X chromosomes, are typically less affected because they usually have one normal copy of the gene on their other X chromosome.

Examples of X-linked genetic diseases include Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy, hemophilia A and B, color blindness, and fragile X syndrome. Symptoms and severity can vary widely depending on the specific condition and the nature of the genetic mutation involved. Treatment options depend on the particular disease but may include physical therapy, medication, or in some cases, gene therapy.

Eye abnormalities refer to any structural or functional anomalies that affect the eye or its surrounding tissues. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to various factors such as injury, disease, or aging. Some examples of eye abnormalities include:

1. Strabismus: Also known as crossed eyes, strabismus is a condition where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions.
2. Nystagmus: This is an involuntary movement of the eyes that can be horizontal, vertical, or rotatory.
3. Cataracts: A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye that can cause vision loss.
4. Glaucoma: This is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve and can lead to vision loss.
5. Retinal disorders: These include conditions such as retinal detachment, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.
6. Corneal abnormalities: These include conditions such as keratoconus, corneal ulcers, and Fuchs' dystrophy.
7. Orbital abnormalities: These include conditions such as orbital tumors, thyroid eye disease, and Graves' ophthalmopathy.
8. Ptosis: This is a condition where the upper eyelid droops over the eye.
9. Color blindness: A condition where a person has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors.
10. Microphthalmia: A condition where one or both eyes are abnormally small.

These are just a few examples of eye abnormalities, and there are many others that can affect the eye and its functioning. If you suspect that you have an eye abnormality, it is important to consult with an ophthalmologist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Beta-galactosidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of beta-galactosides into monosaccharides. It is found in various organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and mammals. In humans, it plays a role in the breakdown and absorption of certain complex carbohydrates, such as lactose, in the small intestine. Deficiency of this enzyme in humans can lead to a disorder called lactose intolerance. In scientific research, beta-galactosidase is often used as a marker for gene expression and protein localization studies.

Amebicides are medications that are used to treat infections caused by amebae, which are single-celled microorganisms. One common ameba that can cause infection in humans is Entamoeba histolytica, which can lead to a condition called amebiasis. Amebicides work by killing or inhibiting the growth of the amebae. Some examples of amebicides include metronidazole, tinidazole, and chloroquine. It's important to note that these medications should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have side effects and may interact with other medications.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins are the proteins that are produced by the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organism is a single-celled eukaryote that has been widely used as a model organism in scientific research for many years due to its relatively simple genetic makeup and its similarity to higher eukaryotic cells.

The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been fully sequenced, and it is estimated to contain approximately 6,000 genes that encode proteins. These proteins play a wide variety of roles in the cell, including catalyzing metabolic reactions, regulating gene expression, maintaining the structure of the cell, and responding to environmental stimuli.

Many Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins have human homologs and are involved in similar biological processes, making this organism a valuable tool for studying human disease. For example, many of the proteins involved in DNA replication, repair, and recombination in yeast have human counterparts that are associated with cancer and other diseases. By studying these proteins in yeast, researchers can gain insights into their function and regulation in humans, which may lead to new treatments for disease.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

DNA restriction enzymes, also known as restriction endonucleases, are a type of enzyme that cut double-stranded DNA at specific recognition sites. These enzymes are produced by bacteria and archaea as a defense mechanism against foreign DNA, such as that found in bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria).

Restriction enzymes recognize specific sequences of nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA) and cleave the phosphodiester bonds between them. The recognition sites for these enzymes are usually palindromic, meaning that the sequence reads the same in both directions when facing the opposite strands of DNA.

Restriction enzymes are widely used in molecular biology research for various applications such as genetic engineering, genome mapping, and DNA fingerprinting. They allow scientists to cut DNA at specific sites, creating precise fragments that can be manipulated and analyzed. The use of restriction enzymes has been instrumental in the development of recombinant DNA technology and the Human Genome Project.

Post-transcriptional RNA processing refers to the modifications and regulations that occur on RNA molecules after the transcription of DNA into RNA. This process includes several steps:

1. 5' capping: The addition of a cap structure, usually a methylated guanosine triphosphate (GTP), to the 5' end of the RNA molecule. This helps protect the RNA from degradation and plays a role in its transport, stability, and translation.
2. 3' polyadenylation: The addition of a string of adenosine residues (poly(A) tail) to the 3' end of the RNA molecule. This process is important for mRNA stability, export from the nucleus, and translation initiation.
3. Intron removal and exon ligation: Eukaryotic pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs) contain intronic sequences that do not code for proteins. These introns are removed by a process called splicing, where the flanking exons are joined together to form a continuous mRNA sequence. Alternative splicing can lead to different mature mRNAs from a single pre-mRNA, increasing transcriptomic and proteomic diversity.
4. RNA editing: Specific nucleotide changes in RNA molecules that alter the coding potential or regulatory functions of RNA. This process is catalyzed by enzymes like ADAR (Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA) and APOBEC (Apolipoprotein B mRNA Editing Catalytic Polypeptide-like).
5. Chemical modifications: Various chemical modifications can occur on RNA nucleotides, such as methylation, pseudouridination, and isomerization. These modifications can influence RNA stability, localization, and interaction with proteins or other RNAs.
6. Transport and localization: Mature mRNAs are transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm for translation. In some cases, specific mRNAs are localized to particular cellular compartments to ensure local protein synthesis.
7. Degradation: RNA molecules have finite lifetimes and undergo degradation by various ribonucleases (RNases). The rate of degradation can be influenced by factors such as RNA structure, modifications, or interactions with proteins.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Pseudouridine is a modified nucleoside that is formed through the enzymatic process of pseudouridylation, where a uracil base in RNA is replaced by a pseudouracil base. Pseudouridine is structurally similar to uridine, but the uracil base is linked to the ribose sugar at carbon-5 rather than carbon-1, which leads to altered chemical and physical properties. This modification can affect RNA structure, stability, and function, and has been implicated in various cellular processes such as translation, splicing, and gene regulation.

Viral proteins are the proteins that are encoded by the viral genome and are essential for the viral life cycle. These proteins can be structural or non-structural and play various roles in the virus's replication, infection, and assembly process. Structural proteins make up the physical structure of the virus, including the capsid (the protein shell that surrounds the viral genome) and any envelope proteins (that may be present on enveloped viruses). Non-structural proteins are involved in the replication of the viral genome and modulation of the host cell environment to favor viral replication. Overall, a thorough understanding of viral proteins is crucial for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Fungal proteins are a type of protein that is specifically produced and present in fungi, which are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds. These proteins play various roles in the growth, development, and survival of fungi. They can be involved in the structure and function of fungal cells, metabolism, pathogenesis, and other cellular processes. Some fungal proteins can also have important implications for human health, both in terms of their potential use as therapeutic targets and as allergens or toxins that can cause disease.

Fungal proteins can be classified into different categories based on their functions, such as enzymes, structural proteins, signaling proteins, and toxins. Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in fungal cells, while structural proteins provide support and protection for the cell. Signaling proteins are involved in communication between cells and regulation of various cellular processes, and toxins are proteins that can cause harm to other organisms, including humans.

Understanding the structure and function of fungal proteins is important for developing new treatments for fungal infections, as well as for understanding the basic biology of fungi. Research on fungal proteins has led to the development of several antifungal drugs that target specific fungal enzymes or other proteins, providing effective treatment options for a range of fungal diseases. Additionally, further study of fungal proteins may reveal new targets for drug development and help improve our ability to diagnose and treat fungal infections.

Northern blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and analyze specific RNA molecules (such as mRNA) in a mixture of total RNA extracted from cells or tissues. This technique is called "Northern" blotting because it is analogous to the Southern blotting method, which is used for DNA detection.

The Northern blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Electrophoresis: The total RNA mixture is first separated based on size by running it through an agarose gel using electrical current. This separates the RNA molecules according to their length, with smaller RNA fragments migrating faster than larger ones.

2. Transfer: After electrophoresis, the RNA bands are denatured (made single-stranded) and transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or nylon membrane using a technique called capillary transfer or vacuum blotting. This step ensures that the order and relative positions of the RNA fragments are preserved on the membrane, similar to how they appear in the gel.

3. Cross-linking: The RNA is then chemically cross-linked to the membrane using UV light or heat treatment, which helps to immobilize the RNA onto the membrane and prevent it from washing off during subsequent steps.

4. Prehybridization: Before adding the labeled probe, the membrane is prehybridized in a solution containing blocking agents (such as salmon sperm DNA or yeast tRNA) to minimize non-specific binding of the probe to the membrane.

5. Hybridization: A labeled nucleic acid probe, specific to the RNA of interest, is added to the prehybridization solution and allowed to hybridize (form base pairs) with its complementary RNA sequence on the membrane. The probe can be either a DNA or an RNA molecule, and it is typically labeled with a radioactive isotope (such as ³²P) or a non-radioactive label (such as digoxigenin).

6. Washing: After hybridization, the membrane is washed to remove unbound probe and reduce background noise. The washing conditions (temperature, salt concentration, and detergent concentration) are optimized based on the stringency required for specific hybridization.

7. Detection: The presence of the labeled probe is then detected using an appropriate method, depending on the type of label used. For radioactive probes, this typically involves exposing the membrane to X-ray film or a phosphorimager screen and analyzing the resulting image. For non-radioactive probes, detection can be performed using colorimetric, chemiluminescent, or fluorescent methods.

8. Data analysis: The intensity of the signal is quantified and compared to controls (such as housekeeping genes) to determine the relative expression level of the RNA of interest. This information can be used for various purposes, such as identifying differentially expressed genes in response to a specific treatment or comparing gene expression levels across different samples or conditions.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

"Family Health" is not a term that has a single, widely accepted medical definition. However, in the context of healthcare and public health, "family health" often refers to the physical, mental, and social well-being of all members of a family unit. It includes the assessment, promotion, and prevention of health conditions that affect individual family members as well as the family as a whole.

Family health may also encompass interventions and programs that aim to strengthen family relationships, communication, and functioning, as these factors can have a significant impact on overall health outcomes. Additionally, family health may involve addressing social determinants of health, such as poverty, housing, and access to healthcare, which can affect the health of families and communities.

Overall, family health is a holistic approach to healthcare that recognizes the importance of considering the needs and experiences of all family members in promoting and maintaining good health.

The Founder Effect is a concept in population genetics that refers to the loss of genetic variation that occurs when a new colony is established by a small number of individuals from a larger population. This decrease in genetic diversity can lead to an increase in homozygosity, which can in turn result in a higher frequency of certain genetic disorders or traits within the founding population and its descendants. The Founder Effect is named after the "founding" members of the new colony who carry and pass on their particular set of genes to the next generations. It is one of the mechanisms that can lead to the formation of distinct populations or even new species over time.

Eye proteins, also known as ocular proteins, are specific proteins that are found within the eye and play crucial roles in maintaining proper eye function and health. These proteins can be found in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, retina, and other structures. They perform a wide range of functions, such as:

1. Structural support: Proteins like collagen and elastin provide strength and flexibility to the eye's tissues, enabling them to maintain their shape and withstand mechanical stress.
2. Light absorption and transmission: Proteins like opsins and crystallins are involved in capturing and transmitting light signals within the eye, which is essential for vision.
3. Protection against damage: Some eye proteins, such as antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins, help protect the eye from oxidative stress, UV radiation, and other environmental factors that can cause damage.
4. Regulation of eye growth and development: Various growth factors and signaling molecules, which are protein-based, contribute to the proper growth, differentiation, and maintenance of eye tissues during embryonic development and throughout adulthood.
5. Immune defense: Proteins involved in the immune response, such as complement components and immunoglobulins, help protect the eye from infection and inflammation.
6. Maintenance of transparency: Crystallin proteins in the lens maintain its transparency, allowing light to pass through unobstructed for clear vision.
7. Neuroprotection: Certain eye proteins, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), support the survival and function of neurons within the retina, helping to preserve vision.

Dysfunction or damage to these eye proteins can contribute to various eye disorders and diseases, such as cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and others.

Heterozygote detection is a method used in genetics to identify individuals who carry one normal and one mutated copy of a gene. These individuals are known as heterozygotes and they do not typically show symptoms of the genetic disorder associated with the mutation, but they can pass the mutated gene on to their offspring, who may then be affected.

Heterozygote detection is often used in genetic counseling and screening programs for recessive disorders such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia. By identifying heterozygotes, individuals can be informed of their carrier status and the potential risks to their offspring. This information can help them make informed decisions about family planning and reproductive options.

Various methods can be used for heterozygote detection, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based tests, DNA sequencing, and genetic linkage analysis. The choice of method depends on the specific gene or mutation being tested, as well as the availability and cost of the testing technology.

Gene expression regulation in bacteria refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins from specific genes. This regulation allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions and ensure the appropriate amount of protein is produced at the right time.

Bacteria have a variety of mechanisms for regulating gene expression, including:

1. Operon structure: Many bacterial genes are organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule. The expression of these genes can be coordinately regulated by controlling the transcription of the entire operon.
2. Promoter regulation: Transcription is initiated at promoter regions upstream of the gene or operon. Bacteria have regulatory proteins called sigma factors that bind to the promoter and recruit RNA polymerase, the enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into RNA. The binding of sigma factors can be influenced by environmental signals, allowing for regulation of transcription.
3. Attenuation: Some operons have regulatory regions called attenuators that control transcription termination. These regions contain hairpin structures that can form in the mRNA and cause transcription to stop prematurely. The formation of these hairpins is influenced by the concentration of specific metabolites, allowing for regulation of gene expression based on the availability of those metabolites.
4. Riboswitches: Some bacterial mRNAs contain regulatory elements called riboswitches that bind small molecules directly. When a small molecule binds to the riboswitch, it changes conformation and affects transcription or translation of the associated gene.
5. CRISPR-Cas systems: Bacteria use CRISPR-Cas systems for adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids. These systems incorporate short sequences from foreign DNA into their own genome, which can then be used to recognize and cleave similar sequences in invading genetic elements.

Overall, gene expression regulation in bacteria is a complex process that allows them to respond quickly and efficiently to changing environmental conditions. Understanding these regulatory mechanisms can provide insights into bacterial physiology and help inform strategies for controlling bacterial growth and behavior.

Insertional mutagenesis is a process of introducing new genetic material into an organism's genome at a specific location, which can result in a change or disruption of the function of the gene at that site. This technique is often used in molecular biology research to study gene function and regulation. The introduction of the foreign DNA is typically accomplished through the use of mobile genetic elements, such as transposons or viruses, which are capable of inserting themselves into the genome.

The insertion of the new genetic material can lead to a loss or gain of function in the affected gene, resulting in a mutation. This type of mutagenesis is called "insertional" because the mutation is caused by the insertion of foreign DNA into the genome. The effects of insertional mutagenesis can range from subtle changes in gene expression to the complete inactivation of a gene.

This technique has been widely used in genetic research, including the study of developmental biology, cancer, and genetic diseases. It is also used in the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for agricultural and industrial applications.

Pseudogenes are defined in medical and genetics terminology as non-functional segments of DNA that resemble functional genes, such as protein-coding genes or RNA genes, but have lost their ability to be expressed or produce a functional product. They are often characterized by the presence of mutations, such as frameshifts, premature stop codons, or deletions, that prevent them from being transcribed or translated into functional proteins or RNAs.

Pseudogenes can arise through various mechanisms, including gene duplication followed by degenerative mutations, retrotransposition of processed mRNA, and the insertion of transposable elements. While they were once considered "genomic fossils" with no biological relevance, recent research has shown that pseudogenes may play important roles in regulating gene expression, modulating protein function, and contributing to disease processes.

It's worth noting that there is ongoing debate in the scientific community about the precise definition and functional significance of pseudogenes, as some may still retain residual functions or regulatory potential.

Southern blotting is a type of membrane-based blotting technique that is used in molecular biology to detect and locate specific DNA sequences within a DNA sample. This technique is named after its inventor, Edward M. Southern.

In Southern blotting, the DNA sample is first digested with one or more restriction enzymes, which cut the DNA at specific recognition sites. The resulting DNA fragments are then separated based on their size by gel electrophoresis. After separation, the DNA fragments are denatured to convert them into single-stranded DNA and transferred onto a nitrocellulose or nylon membrane.

Once the DNA has been transferred to the membrane, it is hybridized with a labeled probe that is complementary to the sequence of interest. The probe can be labeled with radioactive isotopes, fluorescent dyes, or chemiluminescent compounds. After hybridization, the membrane is washed to remove any unbound probe and then exposed to X-ray film (in the case of radioactive probes) or scanned (in the case of non-radioactive probes) to detect the location of the labeled probe on the membrane.

The position of the labeled probe on the membrane corresponds to the location of the specific DNA sequence within the original DNA sample. Southern blotting is a powerful tool for identifying and characterizing specific DNA sequences, such as those associated with genetic diseases or gene regulation.

Gene frequency, also known as allele frequency, is a measure in population genetics that reflects the proportion of a particular gene or allele (variant of a gene) in a given population. It is calculated as the number of copies of a specific allele divided by the total number of all alleles at that genetic locus in the population.

For example, if we consider a gene with two possible alleles, A and a, the gene frequency of allele A (denoted as p) can be calculated as follows:

p = (number of copies of allele A) / (total number of all alleles at that locus)

Similarly, the gene frequency of allele a (denoted as q) would be:

q = (number of copies of allele a) / (total number of all alleles at that locus)

Since there are only two possible alleles for this gene in this example, p + q = 1. These frequencies can help researchers understand genetic diversity and evolutionary processes within populations.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Hypobetalipoproteinemias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by low levels of betalipoproteins, including low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and/or apolipoprotein B (apoB), in the blood. These conditions can lead to decreased absorption and transportation of dietary fats and fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamin E and A.

There are two main types of hypobetalipoproteinemias:

1. Type I (also known as Abetalipoproteinemia): This is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) gene. It results in almost undetectable levels of LDL, apoB, and chylomicrons in the blood. Symptoms typically appear in infancy or early childhood and include fat malabsorption, steatorrhea (fatty stools), and failure to thrive. Additionally, individuals with type I hypobetalipoproteinemia may develop neurological symptoms such as ataxia, neuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa due to vitamin E deficiency.
2. Type II (also known as Homozygous or Compound Heterozygous Hypobetalipoproteinemia): This is a less severe form of the disorder caused by mutations in the APOB gene, which encodes apolipoprotein B. It leads to reduced levels of LDL and apoB but not as dramatically low as in type I. Symptoms may include mild fat malabsorption, decreased blood cholesterol levels, and an increased risk of developing fatty liver disease (hepatic steatosis). Neurological symptoms are less common than in type I hypobetalipoproteinemia.

Early diagnosis and treatment of hypobetalipoproteinemias, particularly type I, are crucial to prevent severe complications associated with fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies and neurological damage. Treatment typically involves dietary modifications, including supplementation with high doses of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K).

Translational peptide chain elongation is the process during protein synthesis where activated amino acids are added to the growing peptide chain in a sequence determined by the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA). This process involves several steps:

1. Recognition of the start codon on the mRNA by the small ribosomal subunit, which binds to the mRNA and brings an initiator tRNA with a methionine or formylmethionine amino acid attached into the P site (peptidyl site) of the ribosome.
2. The large ribosomal subunit then joins the small subunit, forming a complete ribosome complex.
3. An incoming charged tRNA with an appropriate amino acid, complementary to the next codon on the mRNA, binds to the A site (aminoacyl site) of the ribosome.
4. Peptidyl transferase, a catalytic domain within the large ribosomal subunit, facilitates the formation of a peptide bond between the amino acids attached to the tRNAs in the P and A sites. The methionine or formylmethionine initiator amino acid is now covalently linked to the second amino acid via this peptide bond.
5. Translocation occurs, moving the tRNA with the growing peptide chain from the P site to the E site (exit site) and shifting the mRNA by one codon relative to the ribosome. The uncharged tRNA is then released from the E site.
6. The next charged tRNA carrying an appropriate amino acid binds to the A site, and the process repeats until a stop codon is reached on the mRNA.
7. Upon encountering a stop codon, release factors recognize it and facilitate the release of the completed polypeptide chain from the final tRNA in the P site. The ribosome then dissociates from the mRNA, allowing for further translational events to occur.

Translational peptide chain elongation is a crucial step in protein synthesis and requires precise coordination between various components of the translation machinery, including ribosomes, tRNAs, amino acids, and numerous accessory proteins.

Haploinsufficiency is a genetic concept referring to the situation where an individual with only one functional copy of a gene, out of the two copies (one inherited from each parent) that most genes have, exhibits a phenotype or clinical features associated with the gene. This means that having just one working copy of the gene is not enough to ensure normal function, and a reduction in the dosage of the gene's product leads to a negative effect on the organism.

Haploinsufficiency can occur due to various genetic mechanisms such as point mutations, deletions, or other types of alterations that affect the expression or function of the gene. This concept is important in genetics and genomics research, particularly in the study of genetic disorders and diseases, including cancer, where haploinsufficiency of tumor suppressor genes can contribute to tumor development and progression.

Inborn genetic diseases, also known as inherited genetic disorders, are conditions caused by abnormalities in an individual's DNA that are present at conception. These abnormalities can include mutations, deletions, or rearrangements of genes or chromosomes. In many cases, these genetic changes are inherited from one or both parents and may be passed down through families.

Inborn genetic diseases can affect any part of the body and can cause a wide range of symptoms, which can vary in severity depending on the specific disorder. Some genetic disorders are caused by mutations in a single gene, while others are caused by changes in multiple genes or chromosomes. In some cases, environmental factors may also contribute to the development of these conditions.

Examples of inborn genetic diseases include cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia, Huntington's disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and Down syndrome. These conditions can have significant impacts on an individual's health and quality of life, and many require ongoing medical management and treatment. In some cases, genetic counseling and testing may be recommended for individuals with a family history of a particular genetic disorder to help them make informed decisions about their reproductive options.

Genetic testing is a type of medical test that identifies changes in chromosomes, genes, or proteins. The results of a genetic test can confirm or rule out a suspected genetic condition or help determine a person's chance of developing or passing on a genetic disorder. Genetic tests are performed on a sample of blood, hair, skin, amniotic fluid (the fluid that surrounds a fetus during pregnancy), or other tissue. For example, a physician may recommend genetic testing to help diagnose a genetic condition, confirm the presence of a gene mutation known to increase the risk of developing certain cancers, or determine the chance for a couple to have a child with a genetic disorder.

There are several types of genetic tests, including:

* Diagnostic testing: This type of test is used to identify or confirm a suspected genetic condition in an individual. It may be performed before birth (prenatal testing) or at any time during a person's life.
* Predictive testing: This type of test is used to determine the likelihood that a person will develop a genetic disorder. It is typically offered to individuals who have a family history of a genetic condition but do not show any symptoms themselves.
* Carrier testing: This type of test is used to determine whether a person carries a gene mutation for a genetic disorder. It is often offered to couples who are planning to have children and have a family history of a genetic condition or belong to a population that has an increased risk of certain genetic disorders.
* Preimplantation genetic testing: This type of test is used in conjunction with in vitro fertilization (IVF) to identify genetic changes in embryos before they are implanted in the uterus. It can help couples who have a family history of a genetic disorder or who are at risk of having a child with a genetic condition to conceive a child who is free of the genetic change in question.
* Pharmacogenetic testing: This type of test is used to determine how an individual's genes may affect their response to certain medications. It can help healthcare providers choose the most effective medication and dosage for a patient, reducing the risk of adverse drug reactions.

It is important to note that genetic testing should be performed under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional who can interpret the results and provide appropriate counseling and support.

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of rare, genetic disorders that involve a breakdown and loss of cells in the retina - a light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. The retina converts light into electrical signals which are then sent to the brain and interpreted as visual images.

In RP, the cells that detect light (rods and cones) degenerate more slowly than other cells in the retina, leading to a progressive loss of vision. Symptoms typically begin in childhood with night blindness (difficulty seeing in low light), followed by a gradual narrowing of the visual field (tunnel vision). Over time, this can lead to significant vision loss and even blindness.

The condition is usually inherited and there are several different genes that have been associated with RP. The diagnosis is typically made based on a combination of genetic testing, family history, and clinical examination. Currently, there is no cure for RP, but researchers are actively working to develop new treatments that may help slow or stop the progression of the disease.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (also known as aminoacyl-tRNA ligases) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in protein synthesis. They are responsible for attaching specific amino acids to their corresponding transfer RNAs (tRNAs), creating aminoacyl-tRNA complexes. These complexes are then used in the translation process to construct proteins according to the genetic code.

Each aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase is specific to a particular amino acid, and there are 20 different synthetases in total, one for each of the standard amino acids. The enzymes catalyze the reaction between an amino acid and ATP to form an aminoacyl-AMP intermediate, which then reacts with the appropriate tRNA to create the aminoacyl-tRNA complex. This two-step process ensures the fidelity of the translation process by preventing mismatching of amino acids with their corresponding tRNAs.

Defects in aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases can lead to various genetic disorders and diseases, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D, distal spinal muscular atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and lactate acidosis (LBSL).

Transfer RNA (tRNA) that is specific for the amino acid glutamic acid (Glu or E) is referred to as "tRNA-Glu" or "tRNAGlu." This tRNA carries the amino acid glutamic acid to the ribosome during protein synthesis, where it gets incorporated into a growing polypeptide chain according to the genetic code.

The transfer RNA molecules are small adaptor molecules that facilitate translation of the genetic code present in messenger RNA (mRNA) into the corresponding amino acid sequence of proteins. Each tRNA has an anticodon region, which recognizes and binds to a specific codon on the mRNA through base-pairing interactions. The other end of the tRNA contains a binding site for the corresponding amino acid, ensuring that the correct amino acid is added during protein synthesis.

In summary, "tRNA-Glu" or "tRNAGlu" refers to the specific transfer RNA molecule responsible for transporting and incorporating glutamic acid into proteins during translation.

Nucleic acid hybridization is a process in molecular biology where two single-stranded nucleic acids (DNA, RNA) with complementary sequences pair together to form a double-stranded molecule through hydrogen bonding. The strands can be from the same type of nucleic acid or different types (i.e., DNA-RNA or DNA-cDNA). This process is commonly used in various laboratory techniques, such as Southern blotting, Northern blotting, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and microarray analysis, to detect, isolate, and analyze specific nucleic acid sequences. The hybridization temperature and conditions are critical to ensure the specificity of the interaction between the two strands.

Genetic heterogeneity is a phenomenon in genetics where different genetic variations or mutations in various genes can result in the same or similar phenotypic characteristics, disorders, or diseases. This means that multiple genetic alterations can lead to the same clinical presentation, making it challenging to identify the specific genetic cause based on the observed symptoms alone.

There are two main types of genetic heterogeneity:

1. Allelic heterogeneity: Different mutations in the same gene can cause the same or similar disorders. For example, various mutations in the CFTR gene can lead to cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder affecting the respiratory and digestive systems.
2. Locus heterogeneity: Mutations in different genes can result in the same or similar disorders. For instance, mutations in several genes, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2, are associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer.

Genetic heterogeneity is essential to consider when diagnosing genetic conditions, evaluating recurrence risks, and providing genetic counseling. It highlights the importance of comprehensive genetic testing and interpretation for accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of genetic disorders.

Ethylnitrosourea (ENU) is an alkylating agent, which is a type of chemical compound that has the ability to interact with and modify the structure of DNA. It is commonly used in laboratory research as a mutagen, which is a substance that increases the frequency of mutations or changes in the genetic material of organisms.

ENU is known to cause point mutations, which are small changes in the DNA sequence that can lead to alterations in the function of genes. This property makes ENU a valuable tool for studying gene function and for creating animal models of human diseases caused by genetic mutations.

It is important to note that ENU is a potent carcinogen, meaning it can cause cancer, and should be handled with care in laboratory settings. It is not used as a medical treatment in humans or animals.

The term "Asian Continental Ancestry Group" is a medical/ethnic classification used to describe a person's genetic background and ancestry. According to this categorization, individuals with origins in the Asian continent are grouped together. This includes populations from regions such as East Asia (e.g., China, Japan, Korea), South Asia (e.g., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh), Southeast Asia (e.g., Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand), and Central Asia (e.g., Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan). It is important to note that this broad categorization may not fully capture the genetic diversity within these regions or accurately reflect an individual's specific ancestral origins.

Intellectual disability (ID) is a term used when there are significant limitations in both intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior, which covers many everyday social and practical skills. This disability originates before the age of 18.

Intellectual functioning, also known as intelligence, refers to general mental capacity, such as learning, reasoning, problem-solving, and other cognitive skills. Adaptive behavior includes skills needed for day-to-day life, such as communication, self-care, social skills, safety judgement, and basic academic skills.

Intellectual disability is characterized by below-average intelligence or mental ability and a lack of skills necessary for day-to-day living. It can be mild, moderate, severe, or profound, depending on the degree of limitation in intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior.

It's important to note that people with intellectual disabilities have unique strengths and limitations, just like everyone else. With appropriate support and education, they can lead fulfilling lives and contribute to their communities in many ways.

Isopentenyladenosine (IPA) is a derivative of adenosine, which is a nucleoside consisting of adenine attached to ribose sugar via a β-N9-glycosidic bond. In Isopentenyladenosine, an isopentenyl group (a hydrocarbon chain with five carbon atoms) is added to the N6 position of the adenine base.

Isopentenyladenosine is a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of cytokinins, a class of plant hormones that play crucial roles in cell division and differentiation, shoot initiation, leaf expansion, apical dominance, root growth, and other developmental processes.

It's worth noting that Isopentenyladenosine is not typically used as a medical term or definition but rather in the context of biochemistry and plant physiology.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems like the term you're looking for is "Transfer RNA arginine," not "Arg." Transfer RNA (tRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that plays a crucial role in protein synthesis. Specifically, tRNAs are responsible for delivering amino acids to the ribosome, where they are joined together to form proteins.

Each tRNA molecule contains a specific anticodon sequence that can base-pair with a complementary codon sequence on messenger RNA (mRNA). When a tRNA molecule encounters an mRNA codon that matches its anticodon, it binds to the mRNA and delivers the amino acid associated with that tRNA.

In the case of tRNA arginine, this type of tRNA is responsible for delivering the amino acid arginine to the ribosome during protein synthesis. Arginine is a positively charged amino acid that plays important roles in various cellular processes, including protein structure and function, signal transduction, and gene regulation.

Therefore, Transfer RNA arginine refers to the specific tRNA molecule that delivers the amino acid arginine during protein synthesis.

A "reporter gene" is a type of gene that is linked to a gene of interest in order to make the expression or activity of that gene detectable. The reporter gene encodes for a protein that can be easily measured and serves as an indicator of the presence and activity of the gene of interest. Commonly used reporter genes include those that encode for fluorescent proteins, enzymes that catalyze colorimetric reactions, or proteins that bind to specific molecules.

In the context of genetics and genomics research, a reporter gene is often used in studies involving gene expression, regulation, and function. By introducing the reporter gene into an organism or cell, researchers can monitor the activity of the gene of interest in real-time or after various experimental treatments. The information obtained from these studies can help elucidate the role of specific genes in biological processes and diseases, providing valuable insights for basic research and therapeutic development.

Genetic association studies are a type of epidemiological research that aims to identify statistical associations between genetic variations and particular traits or diseases. These studies typically compare the frequency of specific genetic markers, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in individuals with a given trait or disease to those without it.

The goal of genetic association studies is to identify genetic factors that contribute to the risk of developing common complex diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease, or cancer. By identifying these genetic associations, researchers hope to gain insights into the underlying biological mechanisms of these diseases and develop new strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

It's important to note that while genetic association studies can identify statistical associations between genetic markers and traits or diseases, they cannot prove causality. Further research is needed to confirm and validate these findings and to understand the functional consequences of the identified genetic variants.

Recombinant DNA is a term used in molecular biology to describe DNA that has been created by combining genetic material from more than one source. This is typically done through the use of laboratory techniques such as molecular cloning, in which fragments of DNA are inserted into vectors (such as plasmids or viruses) and then introduced into a host organism where they can replicate and produce many copies of the recombinant DNA molecule.

Recombinant DNA technology has numerous applications in research, medicine, and industry, including the production of recombinant proteins for use as therapeutics, the creation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for agricultural or industrial purposes, and the development of new tools for genetic analysis and manipulation.

It's important to note that while recombinant DNA technology has many potential benefits, it also raises ethical and safety concerns, and its use is subject to regulation and oversight in many countries.

RNA precursors, also known as primary transcripts or pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs), refer to the initial RNA molecules that are synthesized during the transcription process in which DNA is copied into RNA. These precursor molecules still contain non-coding sequences and introns, which need to be removed through a process called splicing, before they can become mature and functional RNAs such as messenger RNAs (mRNAs), ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), or transfer RNAs (tRNAs).

Pre-mRNAs undergo several processing steps, including 5' capping, 3' polyadenylation, and splicing, to generate mature mRNA molecules that can be translated into proteins. The accurate and efficient production of RNA precursors and their subsequent processing are crucial for gene expression and regulation in cells.

Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a cellular surveillance mechanism that degrades abnormal messenger RNAs (mRNAs) containing premature termination codons (PTCs) to prevent the production of potentially harmful truncated proteins. This process helps maintain the fidelity and integrity of gene expression.

In eukaryotic cells, NMD is initiated when the ribosome encounters a PTC during translation, which is typically located more than 50-55 nucleotides upstream of an exon-exon junction. This distinctive arrangement triggers the recruitment of specific protein factors that mark the mRNA for degradation in the cytoplasm.

NMD plays a crucial role in maintaining the normal function of cells and has been implicated in various physiological processes, including development, differentiation, and stress response. Moreover, defects in NMD have been associated with several human diseases, such as cancer, neurodevelopmental disorders, and genetic disorders caused by PTC-containing mRNAs.

'Mental retardation, X-linked' is not a term that is used in modern medicine. The term "mental retardation" has been replaced by the term "intellectual disability" to avoid stigmatization and to more accurately describe the condition. Furthermore, the use of terms like "X-linked" to describe a genetic disorder has been replaced by more precise genetic terminology.

The specific condition that you may be referring to is known as "Fragile X syndrome," which is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome. Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability, affecting about 1 in 4,000 boys and 1 in 8,000 girls.

Individuals with Fragile X syndrome may have a range of symptoms, including intellectual disability that can vary from mild to severe, developmental delays, behavioral and learning challenges, physical features such as a long face, large ears, and flexible joints, and speech and language difficulties. They may also be at increased risk for certain medical conditions, such as seizures and autism spectrum disorder.

It's important to note that the use of outdated terminology can contribute to stigma and discrimination against individuals with intellectual disabilities. It is always best to use person-first language, such as "a person with Fragile X syndrome," to emphasize the individuality and dignity of people with intellectual disabilities.

Oligonucleotides are short sequences of nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA and RNA. They typically contain fewer than 100 nucleotides, and can be synthesized chemically to have specific sequences. Oligonucleotides are used in a variety of applications in molecular biology, including as probes for detecting specific DNA or RNA sequences, as inhibitors of gene expression, and as components of diagnostic tests and therapies. They can also be used in the study of protein-nucleic acid interactions and in the development of new drugs.

APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) gene is a tumor suppressor gene that provides instructions for making a protein called adenomatous polyposis coli. This protein plays a crucial role in regulating the growth and division of cells in the colon and rectum. Specifically, it helps to maintain the stability of the cell's genetic material (DNA) by controlling the process of beta-catenin degradation.

When the APC gene is mutated or altered, it can lead to an accumulation of beta-catenin in the cell, which can result in uncontrolled cell growth and division. This can ultimately lead to the development of colon polyps, which are benign growths that can become cancerous over time if left untreated.

Mutations in the APC gene are associated with several inherited cancer syndromes, including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and attenuated FAP (AFAP). These conditions are characterized by the development of numerous colon polyps at a young age, which can increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Genetic recombination is the process by which genetic material is exchanged between two similar or identical molecules of DNA during meiosis, resulting in new combinations of genes on each chromosome. This exchange occurs during crossover, where segments of DNA are swapped between non-sister homologous chromatids, creating genetic diversity among the offspring. It is a crucial mechanism for generating genetic variability and facilitating evolutionary change within populations. Additionally, recombination also plays an essential role in DNA repair processes through mechanisms such as homologous recombinational repair (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ).

Oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) are relatively short, synthetic single-stranded DNA molecules. They typically contain 15 to 30 nucleotides, but can range from 2 to several hundred nucleotides in length. ODNs are often used as tools in molecular biology research for various applications such as:

1. Nucleic acid detection and quantification (e.g., real-time PCR)
2. Gene regulation (antisense, RNA interference)
3. Gene editing (CRISPR-Cas systems)
4. Vaccine development
5. Diagnostic purposes

Due to their specificity and affinity towards complementary DNA or RNA sequences, ODNs can be designed to target a particular gene or sequence of interest. This makes them valuable tools in understanding gene function, regulation, and interaction with other molecules within the cell.

Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) refer to a group of genetic disorders caused by defects in enzymes or transporters that play a role in the body's metabolic processes. These disorders result in the accumulation or deficiency of specific chemicals within the body, which can lead to various clinical manifestations, such as developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, organ damage, and in some cases, death.

Examples of IEM include phenylketonuria (PKU), maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), galactosemia, and glycogen storage diseases, among many others. These disorders are typically inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an affected individual has two copies of the mutated gene, one from each parent.

Early diagnosis and management of IEM are crucial to prevent or minimize complications and improve outcomes. Treatment options may include dietary modifications, supplementation with missing enzymes or cofactors, medication, and in some cases, stem cell transplantation or gene therapy.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) are small RNA molecules that play a crucial role in protein synthesis. They are responsible for translating the genetic code contained within messenger RNA (mRNA) into the specific sequence of amino acids during protein synthesis.

Amino acid-specific tRNAs are specialized tRNAs that recognize and bind to specific amino acids. Each tRNA has an anticodon region that can base-pair with a complementary codon on the mRNA, which determines the specific amino acid that will be added to the growing polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

Therefore, a more detailed medical definition of "RNA, Transfer, Amino Acid-Specific" would be:

A type of transfer RNA (tRNA) molecule that is specific to a particular amino acid and plays a role in translating the genetic code contained within messenger RNA (mRNA) into the specific sequence of amino acids during protein synthesis. The anticodon region of an amino acid-specific tRNA base-pairs with a complementary codon on the mRNA, which determines the specific amino acid that will be added to the growing polypeptide chain during protein synthesis.

Trans-activators are proteins that increase the transcriptional activity of a gene or a set of genes. They do this by binding to specific DNA sequences and interacting with the transcription machinery, thereby enhancing the recruitment and assembly of the complexes needed for transcription. In some cases, trans-activators can also modulate the chromatin structure to make the template more accessible to the transcription machinery.

In the context of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection, the term "trans-activator" is often used specifically to refer to the Tat protein. The Tat protein is a viral regulatory protein that plays a critical role in the replication of HIV by activating the transcription of the viral genome. It does this by binding to a specific RNA structure called the Trans-Activation Response Element (TAR) located at the 5' end of all nascent HIV transcripts, and recruiting cellular cofactors that enhance the processivity and efficiency of RNA polymerase II, leading to increased viral gene expression.

Transfer RNA (tRNA) that specifically carries the amino acid tyrosine (Tyr) during protein synthesis. In genetic code, Tyr is coded by the codons UAC and UAU. The corresponding anticodon on the tRNA molecule is AUA, which pairs with the mRNA codons to bring tyrosine to the ribosome for incorporation into the growing polypeptide chain.

Arginine is an α-amino acid that is classified as a semi-essential or conditionally essential amino acid, depending on the developmental stage and health status of the individual. The adult human body can normally synthesize sufficient amounts of arginine to meet its needs, but there are certain circumstances, such as periods of rapid growth or injury, where the dietary intake of arginine may become necessary.

The chemical formula for arginine is C6H14N4O2. It has a molecular weight of 174.20 g/mol and a pKa value of 12.48. Arginine is a basic amino acid, which means that it contains a side chain with a positive charge at physiological pH levels. The side chain of arginine is composed of a guanidino group, which is a functional group consisting of a nitrogen atom bonded to three methyl groups.

In the body, arginine plays several important roles. It is a precursor for the synthesis of nitric oxide, a molecule that helps regulate blood flow and immune function. Arginine is also involved in the detoxification of ammonia, a waste product produced by the breakdown of proteins. Additionally, arginine can be converted into other amino acids, such as ornithine and citrulline, which are involved in various metabolic processes.

Foods that are good sources of arginine include meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, nuts, seeds, and legumes. Arginine supplements are available and may be used for a variety of purposes, such as improving exercise performance, enhancing wound healing, and boosting immune function. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider before taking arginine supplements, as they can interact with certain medications and have potential side effects.

Dystrophin is a protein that provides structural stability to muscle fibers. It is an essential component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, which helps maintain the integrity of the sarcolemma (the membrane surrounding muscle cells) during muscle contraction and relaxation. Dystrophin plays a crucial role in connecting the cytoskeleton of the muscle fiber to the extracellular matrix, allowing for force transmission and protecting the muscle cell from damage.

Mutations in the DMD gene, which encodes dystrophin, can lead to various forms of muscular dystrophy, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). In DMD, a severe form of the disease, genetic alterations typically result in little or no production of functional dystrophin, causing progressive muscle weakness, wasting, and degeneration. In BMD, a milder form of the disorder, partially functional dystrophin is produced, leading to less severe symptoms and later onset of the disease.

Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa (JEB) is a rare genetic skin disorder characterized by the presence of blisters and erosions on the skin and mucous membranes. It results from a defect in one of the proteins that anchors the epidermis (the outermost layer of the skin) to the dermis (the underlying layer of connective tissue). This defect causes the layers to separate easily, leading to blistering with minor friction or trauma.

JEB is usually apparent at birth or within the first few months of life. The severity of the condition can vary widely, even among members of the same family. There are several subtypes of JEB, each caused by mutations in different genes. These include:

1. Herlitz JEB: This is the most severe form, often lethal in infancy. It's characterized by widespread blistering over the entire body, including the mucous membranes, and severe growth retardation.

2. Non-Herlitz JEB: Less severe than Herlitz JEB, this form can still cause significant disability. Blistering tends to be localized to specific areas of the body, such as the hands, feet, and knees.

3. JEB with Pyloric Atresia: This subtype includes gastrointestinal abnormalities like pyloric atresia (a blockage in the lower part of the stomach), in addition to skin fragility.

Treatment for JEB typically focuses on managing symptoms and preventing complications. This may involve wound care, prevention of infection, pain management, nutritional support, and physical therapy. There is currently no cure for JEB.

A chromosome deletion is a type of genetic abnormality that occurs when a portion of a chromosome is missing or deleted. Chromosomes are thread-like structures located in the nucleus of cells that contain our genetic material, which is organized into genes.

Chromosome deletions can occur spontaneously during the formation of reproductive cells (eggs or sperm) or can be inherited from a parent. They can affect any chromosome and can vary in size, from a small segment to a large portion of the chromosome.

The severity of the symptoms associated with a chromosome deletion depends on the size and location of the deleted segment. In some cases, the deletion may be so small that it does not cause any noticeable symptoms. However, larger deletions can lead to developmental delays, intellectual disabilities, physical abnormalities, and various medical conditions.

Chromosome deletions are typically detected through a genetic test called karyotyping, which involves analyzing the number and structure of an individual's chromosomes. Other more precise tests, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), may also be used to confirm the diagnosis and identify the specific location and size of the deletion.

HeLa cells are a type of immortalized cell line used in scientific research. They are derived from a cancer that developed in the cervical tissue of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman, in 1951. After her death, cells taken from her tumor were found to be capable of continuous division and growth in a laboratory setting, making them an invaluable resource for medical research.

HeLa cells have been used in a wide range of scientific studies, including research on cancer, viruses, genetics, and drug development. They were the first human cell line to be successfully cloned and are able to grow rapidly in culture, doubling their population every 20-24 hours. This has made them an essential tool for many areas of biomedical research.

It is important to note that while HeLa cells have been instrumental in numerous scientific breakthroughs, the story of their origin raises ethical questions about informed consent and the use of human tissue in research.

Hereditary eye diseases refer to conditions that affect the eyes and are passed down from parents to their offspring through genetics. These diseases are caused by mutations or changes in an individual's DNA that are inherited from their parents. The mutations can occur in any of the genes associated with eye development, function, or health.

There are many different types of hereditary eye diseases, some of which include:

1. Retinitis Pigmentosa - a group of rare, genetic disorders that involve a breakdown and loss of cells in the retina.
2. Macular Degeneration - a progressive disease that damages the central portion of the retina, impairing vision.
3. Glaucoma - a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, often caused by an increase in pressure inside the eye.
4. Cataracts - clouding of the lens inside the eye, which can lead to blurry vision and blindness.
5. Keratoconus - a progressive eye disease that causes the cornea to thin and bulge outward into a cone shape.
6. Color Blindness - a condition where an individual has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors.
7. Optic Neuropathy - damage to the optic nerve, which can result in vision loss.

The symptoms and severity of hereditary eye diseases can vary widely depending on the specific condition and the individual's genetic makeup. Some conditions may be present at birth or develop in early childhood, while others may not appear until later in life. Treatment options for these conditions may include medication, surgery, or lifestyle changes, and are often most effective when started early.

Gene order, in the context of genetics and genomics, refers to the specific sequence or arrangement of genes along a chromosome. The order of genes on a chromosome is not random, but rather, it is highly conserved across species and is often used as a tool for studying evolutionary relationships between organisms.

The study of gene order has also provided valuable insights into genome organization, function, and regulation. For example, the clustering of genes that are involved in specific pathways or functions can provide information about how those pathways or functions have evolved over time. Similarly, the spatial arrangement of genes relative to each other can influence their expression levels and patterns, which can have important consequences for phenotypic traits.

Overall, gene order is an important aspect of genome biology that continues to be a focus of research in fields such as genomics, genetics, evolutionary biology, and bioinformatics.

Stretton AO, Kaplan S, Brenner S (1966). "Nonsense codons". Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol. 31: 173-179. doi:10.1101/sqb. ... Thus, the Garen lab and Brenner labs are both credited with discovery of the stop codons of the genetic code. Garen was a ... The Garen lab also showed that certain triplet codons (5'-UAG, 5'-UAA, and 5'-UGA) failed to bind amino acids. ...
Maloy S. (29 November 2003). "How nonsense mutations got their names". Microbial Genetics Course. San Diego State University. ... Stop codons can also be affected: in ciliated protozoa, the universal stop codons UAA and UAG code for glutamine. The following ... In rare instances, start codons in the standard code may also include GUG or UUG; these codons normally represent valine and ... In DNA, these stop codons are TAG, TGA, and TAA, respectively. The historical basis for designating the stop codons as amber, ...
Nonsense mutation Start codon Stop codon Jameson JL. Principles of Molecular Medicine. Springer. p. 731. Belgrader P, Maquat LE ... Missense mRNA is a messenger RNA bearing one or more mutated codons that yield polypeptides with an amino acid sequence ... The point mutation is nonsynonymous because it alters the RNA codon in the mRNA transcript such that translation results in ... If the resulting mRNA codon is one that changes the amino acid, a missense mRNA would be detected. A hypergeometric ...
... and cells commonly use ochre codons as the termination signal, whose nonsense suppressors are usually inefficient. Nonsense ... A nonsense suppressor is a factor which can inhibit the effect of the nonsense mutation. Nonsense suppressors can be generally ... Genes with different or multiple stop codons will be unaffected. SUP35, a nonsense suppressor identified by Wickner in 1994, is ... In synthetic biology, artificial suppressor elongator tRNAs are used to incorporate unnatural amino acids at nonsense codons ...
Although nonsense-mediated mRNA decay reduces nonsense codons, mutations can occur that lead to various health problems and ... Nonsense mutations code for a premature stop codon which causes the protein to be shortened. The truncated protein may or may ... The substitution was localized in exon 3 and nonsense mutation at codon 68. The results from this experiment strongly suggest ... A dominant-negative or deleterious gain-of-function mutation can occur if premature terminating (nonsense) codons are ...
Karijolich J, Yu YT (June 2011). "Converting nonsense codons into sense codons by targeted pseudouridylation". Nature. 474 ( ... but it cannot destroy existing start and stop codons. A cryptic start codon is created when the codon ACG is edited to be AUG. ... Pseudouridylation of nonsense codons suppresses translation termination both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that RNA ... a pre-mature stop codon mutation in a dystrophin sequence to activate A-to-I editing of the stop codon to a read through codon ...
... by promoting insertion of certain near-cognate tRNA at the site of nonsense codons with no apparent effects on downstream ... "Mechanism of PTC124 activity in cell-based luciferase assays of nonsense codon suppression". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 106 (9 ... Ataluren is used in the European Union to treat people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who have a nonsense mutation in the ... Ataluren is thought to make ribosomes less sensitive to premature stop codons (an effect referred to as "read-through") ...
As for the nonsense mutation, the tyrosine codon is replaced by a termination codon. Genetic screening reveals that around 1 in ... There are two common mutations found among them: missense mutation (Glu285AIa) and nonsense mutation (Tyr231X). In the missense ...
Nonsense mutations have been documented as well, occurring exclusively in the codon for proline. The mRNA sequence contains and ...
A nonsense mutation is a point mutation that results in a premature stop codon. Five affected families contained the nonsense ... This mutation causes non-sense mediated decay of the mRNA. Due to the fact that not all 10 affected families were found to have ... This duplication that caused the frameshift resulted in a premature stop codon in the ROGDI gene after the 19th amino acid. A ... All ROGDI mutations which include frameshift, nonsense, and splice site mutations cause premature mRNA degradation or protein ...
Thus, nonsense codons lie more than 50-54 nucleotides upstream from the last exon boundary whereas natural stop codons are ... "Nonsense mutations in close proximity to the initiation codon fail to trigger full nonsense-mediated mRNA decay". The Journal ... It has been observed that the ability of a nonsense codon to cause mRNA degradation depends on its relative location to the ... A premature stop codon must be recognized as different from a normal stop codon so that only the former triggers a NMD response ...
... resulting in a nonsense mutation with a premature stop codon. This causes severe truncation and loss of function in the gene's ... Metachondromatosis is believed to be caused by an 11 base pair deletion resulting in a frameshift and nonsense mutation. The ...
In NMD, the mRNA transcript contains a premature termination codon (PTC) due to a nonsense mutation. If this codon occurs prior ... RNPS1 can function as a coactivator of splicing, but along with Y14, it also takes part in the process of nonsense-mediated ... Recognition of a premature termination codon occurs during translation in the cytoplasm. The image shown below implies that ... More specifically, they are found in the nonsense mediated decay pathway (NMD), wherein mRNA transcripts with premature stop ...
... giving most amino acids more than one possible codon. There are also three 'stop' or 'nonsense' codons signifying the end of ... The genetic code consists of three-letter 'words' called codons formed from a sequence of three nucleotides (e.g. ACT, CAG, TTT ... Since there are 4 bases in 3-letter combinations, there are 64 possible codons (43 combinations). These encode the twenty ... In transcription, the codons of a gene are copied into messenger RNA by RNA polymerase. This RNA copy is then decoded by a ...
May 2013). "A murine Zic3 transcript with a premature termination codon evades nonsense-mediated decay during axis formation". ...
"SMG6 is the catalytic endonuclease that cleaves mRNAs containing nonsense codons in metazoan". RNA. 14 (12): 2609-17. doi: ... "SMG6 is the catalytic endonuclease that cleaves mRNAs containing nonsense codons in metazoan". RNA. 14 (12): 2609-17. doi: ... "SMG6 is the catalytic endonuclease that cleaves mRNAs containing nonsense codons in metazoan". RNA. 14 (12): 2609-17. doi: ... "SMG6 SMG6, nonsense mediated mRNA decay factor [Homo sapiens (human)] - Gene - NCBI". www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2016-10- ...
Both of these mutations are nonsense mutations: the asterisk and the "X" both indicate a stop codon. A 13-base-pair deletion in ...
"Human Upf proteins target an mRNA for nonsense-mediated decay when bound downstream of a termination codon". Cell. 103 (7): ... "Complexes between the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway factor human upf1 (up-frameshift protein 1) and essential nonsense- ... Regulator of nonsense transcripts 3A is a protein that in humans is encoded by the UPF3A gene. This gene encodes a protein that ... Kim VN, Kataoka N, Dreyfuss G (2001). "Role of the nonsense-mediated decay factor hUpf3 in the splicing-dependent exon-exon ...
"Human Upf proteins target an mRNA for nonsense-mediated decay when bound downstream of a termination codon". Cell. 103 (7): ... "Complexes between the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway factor human upf1 (up-frameshift protein 1) and essential nonsense- ... Regulator of nonsense transcripts 3B is a protein that in humans is encoded by the UPF3B gene. This gene encodes a protein that ... Kim VN, Kataoka N, Dreyfuss G (2001). "Role of the nonsense-mediated decay factor hUpf3 in the splicing-dependent exon-exon ...
"Human Upf proteins target an mRNA for nonsense-mediated decay when bound downstream of a termination codon". Cell. 103 (7): ... "Human Upf proteins target an mRNA for nonsense-mediated decay when bound downstream of a termination codon". Cell. 103 (7): ... Regulator of nonsense transcripts 2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the UPF2 gene. This gene encodes a protein that ... Schell T, Köcher T, Wilm M, Seraphin B, Kulozik AE, Hentze MW (Aug 2003). "Complexes between the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay ...
Wong F, Goldberg MF, Hao Y (1993). "Identification of a nonsense mutation at codon 128 of the Norrie's disease gene in a male ...
The Determination and Use of Mutagen Specificity in Bacteria Containing Nonsense Codons (PhD thesis). Pennsylvania State ... Her PhD on mutagenesis in nonsense mutations in bacteria was awarded by Pennsylvania State University in 1972. Mary Osborn ... Bockrath, R. C.; Osborn, M; Person, S (1968). "Nonsense suppression in a multiauxotrophic derivative of Escherichia coli 15T-: ...
... twofold degenerate codons can withstand silence mutation rather than Missense or Nonsense point mutations at the third position ... Only two amino acids are specified by a single codon each. One of these is the amino-acid methionine, specified by the codon ... For example, in theory, fourfold degenerate codons can tolerate any point mutation at the third position, although codon usage ... A position of a codon is said to be a n-fold degenerate site if only n of four possible nucleotides (A, C, G, T) at this ...
The premature insertion of a stop codon, a nonsense mutation, can alter the primary structure of a protein. In this case, a ... Codons decide when to cut out introns based on the codon it is reading in mRNA. The mutated codons have a higher risk of making ... Codon degeneracy Neutral mutation Genealogical DNA test Missense mutation Nonsense mutation Point mutation Synonymous ... For example, there is a specific tRNA molecule for the codon UCU and another specific for the codon UCC, both of which code for ...
Notably, humans possess a greater number of early stop codons in TLR4 than great apes; in a study of 158 humans worldwide, 0.6 ... had a nonsense mutation. This suggests that there are weaker evolutionary pressures on the human TLR4 than on our primate ...
... producing premature termination codons. As consequent products are distant from normal, mutant mRNA arises and nonsense ... MTRR):c.1049A>G - Lysine to arginine substitution at codon 350. (MTRR):c.1349C>G - Proline to arginine substitution at codon ... MTRR):c.1573C>T - Arginine substitution with a premature termination codon at codon 525. (MTRR):c.1622_1623dupTA - Results in ... MTRR):c.1459G>A - Involves glycine to arginine substitution at codon 487. Conserved in MTRR and found to occur within the FAD ...
In these stop codons both a U→Ψ modification and a U→C mutation both promote nonsense suppression. In the SARS-CoV2 vaccine ... The stabilized conformation of the ASL helps maintain correct anticodon-codon pairings during translation. This stability may ... Ψ residues in mRNA can affect the coding specificity of stop codons UAA, UGA, and UAG. ... increase translational accuracy by decreasing the rate of peptide bond formation and allowing for more time for incorrect codon ...
These changes are all by missense mutations of base substitution, except for one nonsense mutation with a stop codon added. The ...
Nonsense mediated decay recognizes premature stop codons and promotes decapping as well as decay by the exosome. Certain ...
... s can alternatively splice pre-mRNA transcripts to include nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) codons in the mRNA. The most ... For example, SC35 SR protein can alternatively splice a SC35 pre-mRNA to include a NMD codon in the mRNA. The location of SR ... The splice variant with the NMD codon is chosen more often during splicing and the cell is more sensitive to NMD further down ... SR proteins can alternatively splice NMD codons into its own mRNA transcript to auto-regulate the concentration of SR proteins ...
Stretton AO, Kaplan S, Brenner S (1966). "Nonsense codons". Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol. 31: 173-179. doi:10.1101/sqb. ... Thus, the Garen lab and Brenner labs are both credited with discovery of the stop codons of the genetic code. Garen was a ... The Garen lab also showed that certain triplet codons (5-UAG, 5-UAA, and 5-UGA) failed to bind amino acids. ...
Single or multiple codon deletions, as well as large deletions, nonsense mutations, and missense mutations, have also been ...
... renders the transcript a candidate for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD).. Source sequence(s). AC018988, BC010615, DA777624 ... This variant is represented as non-coding because the use of the supported translational start codon, as used in variant 1, ... renders the transcript a candidate for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD).. Source sequence(s). AC018988, AW402906, BX098014, ... This variant is represented as non-coding because the use of the supported translational start codon, as used in variant 1, ...
Many FTD-causing nonsense progranulin mutations contain a premature termination codon (PTC), thus progranulin ... "Frontotemporal dementia nonsense mutation of progranulin rescued by aminoglycosides". Haining Zhu et al.. Human Molecular ... Frontotemporal dementia nonsense mutation of progranulin rescued by aminoglycosides. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is an early ...
A variant in a transcript that is already the target of nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), i.e. stop codon is not in last exon nor ... initiator_codon_variant. A codon variant that changes at least one base of the first codon of a transcript. ... incomplete_terminal_codon_variant. A sequence variant where at least one base of the final codon of an incompletely annotated ... A sequence variant whereby at least one base of a codon is changed, resulting in a premature stop codon, leading to a shortened ...
... ribosomal arrest at the stop Codon of an upstream open reading frame of the AdoMetDC1 gene triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA ... Some species possess a substitution of the start codon AUG to AUG-like codons such as GUG or a mutation of stop codon that ... B) A single substitution (A/G)88 mutation destroys the stop codon UAG87 to UGG in Hoxa11 TIE, Hoxa11 TIE wt, and control (w/o ... Since Hoxa3 uORF is long and extends downstream the AUG start codon of the main CDS in native Hoxa3 mRNA, which means that the ...
Two nonsense PAX3 mutations were identified in Chinese patients with WS1. One is heterozygous for a novel nonsense mutation, ... 8] Both mutations created stop codons leading to truncation of the PAX3 protein. Novel mutations of PAX3, MITF, and SOX10 genes ... Nonsense mutations in the PAX3 gene cause Waardenburg syndrome type I in two Chinese patients. Chin Med J (Engl). 2007 Jan 5. ... Deletions, frame shifts, splice site, and nonsense mutations, as well as whole gene deletions, have been reported. WS1 may be ...
A variant in a transcript that is already the target of nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), i.e. stop codon is not in last exon nor ... initiator_codon_variant. A codon variant that changes at least one base of the first codon of a transcript. ... incomplete_terminal_codon_variant. A sequence variant where at least one base of the final codon of an incompletely annotated ... A sequence variant whereby at least one base of a codon is changed, resulting in a premature stop codon, leading to a shortened ...
First described in viruses, recoding is a programmed translation event in which codon alterations are context dependent. ... and the latter requires decoding of a non-sense codon. Both processes occur at a low but defined frequency, and both require ... One such strategy is codon redefinition or recoding. ... and the latter requires decoding of a non-sense codon. Both ... One such strategy is codon redefinition or recoding. First described in viruses, recoding is a programmed translation event in ...
Figure 2A). There was also a difference in the frequency of heteroplasmies depending on the codon position with heteroplasmies ... Figure 2B). To further explore the effect of heteroplasmies, all nonsynonymous heteroplasmies, excluding nonsense mutations, ... at the second codon position at a lower frequency than position 1 or 3, which showed no difference to each other (KS Test, p= ...
A variant in a transcript that is already the target of nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), i.e. stop codon is not in last exon nor ... initiator_codon_variant. A codon variant that changes at least one base of the first codon of a transcript. ... incomplete_terminal_codon_variant. A sequence variant where at least one base of the final codon of an incompletely annotated ... A sequence variant whereby at least one base of a codon is changed, resulting in a premature stop codon, leading to a shortened ...
Ataluren for the treatment of nonsense-mutation cystic fibrosis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial. ...
Mutations Silent mutation, missense mutation (sickle-cell) Nonsense mutation, (stop) frameshift mutation,( 1-2piece deletion or ... All amino acid have more than one codon except Met and Trp ...
... nonsense mutation in the exon 3 leading Description to stop codon in the EX domain Date 10-Feb-1999 (Rel. 1, Created) Date 23- ... nonsense Feature /loc: EMBL: X04145; g115993; HSTCRGT3: 242 Feature /codon: aaa -> taa; 1 Feature aa; 3 Feature /rnalink: 2 ... nonsense Feature /loc: EMBL: X04145; g115993; HSTCRGT3: 242 Feature /codon: aaa -> taa; 1 Feature aa; 6 Feature /rnalink: 5 ... nonsense Feature /loc: IDRefSeq: C0098; GI:115993; CD3GC: 237 Feature /codon: aaa -> taa; 1 Feature aa; 3 Feature /rnalink: 2 ...
Most terminal codon expected to undergo nonsense-mediated decay: p.Thr1591. For splice sites, this criterion should not be ... Null variant (nonsense, frameshift, canonical +/−1 or 2 splice sites, initiation codon, single or multi-exon deletion) in a ... Most terminal codon predicted to undergo nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) p.Thr1591. ... Most terminal codon predicted to undergo nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) p.Thr1591. ...
These triplets codons are UAA, UAG and UGA in prokaryotic cell. These are called nonsense codons which do not collaborate with ... The mRNA has the first codon as AUG at the beginning and so it is own as initiation codon. There are three initiators, F1, F2 ... The AUG codons are the codes for the methionine. The methionine has ry important role in protein synthesis as it is the amino ... The UAC anticodon of F-met-tRNA binds to AUG codon of mRNA. In every type of protein, formyl methionine occupies the first ...
Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is really a system of degradation of mRNA types using a premature termination codon (PTC)1 2 ... Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a ubiquitous mechanism of degradation of transcripts having a premature termination codon ... Generally in most vertebrate genes end codons are located in the final exon. End codons >50 nucleotides from the last exon-exon ... When the last exon includes an end codon the very first circular of translation leads to removing all EJCs in the mRNA with the ...
Wasif N, Ahmad W. A novel nonsense mutation in RSPO4 gene underlies autosomal recessive congenital anonychia in a Pakistani ... Novel missense mutation in the RSPO4 gene in congenital hyponychia and evidence for a polymorphic initiation codon (p.M1I). BMC ...
Nonsense mutations result in a premature termination codon (PTC) and cause approximately 12% of all IRD cases. An approach that ... We validated Atalurens efficacy to induce read-through on a nonsense mutation in USH2A-related IRD. Our findings support the ... Ataluren for the Treatment of Usher Syndrome 2A Caused by Nonsense Mutations ... on a nonsense mutation in the Usher syndrome gene USH2A that causes deafblindness in humans. ...
Two heterozygous variants of the GNRH1 gene were detected, nonsense variant 1: c.85G > T:p.G29* and variant 2: c.1A > G:p.M1V, ... which disrupted the start codon. CONCLUSIONS: Two GNRH1 mutations responsible for nIHH are identified in this study. Our ...
In codon 311(18%) (katG) only one base change were obtained Asp→Tyr (GAC → TAC) in nine strains demonstrate a nonsense mutation ... Most of detected deletions were identified in codon 510 GAG/_AG (12.5%). All silent mutations were localized in codon 507, ... Furthermore only one mutation observed in codons 311,299 and 322. And in 12 strains one mutation in codon 315(42.8 %), 7 ... in codons 526, 510 (52%, 52%). Three or four mutations were detected in codons 510 (70%). To study the prevalence of mutations ...
We further confirmed the apparent transcript escape of the nonsense-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA) decay pathway. Real-time PCR ... Results: A homozygous 28-nucleotide frameshift deletion introducing a premature stop codon in the PTRHD1 exon 1 was identified ... We further confirmed the apparent transcript escape of the nonsense-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA) decay pathway. Real-time PCR ... We further confirmed the apparent transcript escape of the nonsense-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA) decay pathway. Real-time PCR ...
"Upf1 is a crucial factor in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, the eukaryotic surveillance pathway that degrades mRNAs containing ... of the ATG start codon and that the P1BS (PHR1 Binding Site) element, located at -160 bp, also contributes regulatory control. ... premature stop codons. The essential RNA-dependent ATPase activity of Upf1 is triggered by the formation of the surveillance ...
Results: CASK alterations include one nonsense mutation, one 5-bp deletion, one mutation of the start codon, and five partial ... Results: CASK alterations include one nonsense mutation, one 5-bp deletion, one mutation of the start codon, and five partial ... Results: CASK alterations include one nonsense mutation, one 5-bp deletion, one mutation of the start codon, and five partial ... Results: CASK alterations include one nonsense mutation, one 5-bp deletion, one mutation of the start codon, and five partial ...
Two nonsense PAX3 mutations were identified in Chinese patients with WS1. One is heterozygous for a novel nonsense mutation, ... 7] Both mutations created stop codons leading to truncation of the PAX3 protein. Novel mutations of PAX3, MITF, and SOX10 genes ... Nonsense mutations in the PAX3 gene cause Waardenburg syndrome type I in two Chinese patients. Chin Med J (Engl). 2007 Jan 5. ... Deletions, frame shifts, splice site, and nonsense mutations, as well as whole gene deletions, have been reported. WS1 may be ...
... a premature stop codon, leading to a shortened transcript (dbSNP term: nonsense. ) ... one base of a codon is changed resulting in a codon that encodes for a different amino acid (dbSNP term: missense. ) ... stop_lost - A sequence variant where at least one base of the terminator codon (stop) is changed, resulting in an elongated ... stop_gained - A sequence variant whereby at least one base of a codon is changed, resulting in ...
PVS1 - null variant (nonsense, frameshift, canonical ±1 or 2 splice sites, initiation codon, single or multiexon deletion) in a ...

No FAQ available that match "codon nonsense"