Cochlear Implants: Electronic hearing devices typically used for patients with normal outer and middle ear function, but defective inner ear function. In the COCHLEA, the hair cells (HAIR CELLS, VESTIBULAR) may be absent or damaged but there are residual nerve fibers. The device electrically stimulates the COCHLEAR NERVE to create sound sensation.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Cochlear Implantation: Surgical insertion of an electronic hearing device (COCHLEAR IMPLANTS) with electrodes to the COCHLEAR NERVE in the inner ear to create sound sensation in patients with residual nerve fibers.Deafness: A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.Speech Perception: The process whereby an utterance is decoded into a representation in terms of linguistic units (sequences of phonetic segments which combine to form lexical and grammatical morphemes).Auditory Threshold: The audibility limit of discriminating sound intensity and pitch.Correction of Hearing Impairment: Procedures for correcting HEARING DISORDERS.Hearing: The ability or act of sensing and transducing ACOUSTIC STIMULATION to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is also called audition.Hearing Aids: Wearable sound-amplifying devices that are intended to compensate for impaired hearing. These generic devices include air-conduction hearing aids and bone-conduction hearing aids. (UMDNS, 1999)Cochlea: The part of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is concerned with hearing. It forms the anterior part of the labyrinth, as a snail-like structure that is situated almost horizontally anterior to the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH.Audiometry, Speech: Measurement of the ability to hear speech under various conditions of intensity and noise interference using sound-field as well as earphones and bone oscillators.Hearing Loss, Bilateral: Partial hearing loss in both ears.Persons With Hearing Impairments: Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.Psychoacoustics: The science pertaining to the interrelationship of psychologic phenomena and the individual's response to the physical properties of sound.Hearing Loss: A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.Cochlear Nerve: The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.Noise: Any sound which is unwanted or interferes with HEARING other sounds.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Auditory Pathways: NEURAL PATHWAYS and connections within the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, beginning at the hair cells of the ORGAN OF CORTI, continuing along the eighth cranial nerve, and terminating at the AUDITORY CORTEX.Speech Intelligibility: Ability to make speech sounds that are recognizable.Speech Discrimination Tests: Tests of the ability to hear and understand speech as determined by scoring the number of words in a word list repeated correctly.Sound Localization: Ability to determine the specific location of a sound source.Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem: Electrical waves in the CEREBRAL CORTEX generated by BRAIN STEM structures in response to auditory click stimuli. These are found to be abnormal in many patients with CEREBELLOPONTINE ANGLE lesions, MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, or other DEMYELINATING DISEASES.Audiometry: The testing of the acuity of the sense of hearing to determine the thresholds of the lowest intensity levels at which an individual can hear a set of tones. The frequencies between 125 and 8000 Hz are used to test air conduction thresholds and the frequencies between 250 and 4000 Hz are used to test bone conduction thresholds.Evoked Potentials, Auditory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by ACOUSTIC STIMULATION or stimulation of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS.Loudness Perception: The perceived attribute of a sound which corresponds to the physical attribute of intensity.Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Auditory Cortex: The region of the cerebral cortex that receives the auditory radiation from the MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY.Audiometry, Pure-Tone: Measurement of hearing based on the use of pure tones of various frequencies and intensities as auditory stimuli.Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous: Self-generated faint acoustic signals from the inner ear (COCHLEA) without external stimulation. These faint signals can be recorded in the EAR CANAL and are indications of active OUTER AUDITORY HAIR CELLS. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions are found in all classes of land vertebrates.Pitch Perception: A dimension of auditory sensation varying with cycles per second of the sound stimulus.Speech Reception Threshold Test: A test to determine the lowest sound intensity level at which fifty percent or more of the spondaic test words (words of two syllables having equal stress) are repeated correctly.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Hearing Loss, Sensorineural: Hearing loss resulting from damage to the COCHLEA and the sensorineural elements which lie internally beyond the oval and round windows. These elements include the AUDITORY NERVE and its connections in the BRAINSTEM.Drug Implants: Small containers or pellets of a solid drug implanted in the body to achieve sustained release of the drug.Speech Acoustics: The acoustic aspects of speech in terms of frequency, intensity, and time.Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Music: Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.Speech Production Measurement: Measurement of parameters of the speech product such as vocal tone, loudness, pitch, voice quality, articulation, resonance, phonation, phonetic structure and prosody.Phonetics: The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Inferior Colliculi: The posterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which contain centers for auditory function.Perceptual Masking: The interference of one perceptual stimulus with another causing a decrease or lessening in perceptual effectiveness.Scala Tympani: The lower chamber of the COCHLEA, extending from the round window to the helicotrema (the opening at the apex that connects the PERILYMPH-filled spaces of scala tympani and SCALA VESTIBULI).Spiral Ganglion: The sensory ganglion of the COCHLEAR NERVE. The cells of the spiral ganglion send fibers peripherally to the cochlear hair cells and centrally to the COCHLEAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM.Tympanic Membrane: An oval semitransparent membrane separating the external EAR CANAL from the tympanic cavity (EAR, MIDDLE). It contains three layers: the skin of the external ear canal; the core of radially and circularly arranged collagen fibers; and the MUCOSA of the middle ear.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Efferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a nerve center toward a peripheral site. Such impulses are conducted via efferent neurons (NEURONS, EFFERENT), such as MOTOR NEURONS, autonomic neurons, and hypophyseal neurons.Cochlear Nucleus: The brain stem nucleus that receives the central input from the cochlear nerve. The cochlear nucleus is located lateral and dorsolateral to the inferior cerebellar peduncles and is functionally divided into dorsal and ventral parts. It is tonotopically organized, performs the first stage of central auditory processing, and projects (directly or indirectly) to higher auditory areas including the superior olivary nuclei, the medial geniculi, the inferior colliculi, and the auditory cortex.Pitch Discrimination: The ability to differentiate tones.Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Olivary Nucleus: A part of the MEDULLA OBLONGATA situated in the olivary body. It is involved with motor control and is a major source of sensory input to the CEREBELLUM.Implants, Experimental: Artificial substitutes for body parts and materials inserted into organisms during experimental studies.Breast Implants: Implants used to reconstruct and/or cosmetically enhance the female breast. They have an outer shell or envelope of silicone elastomer and are filled with either saline or silicone gel. The outer shell may be either smooth or textured.Temporal Bone: Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).Hair Cells, Auditory: Sensory cells in the organ of Corti, characterized by their apical stereocilia (hair-like projections). The inner and outer hair cells, as defined by their proximity to the core of spongy bone (the modiolus), change morphologically along the COCHLEA. Towards the cochlear apex, the length of hair cell bodies and their apical STEREOCILIA increase, allowing differential responses to various frequencies of sound.Audiology: The study of hearing and hearing impairment.Child Language: The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.Hearing Tests: Part of an ear examination that measures the ability of sound to reach the brain.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Gerbillinae: A subfamily of the Muridae consisting of several genera including Gerbillus, Rhombomys, Tatera, Meriones, and Psammomys.Hair Cells, Auditory, Outer: Sensory cells of organ of Corti. In mammals, they are usually arranged in three or four rows, and away from the core of spongy bone (the modiolus), lateral to the INNER AUDITORY HAIR CELLS and other supporting structures. Their cell bodies and STEREOCILIA increase in length from the cochlear base toward the apex and laterally across the rows, allowing differential responses to various frequencies of sound.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Pattern Recognition, Physiological: The analysis of a critical number of sensory stimuli or facts (the pattern) by physiological processes such as vision (PATTERN RECOGNITION, VISUAL), touch, or hearing.Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Hearing Loss, Central: Hearing loss due to disease of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS (in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM) which originate in the COCHLEAR NUCLEI of the PONS and then ascend bilaterally to the MIDBRAIN, the THALAMUS, and then the AUDITORY CORTEX in the TEMPORAL LOBE. Bilateral lesions of the auditory pathways are usually required to cause central hearing loss. Cortical deafness refers to loss of hearing due to bilateral auditory cortex lesions. Unilateral BRAIN STEM lesions involving the cochlear nuclei may result in unilateral hearing loss.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Electric Stimulation Therapy: Application of electric current in treatment without the generation of perceptible heat. It includes electric stimulation of nerves or muscles, passage of current into the body, or use of interrupted current of low intensity to raise the threshold of the skin to pain.Lipreading: The process by which an observer comprehends speech by watching the movements of the speaker's lips without hearing the speaker's voice.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Language Arts: Skills in the use of language which lead to proficiency in written or spoken communication.Bionics: The study of systems, particularly electronic systems, which function after the manner of, in a manner characteristic of, or resembling living systems. Also, the science of applying biological techniques and principles to the design of electronic systems.Round Window, Ear: Fenestra of the cochlea, an opening in the basal wall between the MIDDLE EAR and the INNER EAR, leading to the cochlea. It is closed by a secondary tympanic membrane.Orbital Implants: Rounded objects made of coral, teflon, or alloplastic polymer and covered with sclera, and which are implanted in the orbit following enucleation. An artificial eye (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) is usually attached to the anterior of the orbital implant for cosmetic purposes.Voice: The sounds produced by humans by the passage of air through the LARYNX and over the VOCAL CORDS, and then modified by the resonance organs, the NASOPHARYNX, and the MOUTH.Communication Methods, Total: Utilization of all available receptive and expressive modes for the purpose of achieving communication with the hearing impaired, such as gestures, postures, facial expression, types of voice, formal speech and non-speech systems, and simultaneous communication.Dental Implants, Single-Tooth: Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.Deaf-Blind Disorders: The absence of both hearing and vision.Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Auditory Brain Stem Implants: Multi-channel hearing devices typically used for patients who have tumors on the COCHLEAR NERVE and are unable to benefit from COCHLEAR IMPLANTS after tumor surgery that severs the cochlear nerve. The device electrically stimulates the nerves of cochlea nucleus in the BRAIN STEM rather than the inner ear as in cochlear implants.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Stimulation, Chemical: The increase in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.Otologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the external, middle, or internal ear.Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Time Perception: The ability to estimate periods of time lapsed or duration of time.Education of Hearing Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.Biomedical Technology: The application of technology to the solution of medical problems.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Deep Brain Stimulation: Therapy for MOVEMENT DISORDERS, especially PARKINSON DISEASE, that applies electricity via stereotactic implantation of ELECTRODES in specific areas of the BRAIN such as the THALAMUS. The electrodes are attached to a neurostimulator placed subcutaneously.Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported: A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Absorbable Implants: Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Hearing Loss, Unilateral: Partial or complete hearing loss in one ear.Magnets: Objects that produce a magnetic field.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Hearing Disorders: Conditions that impair the transmission of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.Telemetry: Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Diagnostic Techniques, Otological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the ear or of hearing disorders or demonstration of hearing acuity or loss.Sign Language: A system of hand gestures used for communication by the deaf or by people speaking different languages.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A technique that involves the use of electrical coils on the head to generate a brief magnetic field which reaches the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is coupled with ELECTROMYOGRAPHY response detection to assess cortical excitability by the threshold required to induce MOTOR EVOKED POTENTIALS. This method is also used for BRAIN MAPPING, to study NEUROPHYSIOLOGY, and as a substitute for ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY for treating DEPRESSION. Induction of SEIZURES limits its clinical usage.Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Cochlear Diseases: Pathological processes of the snail-like structure (COCHLEA) of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) which can involve its nervous tissue, blood vessels, or fluid (ENDOLYMPH).Speech Articulation Tests: Tests of accuracy in pronouncing speech sounds, e.g., Iowa Pressure Articulation Test, Deep Test of Articulation, Templin-Darley Tests of Articulation, Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, Screening Speech Articulation Test, Arizona Articulation Proficiency Scale.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Electronics, Medical: The research and development of ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES for such medical applications as diagnosis, therapy, research, anesthesia control, cardiac control, and surgery. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Signal Detection, Psychological: Psychophysical technique that permits the estimation of the bias of the observer as well as detectability of the signal (i.e., stimulus) in any sensory modality. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)ReadingSocioenvironmental Therapy: Therapy whose primary emphasis is on the physical and social structuring of the environment to promote interpersonal relationships which will be influential in reducing behavioral disturbances of patients.Prosthesis Fitting: The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Signal-To-Noise Ratio: The comparison of the quantity of meaningful data to the irrelevant or incorrect data.Language Development Disorders: Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.Reflex, Acoustic: Intra-aural contraction of tensor tympani and stapedius in response to sound.Audiometry, Evoked Response: A form of electrophysiologic audiometry in which an analog computer is included in the circuit to average out ongoing or spontaneous brain wave activity. A characteristic pattern of response to a sound stimulus may then become evident. Evoked response audiometry is known also as electric response audiometry.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Voice Quality: That component of SPEECH which gives the primary distinction to a given speaker's VOICE when pitch and loudness are excluded. It involves both phonatory and resonatory characteristics. Some of the descriptions of voice quality are harshness, breathiness and nasality.Immediate Dental Implant Loading: Endosseous dental implantation where implants are fitted with an abutment or where an implant with a transmucosal coronal portion is used immediately (within 1 week) after the initial extraction. Conventionally, the implantation is performed in two stages with more than two months in between the stages.Phonation: The process of producing vocal sounds by means of VOCAL CORDS vibrating in an expiratory blast of air.Mainstreaming (Education): Most frequently refers to the integration of a physically or mentally disabled child into the regular class of normal peers and provision of the appropriately determined educational program.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Vestibular Aqueduct: A small bony canal linking the vestibule of the inner ear to the posterior part of the internal surface of the petrous TEMPORAL BONE. It transmits the endolymphatic duct and two small blood vessels.
Phonemic Restoration with Simulations of Cochlear Implants and Combined Electric-Acoustic Stimulation". Journal of the ... For people with cochlear implants, phonemic restoration is only achievable at resolutions higher than 8. Implants that are at 4 ... The study for this came upon when listeners with cochlear implants were not able to adequately understand speech and upon ... It is believed that humans and other vertebrates have evolved the ability to complete acoustic signals that are critical but ...
Those who received cochlear implant stimulation in early childhood (younger than 3.5 years) had normal P1 latencies. Children ... Teas, Donald C. (1962). "Cochlear Responses to Acoustic Transients: An Interpretation of Whole-Nerve Action Potentials". The ... The way a cochlear implant works is sound is received by the cochlear implant's microphone, which picks up input that needs to ... children receiving a cochlear implant before the age of four, and children receiving a cochlear implant after the age of seven ...
These include cochlear implants, middle ear implants, bone conduction hearing implants, electric acoustic stimulation hearing ... "Journey to Developing MED-EL's Cochlear Implant: Interview with Dr. Ingeborg and Professor Erwin Hochmair, Founders of MED-EL ... Henkel, Gretchen (1 April 2013). "History of the Cochlear Implant". ENT Today. The Triological Society. Retrieved 19 July 2016 ... Austrian scientists Ingeborg and Erwin Hochmair developed the first passive single-channel cochlear implant. The implantation ...
There have been about 80.000 children implanted worldwide. The concept of combining simultaneous electric-acoustic stimulation ... For receiving sound) Cochlear implants (CIs), auditory brain stem implants (ABIs), and auditory midbrain implants (AMIs) are ... Proceedings of the Ieee 96:1076-84 J. K. Niparko and B. W. Wilson, "History of cochlear implants," in Cochlear Implants: ... In 1972, the first portable cochlear implant system in an adult was implanted at the House Ear Clinic. The U.S. Food and Drug ...
... an American organization in analytical chemistry Electric acoustic stimulation, hearing aid and a cochlear implant in the same ...
... (EAS) is the use of a hearing aid and a cochlear implant together in the same ear. The hearing ... Cochlear implant Hearing aid Brain implant ENT Dept. of the Universitätsklinik Frankfurt V. Ilberg C., Kiefer J., Tillein J., ... Electric stimulation of the auditory system via cochlear implant is a commonly used technique for individuals with a severe to ... and cochlear implant stimulation (focusing on high-frequency hearing). The hearing aid is integrated in the ear hook and the ...
... such as the cochlear implant. Neural stimulation To activate or energize a nerve through an external source. Neurofibromatosis ... Also see acoustic neurinoma. Neurogenic communication disorder Inability to exchange information with others because of hearing ... This type of implant helps individuals who cannot benefit from a cochlear implant because the auditory nerves are not working. ... Cochlear implant Medical device that bypasses damaged structures in the inner ear and directly stimulates the auditory nerve, ...
The Institute's three core research themes are bionic hearing through cochlear implants, bionic vision through stimulation of ... Institute Staff are recruited from disciplines including neuroscience, psychophysics, medicine, electrical and acoustic ... and improving cochlear implants through novel stimulation strategies, Understanding the hearing brain - opening windows on the ... and ongoing evaluation of a novel stimulation method to improve speech perception in five cochlear implant patients. The Bionic ...
Electric Acoustic Stimulation in Children W: Van de Heyning P, Kleine Punte A (eds): Cochlear Implants and Hearing Preservation ... July 12 the world's first cochlear implant surgery in an adult patient with partial deafness. 2003 - Poland's first cochlear ... 1992 - Implementation of deafness treatment program in Poland using cochlear implants. 1998 - Implementation of deafness and ... International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology 71(9):1407-13 (2007) Skarzynski H, Lorens A. Cochlear Implants and ...
Auditory brainstem implant Bone-anchored hearing aid Bone conduction Brain implant Ear trumpet Electric Acoustic Stimulation ... Cochlear Implants at Curlie (based on DMOZ) What is it like to live with a cochlear implant? A short documentary video clip ... Cochlear implants are only approved for people who are deaf in both ears; as of 2014 a cochlear implant had been used ... NAD Cochlear Implant Committee. "Cochlear Implants". Archived from the original on 2007-02-20. Ringo, Allegra (August 9, 2013 ...
Cochlear implants improve outcomes in people with hearing loss in either one or both ears. They work by artificial stimulation ... Because of the cumulative impact of age and exposure to noise and other acoustic insults, 'typical' hearing may not be ... NAD Cochlear Implant Committee. "NAD Position Statement on Cochlear Implants (2000)". Cochlear Implants %7c National ... Middle ear implants or bone conduction implants can help with conductive hearing loss. People with cochlear implants are at a ...
The acoustic information conveyed by an implant is usually sufficient for implant users to properly recognize speech of people ... For cochlear implant users, it is more difficult to understand unknown speakers and sounds. The perceptual abilities of ... When a patient has this procedure done, they are most likely going to receive a deep brain stimulation. So it will keep the ... Cochlear implantation restores access to the acoustic signal in individuals with sensorineural hearing loss. ...
The auditory brainstem implant uses technology similar to that of the cochlear implant, but instead of electrical stimulation ... "Cochlear and Auditory Brainstem Implants in the Management of Acoustic Neuroma and Bilateral Acoustic Neurofibromatosis" (PDF ... A 16 electrode array implant with the Clarion-1.2 cochlear implant (Advanced Bionics) have also been developed. Brain implant " ... Cochlear Limited) speech processor. A 12 electrode array implant with a speech processor based on the C40+ cochlear implant ( ...
Cochlear or auditory brainstem implantation could also be treatment options. Electrical stimulation of the peripheral auditory ... A case published in 2001 describes the patient as 20-year-old man referred for cochlear implants because of bilateral deafness ... nature whereas cortical deafness relies on the anatomic and functional disconnection of the auditory cortex from acoustic ... Therefore, cochlear implantation was not performed. Published in 1994, this patient was monitored over the course of almost 20 ...
Brånemark sought an acoustic way to evaluate osseointegration. A patient with implants in the jaws was fitted with a bone ... Cochlear Implants International. 10 Suppl 1: 43-7. doi:10.1179/cim.2009.10.Supplement-1.43. PMID 19195004.. ... vibrator on one of his implants. When tested, the patient experienced very loud sound even at low stimulation levels, ... A sound processor sits on this abutment and transmits sound vibrations to the titanium implant. The implant vibrates the skull ...
Profound or total hearing loss may be amenable to management by cochlear implants, which stimulate cochlear nerve endings ... Other tests, such as oto-acoustic emissions, acoustic stapedial reflexes, speech audiometry and evoked response audiometry are ... in response to the electrical stimulations provided by the efferent nerve supply, they can alter in length, shape and stiffness ... A cochlear implant is surgical implantation of a battery powered electronic medical device in the inner ear. Unlike hearing ...
The MRI environment may cause harm in patients with MR-Unsafe devices such as cochlear implants, aneurysm clips, and many ... The rapid switching on and off of the magnetic field gradients is capable of causing nerve stimulation. Volunteers report a ... "Investigation of acoustic noise on 15 MRI scanners from 0.2 T to 3 T". J Magn Reson Imaging. 13 (2): 288-93. doi:10.1002/1522- ... Medical devices and implants are categorized as MR Safe, MR Conditional or MR Unsafe: MR-Safe - The device or implant is ...
Cochlear implant[edit]. This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (April 2016) ... Hence, it is not clear to what extent the electrical neuron models hold for extra-cellular stimulation (see e.g.[1]). ... Bullock, T. H. (1997-01-01). "Comparative Physiology of Acoustic and Allied Central Analyzers". Acta Oto-Laryngologica. 117 ( ... For example, cochlear hair cells, retinal receptor cells, and retinal bipolar cells do not spike. Furthermore, many cells in ...
Merzenich and DT Blake (2002, 2005, 2006) went on to use cortical implants to study the evolution of plasticity in both the ... Consequently, in prelingually deaf children, early cochlear implantation, as a rule, allows the children to learn the mother ... and electrical-stimulation therapy. Jon Kaas, a professor at Vanderbilt University, has been able to show "how somatosensory ... language and acquire acoustic communication. In the phenomenon of phantom limb sensation, a person continues to feel pain or ...
... are excited by stimulation of one ear and inhibited by stimulation of the other ear, such that the response magnitude of the ... These resonances implant direction-specific patterns into the frequency responses of the ears, which can be evaluated by the ... For example, based on duplex theory, if two acoustic sources are symmetrically located on the right front and right back of the ... which synapse onto spiral ganglion fibers that travel through the cochlear nerve into the brain. In vertebrates, inter-aural ...
... such as in cochlear implants), relief of pain, or control of symptoms, such as tremor seen in movement disorders like ... Electrical stimulation devices include deep brain stimulation systems (DBS), colloquially referred to as "brain pacemakers", ... The therapies consist primarily of targeted electrical stimulation, or infusion of medications into the cerebrospinal fluid ... stimulation of neuronal plasticity through LTP, regulation of glutamate uptake by astrocytes and LTD, and consolidation of ...
The Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) is an acoustic hailing device developed by LRAD Corporation to send messages and warning ... Personnel Halting and Stimulation Response, or PHaSR, is a non-lethal hand-held weapon developed by the United States Air Force ... by vibrating the middle ear bones and shaking the cochlear fluid within the inner ear. At distances of 50-200 metres (160-660 ... The personnel halting and stimulation response rifle (PHASR) is a prototype non-lethal laser dazzler developed by the Air Force ...
Investigation of Balance Function Using Dynamic Posturography under Electrical-Acoustic Stimulation in Cochlear Implant ... In summary, it can be said that an activated cochlear implant affects the function of the vestibular system and may, to an ... The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of electrical-acoustic stimulation on vestibular function in CI ... was selected at random from among the cochlear implant recipients. Dynamic posturography (using the EquiTest) was performed ...
Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation With Hearing Preservation: Effect of Cochlear Implant Low-Frequency Cutoff on Speech ... The aided acoustic bandwidth was fixed and the low-frequency cutoff for the cochlear implant (CI) was varied systematically. ... Three primary findings were that (1) there was statistically significant benefit of preserved acoustic hearing in the implanted ... and bilateral-aided electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS; CI + bilateral hearing aid). Low-frequency cutoffs both below and ...
Acoustic neural stimulation *Cochlear implants *Antidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs *Other medications ...
Loudness balance between acoustic and electric stimulation by a patient with a multichannel cochlear implant. Ear and hearing. ... Loudness balance between acoustic and electric stimulation by a patient with a multichannel cochlear implant. / Dorman, Michael ... Loudness balance between acoustic and electric stimulation by a patient with a multichannel cochlear implant. ... title = "Loudness balance between acoustic and electric stimulation by a patient with a multichannel cochlear implant", ...
Acoustic hearing in combination with electric stimulation provided by a cochlear implant in postlingually hearing impaired ...
Acoustic neural stimulation. *Cochlear implants. *Osteopathy. *Physical therapy. *Chiropractic. *Surgery (neurectomy or ... Acoustic neuroma: This is a rare subjective cause of tinnitus, and includes a certain type of brain tumor known as an acoustic ... If severe hearing loss accompanies tinnitus, cochlear implants may be used. Like a hearing aid, these devices can help patients ... For people whose tinnitus is very loud or persistent, a new technique called acoustic neural stimulation helps change the ...
Utility of bilateral acoustic hearing in combination with electrical stimulation provided by the cochlear implant. ... Clinical outcomes for adult cochlear implant recipients experiencing loss of usable acoustic hearing in the implanted ear. ... Factors Predicting Postoperative Unilateral and Bilateral Speech Recognition in Adult Cochlear Implant Recipients with Acoustic ... Cochlear Implants Int. 2015 Jan;16 Suppl 1:S12-5. doi: 10.1179/1467010014Z.000000000225. Review. No abstract available. ...
Cochlear implants: Bimodal Fitting is a combination of two different amplifications (electrical and acoustic stimulation) in ... Cochlear Implant : Bimodal Fitting (Cochlear Implant and Hearing Aid Usage). Cochlear implant technology is growing rapidly in ... Cochlear Implant. Electrical stimulation. Source: http://www.the-scientist.com/Sept2015/. Hearing Aid. Acoustic stimulation. ... Home , Kids , Children with Special Needs , Cochlear Implant : Bimodal Fitting (Cochlear Implant and Hearing Aid Usage) ...
... type of cochlear implant is often referred to as a hybrid cochlear implant or as combined electric and acoustic stimulation ( ... Adult implant candidates. Adult cochlear implant candidacy criteria vary not only amongst implant manufacturers but also with ... Since the three cochlear implant manufacturers generally work independently, the labeled indications for cochlear implant ... Given the tremendous communicative benefit afforded by cochlear implants, and the outline of current cochlear implant criteria ...
... the worlds most innovative cochlear implant company. Helping children and adults with hearing loss hearlife again ... Electric Acoustic Stimulation (EAS) EAS combines a cochlear implant with hearing aid technology. This solution is for ... Cochlear Implants A cochlear implant converts sound into information that the brain can understand. This solution is for ... Electric Acoustic Stimulation. Learn why Electro Acoustic Stimulation is ideal for individuals with partial hearing loss. ...
... middle ear implant or combined electric acoustic stimulation from the innovative cochlear implant company ... Information for individuals with hearing loss considering a cochlear implant, ... Cochlear Implants. Combined Electric Acoustic Stimulation. Middle Ear Implants. Bone Conduction Implants. ... Cochlear Implants. Combined Electric Acoustic Stimulation. Middle Ear Implants. Bone Conduction Implants. ...
Liberman MC, Mulroy MJ (1982) Acute and chronic effects of acoustic trauma: cochlear pathology and auditory nerve ... Cochlear implants and electrical stimulation. The experimental design was set to begin "early" stimulation at 3 months of age ( ... Each cat received just over 2 months of stimulation via its cochlear implant. Total stimulation time varied from 330 to 958 h ... Waltzman SB (2006) Speech processing in children with cochlear implants. In: Waltzman SB, Roland JT Jr (eds) Cochlear implants ...
Intraoperative round window recordings to acoustic stimuli from cochlear implant patients. Otol Neurotol, 33(9):1507-15. ... Influence on functional outcomes in electric-acoustic stimulation of the auditory system. Otol Neurotol, 35(4):613-8. ... Comparison of two cochlear implant coding strategies on speech perception. Cochlear Implants International, 17(6):263-270. ... Director, Cochlear Implant Clinical Research Specialty:. Cochlear implantation, hearing preservation, middle ear implantation, ...
Delivery of acoustic-electric stimulation will be provided by the Nucleus Hybrid L24 cochlear implant system. ... Implantation with the Nucleus Hybrid L24 Cochlear Implant. Device: Nucleus Hybrid L24 Implantation with Nucleus Hybrid L24 ... Evaluation of the Nucleus Hybrid™ L24 Cochlear Implant System. This study has been completed. ... Hybrid L24 cochlear implant subjects.. The CNC Words test consists of 10 recorded lists of 50 monosyllabic words in CD format. ...
... the subjects cochlear implant was being stimulated in the middle region (electrode 6), with a slow stimulation pulse rate (200 ... How one subject receiving acoustic stimulation (top graph) and one subject receiving electrical stimulation (bottom graph) ... In the acoustic stimulation condition (top graph in Figure 2), the subject was listening to a 6000-Hz carrier frequency with 40 ... For acoustic stimulation, subjects were asked to listen to 17 different sounds. The sounds varied by frequency and included ...
... improve speech understanding and a feeling of balance hearing between both ears for patients with unilateral cochlear implants. ... Using a hearing aid and cochlear implant together can help ... The benefits of combining acoustic and electric stimulation for ... can be improved when both a cochlear implant and hearing aid are used together compared to the use of a cochlear implant or ... the use of a hearing aid will provide continued stimulation to an ear that may eventually require a cochlear implant. If you ...
... boards are interfaced between the SIMULINK blocks and the CI stimulation system, such that the output can be controlled ... Cochlear implants (CIs) require efficient speech processing to maximize information transmission to the brain, especially in ... On the Design and Evaluation of the PDA-based Research Platform for Electric and Acoustic Stimulation. Proceedings of the ... Loizou, P.C. Speech Processing in Vocoder-centric Cochlear Implants. In Cochlear and Brainstem Implants; Meller, A., Ed.; ...
Cochlear implant spectral resolution is limited by current spread from each stimulation electrode. Here the authors compare ... electric and acoustic stimulation in gerbils and demonstrate improved spectral resolution of optogenetic over conventional ... Near physiological spectral selectivity of cochlear optogenetics ...
Chapter 9. Hearing Preservation Cochlear Implantation and Electro-Acoustic Stimulation. Sandra Prentiss, Athanasia Warnecke, ... Chapter 8. Surgical Technique for Cochlear Implants in Adults. James G. Naples, Jason Brant, D. C. Bigelow, and Michael J. ... Cochlear Implants and Other Implantable Hearing Devices, Second Edition remains a fundamental text for hearing professionals. ... Cochlear implants and other implantable hearing mechanisms have become increasingly prevalent solutions to modern-day hearing ...
Development of a loudness normalisation strategy for combined cochlear implant and acoustic stimulation. ... Psychophysics, fitting, and signal processing for combined hearing aid and cochlear implant stimulation. ... Real-time loudness normalisation with combined cochlear implant and hearing aid stimulation. ... a loudness normalisation strategy for combined cochlear implant and hearing aid stimulation. ...
Mika Sato, Peter Baumhoff, Jochen Tillein, Andrej Kral, Physiological Mechanisms in Combined Electric-Acoustic Stimulation, ... Delayed changes in auditory status in cochlear implant users with preserved acoustic hearing, Hearing Research, 2017, 350, 45. ... and Cochlear Corporation for developing a cochlear implant to our specifications, providing initial devices at no cost, and ... Meredith T. Caldwell, Nicole T. Jiam, Charles J. Limb, Assessment and improvement of sound quality in cochlear implant users, ...
The electrical stimulation is accomplished with an implanted cochlear implant stimulator connected to an electrode inserted ... and that no synergetic effects between acoustic and electric stimulation is available. Electro-acoustic synergetic effects may ... Cochlear implant electrode and method of making same. US7367992 *. Mar 11, 2002. May 6, 2008. Cochlear Limited. Curved cochlear ... The inclusion of a fluid delivery function with a cochlear implant is therefore a valuable aspect of cochlear implant design. ...
Electro-acoustic stimulation systems that perform predetermined actions in accordance with evoked responses ... Low power inverted alterphasic stimulation in a cochlear implant WO2008154706A1 (en) 2007-06-20. 2008-12-24. Cochlear Limited. ... Cochlear implantation: current and future device options. US8024046B2 (en) 2011-09-20. Systems for fitting a cochlear implant ... Low pulse rate cochlear implant stimulation in conjunction with a separate representation of fundamental frequencies and voiced ...
Cochlear implant prostheses are designed to create hearing sensation by direct electrical stimulation of auditory neurons ( ... The purpose of the device is to improve speech recognition of cochlear implant users by representing acoustic (sound) ... What Are Some Questions to Ask in Choosing Cochlear Implants?. * Where can I find out more about cochlear implants? * What type ... What Are the Limitations of Cochlear Implants?. Little is currently known about the long-term effect of the cochlear implant. ...
... various treatments such as cochlear implants, electric acoustic stimulation and sound therapy; how light affects tinnitus, as ... Modified cochlear implant to treat balance disorder. generic viagra online You most definitely can buy Sildenafil Over The ... the perception of sound without any acoustic stimulus), a disorder that affects 10-14 percent of Americans and is especially ...
  • DURHAM, N.C.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--May 17, 2018--MED-EL USA announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the RONDO 2 cochlear implant (CI) audio processor featuring revolutionary wireless charging. (apnews.com)
  • PlusRONDO is only available to patients implanted in the USA with patient kit order forms and corresponding purchase orders received on or after March 7, 2018. (apnews.com)
  • In modern cochlear implant (CI) processors, the temporal information in speech or environmental sounds is delivered through modulated electric pulse trains. (jneurosci.org)
  • In 2013, Ingeborg Hochmair received the prestigious Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award in New York for her part in developing the modern cochlear implant. (wikipedia.org)
  • It very nicely fills a gap that current cochlear implant resources, which primarily focus on speech processing, anatomical, and behavioral outcome information, have not typically provided. (pluralpublishing.com)
  • OHC stimulation induces two different motile responses: i) electromotility, a.k.a fast motility, changes in length in the microsecond range derived from electrically-driven conformational changes in motor proteins densely packed in OHC plasma membrane, and ii) slow motility, shape changes in the millisecond to seconds range involving cytoskeletal reorganization 2, 3 . (jove.com)