Electronic hearing devices typically used for patients with normal outer and middle ear function, but defective inner ear function. In the COCHLEA, the hair cells (HAIR CELLS, VESTIBULAR) may be absent or damaged but there are residual nerve fibers. The device electrically stimulates the COCHLEAR NERVE to create sound sensation.
Surgical insertion of an electronic hearing device (COCHLEAR IMPLANTS) with electrodes to the COCHLEAR NERVE in the inner ear to create sound sensation in patients with residual nerve fibers.
A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.
The process whereby an utterance is decoded into a representation in terms of linguistic units (sequences of phonetic segments which combine to form lexical and grammatical morphemes).
Procedures for correcting HEARING DISORDERS.
Partial hearing loss in both ears.
Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.
Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.
Ability to make speech sounds that are recognizable.
Tests of the ability to hear and understand speech as determined by scoring the number of words in a word list repeated correctly.
The audibility limit of discriminating sound intensity and pitch.
The perceived attribute of a sound which corresponds to the physical attribute of intensity.
The science pertaining to the interrelationship of psychologic phenomena and the individual's response to the physical properties of sound.
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.
Wearable sound-amplifying devices that are intended to compensate for impaired hearing. These generic devices include air-conduction hearing aids and bone-conduction hearing aids. (UMDNS, 1999)
Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.
Measurement of the ability to hear speech under various conditions of intensity and noise interference using sound-field as well as earphones and bone oscillators.
A test to determine the lowest sound intensity level at which fifty percent or more of the spondaic test words (words of two syllables having equal stress) are repeated correctly.
A dimension of auditory sensation varying with cycles per second of the sound stimulus.
Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.
The ability or act of sensing and transducing ACOUSTIC STIMULATION to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is also called audition.
The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.
Hearing loss resulting from damage to the COCHLEA and the sensorineural elements which lie internally beyond the oval and round windows. These elements include the AUDITORY NERVE and its connections in the BRAINSTEM.
Any sound which is unwanted or interferes with HEARING other sounds.
Small containers or pellets of a solid drug implanted in the body to achieve sustained release of the drug.
The acoustic aspects of speech in terms of frequency, intensity, and time.
The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.
Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.
Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.
Measurement of parameters of the speech product such as vocal tone, loudness, pitch, voice quality, articulation, resonance, phonation, phonetic structure and prosody.
The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The interference of one perceptual stimulus with another causing a decrease or lessening in perceptual effectiveness.
The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.
The lower chamber of the COCHLEA, extending from the round window to the helicotrema (the opening at the apex that connects the PERILYMPH-filled spaces of scala tympani and SCALA VESTIBULI).
The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.
The testing of the acuity of the sense of hearing to determine the thresholds of the lowest intensity levels at which an individual can hear a set of tones. The frequencies between 125 and 8000 Hz are used to test air conduction thresholds and the frequencies between 250 and 4000 Hz are used to test bone conduction thresholds.
The sensory ganglion of the COCHLEAR NERVE. The cells of the spiral ganglion send fibers peripherally to the cochlear hair cells and centrally to the COCHLEAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM.
Ability to determine the specific location of a sound source.
The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.
Measurement of hearing based on the use of pure tones of various frequencies and intensities as auditory stimuli.
The ability to differentiate tones.
The part of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is concerned with hearing. It forms the anterior part of the labyrinth, as a snail-like structure that is situated almost horizontally anterior to the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH.
Implants used to reconstruct and/or cosmetically enhance the female breast. They have an outer shell or envelope of silicone elastomer and are filled with either saline or silicone gel. The outer shell may be either smooth or textured.
Artificial substitutes for body parts and materials inserted into organisms during experimental studies.
Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).
The study of hearing and hearing impairment.
The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.
Part of an ear examination that measures the ability of sound to reach the brain.
Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.
Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.
Electrical waves in the CEREBRAL CORTEX generated by BRAIN STEM structures in response to auditory click stimuli. These are found to be abnormal in many patients with CEREBELLOPONTINE ANGLE lesions, MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, or other DEMYELINATING DISEASES.
The analysis of a critical number of sensory stimuli or facts (the pattern) by physiological processes such as vision (PATTERN RECOGNITION, VISUAL), touch, or hearing.
Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.
The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)
Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.
Hearing loss due to disease of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS (in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM) which originate in the COCHLEAR NUCLEI of the PONS and then ascend bilaterally to the MIDBRAIN, the THALAMUS, and then the AUDITORY CORTEX in the TEMPORAL LOBE. Bilateral lesions of the auditory pathways are usually required to cause central hearing loss. Cortical deafness refers to loss of hearing due to bilateral auditory cortex lesions. Unilateral BRAIN STEM lesions involving the cochlear nuclei may result in unilateral hearing loss.
The process by which an observer comprehends speech by watching the movements of the speaker's lips without hearing the speaker's voice.
The region of the cerebral cortex that receives the auditory radiation from the MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY.
The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by ACOUSTIC STIMULATION or stimulation of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS.
Skills in the use of language which lead to proficiency in written or spoken communication.
The study of systems, particularly electronic systems, which function after the manner of, in a manner characteristic of, or resembling living systems. Also, the science of applying biological techniques and principles to the design of electronic systems.
Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
Rounded objects made of coral, teflon, or alloplastic polymer and covered with sclera, and which are implanted in the orbit following enucleation. An artificial eye (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) is usually attached to the anterior of the orbital implant for cosmetic purposes.
Utilization of all available receptive and expressive modes for the purpose of achieving communication with the hearing impaired, such as gestures, postures, facial expression, types of voice, formal speech and non-speech systems, and simultaneous communication.
Fenestra of the cochlea, an opening in the basal wall between the MIDDLE EAR and the INNER EAR, leading to the cochlea. It is closed by a secondary tympanic membrane.
The sounds produced by humans by the passage of air through the LARYNX and over the VOCAL CORDS, and then modified by the resonance organs, the NASOPHARYNX, and the MOUTH.
Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.
The absence of both hearing and vision.
NEURAL PATHWAYS and connections within the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, beginning at the hair cells of the ORGAN OF CORTI, continuing along the eighth cranial nerve, and terminating at the AUDITORY CORTEX.
The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Multi-channel hearing devices typically used for patients who have tumors on the COCHLEAR NERVE and are unable to benefit from COCHLEAR IMPLANTS after tumor surgery that severs the cochlear nerve. The device electrically stimulates the nerves of cochlea nucleus in the BRAIN STEM rather than the inner ear as in cochlear implants.
Surgery performed on the external, middle, or internal ear.
Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.
The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.
Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.
The ability to estimate periods of time lapsed or duration of time.
The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.
The application of technology to the solution of medical problems.
A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.
Partial or complete hearing loss in one ear.
Objects that produce a magnetic field.
A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.
The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Conditions that impair the transmission of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.
Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the ear or of hearing disorders or demonstration of hearing acuity or loss.
Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A system of hand gestures used for communication by the deaf or by people speaking different languages.
The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.
Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.
Tests of accuracy in pronouncing speech sounds, e.g., Iowa Pressure Articulation Test, Deep Test of Articulation, Templin-Darley Tests of Articulation, Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, Screening Speech Articulation Test, Arizona Articulation Proficiency Scale.
Pathological processes of the snail-like structure (COCHLEA) of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) which can involve its nervous tissue, blood vessels, or fluid (ENDOLYMPH).
The posterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which contain centers for auditory function.
The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.
Therapy whose primary emphasis is on the physical and social structuring of the environment to promote interpersonal relationships which will be influential in reducing behavioral disturbances of patients.
'Reading' in a medical context often refers to the act or process of a person interpreting and comprehending written or printed symbols, such as letters or words, for the purpose of deriving information or meaning from them.
The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)
Methods of creating machines and devices.
The research and development of ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES for such medical applications as diagnosis, therapy, research, anesthesia control, cardiac control, and surgery. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Psychophysical technique that permits the estimation of the bias of the observer as well as detectability of the signal (i.e., stimulus) in any sensory modality. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
The comparison of the quantity of meaningful data to the irrelevant or incorrect data.
Differential response to different stimuli.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Intra-aural contraction of tensor tympani and stapedius in response to sound.
A form of electrophysiologic audiometry in which an analog computer is included in the circuit to average out ongoing or spontaneous brain wave activity. A characteristic pattern of response to a sound stimulus may then become evident. Evoked response audiometry is known also as electric response audiometry.
That component of SPEECH which gives the primary distinction to a given speaker's VOICE when pitch and loudness are excluded. It involves both phonatory and resonatory characteristics. Some of the descriptions of voice quality are harshness, breathiness and nasality.
Endosseous dental implantation where implants are fitted with an abutment or where an implant with a transmucosal coronal portion is used immediately (within 1 week) after the initial extraction. Conventionally, the implantation is performed in two stages with more than two months in between the stages.
The process of producing vocal sounds by means of VOCAL CORDS vibrating in an expiratory blast of air.
Most frequently refers to the integration of a physically or mentally disabled child into the regular class of normal peers and provision of the appropriately determined educational program.
A small bony canal linking the vestibule of the inner ear to the posterior part of the internal surface of the petrous TEMPORAL BONE. It transmits the endolymphatic duct and two small blood vessels.
Apparatus and instruments that generate and operate with ELECTRICITY, and their electrical components.
Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.
Disorders of hearing or auditory perception due to pathological processes of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. These include CENTRAL HEARING LOSS and AUDITORY PERCEPTUAL DISORDERS.

PET imaging of cochlear-implant and normal-hearing subjects listening to speech and nonspeech. (1/786)

Functional neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET) was used to compare the brain activation patterns of normal-hearing (NH) with postlingually deaf, cochlear-implant (CI) subjects listening to speech and nonspeech signals. The speech stimuli were derived from test batteries for assessing speech-perception performance of hearing-impaired subjects with different sensory aids. Subjects were scanned while passively listening to monaural (right ear) stimuli in five conditions: Silent Baseline, Word, Sentence, Time-reversed Sentence, and Multitalker Babble. Both groups showed bilateral activation in superior and middle temporal gyri to speech and backward speech. However, group differences were observed in the Sentence compared to Silence condition. CI subjects showed more activated foci in right temporal regions, where lateralized mechanisms for prosodic (pitch) processing have been well established; NH subjects showed a focus in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann's area 47), where semantic processing has been implicated. Multitalker Babble activated auditory temporal regions in the CI group only. Whereas NH listeners probably habituated to this multitalker babble, the CI listeners may be using a perceptual strategy that emphasizes 'coarse' coding to perceive this stimulus globally as speechlike. The group differences provide the first neuroimaging evidence suggesting that postlingually deaf CI and NH subjects may engage differing perceptual processing strategies under certain speech conditions.  (+info)

Recruitment of the auditory cortex in congenitally deaf cats by long-term cochlear electrostimulation. (2/786)

In congenitally deaf cats, the central auditory system is deprived of acoustic input because of degeneration of the organ of Corti before the onset of hearing. Primary auditory afferents survive and can be stimulated electrically. By means of an intracochlear implant and an accompanying sound processor, congenitally deaf kittens were exposed to sounds and conditioned to respond to tones. After months of exposure to meaningful stimuli, the cortical activity in chronically implanted cats produced field potentials of higher amplitudes, expanded in area, developed long latency responses indicative of intracortical information processing, and showed more synaptic efficacy than in naive, unstimulated deaf cats. The activity established by auditory experience resembles activity in hearing animals.  (+info)

Positron emission tomography in cochlear implant and auditory brain stem implant recipients. (3/786)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether similar cortical regions are activated by speech signals in profoundly deaf patients who have received a multichannel cochlear implant (CI) or auditory brain stem implant (ABI) as in normal-hearing subjects. STUDY DESIGN: Positron emission tomography (PET) studies were performed using a variety of discrete stimulus conditions. Images obtained were superimposed on standard anatomic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the CI subjects. The PET images were superimposed on the ABI subject's own MRI. SETTING: Academic, tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Five subjects who have received a multichannel CI and one who had received an ABI. INTERVENTION: Multichannel CI and ABI. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: PET images. RESULTS: Similar cortical regions are activated by speech stimuli in subjects who have received an auditory prosthesis. CONCLUSIONS: Neuroimaging provides a new approach to the study of speech processing in CI and ABI subjects.  (+info)

Noninvasive direct stimulation of the cochlear nerve for functional MR imaging of the auditory cortex. (4/786)

We herein present our preliminary experience with functional MR imaging of the direct electrical stimulation of the cochlear nerve using an MR imaging-compatible electrode placed in the external auditory meatus of five patients with binaural sensorineural hearing loss. The stimulator was placed outside the imager's bore, and the electrode produced virtually no susceptibility artifacts. In three of five patients, it was possible to activate the superior temporal gyrus during functional MR imaging. No side effects were observed.  (+info)

Cognitive factors and cochlear implants: some thoughts on perception, learning, and memory in speech perception. (5/786)

Over the past few years, there has been increased interest in studying some of the cognitive factors that affect speech perception performance of cochlear implant patients. In this paper, I provide a brief theoretical overview of the fundamental assumptions of the information-processing approach to cognition and discuss the role of perception, learning, and memory in speech perception and spoken language processing. The information-processing framework provides researchers and clinicians with a new way to understand the time-course of perceptual and cognitive development and the relations between perception and production of spoken language. Directions for future research using this approach are discussed including the study of individual differences, predicting success with a cochlear implant from a set of cognitive measures of performance and developing new intervention strategies.  (+info)

Electrical cochlear stimulation in the deaf cat: comparisons between psychophysical and central auditory neuronal thresholds. (6/786)

Cochlear prostheses for electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve ("electrical hearing") can provide auditory capacity for profoundly deaf adults and children, including in many cases a restored ability to perceive speech without visual cues. A fundamental challenge in auditory neuroscience is to understand the neural and perceptual mechanisms that make rehabilitation of hearing possible in these deaf humans. We have developed a feline behavioral model that allows us to study behavioral and physiological variables in the same deaf animals. Cats deafened by injection of ototoxic antibiotics were implanted with either a monopolar round window electrode or a multichannel scala tympani electrode array. To evaluate the effects of perceptually significant electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve on the central auditory system, an animal was trained to avoid a mild electrocutaneous shock when biphasic current pulses (0.2 ms/phase) were delivered to its implanted cochlea. Psychophysical detection thresholds and electrical auditory brain stem response (EABR) thresholds were estimated in each cat. At the conclusion of behavioral testing, acute physiological experiments were conducted, and threshold responses were recorded for single neurons and multineuronal clusters in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) and the primary auditory cortex (A1). Behavioral and neurophysiological thresholds were evaluated with reference to cochlear histopathology in the same deaf cats. The results of the present study include: 1) in the cats implanted with a scala tympani electrode array, the lowest ICC and A1 neural thresholds were virtually identical to the behavioral thresholds for intracochlear bipolar stimulation; 2) behavioral thresholds were lower than ICC and A1 neural thresholds in each of the cats implanted with a monopolar round window electrode; 3) EABR thresholds were higher than behavioral thresholds in all of the cats (mean difference = 6.5 dB); and 4) the cumulative number of action potentials for a sample of ICC neurons increased monotonically as a function of the amplitude and the number of stimulating biphasic pulses. This physiological result suggests that the output from the ICC may be integrated spatially across neurons and temporally integrated across pulses when the auditory nerve array is stimulated with a train of biphasic current pulses. Because behavioral thresholds were lower and reaction times were faster at a pulse rate of 30 pps compared with a pulse rate of 2 pps, spatial-temporal integration in the central auditory system was presumably reflected in psychophysical performance.  (+info)

Differential recruitment of the speech processing system in healthy subjects and rehabilitated cochlear implant patients. (7/786)

Differences in cerebral activation between control subjects and post-lingually deaf rehabilitated cochlear implant patients were identified with PET under various speech conditions of different linguistic complexity. Despite almost similar performance in patients and controls, different brain activation patterns were elicited. In patients, an attentional network including prefrontal and parietal modality-aspecific attentional regions and subcortical auditory regions was over-activated irrespective of the nature of the speech stimuli and during expectancy of speech stimuli. A left temporoparietal semantic region was responsive to meaningless stimuli (vowels). In response to meaningful stimuli (words, sentences, story), left middle and inferior temporal semantic regions and posterior superior temporal phonological regions were under-activated in patients, whereas anterior superior temporal phonological regions were over-activated. These differences in the recruitment of the speech comprehension system reflect the alternative neural strategies that permit speech comprehension after cochlear implantation.  (+info)

Responses of inferior colliculus neurons to amplitude-modulated intracochlear electrical pulses in deaf cats. (8/786)

Current cochlear prostheses use amplitude-modulated pulse trains to encode acoustic signals. In this study we examined the responses of inferior colliculus (IC) neurons to sinusoidal amplitude-modulated pulses and compared the maximum unmodulated pulse rate (Fmax) to which they responded with the maximum modulation frequency (maxFm) that they followed. Consistent with previous results, responses to unmodulated pulses were all low-pass functions of pulse rate. Mean Fmax to unmodulated pulses was 104 pulses per second (pps) and modal Fmax was 60 pps. Above Fmax IC neurons ceased responding except for an onset burst at the beginning of the stimulus. However, IC neurons responded to much higher pulse rates when these pulses were amplitude modulated; 74% were relatively insensitive to carrier rate and responded to all modulated carriers including those exceeding 600 pps. In contrast, the responses of these neurons (70%) were low-pass functions of modulation frequency, and the remaining (30%) had band-pass functions with a maxFm of 42 and 34 Hz, respectively. Thus temporal resolution of IC neurons for modulated frequencies is significantly lower than that for unmodulated pulses. These two measures of temporal resolution (Fmax and maxFm) were uncorrelated (r(2) = 0.101). Several parameters influenced the amplitude and temporal structure of modulation responses including modulation depth, overall intensity and modulation-to-carrier rate ratio. We observed distortions in unit responses to amplitude-modulated signals when this ratio was 1/4 to 1/6. Since most current cochlear implant speech processors permit ratios that are significantly greater than this, severe distortion and signal degradation may occur frequently in these devices.  (+info)

Cochlear implants are medical devices that are surgically implanted in the inner ear to help restore hearing in individuals with severe to profound hearing loss. These devices bypass the damaged hair cells in the inner ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve, allowing the brain to interpret sound signals. Cochlear implants consist of two main components: an external processor that picks up and analyzes sounds from the environment, and an internal receiver/stimulator that receives the processed information and sends electrical impulses to the auditory nerve. The resulting patterns of electrical activity are then perceived as sound by the brain. Cochlear implants can significantly improve communication abilities, language development, and overall quality of life for individuals with profound hearing loss.

Cochlear implantation is a surgical procedure in which a device called a cochlear implant is inserted into the inner ear (cochlea) of a person with severe to profound hearing loss. The implant consists of an external component, which includes a microphone, processor, and transmitter, and an internal component, which includes a receiver and electrode array.

The microphone picks up sounds from the environment and sends them to the processor, which analyzes and converts the sounds into electrical signals. These signals are then transmitted to the receiver, which stimulates the electrode array in the cochlea. The electrodes directly stimulate the auditory nerve fibers, bypassing the damaged hair cells in the inner ear that are responsible for normal hearing.

The brain interprets these electrical signals as sound, allowing the person to perceive and understand speech and other sounds. Cochlear implantation is typically recommended for people who do not benefit from traditional hearing aids and can significantly improve communication, quality of life, and social integration for those with severe to profound hearing loss.

Deafness is a hearing loss that is so severe that it results in significant difficulty in understanding or comprehending speech, even when using hearing aids. It can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired later in life due to various causes such as disease, injury, infection, exposure to loud noises, or aging. Deafness can range from mild to profound and may affect one ear (unilateral) or both ears (bilateral). In some cases, deafness may be accompanied by tinnitus, which is the perception of ringing or other sounds in the ears.

Deaf individuals often use American Sign Language (ASL) or other forms of sign language to communicate. Some people with less severe hearing loss may benefit from hearing aids, cochlear implants, or other assistive listening devices. Deafness can have significant social, educational, and vocational implications, and early intervention and appropriate support services are critical for optimal development and outcomes.

Speech perception is the process by which the brain interprets and understands spoken language. It involves recognizing and discriminating speech sounds (phonemes), organizing them into words, and attaching meaning to those words in order to comprehend spoken language. This process requires the integration of auditory information with prior knowledge and context. Factors such as hearing ability, cognitive function, and language experience can all impact speech perception.

The correction of hearing impairment refers to the various methods and technologies used to improve or restore hearing function in individuals with hearing loss. This can include the use of hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other assistive listening devices. Additionally, speech therapy and auditory training may also be used to help individuals with hearing impairment better understand and communicate with others. In some cases, surgical procedures may also be performed to correct physical abnormalities in the ear or improve nerve function. The goal of correction of hearing impairment is to help individuals with hearing loss better interact with their environment and improve their overall quality of life.

Bilateral hearing loss refers to a type of hearing loss that affects both ears equally or to varying degrees. It can be further categorized into two types: sensorineural and conductive hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing loss occurs due to damage to the inner ear or nerve pathways from the inner ear to the brain, while conductive hearing loss happens when sound waves are not properly transmitted through the outer ear canal to the eardrum and middle ear bones. Bilateral hearing loss can result in difficulty understanding speech, localizing sounds, and may impact communication and quality of life. The diagnosis and management of bilateral hearing loss typically involve a comprehensive audiological evaluation and medical assessment to determine the underlying cause and appropriate treatment options.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "hearing impairment" is defined as "hearing loss greater than 40 decibels (dB) in the better ear in adults or greater than 30 dB in children." Therefore, "Persons with hearing impairments" refers to individuals who have a significant degree of hearing loss that affects their ability to communicate and perform daily activities.

Hearing impairment can range from mild to profound and can be categorized as sensorineural (inner ear or nerve damage), conductive (middle ear problems), or mixed (a combination of both). The severity and type of hearing impairment can impact the communication methods, assistive devices, or accommodations that a person may need.

It is important to note that "hearing impairment" and "deafness" are not interchangeable terms. While deafness typically refers to a profound degree of hearing loss that significantly impacts a person's ability to communicate using sound, hearing impairment can refer to any degree of hearing loss that affects a person's ability to hear and understand speech or other sounds.

Dental implants are artificial tooth roots that are surgically placed into the jawbone to replace missing or extracted teeth. They are typically made of titanium, a biocompatible material that can fuse with the bone over time in a process called osseointegration. Once the implant has integrated with the bone, a dental crown, bridge, or denture can be attached to it to restore function and aesthetics to the mouth.

Dental implants are a popular choice for tooth replacement because they offer several advantages over traditional options like dentures or bridges. They are more stable and comfortable, as they do not rely on adjacent teeth for support and do not slip or move around in the mouth. Additionally, dental implants can help to preserve jawbone density and prevent facial sagging that can occur when teeth are missing.

The process of getting dental implants typically involves several appointments with a dental specialist called a prosthodontist or an oral surgeon. During the first appointment, the implant is placed into the jawbone, and the gum tissue is stitched closed. Over the next few months, the implant will fuse with the bone. Once this process is complete, a second surgery may be necessary to expose the implant and attach an abutment, which connects the implant to the dental restoration. Finally, the crown, bridge, or denture is attached to the implant, providing a natural-looking and functional replacement for the missing tooth.

Speech intelligibility is a term used in audiology and speech-language pathology to describe the ability of a listener to correctly understand spoken language. It is a measure of how well speech can be understood by others, and is often assessed through standardized tests that involve the presentation of recorded or live speech at varying levels of loudness and/or background noise.

Speech intelligibility can be affected by various factors, including hearing loss, cognitive impairment, developmental disorders, neurological conditions, and structural abnormalities of the speech production mechanism. Factors related to the speaker, such as speaking rate, clarity, and articulation, as well as factors related to the listener, such as attention, motivation, and familiarity with the speaker or accent, can also influence speech intelligibility.

Poor speech intelligibility can have significant impacts on communication, socialization, education, and employment opportunities, making it an important area of assessment and intervention in clinical practice.

Speech discrimination tests are a type of audiological assessment used to measure a person's ability to understand and identify spoken words, typically presented in quiet and/or noisy backgrounds. These tests are used to evaluate the function of the peripheral and central auditory system, as well as speech perception abilities.

During the test, the individual is presented with lists of words or sentences at varying intensity levels and/or signal-to-noise ratios. The person's task is to repeat or identify the words or phrases they hear. The results of the test are used to determine the individual's speech recognition threshold (SRT), which is the softest level at which the person can correctly identify spoken words.

Speech discrimination tests can help diagnose hearing loss, central auditory processing disorders, and other communication difficulties. They can also be used to monitor changes in hearing ability over time, assess the effectiveness of hearing aids or other interventions, and develop communication strategies for individuals with hearing impairments.

The auditory threshold is the minimum sound intensity or loudness level that a person can detect 50% of the time, for a given tone frequency. It is typically measured in decibels (dB) and represents the quietest sound that a person can hear. The auditory threshold can be affected by various factors such as age, exposure to noise, and certain medical conditions. Hearing tests, such as pure-tone audiometry, are used to measure an individual's auditory thresholds for different frequencies.

Loudness perception refers to the subjective experience of the intensity or volume of a sound, which is a psychological response to the physical property of sound pressure level. It is a measure of how loud or soft a sound seems to an individual, and it can be influenced by various factors such as frequency, duration, and the context in which the sound is heard.

The perception of loudness is closely related to the concept of sound intensity, which is typically measured in decibels (dB). However, while sound intensity is an objective physical measurement, loudness is a subjective experience that can vary between individuals and even for the same individual under different listening conditions.

Loudness perception is a complex process that involves several stages of auditory processing, including mechanical transduction of sound waves by the ear, neural encoding of sound information in the auditory nerve, and higher-level cognitive processes that interpret and modulate the perceived loudness of sounds. Understanding the mechanisms underlying loudness perception is important for developing hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other assistive listening devices, as well as for diagnosing and treating various hearing disorders.

Psychoacoustics is a branch of psychophysics that deals with the study of the psychological and physiological responses to sound. It involves understanding how people perceive, interpret, and react to different sounds, including speech, music, and environmental noises. This field combines knowledge from various areas such as psychology, acoustics, physics, and engineering to investigate the relationship between physical sound characteristics and human perception. Research in psychoacoustics has applications in fields like hearing aid design, noise control, music perception, and communication systems.

Hearing loss is a partial or total inability to hear sounds in one or both ears. It can occur due to damage to the structures of the ear, including the outer ear, middle ear, inner ear, or nerve pathways that transmit sound to the brain. The degree of hearing loss can vary from mild (difficulty hearing soft sounds) to severe (inability to hear even loud sounds). Hearing loss can be temporary or permanent and may be caused by factors such as exposure to loud noises, genetics, aging, infections, trauma, or certain medical conditions. It is important to note that hearing loss can have significant impacts on a person's communication abilities, social interactions, and overall quality of life.

Hearing aids are electronic devices designed to improve hearing and speech comprehension for individuals with hearing loss. They consist of a microphone, an amplifier, a speaker, and a battery. The microphone picks up sounds from the environment, the amplifier increases the volume of these sounds, and the speaker sends the amplified sound into the ear. Modern hearing aids often include additional features such as noise reduction, directional microphones, and wireless connectivity to smartphones or other devices. They are programmed to meet the specific needs of the user's hearing loss and can be adjusted for comfort and effectiveness. Hearing aids are available in various styles, including behind-the-ear (BTE), receiver-in-canal (RIC), in-the-ear (ITE), and completely-in-canal (CIC).

Acoustic stimulation refers to the use of sound waves or vibrations to elicit a response in an individual, typically for the purpose of assessing or treating hearing, balance, or neurological disorders. In a medical context, acoustic stimulation may involve presenting pure tones, speech sounds, or other types of auditory signals through headphones, speakers, or specialized devices such as bone conduction transducers.

The response to acoustic stimulation can be measured using various techniques, including electrophysiological tests like auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) or otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), behavioral observations, or functional imaging methods like fMRI. Acoustic stimulation is also used in therapeutic settings, such as auditory training programs for hearing impairment or vestibular rehabilitation for balance disorders.

It's important to note that acoustic stimulation should be administered under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional to ensure safety and effectiveness.

Speech Audiometry is a hearing test that measures a person's ability to understand and recognize spoken words at different volumes and frequencies. It is used to assess the function of the auditory system, particularly in cases where there is a suspected problem with speech discrimination or understanding spoken language.

The test typically involves presenting lists of words to the patient at varying intensity levels and asking them to repeat what they hear. The examiner may also present sentences with missing words that the patient must fill in. Based on the results, the audiologist can determine the quietest level at which the patient can reliably detect speech and the degree of speech discrimination ability.

Speech Audiometry is often used in conjunction with pure-tone audiometry to provide a more comprehensive assessment of hearing function. It can help identify any specific patterns of hearing loss, such as those caused by nerve damage or cochlear dysfunction, and inform decisions about treatment options, including the need for hearing aids or other assistive devices.

The Speech Reception Threshold (SRT) test is a hearing assessment used to estimate the softest speech level, typically expressed in decibels (dB), at which a person can reliably detect and repeat back spoken words or sentences. It measures the listener's ability to understand speech in quiet environments and serves as an essential component of a comprehensive audiological evaluation.

During the SRT test, the examiner presents a list of phonetically balanced words or sentences at varying intensity levels, usually through headphones or insert earphones. The patient is then asked to repeat each word or sentence back to the examiner. The intensity level is decreased gradually until the patient can no longer accurately identify the presented stimuli. The softest speech level where the patient correctly repeats 50% of the words or sentences is recorded as their SRT.

The SRT test results help audiologists determine the presence and degree of hearing loss, assess the effectiveness of hearing aids, and monitor changes in hearing sensitivity over time. It is often performed alongside other tests, such as pure-tone audiometry and tympanometry, to provide a comprehensive understanding of an individual's hearing abilities.

Pitch perception is the ability to identify and discriminate different frequencies or musical notes. It is the way our auditory system interprets and organizes sounds based on their highness or lowness, which is determined by the frequency of the sound waves. A higher pitch corresponds to a higher frequency, while a lower pitch corresponds to a lower frequency. Pitch perception is an important aspect of hearing and is crucial for understanding speech, enjoying music, and localizing sounds in our environment. It involves complex processing in the inner ear and auditory nervous system.

Prostheses: Artificial substitutes or replacements for missing body parts, such as limbs, eyes, or teeth. They are designed to restore the function, appearance, or mobility of the lost part. Prosthetic devices can be categorized into several types, including:

1. External prostheses: Devices that are attached to the outside of the body, like artificial arms, legs, hands, and feet. These may be further classified into:
a. Cosmetic or aesthetic prostheses: Primarily designed to improve the appearance of the affected area.
b. Functional prostheses: Designed to help restore the functionality and mobility of the lost limb.
2. Internal prostheses: Implanted artificial parts that replace missing internal organs, bones, or tissues, such as heart valves, hip joints, or intraocular lenses.

Implants: Medical devices or substances that are intentionally placed inside the body to replace or support a missing or damaged biological structure, deliver medication, monitor physiological functions, or enhance bodily functions. Examples of implants include:

1. Orthopedic implants: Devices used to replace or reinforce damaged bones, joints, or cartilage, such as knee or hip replacements.
2. Cardiovascular implants: Devices that help support or regulate heart function, like pacemakers, defibrillators, and artificial heart valves.
3. Dental implants: Artificial tooth roots that are placed into the jawbone to support dental prostheses, such as crowns, bridges, or dentures.
4. Neurological implants: Devices used to stimulate nerves, brain structures, or spinal cord tissues to treat various neurological conditions, like deep brain stimulators for Parkinson's disease or cochlear implants for hearing loss.
5. Ophthalmic implants: Artificial lenses that are placed inside the eye to replace a damaged or removed natural lens, such as intraocular lenses used in cataract surgery.

Hearing is the ability to perceive sounds by detecting vibrations in the air or other mediums and translating them into nerve impulses that are sent to the brain for interpretation. In medical terms, hearing is defined as the sense of sound perception, which is mediated by the ear and interpreted by the brain. It involves a complex series of processes, including the conduction of sound waves through the outer ear to the eardrum, the vibration of the middle ear bones, and the movement of fluid in the inner ear, which stimulates hair cells to send electrical signals to the auditory nerve and ultimately to the brain. Hearing allows us to communicate with others, appreciate music and sounds, and detect danger or important events in our environment.

The cochlear nerve, also known as the auditory nerve, is the sensory nerve that transmits sound signals from the inner ear to the brain. It consists of two parts: the outer spiral ganglion and the inner vestibular portion. The spiral ganglion contains the cell bodies of the bipolar neurons that receive input from hair cells in the cochlea, which is the snail-shaped organ in the inner ear responsible for hearing. These neurons then send their axons to form the cochlear nerve, which travels through the internal auditory meatus and synapses with neurons in the cochlear nuclei located in the brainstem.

Damage to the cochlear nerve can result in hearing loss or deafness, depending on the severity of the injury. Common causes of cochlear nerve damage include acoustic trauma, such as exposure to loud noises, viral infections, meningitis, and tumors affecting the nerve or surrounding structures. In some cases, cochlear nerve damage may be treated with hearing aids, cochlear implants, or other assistive devices to help restore or improve hearing function.

Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a type of hearing impairment that occurs due to damage to the inner ear (cochlea) or to the nerve pathways from the inner ear to the brain. It can be caused by various factors such as aging, exposure to loud noises, genetics, certain medical conditions (like diabetes and heart disease), and ototoxic medications.

SNHL affects the ability of the hair cells in the cochlea to convert sound waves into electrical signals that are sent to the brain via the auditory nerve. As a result, sounds may be perceived as muffled, faint, or distorted, making it difficult to understand speech, especially in noisy environments.

SNHL is typically permanent and cannot be corrected with medication or surgery, but hearing aids or cochlear implants can help improve communication and quality of life for those affected.

In the context of medicine, particularly in audiology and otolaryngology (ear, nose, and throat specialty), "noise" is defined as unwanted or disturbing sound in the environment that can interfere with communication, rest, sleep, or cognitive tasks. It can also refer to sounds that are harmful to hearing, such as loud machinery noises or music, which can cause noise-induced hearing loss if exposure is prolonged or at high enough levels.

In some medical contexts, "noise" may also refer to non-specific signals or interfering factors in diagnostic tests and measurements that can make it difficult to interpret results accurately.

A drug implant is a medical device that is specially designed to provide controlled release of a medication into the body over an extended period of time. Drug implants can be placed under the skin or in various body cavities, depending on the specific medical condition being treated. They are often used when other methods of administering medication, such as oral pills or injections, are not effective or practical.

Drug implants come in various forms, including rods, pellets, and small capsules. The medication is contained within the device and is released slowly over time, either through diffusion or erosion of the implant material. This allows for a steady concentration of the drug to be maintained in the body, which can help to improve treatment outcomes and reduce side effects.

Some common examples of drug implants include:

1. Hormonal implants: These are small rods that are inserted under the skin of the upper arm and release hormones such as progestin or estrogen over a period of several years. They are often used for birth control or to treat conditions such as endometriosis or uterine fibroids.
2. Intraocular implants: These are small devices that are placed in the eye during surgery to release medication directly into the eye. They are often used to treat conditions such as age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy.
3. Bone cement implants: These are specially formulated cements that contain antibiotics and are used to fill bone defects or joint spaces during surgery. The antibiotics are released slowly over time, helping to prevent infection.
4. Implantable pumps: These are small devices that are placed under the skin and deliver medication directly into a specific body cavity, such as the spinal cord or the peritoneal cavity. They are often used to treat chronic pain or cancer.

Overall, drug implants offer several advantages over other methods of administering medication, including improved compliance, reduced side effects, and more consistent drug levels in the body. However, they may also have some disadvantages, such as the need for surgical placement and the potential for infection or other complications. As with any medical treatment, it is important to discuss the risks and benefits of drug implants with a healthcare provider.

Speech acoustics is a subfield of acoustic phonetics that deals with the physical properties of speech sounds, such as frequency, amplitude, and duration. It involves the study of how these properties are produced by the vocal tract and perceived by the human ear. Speech acousticians use various techniques to analyze and measure the acoustic signals produced during speech, including spectral analysis, formant tracking, and pitch extraction. This information is used in a variety of applications, such as speech recognition, speaker identification, and hearing aid design.

Language development refers to the process by which children acquire the ability to understand and communicate through spoken, written, or signed language. This complex process involves various components including phonology (sound system), semantics (meaning of words and sentences), syntax (sentence structure), and pragmatics (social use of language). Language development begins in infancy with cooing and babbling and continues through early childhood and beyond, with most children developing basic conversational skills by the age of 4-5 years. However, language development can continue into adolescence and even adulthood as individuals learn new languages or acquire more advanced linguistic skills. Factors that can influence language development include genetics, environment, cognition, and social interactions.

Speech is the vocalized form of communication using sounds and words to express thoughts, ideas, and feelings. It involves the articulation of sounds through the movement of muscles in the mouth, tongue, and throat, which are controlled by nerves. Speech also requires respiratory support, phonation (vocal cord vibration), and prosody (rhythm, stress, and intonation).

Speech is a complex process that develops over time in children, typically beginning with cooing and babbling sounds in infancy and progressing to the use of words and sentences by around 18-24 months. Speech disorders can affect any aspect of this process, including articulation, fluency, voice, and language.

In a medical context, speech is often evaluated and treated by speech-language pathologists who specialize in diagnosing and managing communication disorders.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "music" is not a term that has a medical definition. Music is a form of art that uses sound organized in time. It may include elements such as melody, harmony, rhythm, and dynamics. While music can have various psychological and physiological effects on individuals, it is not considered a medical term with a specific diagnosis or treatment application. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Speech production measurement is the quantitative analysis and assessment of various parameters and characteristics of spoken language, such as speech rate, intensity, duration, pitch, and articulation. These measurements can be used to diagnose and monitor speech disorders, evaluate the effectiveness of treatment, and conduct research in fields such as linguistics, psychology, and communication disorders. Speech production measurement tools may include specialized software, hardware, and techniques for recording, analyzing, and visualizing speech data.

Phonetics is not typically considered a medical term, but rather a branch of linguistics that deals with the sounds of human speech. It involves the study of how these sounds are produced, transmitted, and received, as well as how they are used to convey meaning in different languages. However, there can be some overlap between phonetics and certain areas of medical research, such as speech-language pathology or audiology, which may study the production, perception, and disorders of speech sounds for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

Perceptual masking, also known as sensory masking or just masking, is a concept in sensory perception that refers to the interference in the ability to detect or recognize a stimulus (the target) due to the presence of another stimulus (the mask). This phenomenon can occur across different senses, including audition and vision.

In the context of hearing, perceptual masking occurs when one sound (the masker) makes it difficult to hear another sound (the target) because the two sounds are presented simultaneously or in close proximity to each other. The masker can make the target sound less detectable, harder to identify, or even completely inaudible.

There are different types of perceptual masking, including:

1. Simultaneous Masking: When the masker and target sounds occur at the same time.
2. Temporal Masking: When the masker sound precedes or follows the target sound by a short period. This type of masking can be further divided into forward masking (when the masker comes before the target) and backward masking (when the masker comes after the target).
3. Informational Masking: A more complex form of masking that occurs when the listener's cognitive processes, such as attention or memory, are affected by the presence of the masker sound. This type of masking can make it difficult to understand speech in noisy environments, even if the signal-to-noise ratio is favorable.

Perceptual masking has important implications for understanding and addressing hearing difficulties, particularly in situations with background noise or multiple sounds occurring simultaneously.

Sound spectrography, also known as voice spectrography, is a diagnostic procedure in which a person's speech sounds are analyzed and displayed as a visual pattern called a spectrogram. This test is used to evaluate voice disorders, speech disorders, and hearing problems. It can help identify patterns of sound production and reveal any abnormalities in the vocal tract or hearing mechanism.

During the test, a person is asked to produce specific sounds or sentences, which are then recorded and analyzed by a computer program. The program breaks down the sound waves into their individual frequencies and amplitudes, and displays them as a series of horizontal lines on a graph. The resulting spectrogram shows how the frequencies and amplitudes change over time, providing valuable information about the person's speech patterns and any underlying problems.

Sound spectrography is a useful tool for diagnosing and treating voice and speech disorders, as well as for researching the acoustic properties of human speech. It can also be used to evaluate hearing aids and other assistive listening devices, and to assess the effectiveness of various treatments for hearing loss and other auditory disorders.

The Scala Tympani is a part of the inner ear's bony labyrinth, specifically within the cochlea. It is one of the two channels (the other being the Scala Vestibuli) that make up the bony duct of the cochlea, through which sound waves are transmitted to the inner ear.

The Scala Tympani starts at the round window, which is a membrane-covered opening located on the cochlea's outer wall. It runs parallel to the Scala Vestibuli and connects with it at the helicotrema, a small opening at the apex or tip of the cochlea.

When sound waves reach the inner ear, they cause vibrations in the fluid-filled Scala Tympani and Scala Vestibuli, which stimulate hair cells within the organ of Corti, leading to the conversion of mechanical energy into electrical signals that are then transmitted to the brain via the auditory nerve.

It's important to note that any damage or dysfunction in the Scala Tympani or other parts of the inner ear can lead to hearing loss or other auditory disorders.

Auditory perception refers to the process by which the brain interprets and makes sense of the sounds we hear. It involves the recognition and interpretation of different frequencies, intensities, and patterns of sound waves that reach our ears through the process of hearing. This allows us to identify and distinguish various sounds such as speech, music, and environmental noises.

The auditory system includes the outer ear, middle ear, inner ear, and the auditory nerve, which transmits electrical signals to the brain's auditory cortex for processing and interpretation. Auditory perception is a complex process that involves multiple areas of the brain working together to identify and make sense of sounds in our environment.

Disorders or impairments in auditory perception can result in difficulties with hearing, understanding speech, and identifying environmental sounds, which can significantly impact communication, learning, and daily functioning.

Audiometry is the testing of a person's ability to hear different sounds, pitches, or frequencies. It is typically conducted using an audiometer, a device that emits tones at varying volumes and frequencies. The person being tested wears headphones and indicates when they can hear the tone by pressing a button or raising their hand.

There are two main types of audiometry: pure-tone audiometry and speech audiometry. Pure-tone audiometry measures a person's ability to hear different frequencies at varying volumes, while speech audiometry measures a person's ability to understand spoken words at different volumes and in the presence of background noise.

The results of an audiometry test are typically plotted on an audiogram, which shows the quietest sounds that a person can hear at different frequencies. This information can be used to diagnose hearing loss, determine its cause, and develop a treatment plan.

The spiral ganglion is a structure located in the inner ear, specifically within the cochlea. It consists of nerve cell bodies that form the sensory component of the auditory nervous system. The spiral ganglion's neurons are bipolar and have peripheral processes that form synapses with hair cells in the organ of Corti, which is responsible for converting sound vibrations into electrical signals.

The central processes of these neurons then coalesce to form the cochlear nerve, which transmits these electrical signals to the brainstem and ultimately to the auditory cortex for processing and interpretation as sound. Damage to the spiral ganglion or its associated neural structures can lead to hearing loss or deafness.

Sound localization is the ability of the auditory system to identify the location or origin of a sound source in the environment. It is a crucial aspect of hearing and enables us to navigate and interact with our surroundings effectively. The process involves several cues, including time differences in the arrival of sound to each ear (interaural time difference), differences in sound level at each ear (interaural level difference), and spectral information derived from the filtering effects of the head and external ears on incoming sounds. These cues are analyzed by the brain to determine the direction and distance of the sound source, allowing for accurate localization.

Prosthesis design is a specialized field in medical device technology that involves creating and developing artificial substitutes to replace a missing body part, such as a limb, tooth, eye, or internal organ. The design process typically includes several stages: assessment of the patient's needs, selection of appropriate materials, creation of a prototype, testing and refinement, and final fabrication and fitting of the prosthesis.

The goal of prosthesis design is to create a device that functions as closely as possible to the natural body part it replaces, while also being comfortable, durable, and aesthetically pleasing for the patient. The design process may involve collaboration between medical professionals, engineers, and designers, and may take into account factors such as the patient's age, lifestyle, occupation, and overall health.

Prosthesis design can be highly complex, particularly for advanced devices such as robotic limbs or implantable organs. These devices often require sophisticated sensors, actuators, and control systems to mimic the natural functions of the body part they replace. As a result, prosthesis design is an active area of research and development in the medical field, with ongoing efforts to improve the functionality, comfort, and affordability of these devices for patients.

Pure-tone audiometry is a hearing test that measures a person's ability to hear different sounds, pitches, or frequencies. During the test, pure tones are presented to the patient through headphones or ear inserts, and the patient is asked to indicate each time they hear the sound by raising their hand, pressing a button, or responding verbally.

The softest sound that the person can hear at each frequency is recorded as the hearing threshold, and a graph called an audiogram is created to show the results. The audiogram provides information about the type and degree of hearing loss in each ear. Pure-tone audiometry is a standard hearing test used to diagnose and monitor hearing disorders.

Pitch discrimination, in the context of audiology and neuroscience, refers to the ability to perceive and identify the difference in pitch between two or more sounds. It is the measure of how accurately an individual can distinguish between different frequencies or tones. This ability is crucial for various aspects of hearing, such as understanding speech, appreciating music, and localizing sound sources.

Pitch discrimination is typically measured using psychoacoustic tests, where a listener is presented with two sequential tones and asked to determine whether the second tone is higher or lower in pitch than the first one. The smallest detectable difference between the frequencies of these two tones is referred to as the "just noticeable difference" (JND) or the "difference limen." This value can be used to quantify an individual's pitch discrimination abilities and may vary depending on factors such as frequency, intensity, and age.

Deficits in pitch discrimination can have significant consequences for various aspects of daily life, including communication difficulties and reduced enjoyment of music. These deficits can result from damage to the auditory system due to factors like noise exposure, aging, or certain medical conditions, such as hearing loss or neurological disorders.

The cochlea is a part of the inner ear that is responsible for hearing. It is a spiral-shaped structure that looks like a snail shell and is filled with fluid. The cochlea contains hair cells, which are specialized sensory cells that convert sound vibrations into electrical signals that are sent to the brain.

The cochlea has three main parts: the vestibular canal, the tympanic canal, and the cochlear duct. Sound waves enter the inner ear and cause the fluid in the cochlea to move, which in turn causes the hair cells to bend. This bending motion stimulates the hair cells to generate electrical signals that are sent to the brain via the auditory nerve.

The brain then interprets these signals as sound, allowing us to hear and understand speech, music, and other sounds in our environment. Damage to the hair cells or other structures in the cochlea can lead to hearing loss or deafness.

Breast implants are medical devices that are inserted into the breast to enhance their size, shape, or fullness. They can also be used for breast reconstruction after a mastectomy or other medical treatments. Breast implants typically consist of a silicone shell filled with either saline (sterile saltwater) or silicone gel.

There are two main types of breast implants:

1. Saline-filled implants: These implants have a silicone outer shell that is filled with sterile saline solution after the implant has been inserted into the breast. This allows for some adjustment in the size and shape of the implant after surgery.
2. Silicone gel-filled implants: These implants have a silicone outer shell that is pre-filled with a cohesive silicone gel. The gel is designed to feel more like natural breast tissue than saline implants.

Breast implants come in various sizes, shapes, and textures, and the choice of implant will depend on several factors, including the patient's body type, desired outcome, and personal preference. It is important for patients considering breast implants to discuss their options with a qualified plastic surgeon who can help them make an informed decision based on their individual needs and goals.

Experimental implants refer to medical devices that are not yet approved by regulatory authorities for general use in medical practice. These are typically being tested in clinical trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy. The purpose of experimental implants is to determine whether they can be used as a viable treatment option for various medical conditions. They may include, but are not limited to, devices such as artificial joints, heart valves, or spinal cord stimulators that are still in the developmental or testing stage. Participation in clinical trials involving experimental implants is voluntary and usually requires informed consent from the patient.

The temporal bone is a paired bone that is located on each side of the skull, forming part of the lateral and inferior walls of the cranial cavity. It is one of the most complex bones in the human body and has several important structures associated with it. The main functions of the temporal bone include protecting the middle and inner ear, providing attachment for various muscles of the head and neck, and forming part of the base of the skull.

The temporal bone is divided into several parts, including the squamous part, the petrous part, the tympanic part, and the styloid process. The squamous part forms the lateral portion of the temporal bone and articulates with the parietal bone. The petrous part is the most medial and superior portion of the temporal bone and contains the inner ear and the semicircular canals. The tympanic part forms the lower and anterior portions of the temporal bone and includes the external auditory meatus or ear canal. The styloid process is a long, slender projection that extends downward from the inferior aspect of the temporal bone and serves as an attachment site for various muscles and ligaments.

The temporal bone plays a crucial role in hearing and balance, as it contains the structures of the middle and inner ear, including the oval window, round window, cochlea, vestibule, and semicircular canals. The stapes bone, one of the three bones in the middle ear, is entirely encased within the petrous portion of the temporal bone. Additionally, the temporal bone contains important structures for facial expression and sensation, including the facial nerve, which exits the skull through the stylomastoid foramen, a small opening in the temporal bone.

Audiology is a branch of science that deals with the study of hearing, balance disorders, and related conditions. It involves the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of hearing and balance problems using various tests, techniques, and devices. Audiologists are healthcare professionals who specialize in this field and provide services such as hearing evaluations, fitting of hearing aids, and counseling for people with hearing loss or tinnitus (ringing in the ears). They also work closely with other medical professionals to manage complex cases and provide rehabilitation services.

Child language refers to the development of linguistic abilities in children, including both receptive and expressive communication. This includes the acquisition of various components of language such as phonology (sound system), morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (social use of language).

Child language development typically follows a predictable sequence, beginning with cooing and babbling in infancy, followed by the use of single words and simple phrases in early childhood. Over time, children acquire more complex linguistic structures and expand their vocabulary to communicate more effectively. However, individual differences in the rate and pace of language development are common.

Clinical professionals such as speech-language pathologists may assess and diagnose children with language disorders or delays in order to provide appropriate interventions and support for typical language development.

A hearing test is a procedure used to evaluate a person's ability to hear different sounds, pitches, or frequencies. It is performed by a hearing healthcare professional in a sound-treated booth or room with calibrated audiometers. The test measures a person's hearing sensitivity at different frequencies and determines the quietest sounds they can hear, known as their hearing thresholds.

There are several types of hearing tests, including:

1. Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA): This is the most common type of hearing test, where the person is presented with pure tones at different frequencies and volumes through headphones or ear inserts. The person indicates when they hear the sound by pressing a button or raising their hand.
2. Speech Audiometry: This test measures a person's ability to understand speech at different volume levels. The person is asked to repeat words presented to them in quiet and in background noise.
3. Tympanometry: This test measures the function of the middle ear by creating variations in air pressure in the ear canal. It can help identify issues such as fluid buildup or a perforated eardrum.
4. Acoustic Reflex Testing: This test measures the body's natural response to loud sounds and can help identify the location of damage in the hearing system.
5. Otoacoustic Emissions (OAEs): This test measures the sound that is produced by the inner ear when it is stimulated by a sound. It can help identify cochlear damage or abnormalities.

Hearing tests are important for diagnosing and monitoring hearing loss, as well as identifying any underlying medical conditions that may be causing the hearing problems.

Implanted electrodes are medical devices that are surgically placed inside the body to interface directly with nerves, neurons, or other electrically excitable tissue for various therapeutic purposes. These electrodes can be used to stimulate or record electrical activity from specific areas of the body, depending on their design and application.

There are several types of implanted electrodes, including:

1. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) electrodes: These are placed deep within the brain to treat movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. DBS electrodes deliver electrical impulses that modulate abnormal neural activity in targeted brain regions.
2. Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) electrodes: These are implanted along the spinal cord to treat chronic pain syndromes. SCS electrodes emit low-level electrical pulses that interfere with pain signals traveling to the brain, providing relief for patients.
3. Cochlear Implant electrodes: These are surgically inserted into the cochlea of the inner ear to restore hearing in individuals with severe to profound hearing loss. The electrodes stimulate the auditory nerve directly, bypassing damaged hair cells within the cochlea.
4. Retinal Implant electrodes: These are implanted in the retina to treat certain forms of blindness caused by degenerative eye diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The electrodes convert visual information from a camera into electrical signals, which stimulate remaining retinal cells and transmit the information to the brain via the optic nerve.
5. Sacral Nerve Stimulation (SNS) electrodes: These are placed near the sacral nerves in the lower back to treat urinary or fecal incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome. SNS electrodes deliver electrical impulses that regulate the function of the affected muscles and nerves.
6. Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) electrodes: These are wrapped around the vagus nerve in the neck to treat epilepsy and depression. VNS electrodes provide intermittent electrical stimulation to the vagus nerve, which has connections to various regions of the brain involved in these conditions.

Overall, implanted electrodes serve as a crucial component in many neuromodulation therapies, offering an effective treatment option for numerous neurological and sensory disorders.

A language test is not a medical term per se, but it is commonly used in the field of speech-language pathology, which is a medical discipline. A language test, in this context, refers to an assessment tool used by speech-language pathologists to evaluate an individual's language abilities. These tests typically measure various aspects of language, including vocabulary, grammar, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.

Language tests can be standardized or non-standardized and may be administered individually or in a group setting. The results of these tests help speech-language pathologists diagnose language disorders, develop treatment plans, and monitor progress over time. It is important to note that language testing should be conducted by a qualified professional who has experience in administering and interpreting language assessments.

Auditory brainstem evoked potentials (ABEPs or BAEPs) are medical tests that measure the electrical activity in the auditory pathway of the brain in response to sound stimulation. The test involves placing electrodes on the scalp and recording the tiny electrical signals generated by the nerve cells in the brainstem as they respond to clicks or tone bursts presented through earphones.

The resulting waveform is analyzed for latency (the time it takes for the signal to travel from the ear to the brain) and amplitude (the strength of the signal). Abnormalities in the waveform can indicate damage to the auditory nerve or brainstem, and are often used in the diagnosis of various neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis, acoustic neuroma, and brainstem tumors.

The test is non-invasive, painless, and takes only a few minutes to perform. It provides valuable information about the functioning of the auditory pathway and can help guide treatment decisions for patients with hearing or balance disorders.

Pattern recognition in the context of physiology refers to the ability to identify and interpret specific patterns or combinations of physiological variables or signals that are characteristic of certain physiological states, conditions, or functions. This process involves analyzing data from various sources such as vital signs, biomarkers, medical images, or electrophysiological recordings to detect meaningful patterns that can provide insights into the underlying physiology or pathophysiology of a given condition.

Physiological pattern recognition is an essential component of clinical decision-making and diagnosis, as it allows healthcare professionals to identify subtle changes in physiological function that may indicate the presence of a disease or disorder. It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatments and interventions, as well as to guide the development of new therapies and medical technologies.

Pattern recognition algorithms and techniques are often used in physiological signal processing and analysis to automate the identification and interpretation of patterns in large datasets. These methods can help to improve the accuracy and efficiency of physiological pattern recognition, enabling more personalized and precise approaches to healthcare.

Computer-assisted signal processing is a medical term that refers to the use of computer algorithms and software to analyze, interpret, and extract meaningful information from biological signals. These signals can include physiological data such as electrocardiogram (ECG) waves, electromyography (EMG) signals, electroencephalography (EEG) readings, or medical images.

The goal of computer-assisted signal processing is to automate the analysis of these complex signals and extract relevant features that can be used for diagnostic, monitoring, or therapeutic purposes. This process typically involves several steps, including:

1. Signal acquisition: Collecting raw data from sensors or medical devices.
2. Preprocessing: Cleaning and filtering the data to remove noise and artifacts.
3. Feature extraction: Identifying and quantifying relevant features in the signal, such as peaks, troughs, or patterns.
4. Analysis: Applying statistical or machine learning algorithms to interpret the extracted features and make predictions about the underlying physiological state.
5. Visualization: Presenting the results in a clear and intuitive way for clinicians to review and use.

Computer-assisted signal processing has numerous applications in healthcare, including:

* Diagnosing and monitoring cardiac arrhythmias or other heart conditions using ECG signals.
* Assessing muscle activity and function using EMG signals.
* Monitoring brain activity and diagnosing neurological disorders using EEG readings.
* Analyzing medical images to detect abnormalities, such as tumors or fractures.

Overall, computer-assisted signal processing is a powerful tool for improving the accuracy and efficiency of medical diagnosis and monitoring, enabling clinicians to make more informed decisions about patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "vocabulary" is a term related to language and communication, rather than medicine or healthcare. It refers to the words and phrases that a person knows and uses in their communication. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help with those!

Endosseous dental implantation is a medical procedure that involves the placement of an artificial tooth root (dental implant) directly into the jawbone. The term "endosseous" refers to the surgical placement of the implant within the bone (endo- meaning "within" and -osseous meaning "bony"). This type of dental implant is the most common and widely used method for replacing missing teeth.

During the procedure, a small incision is made in the gum tissue to expose the jawbone, and a hole is drilled into the bone to receive the implant. The implant is then carefully positioned and secured within the bone. Once the implant has integrated with the bone (a process that can take several months), a dental crown or bridge is attached to the implant to restore function and aesthetics to the mouth.

Endosseous dental implantation is a safe and effective procedure that has a high success rate, making it an excellent option for patients who are missing one or more teeth due to injury, decay, or other causes.

Central hearing loss is a type of hearing disorder that occurs due to damage or dysfunction in the central auditory pathways of the brain, rather than in the ear itself. This condition can result from various causes, such as stroke, tumors, trauma, infection, or degenerative diseases affecting the brain.

In central hearing loss, the person may have difficulty understanding and processing speech, even when they can hear sounds at normal levels. They might experience problems with sound localization, discriminating between similar sounds, and comprehending complex auditory signals. This type of hearing loss is different from sensorineural or conductive hearing loss, which are related to issues in the outer, middle, or inner ear.

Lipreading, also known as speechreading, is not a medical term per se, but it is a communication strategy often used by individuals with hearing loss. It involves paying close attention to the movements of the lips, facial expressions, and body language of the person who is speaking to help understand spoken words.

While lipreading can be helpful, it should be noted that it is not an entirely accurate way to comprehend speech, as many sounds look similar on the lips, and factors such as lighting and the speaker's articulation can affect its effectiveness. Therefore, lipreading is often used in conjunction with other communication strategies, such as hearing aids, cochlear implants, or American Sign Language (ASL).

The auditory cortex is the region of the brain that is responsible for processing and analyzing sounds, including speech. It is located in the temporal lobe of the cerebral cortex, specifically within the Heschl's gyrus and the surrounding areas. The auditory cortex receives input from the auditory nerve, which carries sound information from the inner ear to the brain.

The auditory cortex is divided into several subregions that are responsible for different aspects of sound processing, such as pitch, volume, and location. These regions work together to help us recognize and interpret sounds in our environment, allowing us to communicate with others and respond appropriately to our surroundings. Damage to the auditory cortex can result in hearing loss or difficulty understanding speech.

Auditory evoked potentials (AEP) are medical tests that measure the electrical activity in the brain in response to sound stimuli. These tests are often used to assess hearing function and neural processing in individuals, particularly those who cannot perform traditional behavioral hearing tests.

There are several types of AEP tests, including:

1. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response (BAER) or Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEP): This test measures the electrical activity generated by the brainstem in response to a click or tone stimulus. It is often used to assess the integrity of the auditory nerve and brainstem pathways, and can help diagnose conditions such as auditory neuropathy and retrocochlear lesions.
2. Middle Latency Auditory Evoked Potentials (MLAEP): This test measures the electrical activity generated by the cortical auditory areas of the brain in response to a click or tone stimulus. It is often used to assess higher-level auditory processing, and can help diagnose conditions such as auditory processing disorders and central auditory dysfunction.
3. Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potentials (LLAEP): This test measures the electrical activity generated by the cortical auditory areas of the brain in response to a complex stimulus, such as speech. It is often used to assess language processing and cognitive function, and can help diagnose conditions such as learning disabilities and dementia.

Overall, AEP tests are valuable tools for assessing hearing and neural function in individuals who cannot perform traditional behavioral hearing tests or who have complex neurological conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Language Arts" is not a term used in medical definitions. Language arts is a term commonly used in education to refer to the academic study of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It encompasses various subjects such as English, literature, grammar, creative writing, and communication skills. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help with those!

Bionics is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the design of engineering systems and technologies. It involves the study of biological systems, such as sensory organs or locomotion, and then using that knowledge to create artificial systems that mimic those natural processes. In other words, bionics seeks to combine biology and technology to create innovative solutions to various challenges.

In a medical context, bionics often refers to the use of artificial devices or implants that are designed to function in a similar way to biological structures or functions. For example, cochlear implants are a type of bionic device that can help restore hearing in people with severe hearing loss by converting sound into electrical signals that stimulate the auditory nerve. Similarly, bionic limbs use sensors and motors to mimic the natural movement of human limbs, allowing amputees to regain some degree of mobility and independence.

Overall, bionics represents a fascinating intersection between biology and technology, with the potential to improve the quality of life for many people around the world.

Electric stimulation, also known as electrical nerve stimulation or neuromuscular electrical stimulation, is a therapeutic treatment that uses low-voltage electrical currents to stimulate nerves and muscles. It is often used to help manage pain, promote healing, and improve muscle strength and mobility. The electrical impulses can be delivered through electrodes placed on the skin or directly implanted into the body.

In a medical context, electric stimulation may be used for various purposes such as:

1. Pain management: Electric stimulation can help to block pain signals from reaching the brain and promote the release of endorphins, which are natural painkillers produced by the body.
2. Muscle rehabilitation: Electric stimulation can help to strengthen muscles that have become weak due to injury, illness, or surgery. It can also help to prevent muscle atrophy and improve range of motion.
3. Wound healing: Electric stimulation can promote tissue growth and help to speed up the healing process in wounds, ulcers, and other types of injuries.
4. Urinary incontinence: Electric stimulation can be used to strengthen the muscles that control urination and reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence.
5. Migraine prevention: Electric stimulation can be used as a preventive treatment for migraines by applying electrical impulses to specific nerves in the head and neck.

It is important to note that electric stimulation should only be administered under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional, as improper use can cause harm or discomfort.

Orbital implants are medical devices used in the field of ophthalmology, specifically for orbital fracture repair and enucleation or evisceration procedures. They serve as a replacement for the natural eye structure (the eyeball) when it is removed due to various reasons such as severe trauma, tumors, or painful blind eyes.

Orbital implants are typically made of biocompatible materials like porous polyethylene, hydroxyapatite, or glass. These materials allow for the growth of fibrovascular tissue into the pores, which helps to integrate the implant with the surrounding tissues and minimize movement. The size of the implant is chosen based on the individual patient's needs and may vary from 16mm to 24mm in diameter.

The primary function of orbital implants is to restore the volume and shape of the eye socket, maintain proper eyelid position and function, and provide a foundation for the attachment of an ocular prosthesis (artificial eye) that can be worn over the implant to give a more natural appearance.

"Communication Methods, Total" is not a standard medical term. However, in the context of healthcare and medicine, "communication methods" generally refer to the ways in which information is exchanged between healthcare providers, patients, and caregivers. This can include both verbal and non-verbal communication, as well as written communication through medical records and documentation.

"Total" in this context could mean that all relevant communication methods are being considered or evaluated. For example, a healthcare organization might assess their "total communication methods" to ensure that they are using a variety of effective and appropriate strategies to communicate with patients and families, including those with limited English proficiency, hearing impairments, or other communication needs.

Therefore, the term "Communication Methods, Total" could be interpreted as a comprehensive approach to evaluating and improving all aspects of communication within a healthcare setting.

The round window ( membrana tympani rotunda) is a small, thin membrane-covered opening located in the inner ear between the middle ear and the cochlea. It serves as one of the two openings that lead into the cochlea, with the other being the oval window.

The round window's primary function is to help regulate and dampen the pressure changes within the cochlea that occur when sound waves reach the inner ear. This is accomplished through the movement of the fluid-filled spaces inside the cochlea (the scala vestibuli and scala tympani) caused by vibrations from the stapes bone, which connects to the oval window.

As the stapes bone moves in response to sound waves, it causes a corresponding motion in the perilymph fluid within the cochlea. This movement then creates pressure changes at the round window, causing it to bulge outward or move inward. The flexibility of the round window allows it to absorb and dissipate these pressure changes, which helps protect the delicate structures inside the inner ear from damage due to excessive pressure buildup.

It is important to note that any damage or dysfunction in the round window can negatively impact hearing ability and cause various hearing disorders.

In medical terms, the term "voice" refers to the sound produced by vibration of the vocal cords caused by air passing out from the lungs during speech, singing, or breathing. It is a complex process that involves coordination between respiratory, phonatory, and articulatory systems. Any damage or disorder in these systems can affect the quality, pitch, loudness, and flexibility of the voice.

The medical field dealing with voice disorders is called Phoniatrics or Voice Medicine. Voice disorders can present as hoarseness, breathiness, roughness, strain, weakness, or a complete loss of voice, which can significantly impact communication, social interaction, and quality of life.

A dental implant is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor.

A single-tooth dental implant specifically refers to the replacement of a single missing tooth. The process typically involves three stages:

1. Placement: A titanium screw is placed into the jawbone where the missing tooth once was, acting as a root for the new tooth.
2. Osseointegration: Over several months, the jawbone grows around and fuses with the implant, creating a strong and stable foundation for the replacement tooth.
3. Restoration: A custom-made crown is attached to the implant, restoring the natural appearance and function of the missing tooth.

Single-tooth dental implants are a popular choice because they look, feel, and function like natural teeth, and they do not require the alteration of adjacent teeth, as is necessary with traditional bridgework.

'Deaf-blind disorders' is a term used to describe conditions that result in significant hearing and vision loss. This combination of sensory impairments can have a profound impact on an individual's ability to communicate, access information, and navigate their environment. It's important to note that the term 'deaf-blind' encompasses a wide range of severity and types of hearing and vision loss, and may be present from birth or acquired later in life due to factors such as illness, injury, or aging.

There is no single medical definition for deaf-blind disorders, but the term is often used to refer to individuals who have a significant combined visual and auditory impairment, defined as:

1. A visual acuity of less than 20/200 in the better eye with best correction, or a field restriction in both eyes to such an extent that the widest diameter of the visual field subtends an angle no greater than 20 degrees.
2. A hearing loss of 55 decibels or greater in the better ear, which is severe enough to require the use of amplification devices (such as hearing aids) or cochlear implants.

Deaf-blind disorders can be categorized into two main types: congenital and acquired. Congenital deaf-blindness refers to individuals who are born with both significant vision and hearing loss, often due to genetic factors, prenatal infections, or birth defects. Acquired deaf-blindness occurs when an individual develops significant vision and hearing loss later in life due to illness, injury, or aging.

Examples of conditions that can lead to deaf-blind disorders include:

* Usher syndrome: A genetic disorder that causes both hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye condition leading to vision loss.
* CHARGE syndrome: A rare genetic disorder that can cause hearing loss, vision loss, and other developmental issues.
* Cerebral palsy: A neurological disorder that can result in both visual and auditory impairments due to brain damage during fetal development or birth.
* Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and presbycusis: Both are common age-related conditions that can lead to vision and hearing loss, respectively.
* Infections such as meningitis, encephalitis, or cytomegalovirus (CMV) can cause both vision and hearing loss if they affect the brain or nervous system.
* Traumatic injuries, such as those caused by accidents or violence, can result in deaf-blindness if they damage the eyes, ears, or brain.

Deaf-blind individuals often face significant challenges in communication, mobility, and access to information. Specialized services, assistive technology, and support from professionals trained in deaf-blindness are crucial for helping these individuals lead fulfilling lives and reach their full potential.

Auditory pathways refer to the series of structures and nerves in the body that are involved in processing sound and transmitting it to the brain for interpretation. The process begins when sound waves enter the ear and cause vibrations in the eardrum, which then move the bones in the middle ear. These movements stimulate hair cells in the cochlea, a spiral-shaped structure in the inner ear, causing them to release neurotransmitters that activate auditory nerve fibers.

The auditory nerve carries these signals to the brainstem, where they are relayed through several additional structures before reaching the auditory cortex in the temporal lobe of the brain. Here, the signals are processed and interpreted as sounds, allowing us to hear and understand speech, music, and other environmental noises.

Damage or dysfunction at any point along the auditory pathway can lead to hearing loss or impairment.

Acoustics is a branch of physics that deals with the study of sound, its production, transmission, and effects. In a medical context, acoustics may refer to the use of sound waves in medical procedures such as:

1. Diagnostic ultrasound: This technique uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of internal organs and tissues. It is commonly used during pregnancy to monitor fetal development, but it can also be used to diagnose a variety of medical conditions, including heart disease, cancer, and musculoskeletal injuries.
2. Therapeutic ultrasound: This technique uses low-frequency sound waves to promote healing and reduce pain and inflammation in muscles, tendons, and ligaments. It is often used to treat soft tissue injuries, arthritis, and other musculoskeletal conditions.
3. Otology: Acoustics also plays a crucial role in the field of otology, which deals with the study and treatment of hearing and balance disorders. The shape, size, and movement of the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear all affect how sound waves are transmitted and perceived. Abnormalities in any of these structures can lead to hearing loss, tinnitus, or balance problems.

In summary, acoustics is an important field of study in medicine that has applications in diagnosis, therapy, and the understanding of various medical conditions related to sound and hearing.

An auditory brainstem implant (ABI) is a surgically placed device that provides a sense of sound to individuals who have severe hearing loss and cannot benefit from cochlear implants. Unlike cochlear implants, which stimulate the auditory nerve directly, ABIs transmit electrical signals directly to the brainstem, bypassing the inner ear entirely.

The ABI consists of a microphone, processor, and a series of electrodes that are surgically placed on the surface of the brainstem. The microphone picks up sounds from the environment, and the processor converts them into electrical signals. These signals are then sent to the electrodes, which stimulate the nearby nerve cells in the brainstem.

The brain interprets these stimuli as sound, allowing the individual to perceive some level of hearing. While ABIs do not provide the same level of hearing as cochlear implants, they can help individuals with profound hearing loss to communicate more effectively and improve their quality of life.

It's important to note that ABIs are typically reserved for individuals who have severe hearing loss due to damage to the inner ear or auditory nerve, and who are not candidates for cochlear implants. The procedure is complex and carries risks, so it is only recommended in cases where the potential benefits outweigh the risks.

Otologic surgical procedures refer to a range of surgeries performed on the ear or its related structures. These procedures are typically conducted by otologists, who are specialists trained in diagnosing and treating conditions that affect the ears, balance system, and related nerves. The goal of otologic surgery can vary from repairing damaged bones in the middle ear to managing hearing loss, tumors, or chronic infections. Some common otologic surgical procedures include:

1. Stapedectomy/Stapedotomy: These are procedures used to treat otosclerosis, a condition where the stapes bone in the middle ear becomes fixed and causes conductive hearing loss. The surgeon creates an opening in the stapes footplate (stapedotomy) or removes the entire stapes bone (stapedectomy) and replaces it with a prosthetic device to improve sound conduction.
2. Myringoplasty/Tympanoplasty: These are surgeries aimed at repairing damaged eardrums (tympanic membrane). A myringoplasty involves grafting a piece of tissue over the perforation in the eardrum, while a tympanoplasty includes both eardrum repair and reconstruction of the middle ear bones if necessary.
3. Mastoidectomy: This procedure involves removing the mastoid air cells, which are located in the bony prominence behind the ear. A mastoidectomy is often performed to treat chronic mastoiditis, cholesteatoma, or complications from middle ear infections.
4. Ossiculoplasty: This procedure aims to reconstruct and improve the function of the ossicles (middle ear bones) when they are damaged due to various reasons such as infection, trauma, or congenital conditions. The surgeon uses prosthetic devices made from plastic, metal, or even bone to replace or support the damaged ossicles.
5. Cochlear implantation: This is a surgical procedure that involves placing an electronic device inside the inner ear to help individuals with severe to profound hearing loss. The implant consists of an external processor and internal components that directly stimulate the auditory nerve, bypassing the damaged hair cells in the cochlea.
6. Labyrinthectomy: This procedure involves removing the balance-sensing structures (vestibular system) inside the inner ear to treat severe vertigo or dizziness caused by conditions like Meniere's disease when other treatments have failed.
7. Acoustic neuroma removal: An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that grows on the vestibulocochlear nerve, which connects the inner ear to the brain. Surgical removal of the tumor is necessary to prevent hearing loss, balance problems, and potential neurological complications.

These are just a few examples of the various surgical procedures performed by otolaryngologists (ear, nose, and throat specialists) to treat conditions affecting the ear and surrounding structures. Each procedure has its specific indications, benefits, risks, and postoperative care requirements. Patients should consult with their healthcare providers to discuss the most appropriate treatment options for their individual needs.

In the context of medicine, "cues" generally refer to specific pieces of information or signals that can help healthcare professionals recognize and respond to a particular situation or condition. These cues can come in various forms, such as:

1. Physical examination findings: For example, a patient's abnormal heart rate or blood pressure reading during a physical exam may serve as a cue for the healthcare professional to investigate further.
2. Patient symptoms: A patient reporting chest pain, shortness of breath, or other concerning symptoms can act as a cue for a healthcare provider to consider potential diagnoses and develop an appropriate treatment plan.
3. Laboratory test results: Abnormal findings on laboratory tests, such as elevated blood glucose levels or abnormal liver function tests, may serve as cues for further evaluation and diagnosis.
4. Medical history information: A patient's medical history can provide valuable cues for healthcare professionals when assessing their current health status. For example, a history of smoking may increase the suspicion for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a patient presenting with respiratory symptoms.
5. Behavioral or environmental cues: In some cases, behavioral or environmental factors can serve as cues for healthcare professionals to consider potential health risks. For instance, exposure to secondhand smoke or living in an area with high air pollution levels may increase the risk of developing respiratory conditions.

Overall, "cues" in a medical context are essential pieces of information that help healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care and treatment.

An electrode is a medical device that can conduct electrical currents and is used to transmit or receive electrical signals, often in the context of medical procedures or treatments. In a medical setting, electrodes may be used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Recording electrical activity in the body: Electrodes can be attached to the skin or inserted into body tissues to measure electrical signals produced by the heart, brain, muscles, or nerves. This information can be used to diagnose medical conditions, monitor the effectiveness of treatments, or guide medical procedures.
2. Stimulating nerve or muscle activity: Electrodes can be used to deliver electrical impulses to nerves or muscles, which can help to restore function or alleviate symptoms in people with certain medical conditions. For example, electrodes may be used to stimulate the nerves that control bladder function in people with spinal cord injuries, or to stimulate muscles in people with muscle weakness or paralysis.
3. Administering treatments: Electrodes can also be used to deliver therapeutic treatments, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for depression or deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders like Parkinson's disease. In these procedures, electrodes are implanted in specific areas of the brain and connected to a device that generates electrical impulses, which can help to regulate abnormal brain activity and improve symptoms.

Overall, electrodes play an important role in many medical procedures and treatments, allowing healthcare professionals to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions that affect the body's electrical systems.

Time perception, in the context of medicine and neuroscience, refers to the subjective experience and cognitive representation of time intervals. It is a complex process that involves the integration of various sensory, attentional, and emotional factors.

Disorders or injuries to certain brain regions, such as the basal ganglia, thalamus, or cerebellum, can affect time perception, leading to symptoms such as time distortion, where time may seem to pass more slowly or quickly than usual. Additionally, some neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and depression, have been associated with altered time perception.

Assessment of time perception is often used in neuropsychological evaluations to help diagnose and monitor the progression of certain neurological disorders. Various tests exist to measure time perception, such as the temporal order judgment task, where individuals are asked to judge which of two stimuli occurred first, or the duration estimation task, where individuals are asked to estimate the duration of a given stimulus.

The medical definition of "Education of Hearing Disabled" refers to the specialized education and teaching methods used for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. This type of education is designed to help students with hearing loss develop language, communication, academic, and social skills in a way that meets their unique needs. It can include various approaches such as American Sign Language (ASL), oral/aural methods, cued speech, and cochlear implant rehabilitation. The goal of education for the hearing disabled is to provide students with equal access to learning opportunities and help them reach their full potential.

Biomedical technology is a field that applies technological principles and methods to the development of medical solutions, diagnostics, and treatments. It combines engineering, physics, biology, and chemistry to create devices, instruments, software, and systems used in healthcare. This can include things like medical imaging equipment, prosthetics, genetic testing technologies, and biocompatible materials for use in the body. The goal of biomedical technology is to improve patient outcomes, enhance diagnostic capabilities, and advance medical research.

Titanium is not a medical term, but rather a chemical element (symbol Ti, atomic number 22) that is widely used in the medical field due to its unique properties. Medically, it is often referred to as a biocompatible material used in various medical applications such as:

1. Orthopedic implants: Titanium and its alloys are used for making joint replacements (hips, knees, shoulders), bone plates, screws, and rods due to their high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility.
2. Dental implants: Titanium is also commonly used in dental applications like implants, crowns, and bridges because of its ability to osseointegrate, or fuse directly with bone tissue, providing a stable foundation for replacement teeth.
3. Cardiovascular devices: Titanium alloys are used in the construction of heart valves, pacemakers, and other cardiovascular implants due to their non-magnetic properties, which prevent interference with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.
4. Medical instruments: Due to its resistance to corrosion and high strength, titanium is used in the manufacturing of various medical instruments such as surgical tools, needles, and catheters.

In summary, Titanium is a chemical element with unique properties that make it an ideal material for various medical applications, including orthopedic and dental implants, cardiovascular devices, and medical instruments.

A dental prosthesis that is supported by dental implants is an artificial replacement for one or more missing teeth. It is a type of dental restoration that is anchored to the jawbone using one or more titanium implant posts, which are surgically placed into the bone. The prosthesis is then attached to the implants, providing a stable and secure fit that closely mimics the function and appearance of natural teeth.

There are several types of implant-supported dental prostheses, including crowns, bridges, and dentures. A single crown may be used to replace a single missing tooth, while a bridge or denture can be used to replace multiple missing teeth. The specific type of prosthesis used will depend on the number and location of the missing teeth, as well as the patient's individual needs and preferences.

Implant-supported dental prostheses offer several advantages over traditional removable dentures, including improved stability, comfort, and functionality. They also help to preserve jawbone density and prevent facial sagging that can occur when teeth are missing. However, they do require a surgical procedure to place the implants, and may not be suitable for all patients due to factors such as bone density or overall health status.

Absorbable implants are medical devices that are designed to be placed inside the body during a surgical procedure, where they provide support, stabilization, or other functions, and then gradually break down and are absorbed by the body over time. These implants are typically made from materials such as polymers, proteins, or ceramics that have been engineered to degrade at a controlled rate, allowing them to be resorbed and eliminated from the body without the need for a second surgical procedure to remove them.

Absorbable implants are often used in orthopedic, dental, and plastic surgery applications, where they can help promote healing and support tissue regeneration. For example, absorbable screws or pins may be used to stabilize fractured bones during the healing process, after which they will gradually dissolve and be absorbed by the body. Similarly, absorbable membranes may be used in dental surgery to help guide the growth of new bone and gum tissue around an implant, and then be resorbed over time.

It's important to note that while absorbable implants offer several advantages over non-absorbable materials, such as reduced risk of infection and improved patient comfort, they may also have some limitations. For example, the mechanical properties of absorbable materials may not be as strong as those of non-absorbable materials, which could affect their performance in certain applications. Additionally, the degradation products of absorbable implants may cause local inflammation or other adverse reactions in some patients. As with any medical device, the use of absorbable implants should be carefully considered and discussed with a qualified healthcare professional.

Unilateral hearing loss is a type of hearing impairment that affects only one ear. This condition can be either sensorineural or conductive in nature. Sensorineural hearing loss results from damage to the inner ear or nerve pathways leading to the brain, while conductive hearing loss occurs when sound waves are not properly transmitted through the outer or middle ear. Unilateral hearing loss can result in difficulty hearing and understanding speech, particularly in noisy environments, and can also impact communication and quality of life. The cause of unilateral hearing loss can vary and may include factors such as infection, trauma, genetics, or exposure to loud noise. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and severity of the hearing loss and may include hearing aids, cochlear implants, or surgical intervention.

In the context of medical devices, magnets are objects made of magnetic material that produce a magnetic field. They are used in various medical applications such as in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines to generate detailed images of internal organs and tissues, and in some types of surgical instruments to help guide and control the positioning of implants. Magnets can also be found in some assistive devices for people with disabilities, such as magnetic bracelets or shoe inserts that are claimed to provide therapeutic benefits, although these claims are not always supported by scientific evidence.

In the context of medicine, particularly in neurolinguistics and speech-language pathology, language is defined as a complex system of communication that involves the use of symbols (such as words, signs, or gestures) to express and exchange information. It includes various components such as phonology (sound systems), morphology (word structures), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (social rules of use). Language allows individuals to convey their thoughts, feelings, and intentions, and to understand the communication of others. Disorders of language can result from damage to specific areas of the brain, leading to impairments in comprehension, production, or both.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "linguistics" is not a term that has a medical definition. Lingustics is the scientific study of language and its structure. It involves analysing language form, language meaning, and language in context.

If you have any questions related to healthcare or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer them!

Hearing disorders, also known as hearing impairments or auditory impairments, refer to conditions that affect an individual's ability to hear sounds in one or both ears. These disorders can range from mild to profound and may result from genetic factors, aging, exposure to loud noises, infections, trauma, or certain medical conditions.

There are mainly two types of hearing disorders: conductive hearing loss and sensorineural hearing loss. Conductive hearing loss occurs when there is a problem with the outer or middle ear, preventing sound waves from reaching the inner ear. Causes include earwax buildup, fluid in the middle ear, a perforated eardrum, or damage to the ossicles (the bones in the middle ear).

Sensorineural hearing loss, on the other hand, is caused by damage to the inner ear (cochlea) or the nerve pathways from the inner ear to the brain. This type of hearing loss is often permanent and can be due to aging (presbycusis), exposure to loud noises, genetics, viral infections, certain medications, or head injuries.

Mixed hearing loss is a combination of both conductive and sensorineural components. In some cases, hearing disorders can also involve tinnitus (ringing or other sounds in the ears) or vestibular problems that affect balance and equilibrium.

Early identification and intervention for hearing disorders are crucial to prevent further deterioration and to help individuals develop appropriate communication skills and maintain a good quality of life.

Diagnostic techniques in otology refer to the methods and tests used by healthcare professionals to identify and diagnose various conditions related to the ear. These techniques can include:

1. Otoscopy: A visual examination of the external auditory canal and eardrum using an otoscope. This helps to identify any physical abnormalities, such as wax buildup, inflammation, or foreign objects in the ear.
2. Audiometry: A hearing test that measures a person's ability to hear different sounds, pitches, and volumes. This can help to identify any hearing loss or auditory processing issues.
3. Tympanometry: A test that measures the function of the middle ear by creating variations in air pressure in the ear canal. This can help to identify any issues with the eardrum or middle ear bones.
4. Acoustic reflex testing: A test that measures the body's involuntary response to loud sounds. This can help to identify any damage to the hearing nerves or brainstem.
5. Otoacoustic emissions (OAE) testing: A test that measures the sound waves produced by the inner ear in response to stimuli. This can help to identify any issues with the cochlea or hair cells in the inner ear.
6. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing: A test that measures the electrical activity of the hearing nerve and brainstem in response to sound. This can help to identify any issues with the auditory nervous system.
7. Vestibular testing: A series of tests that measure a person's balance and equilibrium. This can help to identify any issues with the vestibular system, which is responsible for maintaining balance.

These diagnostic techniques are used to diagnose various otological conditions such as hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, ear infections, and tumors of the ear.

Telemetry is the automated measurement and wireless transmission of data from remote or inaccessible sources to receiving stations for monitoring and analysis. In a medical context, telemetry is often used to monitor patients' vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other important physiological parameters continuously and remotely. This technology allows healthcare providers to track patients' conditions over time, detect any abnormalities or trends, and make informed decisions about their care, even when they are not physically present with the patient. Telemetry is commonly used in hospitals, clinics, and research settings to monitor patients during procedures, after surgery, or during extended stays in intensive care units.

Sign language is not considered a medical term, but it is a visual-manual means of communication used by individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. It combines hand shapes, orientation, and movement of the hands, arms, or body, along with facial expressions and lip patterns. Different sign languages exist in various countries and communities, such as American Sign Language (ASL) and British Sign Language (BSL).

However, I can provide a definition related to medical terminology that involves the use of gestures for communication purposes:

Gesture (in medical context): A bodily action or movement, often used to convey information or communicate. In some medical situations, healthcare professionals may use simple, predefined gestures to elicit responses from patients who have difficulty with verbal communication due to conditions like aphasia, dysarthria, or being in a coma. These gestures can be part of a more comprehensive system called "gesture-based communication" or "nonverbal communication."

For sign language specifically, you may consult resources related to linguistics, special education, or deaf studies for detailed definitions and descriptions.

A dental prosthesis is a device that replaces missing teeth or parts of teeth and restores their function and appearance. The design of a dental prosthesis refers to the plan and specifications used to create it, including the materials, shape, size, and arrangement of the artificial teeth and any supporting structures.

The design of a dental prosthesis is typically based on a variety of factors, including:

* The number and location of missing teeth
* The condition of the remaining teeth and gums
* The patient's bite and jaw alignment
* The patient's aesthetic preferences
* The patient's ability to chew and speak properly

There are several types of dental prostheses, including:

* Dentures: A removable appliance that replaces all or most of the upper or lower teeth.
* Fixed partial denture (FPD): Also known as a bridge, this is a fixed (non-removable) appliance that replaces one or more missing teeth by attaching artificial teeth to the remaining natural teeth on either side of the gap.
* Removable partial denture (RPD): A removable appliance that replaces some but not all of the upper or lower teeth.
* Implant-supported prosthesis: An artificial tooth or set of teeth that is supported by dental implants, which are surgically placed in the jawbone.

The design of a dental prosthesis must be carefully planned and executed to ensure a good fit, proper function, and natural appearance. It may involve several appointments with a dentist or dental specialist, such as a prosthodontist, to take impressions, make measurements, and try in the finished prosthesis.

The vestibulocochlear nerve, also known as the 8th cranial nerve, is responsible for transmitting sound and balance information from the inner ear to the brain. Vestibulocochlear nerve diseases refer to conditions that affect this nerve and can result in hearing loss, vertigo, and balance problems.

These diseases can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infection, trauma, tumors, or degeneration. Some examples of vestibulocochlear nerve diseases include:

1. Vestibular neuritis: an inner ear infection that causes severe vertigo, nausea, and balance problems.
2. Labyrinthitis: an inner ear infection that affects both the vestibular and cochlear nerves, causing vertigo, hearing loss, and tinnitus.
3. Acoustic neuroma: a benign tumor that grows on the vestibulocochlear nerve, causing hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance problems.
4. Meniere's disease: a inner ear disorder that causes vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus, and a feeling of fullness in the ear.
5. Ototoxicity: damage to the inner ear caused by certain medications or chemicals that can result in hearing loss and balance problems.
6. Vestibular migraine: a type of migraine that is associated with vertigo, dizziness, and balance problems.

Treatment for vestibulocochlear nerve diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity. It may include medication, physical therapy, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

In the context of medical and clinical psychology, particularly in the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA), "verbal behavior" is a term used to describe the various functions or purposes of spoken language. It was first introduced by the psychologist B.F. Skinner in his 1957 book "Verbal Behavior."

Skinner proposed that verbal behavior could be classified into several categories based on its function, including:

1. Mand: A verbal operant in which a person requests or demands something from another person. For example, saying "I would like a glass of water" is a mand.
2. Tact: A verbal operant in which a person describes or labels something in their environment. For example, saying "That's a red apple" is a tact.
3. Echoic: A verbal operant in which a person repeats or imitates what they have heard. For example, saying "Hello" after someone says hello to you is an echoic.
4. Intraverbal: A verbal operant in which a person responds to another person's verbal behavior with their own verbal behavior, without simply repeating or imitating what they have heard. For example, answering a question like "What's the capital of France?" is an intraverbal.
5. Textual: A verbal operant in which a person reads or writes text. For example, reading a book or writing a letter are textual.

Understanding the function of verbal behavior can be helpful in assessing and treating communication disorders, such as those seen in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). By identifying the specific functions of a child's verbal behavior, therapists can develop targeted interventions to help them communicate more effectively.

Speech articulation tests are diagnostic assessments used to determine the presence, nature, and severity of speech sound disorders in individuals. These tests typically involve the assessment of an individual's ability to produce specific speech sounds in words, sentences, and conversational speech. The tests may include measures of sound production, phonological processes, oral-motor function, and speech intelligibility.

The results of a speech articulation test can help identify areas of weakness or error in an individual's speech sound system and inform the development of appropriate intervention strategies to improve speech clarity and accuracy. Speech articulation tests are commonly used by speech-language pathologists to evaluate children and adults with speech sound disorders, including those related to developmental delays, hearing impairment, structural anomalies, neurological conditions, or other factors that may affect speech production.

Cochlear diseases refer to conditions that affect the structure or function of the cochlea, which is a part of the inner ear responsible for hearing. These diseases can cause various types and degrees of hearing loss, ranging from mild to profound. Some common cochlear diseases include:

1. Cochlear otosclerosis: A condition where there is abnormal bone growth in the cochlea, which can lead to conductive or sensorineural hearing loss.
2. Cochlear Meniere's disease: A disorder that affects the inner ear and causes vertigo, tinnitus, and fluctuating hearing loss.
3. Cochlear damage due to exposure to loud noises: Prolonged or sudden exposure to loud noises can cause permanent cochlear damage and hearing loss.
4. Presbycusis: Age-related hearing loss that affects the cochlea and other structures of the auditory system.
5. Cochlear nerve tumors: Rare benign or malignant growths on the cochlear nerve can cause hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance problems.
6. Infections: Bacterial or viral infections such as meningitis, labyrinthitis, or otitis media can damage the cochlea and lead to hearing loss.
7. Ototoxicity: Certain medications can be toxic to the cochlea and cause hearing loss, tinnitus, or balance problems.
8. Genetic factors: Inherited genetic mutations can cause various types of cochlear diseases, such as connexin 26 deficiency, Waardenburg syndrome, or Usher syndrome.

It is important to note that early diagnosis and treatment of cochlear diseases can help prevent or minimize hearing loss and other complications.

The inferior colliculi are a pair of rounded eminences located in the midbrain, specifically in the tectum of the mesencephalon. They play a crucial role in auditory processing and integration. The inferior colliculi receive inputs from various sources, including the cochlear nuclei, superior olivary complex, and cortical areas. They then send their outputs to the medial geniculate body, which is a part of the thalamus that relays auditory information to the auditory cortex.

In summary, the inferior colliculi are important structures in the auditory pathway that help process and integrate auditory information before it reaches the cerebral cortex for further analysis and perception.

Comprehension, in a medical context, usually refers to the ability to understand and interpret spoken or written language, as well as gestures and expressions. It is a key component of communication and cognitive functioning. Difficulties with comprehension can be a symptom of various neurological conditions, such as aphasia (a disorder caused by damage to the language areas of the brain), learning disabilities, or dementia. Assessment of comprehension is often part of neuropsychological evaluations and speech-language pathology assessments.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Socioenvironmental Therapy" is not a widely recognized or established term in the field of medicine or therapy. It may be a term used in some specific contexts or by certain practitioners, but it does not have a standardized medical definition.

The term seems to combine elements of socio-therapy, which focuses on addressing psychological issues within a social context, and environmental therapy, which uses natural environments as a therapeutic tool. However, without more specific context, it's difficult to provide an accurate medical definition.

If you have more information about where you encountered this term or its specific use, I may be able to provide a more precise interpretation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "reading" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Reading is the activity or process of deciphering and understanding written words or text. It is a fundamental skill in language acquisition and communication, and is not typically used in a medical context unless there is a concern related to reading difficulties or disorders, such as dyslexia. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Prosthesis fitting is the process of selecting, designing, fabricating, and fitting a prosthetic device to replace a part of an individual's body that is missing due to congenital absence, illness, injury, or amputation. The primary goal of prosthesis fitting is to restore the person's physical function, mobility, and independence, as well as improve their overall quality of life.

The process typically involves several steps:

1. Assessment: A thorough evaluation of the patient's medical history, physical condition, and functional needs is conducted to determine the most appropriate type of prosthesis. This may include measurements, castings, or digital scans of the residual limb.

2. Design: Based on the assessment, a customized design plan is created for the prosthetic device, taking into account factors such as the patient's lifestyle, occupation, and personal preferences.

3. Fabrication: The prosthesis is manufactured using various materials, components, and techniques to meet the specific requirements of the patient. This may involve the use of 3D printing, computer-aided design (CAD), or traditional handcrafting methods.

4. Fitting: Once the prosthesis is fabricated, it is carefully fitted to the patient's residual limb, ensuring optimal comfort, alignment, and stability. Adjustments may be made as needed to achieve the best fit and function.

5. Training: The patient receives training on how to use and care for their new prosthetic device, including exercises to strengthen the residual limb and improve overall mobility. Follow-up appointments are scheduled to monitor progress, make any necessary adjustments, and provide ongoing support.

Equipment design, in the medical context, refers to the process of creating and developing medical equipment and devices, such as surgical instruments, diagnostic machines, or assistive technologies. This process involves several stages, including:

1. Identifying user needs and requirements
2. Concept development and brainstorming
3. Prototyping and testing
4. Design for manufacturing and assembly
5. Safety and regulatory compliance
6. Verification and validation
7. Training and support

The goal of equipment design is to create safe, effective, and efficient medical devices that meet the needs of healthcare providers and patients while complying with relevant regulations and standards. The design process typically involves a multidisciplinary team of engineers, clinicians, designers, and researchers who work together to develop innovative solutions that improve patient care and outcomes.

"Medical electronics" refers to the field of electronics that is specifically designed for medical applications. This can include a wide range of devices and systems, such as:

1. Medical imaging equipment, such as X-ray machines, CT scanners, MRI machines, and ultrasound machines.
2. Patient monitoring equipment, such as heart rate monitors, blood pressure monitors, and oxygen saturation monitors.
3. Therapeutic devices, such as pacemakers, defibrillators, and deep brain stimulators.
4. Laboratory equipment, such as DNA sequencers, mass spectrometers, and microarray scanners.
5. Wearable health technology, such as fitness trackers, smartwatches, and continuous glucose monitors.
6. Telemedicine systems that enable remote consultations and patient monitoring.

Medical electronics must meet strict regulatory requirements to ensure safety, effectiveness, and reliability. These devices often require specialized electronic components, such as sensors, signal processing circuits, and power management circuits, that are designed to operate in the challenging environments found in medical settings. Medical electronics engineers must have a deep understanding of both electronics and medical applications to design and develop these complex systems.

In psychology, Signal Detection Theory (SDT) is a framework used to understand the ability to detect the presence or absence of a signal (such as a stimulus or event) in the presence of noise or uncertainty. It is often applied in sensory perception research, such as hearing and vision, where it helps to separate an observer's sensitivity to the signal from their response bias.

SDT involves measuring both hits (correct detections of the signal) and false alarms (incorrect detections when no signal is present). These measures are then used to calculate measures such as d', which reflects the observer's ability to discriminate between the signal and noise, and criterion (C), which reflects the observer's response bias.

SDT has been applied in various fields of psychology, including cognitive psychology, clinical psychology, and neuroscience, to study decision-making, memory, attention, and perception. It is a valuable tool for understanding how people make decisions under uncertainty and how they trade off accuracy and caution in their responses.

Language development disorders, also known as language impairments or communication disorders, refer to a group of conditions that affect an individual's ability to understand and/or use spoken or written language in a typical manner. These disorders can manifest as difficulties with grammar, vocabulary, sentence structure, word finding, following directions, and/or conversational skills.

Language development disorders can be receptive (difficulty understanding language), expressive (difficulty using language to communicate), or mixed (a combination of both). They can occur in isolation or as part of a broader neurodevelopmental disorder, such as autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability.

The causes of language development disorders are varied and may include genetic factors, environmental influences, neurological conditions, hearing loss, or other medical conditions. It is important to note that language development disorders are not the result of low intelligence or lack of motivation; rather, they reflect a specific impairment in the brain's language processing systems.

Early identification and intervention for language development disorders can significantly improve outcomes and help individuals develop effective communication skills. Treatment typically involves speech-language therapy, which may be provided individually or in a group setting, and may involve strategies such as modeling correct language use, practicing targeted language skills, and using visual aids to support comprehension.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is not a medical term per se, but it is widely used in various medical fields, particularly in diagnostic imaging and telemedicine. It is a measure from signal processing that compares the level of a desired signal to the level of background noise.

In the context of medical imaging (like MRI, CT scans, or ultrasound), a higher SNR means that the useful information (the signal) is stronger relative to the irrelevant and distracting data (the noise). This results in clearer, more detailed, and more accurate images, which can significantly improve diagnostic precision.

In telemedicine and remote patient monitoring, SNR is crucial for ensuring high-quality audio and video communication between healthcare providers and patients. A good SNR ensures that the transmitted data (voice or image) is received with minimal interference or distortion, enabling effective virtual consultations and diagnoses.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

A "reflex, acoustic" is not a standard medical term. However, it seems like you might be looking for a definition of the "acoustic reflex." The acoustic reflex is an involuntary muscle contraction that occurs in the middle ear in response to loud sounds. This reflex helps protect the inner ear from damage caused by high-intensity sounds.

When a loud sound reaches the ear, it stimulates the stapedius muscle in the middle ear, which then contracts and causes the stapes bone (one of the three bones in the middle ear) to become stiffer. This stiffening reduces the amount of sound that is transmitted to the inner ear, thus protecting it from potential harm.

The acoustic reflex can be measured using a device called an impedance audiometer, which measures changes in the pressure within the ear canal caused by muscle contraction during the reflex. This measurement provides valuable information for diagnosing and monitoring various hearing and balance disorders.

Audiometry, evoked response is a hearing test that measures the brain's response to sound. It is often used to detect hearing loss in infants and young children, as well as in people who are unable to cooperate or communicate during traditional hearing tests.

During the test, electrodes are placed on the scalp to measure the electrical activity produced by the brain in response to sounds presented through earphones. The responses are recorded and analyzed to determine the quietest sounds that can be heard at different frequencies. This information is used to help diagnose and manage hearing disorders.

There are several types of evoked response audiometry, including:

* Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR): measures the electrical activity from the brainstem in response to sound.
* Auditory Steady-State Response (ASSR): measures the brain's response to continuous sounds at different frequencies and loudness levels.
* Auditory Middle Latency Response (AMLR): measures the electrical activity from the auditory cortex in response to sound.

These tests are usually performed in a quiet, sound-treated room and can take several hours to complete.

Voice quality, in the context of medicine and particularly in otolaryngology (ear, nose, and throat medicine), refers to the characteristic sound of an individual's voice that can be influenced by various factors. These factors include the vocal fold vibration, respiratory support, articulation, and any underlying medical conditions.

A change in voice quality might indicate a problem with the vocal folds or surrounding structures, neurological issues affecting the nerves that control vocal fold movement, or other medical conditions. Examples of terms used to describe voice quality include breathy, hoarse, rough, strained, or tense. A detailed analysis of voice quality is often part of a speech-language pathologist's assessment and can help in diagnosing and managing various voice disorders.

Immediate dental implant loading is a dental procedure where a dental implant is placed and a restoration (such as a crown, bridge, or denture) is attached to it during the same appointment or immediately after the implant surgery. Traditionally, dental implants were allowed to heal and integrate with the jawbone for several months before loading (placing the restoration), but recent advances in implant technology and surgical techniques have made immediate loading a viable option in certain cases.

The success of immediate dental implant loading depends on various factors such as the patient's oral health, the quality and quantity of bone, the type and location of the implant, and the expertise of the dental professional. Immediate loading can offer several benefits, including reduced treatment time, fewer surgical procedures, and improved aesthetics and function. However, it is not always suitable for every patient or situation, and a thorough evaluation is necessary to determine if immediate loading is the best option.

Phonation is the process of sound production in speech, singing, or crying. It involves the vibration of the vocal folds (also known as the vocal cords) in the larynx, which is located in the neck. When air from the lungs passes through the vibrating vocal folds, it causes them to vibrate and produce sound waves. These sound waves are then shaped into speech sounds by the articulatory structures of the mouth, nose, and throat.

Phonation is a critical component of human communication and is used in various forms of verbal expression, such as speaking, singing, and shouting. It requires precise control of the muscles that regulate the tension, mass, and length of the vocal folds, as well as the air pressure and flow from the lungs. Dysfunction in phonation can result in voice disorders, such as hoarseness, breathiness, or loss of voice.

The vestibular aqueduct is a bony canal that runs from the inner ear to the brain. It contains a membranous duct, called the endolymphatic duct, which is filled with a fluid called endolymph. The vestibular aqueduct plays a role in the maintenance of balance and hearing by regulating the pressure and composition of the endolymph. Abnormalities or damage to the vestibular aqueduct can lead to conditions such as endolymphatic hydrops, which can cause symptoms like vertigo, dizziness, and hearing loss.

"Electrical equipment and supplies" refer to devices, apparatus, or tools that operate using electricity and are used in medical settings for various healthcare purposes. These items can include, but are not limited to:

1. Medical instruments: Devices used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, such as electrocardiogram (ECG) machines, ultrasound machines, and defibrillators.
2. Patient care equipment: Items that provide support or monitoring for patients, including ventilators, oxygen concentrators, infusion pumps, and patient monitors.
3. Laboratory equipment: Instruments used in medical laboratories for testing and analysis, such as centrifuges, microscopes, and spectrophotometers.
4. Imaging equipment: Devices that generate images of the body's internal structures or functions, like X-ray machines, MRI scanners, CT scanners, and mammography systems.
5. Lighting and power distribution: Electrical outlets, switches, lighting fixtures, and other components used to provide electricity and illumination in medical facilities.
6. Communication devices: Equipment used for transmitting or receiving information, such as intercoms, pagers, and wireless networks.
7. Data management systems: Computers, servers, and storage devices that manage patient records, medical images, and other healthcare-related data.
8. Sterilization equipment: Devices used to clean and disinfect medical instruments and supplies, such as autoclaves and ultrasonic cleaners.
9. Building management systems: Electrical controls for heating, ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC), and other environmental systems in healthcare facilities.
10. Safety equipment: Devices used to protect patients, staff, and visitors from electrical hazards, such as ground-fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) and arc-fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs).

A dental abutment is a component of a dental implant restoration that connects the implant to the replacement tooth or teeth. It serves as a support structure and is attached to the implant, which is surgically placed in the jawbone. The abutment provides a stable foundation for the placement of a crown, bridge, or denture, depending on the patient's individual needs.

Dental abutments can be made from various materials such as titanium, zirconia, or other biocompatible materials. They come in different shapes and sizes to accommodate the specific requirements of each implant case. The selection of an appropriate dental abutment is crucial for ensuring a successful and long-lasting dental implant restoration.

Central auditory diseases refer to a group of disorders that affect the processing of auditory information in the central nervous system, specifically in the brainstem and cortex. These disorders can result from various causes, such as head injuries, infections, tumors, or degenerative conditions. They can cause difficulties with understanding speech, locating the source of sounds, and perceiving complex or rapidly changing auditory stimuli.

Central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) is a common type of central auditory disease. It is a hearing problem that affects about 5% of school-aged children. Kids with CAPD can't process what they hear in the same way other kids do because their ears and brain don't fully coordinate. Something interferes with the way the brain recognizes and interprets sounds, especially speech.

CAPD is not a hearing loss or an intelligence problem. Children with CAPD have normal structural hearing and can often hear sounds that are presented to them individually. However, they may struggle to understand speech in noisy environments, follow complex directions, or distinguish similar sounds from one another.

Central auditory diseases are typically diagnosed through a series of tests that assess different aspects of auditory processing, such as speech recognition in noise, temporal processing, and binaural integration. Treatment for these disorders may include auditory training, assistive listening devices, and environmental modifications to help compensate for the processing difficulties.

Media related to Cochlear implants at Wikimedia Commons Cochlear Implants at Curlie Cochlear Implants information from the ... In the past, cochlear implants were only approved for people who were deaf in both ears; as of 2014[update] a cochlear implant ... Critics of cochlear implants from Deaf cultures also assert that the cochlear implant and the subsequent therapy often become ... NAD Cochlear Implant Committee. "Cochlear Implants". Archived from the original on 2007-02-20. Hicks K (2016-08-05). "We Are ...
A totally implantable cochlear implant (TICI) is a new type of cochlear implant and is currently in development. Unlike a ... A totally implantable - and therefore "invisible" - cochlear implant is seen as a benefit to users, particularly those who feel ... The TICI contains the same internal components as a conventional cochlear implant: the magnet, antenna coil, electronics and ... Cohen, Noel (April 2007). "The Totally Implantable Cochlear Implant". Ear and Hearing. 28 (2): 100S-101S. doi:10.1097/AUD. ...
... one can switch to a cochlear implant. A Cochlear implant captures the sound and sends it electrically, through the cochlea, to ... A direct acoustic cochlear implant - also DACI - is an acoustic implant which converts sound in mechanical vibrations that ... The hearing function of the external and middle ear is being taken over by a little motor of a cochlear implant, directly ... To this end, the direct acoustic cochlear implant was developed. A DACI brings the sound directly to the cochlea, and provides ...
... cochlear implants had been implanted as neuroprosthetic device in approximately 220,000 people worldwide. There are also ... Ray's implant was installed in 1998 and he lived long enough to start working with the implant, eventually learning to control ... Implanted in Nagle's right precentral gyrus (area of the motor cortex for arm movement), the 96-electrode BrainGate implant ... 11-4798 (1 March 2011). "Cochlear Implants". National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Miguel Nicolelis ...
"Cochlear Implants". National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. U.S. Department of Health and Human ... In contrast to hearing aids, which amplify sound, cochlear implants are designed to stimulate the auditory nerve. Tubulopathy ... Even though sensorineural deafness is irreversible, one treatment are cochlear implants, which includes a microphone and ...
"Cochlear Implants". 2015-08-18. Richards (1991). "Epstein syndrome: oral lesions ina patient with nephropathy,deafness and ... Sensorineural hearing loss is a common symptom in Epstein syndrome and can be treated with cochlea implants. Cochlea implants ... Nabekura, Takashi (2015). "A case of cochlear implantation in a patient with Epstein syndrome". Auris Nasus Larynx. 42 (2): 160 ...
Cochlear implants (CIs), auditory brain stem implants (ABIs), and auditory midbrain implants (AMIs) are the three main ... Proceedings of the IEEE 96:1076-84 J. K. Niparko and B. W. Wilson, "History of cochlear implants," in Cochlear Implants: ... formally approved the marketing of the House-3M cochlear implant in November 1984. Improved performance in cochlear implants ... In 1972, the first portable cochlear implant system in an adult was implanted at the House Ear Clinic. The U.S. Food and Drug ...
... a cochlear implant may be surgically implanted. Cochlear implants bypass most of the peripheral auditory system to provide a ... "Cochlear Implants". NIH Publication No. 11-4798. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. February ... The prosthetic can be controlled by the brain using a direct implant or implant into various muscles. The two main methods for ... "Testicular Implants". The Men's Clinic. Urology at UCLA. Retrieved 2019-09-15. "Testicular Implants". Cleveland Clinic. ...
"Cochlear Implants". Supalla, Samuel James; Bahan, Benjamin J. Bird of a different feather; Supalla, Samuel James, 1957-. For a ... Topics of religion, identity, and cochlear implants are mentioned. A Journey into the Deaf-World offers insights into the deaf ...
"Cochlear Implants". NIH. Flynn, Mark C.; Sadeghi, Andre; Halvarsson, Glenn (2009). "Baha solutions for patients with severe ... A patient with implants in the jaws was fitted with a bone vibrator on one of his implants. When tested, the patient ... A sound processor sits on this abutment and transmits sound vibrations to the titanium implant. The implant vibrates the skull ... Cochlear Implants International. 10 Suppl 1: 43-7. doi:10.1179/cim.2009.10.Supplement-1.43. PMID 19195004. S2CID 29486631. Lin ...
... with new cochlear implant users in a multi-centre study". Cochlear Implants International. 16 (2): 100-109. doi:10.1179/ ... Rubinstein, Jay T.; Hong, Robert (September 2003). "Signal Coding in Cochlear Implants: Exploiting Stochastic Effects of ... "Design and Evaluation of a Real-Time Audio Source Separation Algorithm to Remix Music for Cochlear Implant Users". Frontiers in ... and an AI based Cochlear Implant fitting assistant. Online surveys processed with ML-based classification have been used to ...
"Factors that affect the social well-being of children with cochlear implants". Cochlear Implants International. 9 (4): 199-214 ... One study compared the English development of deaf children with a cochlear implant versus what the English development might ... With advancements in technology such as cochlear implants and hearing aids, the landscape of deaf education has evolved. While ... Communication in oral-deaf students without cochlear implants is typically less frequent and less complex than hearing peers of ...
"Correlation Between Cognitive Abilities and Language Level in Cochlear Implanted Children". Cochlear Implants International. 11 ...
Niparko JK (2009-01-01). Cochlear Implants: Principles & Practices. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. p. 53. ISBN 9780781777490. ...
"Cochlear implants - Mayo Clinic". www.mayoclinic.org. Retrieved 2021-10-15. Frogner, Jenny (2012). The world of the deaf : how ... One of the most common practices are cochlear implants, which are devices that are affixed to the structures of the ear in ... and many doctors will immediately launch into the process of implementing a cochlear implant if deafness is found to be the ... close-knit circles drawn together in which things like cochlear implants and speech therapy is not needed. There are also many ...
Technology such as cochlear implants, hearing aids, and bone-anchored hearing aids can potentially help provide access to ... For example, if in the future the person undergoes surgery to receive a cochlear implant, their language exposure from birth ... Bi-Bi supporters argue because of the variability in cochlear implant and hearing aid outcomes, sign language access is crucial ... If development of spoken language is desired, listening technology (hearing aids or cochlear implants) can help, but the ...
The development of retinal implants has also been motivated in part by the advancement and success of cochlear implants, which ... Epiretinal implants are placed in the internal surface of the retina, while subretinal implants are placed between the outer ... A subretinal implant is advantageous over an epiretinal implant in part because of its simpler design. The light acquisition, ... Retina Implant AG in Germany has also developed a subretinal implant, which has undergone clinical testing in nine patients. ...
For cochlear implant users, it is more difficult to understand unknown speakers and sounds. The perceptual abilities of ... Postlingually deaf children have better results than the prelingually deaf and adapt to a cochlear implant faster. In both ... Several months following implantation, children with cochlear implants can normalize speech perception. One of the fundamental ... Uhler; Yoshinaga-Itano; Gabbard; Rothpletz; Jenkins (March 2011). "infant speech perception in young cochlear implant users". ...
This new type of implant combines both cochlear implant and hearing aid technology. The cochlear implant technology helps ... working on the development of cochlear implants. In 1977, the first microelectronic multichannel cochlear implant was implanted ... "Cochlear Implants from MED-EL". www.medel.com. Retrieved 2022-05-13. "Children with MED-EL Synchrony cochlear implant can ... It was MED-EL's first non-cochlear implant product. Further non-cochlear implant products followed with the Bonebridge active ...
... because their parents chose an implant for them, because they find environmental sound useful, etc." Cochlear implants may ... Woodcock, Kathryn (1992). Cochlear Implants vs. Deaf Culture? In Mervin Garretson (ed.), Viewpoints on Deafness: A Deaf ... Within Deaf communities, there is strong opposition to the use of cochlear implants and sometimes also hearing aids and similar ...
... because their parents chose an implant for them, because they find environmental sound useful, etc. Cochlear implants may ... The Deaf community[who?] still insists that a child not be fitted with a cochlear implant until old enough to decide for ... Woodcock, Kathryn (1992). Cochlear Implants vs. Deaf Culture? In Mervin Garretson (ed.), Viewpoints on Deafness: A Deaf ... Sign language, as well as cochlear implants, has also had an extensive impact on the Deaf community. These have all been ...
A minority have cochlear implants. As of 2016, 51% have profound hearing loss and 23% have severe hearing loss. Gertrude Scott ...
"Engineering Design of Cochlear Implants". In F. G. Zeng; A. N. Popper; R. R. Fay (eds.). Cochlear Implants: Auditory Prostheses ... 2006, Wilson 2004) A typical cochlear implant electrode array may be inserted at a depth of 22-25 mm into the cochlea [1]. At ... The success of a cochlear implant relies in part upon electrode array placement within the cochlea in which the positioning is ... Well-placed electrode arrays in patients receiving cochlear implants can allow otherwise deafened auditory systems to achieve ...
Cochlear implants are an option too. Cochlear implants are surgically placed devices that stimulate the cochlear nerve in order ... A cochlear implant is used instead of hearing aids in order to help when someone has difficulties understanding speech. In a ... "Cochlear Implant Surgery". 18 July 2022. Baker, Charlotte; Carol Padden (1978). American Sign Language: A Look at Its Story, ...
House's first design for a cochlear implant was surgically implanted in 1961, but the implant was rejected by the patient's ... physician and medical researcher who developed and invented the cochlear implant. The cochlear implant is considered to be the ... ISBN 978-0-525-95379-1. Mudry, Albert; Mills, Mara (2013). "The early history of the cochlear implant: a retrospective". JAMA ... William F. House dies at 89; championed cochlear implant". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-12-19. Berliner, Karen I. (1 ...
A cochlear implant is an electronic device that is surgically implants to stimulate the cochlear nerve. Cochlear implants will ... the best options for treatment for hearing loss are cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants (ABIs), as well as ... "Cochlear Implant Surgery". www.hopkinsmedicine.org. 8 August 2021. Retrieved 2021-11-29. Neff BA, Wiet RM, Lasak JM, Cohen NL, ... The procedure is done by implanting a device that send an electrical signal directly to the cochlear nucleus, allowing sound to ...
In 1969, William F. House, M.D.-brother of Howard-implanted the first three patients with the cochlear implant at House ... Fretz, RJ (May 1985). "Design and function: a physical and electrical description of the 3M House cochlear implant system". Ear ... William F. House dies at 89; championed cochlear implant". Los Angeles Times. December 12, 2012. Retrieved December 26, 2012. ... in hearing sciences include the development of the first clinically useful cochlear implant and auditory brainstem implant as ...
Support for students with cochlear implants. Interpreters are available for non-curricular activities including guidance ...
Brain implant Cochlear implant Colletti, L.; Shannon, R.; Colletti, V. (Oct 2012). "Auditory brainstem implants for ... Møller AR (2006). "History of Cochlear Implants and Auditory Brainstem Implants" (PDF). Adv Otorhinolaryngol. Advances in Oto- ... With a cochlear implant, the electrodes positioned in the basal end of the cochlea elicit a higher pitch sensation than those ... In contrast to cochlear implants, ABI implantation is relatively rare. By 2010, there were only 500 patients worldwide who had ...
Some management options include hearing aids, cochlear implants, middle ear implants, assistive technology, and closed ... "Sound and Fury - Cochlear Implants - Essay". www.pbs.org. PBS. Archived from the original on 2015-07-06. Retrieved 2015-08-01 ... For many, hearing aids, sign language, cochlear implants and subtitles are useful. Lip reading is another useful skill some ... Many members of Deaf culture oppose attempts to cure deafness and some within this community view cochlear implants with ...
From Cochlea to Cochlear Implants. Springer. ISBN 0-387-00496-3. Oghalai JS (October 2004). "The cochlear amplifier: ... Floor of cochlear duct. Spiral limbus and basilar membrane. Section through the spiral organ of Corti (magnified) The reticular ... Salt AN, Konishi T (1986). "The cochlear fluids: Perilymph and endolymph.". In Altschuler RA, Hoffman DW, Bobbin RP (eds.). ... cite journal}}: Cite journal requires ,journal= (help) Nilsen KE, Russell IJ (July 1999). "Timing of cochlear feedback: spatial ...
Cochlear implants have also been tested. Once the surgical implantation is complete, an infant has the opportunity to ... "Co-occurrence patterns in the babbling of children with a cochlear implant". The Syllable in Speech Production: 187-204. ...
Loeb was one of the inventors of the cochlear implant, which is used to restore functional hearing. He led the team that ... "Cochlear Implants - Medical Device Development Facility". mddf.usc.edu. Loeb, G.E.; Richmond, F.J.R.; Olney, D.; Cameron, T.; ... and was also one of the developers of the cochlear implant to restore hearing to the deaf. He has contributed to numerous ... Design and fabrication of an experimental cochlear prosthesis. Med. & Biol. Engng. & Comput. 21:241-254, 1983. Schulman, J.H., ...
Cochlear Implants and Meningitis Vaccination: Fact Sheet for General Public ... People with cochlear implants are more likely to get bacterial meningitis than people without cochlear implants. In addition, ... Follow-up of cochlear implant use in patients who developed bacterial meningitis following cochlear implantation. Laryngoscope ... Cochlear implants in children: surgical site infections and prevention and treatment of acute otitis media and meningitis. ...
Media related to Cochlear implants at Wikimedia Commons Cochlear Implants at Curlie Cochlear Implants information from the ... In the past, cochlear implants were only approved for people who were deaf in both ears; as of 2014[update] a cochlear implant ... Critics of cochlear implants from Deaf cultures also assert that the cochlear implant and the subsequent therapy often become ... NAD Cochlear Implant Committee. "Cochlear Implants". Archived from the original on 2007-02-20. Hicks K (2016-08-05). "We Are ...
A cochlear implant does not restore normal hearing. ... A cochlear implant can help individuals who are severely hard ... Cochlear Implants (Food and Drug Administration) * Cochlear Implants (National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication ... A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are profoundly ... Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants (Food and Drug Administration) * Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with ...
Cochlear implants can help many kids with severe hearing loss. Find out how they work and who can get them. ... How Do Cochlear Implants Work?. Cochlear implants have:. *A microphone and speech processor that sit outside the body. The ... What Are Cochlear Implants?. A cochlear implant is a surgically placed device that helps a person with severe hearing loss hear ... A cochlear implant team will help decide if cochlear implants are a good option. This team includes an audiologist (hearing ...
The Johns Hopkins Cochlear Implant Center The Cochlear Implant Center offers a comprehensive approach to cochlear implantation ... including one-on-one therapy to help patients learn to use cochlear implants. We perform hundreds of cochlear implant surgeries ... Health Treatments, Tests and Therapies Cochlear Implants Cochlear Implant: Joyces Story. *Share on Facebook ...
Choosing cochlear implant surgery is a personal choice, it is not right or wrong. Make an informed choice by learning as much ... Cochlear implants can be a difficult choice for many people with severe to profound hearing loss. ... Cochlear Implant. First, let me say that cochlear implants are a personal choice. Some chose cochlear implants and some do not ... Parts of a Cochlear Implant. Cochlear implants use a sound processor that fits behind the ear (looks like a large hearing aid ...
Hear from people whose lives have been transformed by the Cochlear™ Nucleus® System. ... Learn how cochlear implants work and how they can help adults with hearing loss. ... Cochlear implants for adults. Cochlear implants can provide access to sounds you no longer hear, even in noisy environments. ... Do you qualify for a cochlear implant?. Cochlear implants are approved for adults with moderate to profound sensorineural ...
Hudsons parents reflect on how a cochlear implant has changed his life. ... The Cochlear Implant Team and Dr. Kang walked us through it and said that it was best if he has one hearing aid and one implant ... Cochlear Implants;Patient Story;Childhood Deafness Hearing and Balance It looks like your browser does not have JavaScript ... Boys Town National Research Hospital - Life-Changing Care, Research & Education Knowledge Center Cochlear Implants: Hudsons ...
... giving them information so that they can better understand the assessment and switch-on process in getting a cochlear implant. ... Getting your child to wear their hearing aids and cochlear implants * Decorating your childs hearing aids or cochlear implants ... How do I… decide if my child should have cochlear implant surgery? ... Hearing implants * Cochlear implants * How does a cochlear implant work? * Comparing cochlear implant models ...
Prepare for the moment your child will hear with their new Cochlear™ device and know what questions to ask. ... Your childs cochlear implant surgery. Any surgery can be stressful. Learn how to care for your child and help them on their ... Activating your childs cochlear implant. Prepare your child for the moment theyll hear for the first time with their new ... Is there a network of families of cochlear implant recipients I can connect with? ...
The decision to embark upon cochlear implantation is made either by the patient (if adult) or by the parents or caregivers of a ... Cochlear implantation has become a routine procedure in the United States and worldwide for the management of severe-to- ... An image depicting cochlear implant surgery can be seen below.. Postauricular incision for cochlear implant. View Media Gallery ... encoded search term (Cochlear Implant Surgery) and Cochlear Implant Surgery What to Read Next on Medscape ...
Discover the impact of age on cochlear implant outcomes in adults with severe hearing loss. Explore a retrospective study ... UK Cochlear Implant Study Group (2004) Criteria of Candidacy for Unilateral Cochlear Implantation in Postlingually deafened ... The Impact of Age on Cochlear Implant Performance () Brian Schwab, Michele Gandolfi, Erica Lai, Erin Reilly, Lorie Singer, Ana ... Roberts, D.S., Lin, H.W., Herrmann, B.S. and Lee, D.J. (2013) Differential Cochlear Implant Outcomes in Older Adults. The ...
... whose cochlear implant - a surgically implanted hearing device for people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing - was as much on view ... Another user, Samina Sheikh, wrote, "This is fantastic to see… My daughter is a cochlear implant-user, [who is] also deaf from ... Well done @ASOS for their positive decision to include Natasha, a model with a cochlear implant, on their website. We still ... This week, British fashion retailer ASOS quietly introduced a new model to its roster, Natasha Ghouri, whose cochlear implant ...
Dette Cochlear Implant af typen HiRes™ Ultra, som er udviklet ved brug af gennemprøvet HiRes-elektronik, er ABs hidtil ... Performance of Patients Using Different Cochlear Implant Systems: Effects of Input Dynamic Range. Ear and Hearing. 28:260-275. ... Dette HiRes Ultra-Cochlear Implant og HiFocus Mid-Scala-elektroden er godkendt af det tyske certificeringsinstitut TÜV til ... Factors affecting open-set word recognition in adults with cochlear implants. Ear and Hearing. 2013 Jan 23; Epub. ...
Cochlear implants. This man is wearing the Naida CI M. cochlear implant.. Advanced Bionics currently markets two cochlear ... The two main components of a cochlear implant, the external sound processor and the implanted electrode array, are connected ... cochlear implants provide a sense of sound by stimulating the auditory nerve directly with an implanted electrode array. ... It combines proven cochlear implant technology with machine-learning technology proven to be successful in hearing aids to ...
You are at:Home»News»Organisation raises RM160,000 for cochlear implant ... 000 for three-year-old hearing impaired Voon Fang Qi to undergo the much needed cochlear implant surgery. ...
All the latest science news about cochlear implants from Phys.org ... Cochlear implant. A cochlear implant (CI) is a surgically ... The cochlear implant is often referred to as a bionic ear. Unlike hearing aids, the cochlear implant does not amplify sound, ... External components of the cochlear implant include a microphone, speech processor and an RF transducer or primary headpiece ... There is disagreement whether providing cochlear implants to children is ethically justifiable, renewing a century-old debate ...
Instrument identification through a simulated cochlear implant processing system / , Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of ... Cochlear implants have been successful in restoring partial hearing to profoundly deaf people. The success of cochlear implants ... In a typical cochlear implant design, the ambient sound is detected via a microphone and the transmission unit of the implant ... A cochlear implant system consists of one or more implanted electrodes for direct electrical activation of the auditory nerve, ...
Learn more about hearing aids and cochlear implants for children with hearing loss. ... Cochlear implants. A cochlear implant has different parts: an external piece that the child wears on the ear and an internal ... Cochlear implant surgery may sound a bit scary for a little one, but rest assured, its a safe surgical procedure and something ... Heres more about cochlear implants and hearing aids.. How hearing works. To understand the differences between hearing aids ...
Computational simulation of cochlear implants. Our automatic framework is able to generate patient-specific models for ... In particular, we can simulate the activation of the cochlear implant in different configurations and using specific activation ... Simulation of electrical stimulation protocols for cochlear implants (Ceresa et al., Molecular Neurobiology 2015) ... Surgical planning for cochlear implantation. Cochlear implantation involves the insertion of a thin electrode array inside the ...
This article summarizes the available evidence on pediatric cochlear implantation to provide current ... American Cochlear Implant Alliance Task Force Guidelines for Determining Cochlear Implant Candidacy in Children. Warner-Czyz, ... American Cochlear Implant Alliance Task Force Guidelines for Determining Cochlear Implant Candidacy in Children : Ear and ... Warner-Czyz A. D., Davis B. L. The emergence of segmental accuracy in young cochlear implant recipients. Cochlear Implants Int ...
What Are Some Questions to Ask in Choosing Cochlear Implants?. * Where can I find out more about cochlear implants? * What type ... What Are the Limitations of Cochlear Implants?. Little is currently known about the long-term effect of the cochlear implant. ... What Is Meant by a Cochlear Implant?. A cochlear implant prosthesis is a device that includes an external package (microphone ... What Are the Benefits of Cochlear Implants?. With adults the benefits of cochlear implants have ranged from communication by ...
Objective Unexplained variability in speech recognition outcomes among postlingually deafened adults with cochlear implants ( ... Cochlear implant participant demographics. Sentence recognition tasks were performed at a 13 dB SNR for long, complex sentences ... Importance: Many cochlear implant centers screen patients for cognitive impairment as part of the evaluation process, but the ... The cochlear implant (CI) is widely considered to be one of the most innovative and successful neuroprosthetic treatments ...
Cochlear Implant Wednesdays. Are you a cochlear implant candidate or someone who is frustrated that hearing aids are just not ... Schedule your one-on-one session to learn about cochlear implants. Space is limited! Reserve your spot today! ... What is a Cochlear Implant & How Does It Work? * The Advanced Bionics Cochlear Implant ... Getting a Cochlear Implant * Getting the Most Out of Your Cochlear Implant ...
... his audiologist encouraged him to try a cochlear implant. Six months later, Richard had the surgery to have a cochlear implant ... Cochlear implants provide children and adults who are hard of hearing with access to sound, but receiving an implant isnt ... A cochlear implant can be about so much more than hearing. Loud Shirt Day encourages New Zealanders to commit fashion crimes, ... Richards response to praise such as this is simple but profound: "I can still be my own person with a cochlear implant, and I ...
The Cochlear Implant Center within the University Hospitals Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery is now a ... Director of the Cochlear Implant Center. Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. University Hospitals Cleveland ... Lindsay Zombek, MS, CCC-SLP, LSLS, Cert AVT, and her team help evaluate potential cochlear implant candidates and set goals for ... "The global penetrance for patients who need cochlear implants is just six percent," says Alejandro Rivas, MD, Division Chief of ...
Histories connecting cochlear implants to the broader category of brain implants. Doctoral students are welcome and encouraged ... Early histories of cochlear implant development and use (especially in France, Austria, and Russia) ... Historical and contemporary accounts of cochlear implant development and utilization in specific geographic contexts, including ... than the cochlear implant (CI). The first true bionic device, CIs (re)produce an absent normal human function (Blume 2009). ...
Cochlear implants are only approved for kids as young as Diana in rare cases. The Strohms hope other parents in a similar ... Diana Strohm received a cochlear implant in a surgery that had only ever been tried once before on a child so young.(Source: ... Dianas parents had to decide within a week if they wanted to give her a cochlear implant, a permanent hearing device. Its a ...
Cochlear implants are only approved for kids as young as Diana in rare cases. The Strohms hope other parents in a similar ... Diana Strohm received a cochlear implant in a surgery that had only ever been tried once before on a child so young.(Source: ... Dianas parents had to decide within a week if they wanted to give her a cochlear implant, a permanent hearing device. Its a ...
  • An image depicting cochlear implant surgery can be seen below. (medscape.com)
  • The inside component, the actual implant, has a coil to receive signals, electronics, and an array of electrodes which is placed into the cochlea, which stimulate the cochlear nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Factors such as age of implantation, parental involvement and education level, duration and cause of hearing loss, how the implant is situated in the cochlea, the overall health of the cochlear nerve, but also individual capabilities of re-learning are considered to contribute to this variation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1964, Blair Simmons and Robert J. White implanted a single-channel electrode in a patient's cochlea at Stanford University. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, research indicated that these single-channel cochlear implants were of limited usefulness because they cannot stimulate different areas of the cochlea at different times to allow differentiation between low and mid to high frequencies as required for detecting speech. (wikipedia.org)
  • With an implant, instead, the devices pick up sound and digitize it, convert that digitized sound into electrical signals, and transmit those signals to electrodes embedded in the cochlea. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cochlear implants bypass damaged parts of the cochlea to stimulate the auditory nerve directly. (kidshealth.org)
  • A cochlear implant is a device that is inserted into your cochlea and implanted under the skin. (hubpages.com)
  • Cochlear implants work for people who have a cochlea that is not working quite right. (hubpages.com)
  • Cochlear implants can be an option for people who have severe hearing loss from cochlea damage and who receive little to no help from hearing aids. (hubpages.com)
  • The receiver sends the signals to the electrodes implanted in the cochlea. (hubpages.com)
  • A CT scan is obtained to evaluate the bony anatomy of the cochlea and to establish the presence of a patent (nonossified) cochlear duct. (medscape.com)
  • It is also used to identify various anomalies of cochlea-vestibular anatomy (common cavity, incomplete partition defects, enlarged vestibular aqueduct, and cochlear ossification. (medscape.com)
  • Unlike hearing aids, the cochlear implant does not amplify sound, but works by directly stimulating any functioning auditory nerves inside the cochlea with an electric field. (phys.org)
  • The implant relays the incoming signal to the implanted electrodes in the cochlea. (phys.org)
  • A small but growing segment of recipients have bilateral implants (one implant in each cochlea). (phys.org)
  • In that case, the ability of the cochlea to transduce or convert acoustic energy into electric energy needs to happen through a cochlear implant. (whattoexpect.com)
  • The external part of a cochlear implant is the part that collects sound, or takes sound and acoustic energy into the cochlea. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Cochlear implantation involves the insertion of a thin electrode array inside the cochlea. (upf.edu)
  • A cochlear implant prosthesis is a device that includes an external package (microphone and speech processor) worn by the user and an internal package (an array of electrodes that is surgically implanted into the cochlea (end organ of hearing) in the inner ear. (hoagiesgifted.org)
  • The cochlear implant is thought to function by directly stimulating the surviving nerve population in the cochlea and spiral ganglion. (earsurgery.org)
  • Unlike hearing aids, which amplify sound, cochlear implants directly stimulate the cochlea in the inner ear to send sound signals to the brain. (hearingresearch.org)
  • ABIs are used in cases where the cochlea is damaged or missing or where cochlear implantation is not possible for anatomical reasons. (hearingresearch.org)
  • The implant is a neural stimulator with an electrode array surgically placed near the auditory nerve fibers in the scala tympani of the cochlea. (cdc.gov)
  • Most meningitis cases were associated with an implant with a positioner, a silastic wedge inserted next to the implanted electrode in the cochlea to position the electrode closer to the cochlear nerve endings and thus facilitate electrical signal transmission. (cdc.gov)
  • The cochlea is a bony, spiral-shaped chamber that contains the cochlear duct of the membranous labyrinth. (medscape.com)
  • A cochlear implant (CI) is a surgically implanted neuroprosthesis that provides a person who has moderate-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss with sound perception. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cochlear implants are approved for adults with moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss in one or both ears who are not receiving enough benefit when using hearing aids. (cochlear.com)
  • Cochlear implantation has become a routine procedure in the United States and worldwide for the management of severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. (medscape.com)
  • Objective: Cochlear implantation is the emerging treatment of choice for severe and profound sensorineural hearing loss, yet there are conflicting data on outcomes in adults. (scirp.org)
  • cochlear implants, sensorineural hearing loss, speech perception. (researchgate.net)
  • Taking the step to treat his profound sensorineural hearing loss with a cochlear implant will aid Ferrigno's desire to remain fit and healthy as he ages. (audiologyonline.com)
  • Cochlear implants are the standard of care for adults living with moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss who are not adequately benefiting from their hearing aids,' said Dr. Brian Kaplan, cochlear implant surgeon, Chairman of Otolaryngology at Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Senior Vice President, Clinical Strategy and Innovation, Cochlear Limited. (audiologyonline.com)
  • Since its introduction into clinical practice, hearing care clinicians have increasingly utilized cochlear implantation (CI) to restore auditory stimulation in selected patients with advanced sensorineural hearing loss. (karger.com)
  • Cochlear implantation is the standard treatment for children and adults affected by severe and severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. (cdc.gov)
  • A cochlear implant (CI) as a treatment option for profound sensorineural hearing loss has increased remarkably in recent years. (ajnr.org)
  • Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) from cochlear implant surgery and samples (2 mL) were obtained on the is a type of hearing loss in which the serology findings. (who.int)
  • Instead of delivering sound through the ear canal like traditional hearing aids , cochlear implants provide a sense of sound by stimulating the auditory nerve directly with an implanted electrode array. (healthyhearing.com)
  • The two main components of a cochlear implant, the external sound processor and the implanted electrode array, are connected via a strong magnet. (healthyhearing.com)
  • We have developed a system to perform patient-specific simulations of electrode array insertion, based on the detailed anatomy of the patient (estimated thanks to the SSM) and a library of implants available in the market. (upf.edu)
  • The earliest cochlear implants consisted of a single active electrode, introduced into the inner ear, through the cochlear wall next to the round window. (earsurgery.org)
  • For the present, the implantable portion includes the electrode array and wire from the electrodes to an implanted portion of the device which is behind the ear. (earsurgery.org)
  • We evaluated the visualization quality of single electrode contacts, the scalar position of the electrodes, cochlear walls, mastoid facial canal, metallic artifacts (using a 4-level visual score), and the ability to measure the insertion angle of the electrodes. (ajnr.org)
  • Standard cochlear implantation requires an extended postauricular and scalp incision and large flap, mastoidectomy , facial recess approach, cochleostomy, and insertion of an electrode into the scala tympani. (medscape.com)
  • The most common complications associated with the standard approach to cochlear implantation include flap breakdown and electrode misplacement. (medscape.com)
  • He envisions 3-D printing and designing a series of personalised vinyl sheets to adorn the sleeves of fellow cochlear implant wearers, adding a unique flair to each user's experience. (voxy.co.nz)
  • Don't be afraid to reach out to fellow cochlear implant wearers because they will be more than happy to guide you throughout any obstacles or struggles you're currently going through. (unc.edu)
  • A hearing health professional who specializes in all types of hearing technology, including implantable hearing solutions, will be able to advise if you may benefit from a cochlear implant. (cochlear.com)
  • A good next step is to visit a hearing health professional who specializes in hearing technology that will be able to advise if you may benefit from a cochlear implant. (cochlear.com)
  • In the United States, one out of three people over the age of 65 and half of people over 75 have disabling hearing loss, but only 5 percent of people who could benefit from a cochlear implant have them. (audiologyonline.com)
  • Adults who currently use hearing aids can try the Cochlear Hearing Aid Check, a free online hearing check tool, to learn if they may benefit from a cochlear implant. (audiologyonline.com)
  • External components of the cochlear implant include a microphone, speech processor and an RF transducer or primary headpiece coil. (phys.org)
  • The internal and external components of the cochlear implant are connected via an electric coupling. (hoagiesgifted.org)
  • Hearing aids amplify sound, but cochlear implants bypass the damaged portions of the inner ear to deliver sound directly to the auditory nerve. (hubpages.com)
  • The programmes and services offered by THH and SCIP include assessment, cochlear implant surgery, listening and spoken language therapy, audiology, and outreach programmes for regional and remote patients. (voxy.co.nz)
  • Successful cochlear implantation requires a multispecialty approach," says Gail Murray, PhD, CCC-A , Co-director of the Cochlear Implant Center and Director of Audiology at University Hospitals. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Once the patient is deemed to be a potential cochlear implant candidate, the various cochlear implant options are discussed, and audiologic evaluation commences. (medscape.com)
  • Lindsay Zombek, MS, CCC-SLP, LSLS, Cert AVT , and her team help evaluate potential cochlear implant candidates and set goals for postoperative rehabilitation. (uhhospitals.org)
  • The Cochlear Implant Center offers a comprehensive approach to cochlear implantation and rehabilitation, including one-on-one therapy to help patients learn to use cochlear implants. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • In recent years, the standard approach to cochlear implantation with a large incision has been challenged by successful implantation of cochlear implants in numerous patients with a much smaller incision and a less-invasive approach. (medscape.com)
  • The electrodes electrically stimulate the cochlear nerve, causing it to send signals to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The original single-channel implants have been replaced by greater use of multichannel implants, where the stimulation is distributed across an array of electrodes that evoke a wider range of auditory perception. (hoagiesgifted.org)
  • Today's cochlear implants feature multiple electrodes that stimulate the residual nerve of hearing, combined with sophisticated processing strategies allows for excellent recognition and understanding of speech in most implanted patients after appropriate programming sessions. (earsurgery.org)
  • This component, the sound processor, contains microphones, electronics that include digital signal processor (DSP) chips, battery, and a coil that transmits a signal to the implant across the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cochlear implants use a sound processor that fits behind the ear (looks like a large hearing aid and has a coil that uses a magnet to connect to the internal components). (hubpages.com)
  • Advanced Bionics currently markets two cochlear implants: the Naida CI M and the Sky CI M. The Sky is the world's first dedicated sound processor for children. (healthyhearing.com)
  • The remote programming feature is indicated for patients who have had six months of experience with their cochlear implant sound processor and are comfortable with the programming process. (nyrealestatelawblog.com)
  • Ferrigno now hears the world with his Cochlear Kanso ® 2 Sound Processor , the first off-the-ear cochlear implant sound processor with direct streaming from both Apple ® and Android™ devices. (audiologyonline.com)
  • One of the nation's 10 largest implant centers, the world-class program continues to lead the way in providing patient-centered, value-based care. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Programming adjustments to a cochlear implant are performed at specialized cochlear implant centers or at clinics by audiologists with expertise in cochlear implants. (nyrealestatelawblog.com)
  • What Happens During Cochlear Implant Surgery? (kidshealth.org)
  • Cochlear implant surgery is done under general anesthesia . (kidshealth.org)
  • Are There Risks to Cochlear Implant Surgery? (kidshealth.org)
  • The audiologist will turn on the cochlear implants about 2-4 weeks after surgery. (kidshealth.org)
  • Children with cochlear implants begin auditory rehabilitation (listening therapy) and speech and language therapy soon after surgery. (kidshealth.org)
  • If the patient is cleared for cochlear implantation, the patient proceeds with preoperative medical clearance, chooses a cochlear implant device, and proceeds with surgery. (medscape.com)
  • KUCHING: The Malaysia Shan Xin Charity and Welfare Organisation successfully raised RM160,000 for three-year-old hearing impaired Voon Fang Qi to undergo the much needed cochlear implant surgery. (theborneopost.com)
  • Cochlear implant surgery may sound a bit scary for a little one, but rest assured, it's a safe surgical procedure and something you should explore and talk about with your doctor. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Typically, cochlear implant surgery is less risky than a tonsillectomy. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Six months later, Richard had the surgery to have a cochlear implant fitted on his left side. (voxy.co.nz)
  • The Cochlear Implant Center within the University Hospitals Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery is now a designated Center of Excellence (COE). (uhhospitals.org)
  • In 2021, the center achieved a 60 percent year-over-year increase in cochlear implantation, with a 28-day reduction in average days from office visit to surgery. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Diana Strohm received a cochlear implant in a surgery that had only ever been tried once before on a child so young. (kcbd.com)
  • In this episode of Vera's Journey, discover more about cochlear implant surgery, and see how Vera prepares herself for the big day. (medel.com)
  • In February 2021, Ferrigno underwent surgery for his cochlear implant, the CochlearTM Nucleus ® Profile™ Plus Implant. (audiologyonline.com)
  • The surgery to implant the internal component is typically performed under general anesthesia and takes a few hours. (hearingresearch.org)
  • After the surgery, there is a recovery period during which the implant must be allowed to heal before it can be activated. (hearingresearch.org)
  • The surgery to implant an ABI is complex and requires a highly skilled surgeon. (hearingresearch.org)
  • The Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret has successfully performed the first cochlear implant surgery on a patient. (co.ke)
  • MTRH on Wednesday, June 21 announced the inaugural surgery (cochlear) that helps a patient with severe hearing loss or profoundly deaf to get some sense of sound. (co.ke)
  • Mann WJ, Gosepath J. Technical Note: minimal access surgery for cochlear implantation with MED-EL devices. (medscape.com)
  • Mack KF, Heermann R, Issing PR, Lenarz T, Schwab B. Four years' experience with the minimally invasive surgical approach in cochlear implant surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Majdani O, Rau TS, Baron S, Eilers H, Baier C, Heimann B. A robot-guided minimally invasive approach for cochlear implant surgery: preliminary results of a temporal bone study. (medscape.com)
  • Idiopathic (unexplained) hearing loss 119 SNHL children having cochlear Student t-test was used to determine may be the result of an infectious disease implant surgery, ranging in age from 3 significant differences in means and or an injury [1]. (who.int)
  • Cochlear implants are an implantable hearing treatment for severe-to-profound hearing loss. (healthyhearing.com)
  • A cochlear implant is an implanted electronic hearing device, designed to produce useful hearing sensations to a person with severe to profound hearing loss, by electrically stimulating nerves inside the inner ear. (nyrealestatelawblog.com)
  • Once hearing loss becomes severe to profound, cochlear implants are the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medical solution to treat it effectively. (audiologyonline.com)
  • To review evidence regarding the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and cost-effectiveness of unilateral and bilateral cochlear implantation (CI) among children and adults with severe-to-profound hearing loss. (karger.com)
  • Simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation in children aged 12â 18 months is safe and can be performed using standard cochlear implant surgical techniques. (bvsalud.org)
  • Simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation is often seen as the gold -standard intervention for many people with bilateral deafness . (bvsalud.org)
  • 19 participants received simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation . (bvsalud.org)
  • Simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation can be performed using the same surgical technique as unilateral implantation and poses no increased safety risk for children aged 1â 2 years. (bvsalud.org)
  • This article summarizes the available evidence on pediatric cochlear implantation to provide current guidelines for clinical protocols and candidacy recommendations in the United States. (lww.com)
  • Soft tissue complications after small incision pediatric cochlear implantation. (medscape.com)
  • We perform hundreds of cochlear implant surgeries each year on adults and children, lead clinical trials and provide state-of-the-art care. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Advanced Bionics, part of the Sonova Group, is a world leader in developing cochlear implant systems for adults and children. (healthyhearing.com)
  • Richard, and thousands of other adults and children with cochlear implants, are the focus of Loud Shirt Day 2023 - a national fundraising event and awareness campaign being held on October 27. (voxy.co.nz)
  • Views expressed by Cochlear recipients and hearing health providers are those of the individual. (cochlear.com)
  • Is there a network of families of cochlear implant recipients I can connect with? (cochlear.com)
  • The implant gives recipients additional auditory information, which may include sound discrimination fine enough to understand speech in quiet environments. (phys.org)
  • As of 2006, approximately 100,000 people worldwide had received cochlear implants, with recipients split almost evenly between children and adults. (phys.org)
  • Before the FDA approved implants, children with profound deafness who were at least two years old, and who received no benefit from conventional hearing aids, were the primary recipients. (hoagiesgifted.org)
  • Cochlear implant recipients have been documented as having a higher rate of postimplantation bacterial meningitis than a cohort of the same age in the general US population ( 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Pediatric cochlear implant recipients were found to be at higher risk for developing bacterial meningitis than children in the general US population ( 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Consult your hearing health provider to determine if you are a candidate for cochlear technology and to understand the associated risks and benefits. (cochlear.com)
  • We just kept seeing people at Boys Town and they said he was a candidate for cochlear implants. (boystownhospital.org)
  • From the early days of implants in the 1970s and the 1980s, speech perception via an implant has steadily increased. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many users of modern implants gain reasonable to good hearing and speech perception skills post-implantation, especially when combined with lipreading. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cochlear implants can also improve speech perception and recognition, allowing for better communication and social interaction. (hearingresearch.org)
  • Repeated testing of his hearing and speech perception with the cochlear implant showed no deterioration. (cdc.gov)
  • The knowledge of patient-specific neural excitation patterns from cochlear implants (CIs) can provide important information for optimizing efficacy and improving speech perception outcomes. (springer.com)
  • Their goal was to identify the genetic cause(s) of childhood onset hearing loss, report on severity and progression of hearing thresholds, and determine cochlear implant success through pediatric and adult speech-perception tests. (audiology.org)
  • For all children with cochlear implants, outcomes on adult speech-perception tests were greater than pre-implanted levels. (audiology.org)
  • Adjusting for age at implant and time interval since implant, speech perception was highest for children with hearing loss due to the melanocyte inducing transcription factor (MITF) gene or the transmembrane serine protease 3 (TMPRSS3) gene. (audiology.org)
  • Cochlear provides rehabilitation programs you can access via your clinic. (cochlear.com)
  • The team concept in cochlear implant evaluation allows for an exchange of information between the surgeon and other members of the implant and rehabilitation process, including audiologists, speech and language therapists, social workers, and psychologists. (medscape.com)
  • and (c) early intervention to minimize negative long-term effects on communication and quality of life related to delayed identification of implant candidacy, later age at implantation, and/or limited commitment to an audiologic rehabilitation program. (lww.com)
  • Cochlear implants are options for habilitation (i.e., helping a person develop or learn new skills or abilities) or rehabilitation (i.e., helping a person relearn old skills that were lost somehow) available for individuals with profound hearing impairment (Geers & Moog, 1994). (hoagiesgifted.org)
  • As Richard researched what was involved with the implant technology and rehabilitation, he was surprised by the information and recommendations about cochlear implants that he read in articles and on websites. (voxy.co.nz)
  • He touts his commitment to rehabilitation, including using hearing therapy apps, watching online talks and movies, as being critical to his fast success with his cochlear implant, stating 'The more you put into it, the better it is. (audiologyonline.com)
  • Once the implant is activated, the individual will typically need to undergo several months of rehabilitation to learn how to use the device effectively. (hearingresearch.org)
  • Though duration of deafness seems to be one potential influencing component for post-implant outcomes, the literature advocates that many factors may potentially influence an individual's speech understanding with a CI. (scirp.org)
  • There is disagreement whether providing cochlear implants to children is ethically justifiable, renewing a century-old debate about models of deafness that often pits hearing parents of deaf children against the Deaf community. (phys.org)
  • Those who are born deaf (prelingual deafness), as well as children and adults who lost their hearing from either disease or trauma (post lingual deafness), can experience the gift of hearing thanks to cochlear implants. (earsurgery.org)
  • In addition, some pilot studies here and abroad have confirmed that cochlear implants achieve major benefits in some individuals with single-sided deafness and over time this may become an option for those who have lost all hearing in one ear. (earsurgery.org)
  • The primary benefit of cochlear implants is that they can provide the sense of hearing to individuals with profound deafness. (hearingresearch.org)
  • However, cochlear implants are not a cure for deafness, and there are some limitations to their efficacy. (hearingresearch.org)
  • : http://www.who.int/pbd/deafness/estimates/en/ (accessed 25 April 2017). (who.int)
  • Makes an incision (cut), then places the implant under the skin and inside the skull. (kidshealth.org)
  • Secures the implant in place and closes the incision with stitches. (kidshealth.org)
  • Postauricular incision for cochlear implant. (medscape.com)
  • The hospital said that the medical procedure is performed under general anesthesia and a small incision is made behind the ear to access the cochlear. (co.ke)
  • The doctor will not turn on, or activate, the implant until the incision has healed. (alberta.ca)
  • Long lasting batteries requiring little electric current will allow for a completely implantable cochlear device in the future. (earsurgery.org)
  • The processor captures sound transmits those signals to the receiver implanted under the skin behind the ear. (hubpages.com)
  • The remaining hardware of the device includes the microphone, receiver, speech processor and magnetic link between the outer scalp and the implanted portion of the device. (earsurgery.org)
  • A cochlear implant is a surgically placed device that helps a person with severe hearing loss hear sounds. (kidshealth.org)
  • In addition, some people who are candidates for cochlear implants have anatomic factors that may increase their risk for meningitis. (cdc.gov)
  • Due to their increased risk, CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for people who have or are candidates for cochlear implants. (cdc.gov)
  • Children who have or are candidates for cochlear implants may need pneumococcal vaccination. (cdc.gov)
  • Pneumococcal vaccination is recommended for adults who have or are candidates for cochlear implants. (cdc.gov)
  • Guidelines for cochlear implants have broadened over the years and patience with some residual hearing but very poor word understanding may also be candidates for cochlear implants. (earsurgery.org)
  • 4 However, many adult cochlear implant candidates are not appropriately diagnosed, referred and treated. (audiologyonline.com)
  • The ideal candidates for cochlear implants are individuals who have some experience with sound and speech but have poor speech understanding or discriminating ability. (hearingresearch.org)
  • Through everyday listening and auditory training, cochlear implants allow both children and adults to learn to interpret those signals as speech and sound. (wikipedia.org)
  • The patient may first be seen and identified as an implant candidate by an audiologist. (medscape.com)
  • Last year, his audiologist encouraged him to try a cochlear implant. (voxy.co.nz)
  • Cochlear implants often require regular programming visits with an audiologist. (nyrealestatelawblog.com)
  • During these visits, the audiologist adjusts various electronic settings that control how the implant stimulates the nerves inside the inner ear, such as adjustments in sensitivity to low-level sound or limits on loud sounds. (nyrealestatelawblog.com)
  • Only your doctor and audiologist can determine whether you are a good candidate for a cochlear implant or a bone anchored hearing system. (oticonmedical.com)
  • There is significant variability in the literature concerning the exact effect of age on cochlear implant outcomes. (scirp.org)
  • We sought to evaluate the outcomes of cochlear implant performance stratified by age. (scirp.org)
  • Conclusion: This is one of the largest series to date on hearing outcomes in adults who receive a cochlear implant. (scirp.org)
  • These children are also at risk for additional outcomes such as neurological dysfunction or cochlear ossification (hardening of the bone), presenting surgical challenge. (hoagiesgifted.org)
  • Objective Unexplained variability in speech recognition outcomes among postlingually deafened adults with cochlear implants (CIs) is an enormous clinical and research barrier to progress. (researchgate.net)
  • COE team members are aligned in offering patients streamlined access to cochlear implantation with excellent outcomes. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Optimizing the successful outcomes of cochlear implantation involves expert speech and language therapy for listening skills. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Their electroencephalographic responses were recorded after 12, 18 and 24 months of implant use, revealing a large dichotomy: Some children failed to show semantic processing throughout their second year of CI use, which fell in line with their poor language outcomes. (uniklinikum-dresden.de)
  • Although many cochlear-implant (CI) listeners understand speech well in quiet backgrounds, there is much variability in outcomes, particularly in noisy conditions (Friesen et al. (springer.com)
  • 2023) Association of genetic diagnoses of childhood-onset hearing loss with cochlear implant outcomes . (audiology.org)
  • Initial implants were thus placed against the outer wall of the inner ear. (earsurgery.org)
  • Not only was this introduction more effective in stimulating the residual nerve endings of the inner ear, but it also allowed the surgeon to better anchor the implant into the inner ear without risk of loosing contact with the nerve endings. (earsurgery.org)
  • Cochlear implants are electronic devices that are surgically implanted in the inner ear to provide sound perception for individuals with profound hearing loss. (hearingresearch.org)
  • Preoperative high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones showed bilateral inner ear malformations of both the cochlear and vestibular labyrinth, conditions consistent with bilateral Mondini deformity ( 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Then the doctor placed the implant in the inner ear. (alberta.ca)
  • A sub-analysis was performed comparing patients implanted at a younger (21 - 64 years) and older (65 and above) age. (scirp.org)
  • The global penetrance for patients who need cochlear implants is just six percent," says Alejandro Rivas, MD , Division Chief of Otology and Neurotology and Director of the Cochlear Implant Center . (uhhospitals.org)
  • As patients experience hearing with their implant, they learn how to maximize their communication skills in real-world situations. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Having developed common goals for preop testing and postop programming, partner audiologists complete the workups and refer their patients to University Hospitals surgeons for cochlear implantation. (uhhospitals.org)
  • To support the approval of the remote programming feature for the Nucleus Cochlear Implant System, the FDA evaluated data from a clinical study of 39 patients, aged 12 or older, each of whom had a cochlear implant for at least one year. (nyrealestatelawblog.com)
  • This retrospective multicenter study included 51 patients with cochlear implants and postoperative imaging via temporal bone cone-beam CT ( n = 32 ears) or multidetector CT ( n = 19 ears) between 2012 and 2017. (ajnr.org)
  • Cone-beam CT in patients with cochlear implants provides images with higher spatial resolution and fewer metallic artifacts than multidetector CT at a relatively lower radiation dose. (ajnr.org)
  • People with cochlear implants are more likely to get bacterial meningitis than people without cochlear implants. (cdc.gov)
  • The bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) causes most cases of meningitis in people with cochlear implants. (cdc.gov)
  • There is no evidence people with cochlear implants are more likely to get Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) meningitis or meningococcal meningitis than people who do not have cochlear implants. (cdc.gov)
  • Does meningitis after cochlear implantation remain a concern in 2011? (cdc.gov)
  • Children with cochlear implants have a higher risk for some types of meningitis. (kidshealth.org)
  • Children over 2 years old with cochlear implants also should get the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) to help protect against meningitis. (kidshealth.org)
  • We report a case of GBS meningitis in a 6-year-old boy with a cochlear implant. (cdc.gov)
  • A planning software has been developed to assist the surgeon in planning the intervention and exploring different choices of implant and surgical parameters. (upf.edu)
  • We compared cone-beam CT with multidetector CT to assess postoperative implant placement and delineate finer anatomic structures, image quality, and radiation dose used. (ajnr.org)
  • One of the biggest changes in my hearing loss life has been receiving a cochlear implant (CI) in January of 2017. (hearinghealthmatters.org)
  • The modern multi-channel cochlear implant was independently developed and commercialized by two separate teams-one led by Graeme Clark in Australia and another by Ingeborg Hochmair and her future husband, Erwin Hochmair in Austria, with the Hochmairs' device first implanted in a person in December 1977 and Clark's in August 1978. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This means providing you with an innovative cochlear implant solution that includes the world's most reliable implants 4-6 , Apple® and Android™ device compatibility and proven hearing performance for a lifetime. (cochlear.com)
  • This week, British fashion retailer ASOS quietly introduced a new model to its roster, Natasha Ghouri , whose cochlear implant - a surgically implanted hearing device for people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing - was as much on view in the brand's e-commerce photos as the mushroom-shaped hoop earring she was modeling. (refinery29.com)
  • A cochlear implant (CI) is a surgically implanted electronic device that provides a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard of hearing. (phys.org)
  • The purpose of the device is to improve speech recognition of cochlear implant users by representing acoustic (sound) information. (hoagiesgifted.org)
  • Perhaps no medical device has sparked more popular discussion of the "dangers and opportunities of technology" than the cochlear implant (CI). (4sonline.org)
  • Diana's parents had to decide within a week if they wanted to give her a cochlear implant, a permanent hearing device. (kcbd.com)
  • we recently implanted a grandmother who had been told she was too old for a device. (earsurgery.org)
  • I heard a lot of misinformation about cochlear implants over the years, but a friend of mine received the device and went from 15 percent word understanding before the implant to 95 percent with the implant,' said Ferrigno. (audiologyonline.com)
  • In this research project we explore the implications of acquiring language when relying mainly or exclusively on input from a cochlear implant (CI), a device providing auditory input to otherwise deaf individuals. (uniklinikum-dresden.de)
  • Over the last 15 years, cochlear implant manufacturers have consistently expanded their technologies and device sophistication. (karger.com)
  • A cochlear implant is a small electronic device that can help you hear if you have severe or total hearing loss. (alberta.ca)
  • A small device worn outside the ear turns on the implant. (alberta.ca)
  • Cochlear implants are considered for children with profound hearing loss who can be as young as 9 months old. (kidshealth.org)
  • ABIs are similar to cochlear implants, but they stimulate the auditory nerve fibers in the brainstem directly. (hearingresearch.org)
  • I'm someone that has had profound hearing loss almost all my life, so if this cochlear implant is working for me already, it can give other people hope too. (audiologyonline.com)
  • Cochlear implants are typically recommended for individuals who have severe or profound hearing loss that cannot be corrected with traditional hearing aids. (hearingresearch.org)
  • Despite these limitations, cochlear implants are a valuable tool for individuals with profound hearing loss. (hearingresearch.org)
  • Furthermore, the SSM has been incorporated into a segmentation algorithm, effectively leading to the estimation of patient-specific high-detail cochlear shape from low resolution clinical data. (upf.edu)
  • These evidence-based guidelines for current clinical protocols in determining pediatric cochlear implant candidacy encourage a team-based approach focused on the whole child and the family system. (lww.com)
  • implants (CIs) is an enormous clinical and research barrier to progress. (researchgate.net)
  • Data on hearing aid use and cochlear implant status (variable names AUQ146, AUD148, AUQ152) are available for adults ages 20 years and older in the 2015-2016 survey, rather than only for adults ages 20-69 years in the 2011-2012 survey. (cdc.gov)
  • This document aims to provide professionals and consumers with current, evidence-based criteria for determining cochlear implant (CI) candidacy for the pediatric population. (lww.com)
  • Candidacy requirements for receiving a cochlear implant are changing. (hoagiesgifted.org)
  • This is why cochlear implants may work better than hearing aids for many people. (hubpages.com)
  • Note: Wearing hearing aids first is a necessary step in the evaluation process for a cochlear implant. (cochlear.com)
  • It combines proven cochlear implant technology with machine-learning technology proven to be successful in hearing aids to deliver a quality hearing experience. (healthyhearing.com)
  • What's the Difference Between Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implant for Kids? (whattoexpect.com)
  • Learn more about hearing aids and cochlear implants for children with hearing loss. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Should you look into hearing aids or cochlear implants ? (whattoexpect.com)
  • Here's more about cochlear implants and hearing aids. (whattoexpect.com)
  • To understand the differences between hearing aids and cochlear implants and what they do, we also need to understand some basic ways the ear works. (whattoexpect.com)
  • That means hearing aids and cochlear implants are actually brain-access devices. (whattoexpect.com)
  • If the doorway to the brain is blocked, hearing aids and cochlear implants open that door. (whattoexpect.com)
  • What's the difference between hearing aids and cochlear implants? (whattoexpect.com)
  • However, recommendations for a cochlear implant evaluation also should maintain flexibility and consider a child's skill progression (i.e., month-for-month progress in speech, language, and auditory development) and quality of life with appropriately fit hearing aids. (lww.com)
  • Are you a cochlear implant candidate or someone who is frustrated that hearing aids are just not enough? (advancedbionics.com)
  • The Hearing Aid Check aims to help individuals compare their hearing performance with hearing aids to people with a cochlear implant, and depending on their results, to seek further hearing healthcare advice to treat their hearing loss. (audiologyonline.com)
  • Considered too 'high-functioning' with my hearing aids (although not necessarily in any other area of my life), I'm not a candidate for a cochlear implant. (hearinghealthmatters.org)
  • If my hearing took a nosedive and I could no longer benefit from hearing aids, I wouldn't hesitate to get a cochlear implant. (hearinghealthmatters.org)
  • Learn more about cochlear implants . (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Contact a clinic affiliated with Advanced Bionics to learn more about their cochlear implant solutions. (healthyhearing.com)
  • Schedule your one-on-one session to learn about cochlear implants. (advancedbionics.com)
  • Loud Shirt Day is the annual appeal of The Hearing House (THH) and the Southern Cochlear Implant Programme (SCIP) - the only two charities in New Zealand dedicated to helping children and adults with a cochlear implant learn to listen, speak and reconnect with school, work and the community. (voxy.co.nz)
  • Check out these short snippets and learn more about Vera's cochlear implant journey. (medel.com)
  • Your doctor may recommend that you work with a speech therapist to learn how to make the most of your implant. (alberta.ca)
  • However, no cochlear implant recipient described has been reported to be infected with GBS. (cdc.gov)
  • With our Cochlear Nucleus Implant System, we help you hear your best with more choices of wearing options, wireless connectivity solutions, and personalized services. (cochlear.com)
  • The Cochlear Corporation Nucleus C-512 implant is currently being used in most of Dr. Levenson's implants. (earsurgery.org)
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved a remote feature for follow-up programming sessions for the Nucleus Cochlear Implant System through a telemedicine platform. (nyrealestatelawblog.com)
  • The FDA granted the approval of the Nucleus Cochlear Implant System to Cochlear Americas. (nyrealestatelawblog.com)