Cochlear Duct: A spiral tube that is firmly suspended in the bony shell-shaped part of the cochlea. This ENDOLYMPH-filled cochlear duct begins at the vestibule and makes 2.5 turns around a core of spongy bone (the modiolus) thus dividing the PERILYMPH-filled spiral canal into two channels, the SCALA VESTIBULI and the SCALA TYMPANI.Ear, Inner: The essential part of the hearing organ consists of two labyrinthine compartments: the bony labyrinthine and the membranous labyrinth. The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (COCHLEA; VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH; and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS) in the TEMPORAL BONE. Within the bony labyrinth lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (COCHLEAR DUCT; SACCULE AND UTRICLE; and SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS) forming a continuous space enclosed by EPITHELIUM and connective tissue. These spaces are filled with LABYRINTHINE FLUIDS of various compositions.Organ of Corti: The spiral EPITHELIUM containing sensory AUDITORY HAIR CELLS and supporting cells in the cochlea. Organ of Corti, situated on the BASILAR MEMBRANE and overlaid by a gelatinous TECTORIAL MEMBRANE, converts sound-induced mechanical waves to neural impulses to the brain.Cochlea: The part of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is concerned with hearing. It forms the anterior part of the labyrinth, as a snail-like structure that is situated almost horizontally anterior to the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH.Stria Vascularis: A layer of stratified EPITHELIUM forming the endolymphatic border of the cochlear duct at the lateral wall of the cochlea. Stria vascularis contains primarily three cell types (marginal, intermediate, and basal), and capillaries. The marginal cells directly facing the ENDOLYMPH are important in producing ion gradients and endochoclear potential.Endolymphatic Duct: The part of the membranous labyrinth that traverses the bony vestibular aqueduct and emerges through the bone of posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) where it expands into a blind pouch called the endolymphatic sac.Hair Cells, Auditory: Sensory cells in the organ of Corti, characterized by their apical stereocilia (hair-like projections). The inner and outer hair cells, as defined by their proximity to the core of spongy bone (the modiolus), change morphologically along the COCHLEA. Towards the cochlear apex, the length of hair cell bodies and their apical STEREOCILIA increase, allowing differential responses to various frequencies of sound.Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.Labyrinth Diseases: Pathological processes of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) which contains the essential apparatus of hearing (COCHLEA) and balance (SEMICIRCULAR CANALS).Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Semicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Bile Ducts: The channels that collect and transport the bile secretion from the BILE CANALICULI, the smallest branch of the BILIARY TRACT in the LIVER, through the bile ductules, the bile ducts out the liver, and to the GALLBLADDER for storage.Pancreatic Ducts: Ducts that collect PANCREATIC JUICE from the PANCREAS and supply it to the DUODENUM.Placenta: A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).Meniere Disease: A disease of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is characterized by fluctuating SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS; TINNITUS; episodic VERTIGO; and aural fullness. It is the most common form of endolymphatic hydrops.Tensor Tympani: A short muscle that arises from the pharyngotympanic tube (EUSTACHIAN TUBE) and inserts into the handle of the MALLEUS. This muscle pulls the handle medially thus controlling the tension and movement of TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Stapedius: A tiny muscle that arises from the posterior wall of the TYMPANIC CAVITY of MIDDLE EAR with its tendon inserted onto the neck of the STAPES. Stapedius pulls the stapes posteriorly and controls its movement.Ear, Middle: The space and structures directly internal to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE and external to the inner ear (LABYRINTH). Its major components include the AUDITORY OSSICLES and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE that connects the cavity of middle ear (tympanic cavity) to the upper part of the throat.Reflex, Acoustic: Intra-aural contraction of tensor tympani and stapedius in response to sound.Cochlear Nerve: The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.Botulinum Toxins, Type A: A serotype of botulinum toxins that has specificity for cleavage of SYNAPTOSOMAL-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 25.Labyrinthitis: Inflammation of the inner ear (LABYRINTH).Embryology: The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Ear: The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Dictionaries, MedicalPeptidoglycanDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Diaminopimelic AcidDictionaries, ChemicalEscherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Vertigo: An illusion of movement, either of the external world revolving around the individual or of the individual revolving in space. Vertigo may be associated with disorders of the inner ear (EAR, INNER); VESTIBULAR NERVE; BRAINSTEM; or CEREBRAL CORTEX. Lesions in the TEMPORAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE may be associated with FOCAL SEIZURES that may feature vertigo as an ictal manifestation. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp300-1)Nystagmus, Pathologic: Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)Nystagmus, Physiologic: Involuntary rhythmical movements of the eyes in the normal person. These can be naturally occurring as in end-position (end-point, end-stage, or deviational) nystagmus or induced by the optokinetic drum (NYSTAGMUS, OPTOKINETIC), caloric test, or a rotating chair.Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Vestibular Function Tests: A number of tests used to determine if the brain or balance portion of the inner ear are causing dizziness.Taste Buds: Small sensory organs which contain gustatory receptor cells, basal cells, and supporting cells. Taste buds in humans are found in the epithelia of the tongue, palate, and pharynx. They are innervated by the CHORDA TYMPANI NERVE (a branch of the facial nerve) and the GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NERVE.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Sensory Receptor Cells: Specialized afferent neurons capable of transducing sensory stimuli into NERVE IMPULSES to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Sometimes sensory receptors for external stimuli are called exteroceptors; for internal stimuli are called interoceptors and proprioceptors.Receptors, CCR: Chemokine receptors that are specific for CC CHEMOKINES.Chemokine CCL19: A CC-type chemokine with specificity for CCR7 RECEPTORS. It has activity towards T LYMPHOCYTES and B LYMPHOCYTES.Trypanosoma brucei brucei: A hemoflagellate subspecies of parasitic protozoa that causes nagana in domestic and game animals in Africa. It apparently does not infect humans. It is transmitted by bites of tsetse flies (Glossina).Semaphorin-3A: The prototypical and most well-studied member of the semaphorin family. Semaphorin-3A is an axon-repulsive guidance cue for migrating neurons in the developing nervous system. It has so far been found only in vertebrates, and binds to NEUROPILIN-1/plexin complex receptors on growth cones. Like other class 3 semaphorins, it is a secreted protein.Protozoan Proteins: Proteins found in any species of protozoan.PhrasesSubcellular Fractions: Components of a cell produced by various separation techniques which, though they disrupt the delicate anatomy of a cell, preserve the structure and physiology of its functioning constituents for biochemical and ultrastructural analysis. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p163)
The cochlea consists of three fluid-filled spaces: the vestibular duct, the cochlear duct, and the tympanic duct. Hair cells ... The bony labyrinth refers to the bony compartment which contains the membranous labyrinth, contained within the temporal bone. ... A central area known as the vestibule contains two small fluid-filled recesses, the utricle and saccule. These connect to the ... Part of the saccule will eventually give rise and connect to the cochlear duct. This duct appears approximately during the ...
The cochlea and vestibule, viewed from above. Transverse section of the cochlear duct of a fetal cat. Interior of right osseous ... labyrinth. Diagrammatic longitudinal section of the cochlea. Tympanic duct Slide from University of Kansas Diagram at Indiana ... It is separated from the cochlear duct by Reissner's membrane and extends from the vestibule of the ear to the helicotrema ... The vestibular duct or scala vestibuli is a perilymph-filled cavity inside the cochlea of the inner ear that conducts sound ...
Transverse section of the cochlear duct of a fetal cat. The cochlea and vestibule, viewed from above. Diagrammatic longitudinal ... Interior of right osseous labyrinth. (Scala tympani labeled at right, inside cochlea. ... where it continues as vestibular duct. The purpose of the perilymph-filled tympanic duct and vestibular duct is to transduce ... It is separated from the cochlear duct by the basilar membrane, and it extends from the round window to the helicotrema, ...
... cochlear aqueduct MeSH A09.246.631.246.292 --- cochlear duct MeSH A09.246.631.246.292.876 --- stria vascularis MeSH A09.246. ... vestibule of the ear MeSH A09.246.631.909.551 --- oval window MeSH A09.246.631.909.625 --- saccule and utricle MeSH A09.246. ... labyrinth supporting cells MeSH A09.246.631.246.814 --- round window MeSH A09.246.631.246.848 --- scala tympani MeSH A09.246. ... nasolacrimal duct MeSH A09.371.509.155 --- lens capsule, crystalline MeSH A09.371.509.225 --- lens cortex, crystalline MeSH ...
... end of the otic vesicle gradually elongates as a tube and coils upon itself forming the beginnings of the cochlear duct. The ... It is part of the neural ectoderm, which will develop into the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear. This labyrinth is a ... The central part of the otic vesicle represents the membranous vestibule, and is subdivided by a constriction into a smaller ... Lateral views of membranous labyrinth and acoustic complex. X 25 dia. Median views of membranous labyrinth and acoustic complex ...
The cochlea and vestibule, viewed from above. Cross-section of the cochlea. Bony labyrinth Membranous labyrinth Cochlear ... The cochlear duct is almost as complex on its own as the ear itself. The cochlear duct is bounded on three sides by the basilar ... The perilymph in the vestibular duct and the endolymph in the cochlear duct act mechanically as a single duct, being kept apart ... which lies inferior to the cochlear duct and terminates at the round window the cochlear duct or scala media (containing ...
... has a long cochlear duct, with the same height as the labyrinth, an adaptation to hearing low-frequency sounds. ... The oval window and the ear vestibule form a funnel-shaped recess penetrating deep into the ear zone and having a wide exit on ...
The basilar membrane separates the cochlear duct from the scala tympani, a cavity within the cochlear labyrinth. The lateral ... The three parts of the bony labyrinth are the vestibule of the ear, the semicircular canals, and the cochlea. In the middle ear ... The labyrinth can be divided by layer or by region. The bony labyrinth, or osseous labyrinth, is the network of passages with ... The semicircular ducts are responsible for detecting rotational movement. Ear labyrinth Inner ear Temporal bone Internal ear ...
membranous labyrinth,. bony labyrinth). Auditory system/. Cochlear labyrinth. General cochlea. *Vestibular duct ... Cochlear nuclear complex[edit]. In mammals, the axons from each cochlear nerve terminate in the cochlear nuclear complex that ... inner ear: Hair cells → Spiral ganglion → Cochlear nerve VIII →. *pons: Cochlear nucleus (Anterior, Dorsal) → Trapezoid body → ... the posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN). Each of the three cochlear nuclei are tonotopically organized. The axons from the ...
membranous labyrinth,. bony labyrinth). Auditory system/. Cochlear labyrinth. General cochlea. *Vestibular duct ...
membranous labyrinth,. bony labyrinth). Auditory system/. Cochlear labyrinth. General cochlea. *Vestibular duct ...
membranous labyrinth,. bony labyrinth). Auditory system/. Cochlear labyrinth. General cochlea. *Vestibular duct ...
membranous labyrinth,. bony labyrinth). Auditory system/. Cochlear labyrinth. General cochlea. *Vestibular duct ...
Vestibular labyrinth. Static/translations/vestibule/endolymphatic duct: Utricle (Macula) · Saccule (Macula, Endolymphatic sac) ... Cochlear duct /. scala media. Reissner's/vestibular membrane • Basilar membrane Endolymph • Stria vascularis • Spiral ligament ... membranous labyrinth,. bony labyrinth). Auditory system. Cochlear labyrinth. General cochlea. Scala vestibuli • Helicotrema • ...
... claustrum clava clavicle climbing fiber clinoid clitoris clivus cloaca clonus coccyx cochlea cochlear duct cochlear nerve ... labia majora labia minora labium labrum labyrinth lacrimal bone lacrimal canaliculus lacrimal fossa lacrimal gland lacrimal ... system vertigo vesicle vesiculae seminales vestibular folds vestibular ganglion vestibular membrane vestibular nuclei Vestibule ... Edinger-Westphal nucleus efferent ducts efferent nerve fiber efferent limb ejaculatory duct elbow electrical conduction system ...
... labyrinth Utricle Saccule Semicircular ducts Utriculosaccular duct Endolymphatic duct Cochlear labyrinth Cochlear duct Spiral ... Mons pubis Labium majus Pudendal cleft Labium minus Vestibule of vagina Bulb of vestibule Greater vestibular gland Clitoris ... Liver Common hepatic duct Gall bladder Cystic duct Bile duct Pancreas Pancreatic islets Nose Nasal cavity Nasal septum Spheno- ... Lymphatic trunks and ducts Thoracic duct Cisterna chyli Lymphatic system Primary lymphoid organs Bone marrow Thymus Secondary ...
... vestibule, superior semicircular canal, and medial wall of the tympanic cavity. A second (opisthotic) appears at the promontory ... it forms the floor of the tympanic cavity and vestibule, surrounds the carotid canal, invests the lateral and lower part of the ...
The ethmoidal air cells consist of numerous thin-walled cavities situated in the ethmoidal labyrinth and completed by the ...
The cochlea consists of three fluid-filled spaces: the vestibular duct, the cochlear duct, and the tympanic duct.[3] Hair cells ... The bony labyrinth refers to the bony compartment which contains the membranous labyrinth, contained within the temporal bone. ... A central area known as the vestibule contains two small fluid-filled recesses, the utricle and saccule. These connect to the ... Part of the saccule will eventually give rise and connect to the cochlear duct. This duct appears approximately during the ...
The cochlea and vestibule, viewed from above. Transverse section of the cochlear duct of a fetal cat. Interior of right osseous ... labyrinth. Diagrammatic longitudinal section of the cochlea. Tympanic duct Slide from University of Kansas Diagram at Indiana ... It is separated from the cochlear duct by Reissners membrane and extends from the vestibule of the ear to the helicotrema ... The vestibular duct or scala vestibuli is a perilymph-filled cavity inside the cochlea of the inner ear that conducts sound ...
Transverse section of the cochlear duct of a fetal cat. The cochlea and vestibule, viewed from above. Diagrammatic longitudinal ... Interior of right osseous labyrinth. (Scala tympani labeled at right, inside cochlea. ... where it continues as vestibular duct. The purpose of the perilymph-filled tympanic duct and vestibular duct is to transduce ... It is separated from the cochlear duct by the basilar membrane, and it extends from the round window to the helicotrema, ...
... protects the Membranous Labyrinth. Endolymph - fluid filling the Membranous Labyrinth that is contained in Cochlear Duct. ... Membranous Labyrinths in areas called the. Scala Vestibule and Scala Tympani. Hair Cells - receptors of the Inner Ear that ... sits below Cochlear Duct to seperate it from the Scala Tympani. Tectorial Membrane - attached to Inner wall of Cochlear Duct. ... Cochlea - part of Bony Labyrinth that contains the Cochlear Duct which houses the receptors responsible for hearing. 1. Sound ...
... labyrinth or membranous labyrinth 1) Vestibule (houses the utricle and saccule). 2) Cochlear duct. 3) Cochlea. 4) Endolymphatic ... The ___ labyrinth has ducts, tubes, and sacs, filled with endolymph and suspended within the osseous labyrinth ... The inner ear is comprised of a complex series of endolymph filled ducts, tubes, and sacs called the ___ labyrinth, which is ... The __ duct pierces the buccinator muscle and the orifice of the parotid duct drains into the mouth, opposite the crown of the ...
The membranous labyrinth can be divided into the vestibular apparatus and the cochlear duct. In the walls of the membranous ... The osseous labyrinth has three regions, the vestibule, the semicircular canals and the cochlea. ... A particular form of inner ear tinnitus is cochlear synaptic (cochlear nerve dysfunction) tinnitus which is due to functional ... The neurotransmitter at the afferent cochlear synapse is glutamate. The majority of patients with cochlear synaptic tinnitus ...
... lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (SACCULE AND UTRICLE; COCHLEAR DUCT) forming a continuous ... The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (SEMICIRCULAR CANAL; VESTIBULE; and COCHLEA) in the ... The bony structure of the inner ear that houses the membranous labyrinth (i.e., the cochlea, vestibule, semicircular canals, ... vestibule, and cochlea. (from American Heritage Dictionary online) (NCI) * internal ear; the essential part of the organ of ...
... the anatomy of the inner ear consists of the bony labyrinth, a system of passages making up the following 2 main functional ... The basilar membrane separates the cochlear duct from the scala tympani, a cavity within the cochlear labyrinth. The lateral ... The bony labyrinth can be subdivided into the vestibule, 3 semicircular canals, and the cochlea. The vestibule contains a pair ... The cochlea is a bony, spiral-shaped chamber that contains the cochlear duct of the membranous labyrinth. The sense of hearing ...
... especially the smaller of the two divisions of the membranous labyrinth of the vestibule, which communicates with the cochlear ... connected with the cochlear duct by a very short tube, the ductus reuniens, and with the utriculus by the beginning of the ... 1. The smaller of the two membranous sacs in the vestibule of the labyrinth, lying in the spheric recess; it is connected with ... 1. The smaller of the two membranous sacs in the vestibule of the labyrinth, lying in the spheric recess; ...
Cochlear duct- a continuation of the membranous labyrinth into the cochlea; it is filled with endolymph -Perilymph carries ... Vestibule- middle part of bony labyrinth (contains receptors for static equilibrium) Cochlea- located anteriorly to vestibule ( ... in cochlear duct- pressure waves cause basilar membrane to vibrate -Causes hair cells in the spiral organ of Corti to move- ... vestibule- inner ear- info about balance/ cochlear- helps innervate ears so that we can hear (damage to cranial nerve 8-vertigo ...
Abnormalities of the labyrinth (cochlea, vestibule, SCCs, or endolymphatic duct and sac) were present in 15 patients (14.6%). ... the vestibules were enlarged, and in 2 cases, the vestibules were small. One patient demonstrated an enlarged vestibule with ... bony cochlear nerve canal (cochlear aperture). CISS. constructive interference in steady state. CNVIII. vestibulocochlear nerve ... The left cochlear nerve (arrowhead) is present but is noticeably smaller than the normal-appearing right cochlear nerve (arrow ...
The membranous labyrinth sits inside the bony labyrinth. It consists of the cochlear duct, semi-circular ducts, utricle and ... The bony labyrinth is comprised of cavities in the petrosal part of the temporal bone. It holds the cochlea, vestibule and the ... The inner ear consists of two parts - the bony labyrinth and the membranous labyrinth (Figure 1). ... Figure 1. Anatomy of the internal ear, including the components of the bony labyrinth, membranous labyrinth, and ...
The cochlear bone is extremely thin. Removal of the bony labyrinth from the membranous labyrinth requires a small sharp pick ... the membranous labyrinth is separated from the bony labyrinth by fluid-filled channels (i.e., perilymph). The vestibule houses ... Portions of the cochlear duct can be dissected free from the otic capsule, placed flat on microscope slides in a liquid medium ... the membranous labyrinth, that is housed within the bony labyrinth (otic capsule). The membranous labyrinth spirals around a ...
part of bony labyrinth. 17. Cochlea*Cochlear duct * portion of membranous labyrinth in cochlea ... swelling of membranous labyrinth that communicates with the vestibule * crista ampullaris * sensory organ of ampulla ...
saccule, three semicircular ducts, and a cochlear duct; structures com-. prising the bony labyrinth include the vestibule, ... The membranous labyrinth is filled with endolymph and is housed within the bony labyrinth; the membranous and bony labyrinths ... 2. Structures comprising the membranous labyrinth include the utricle,. ...
4. Movement of fluid in the cochlear duct causes bending of the hair cells imbedded within the spiral organ. ... 1. Membranous labyrinth develops from otic placode (ectoderm)→ otic pit → otic vesicle ... 1. Opens to vestibule of internal ear.. 2. Contacted by the stapes; transmits motion of stapes to fluid of internal ear. ... b.Vibration of stapes induces motion of the fluid within the cochlear duct. ...
... which is enclosed by the bony labyrinth, forms small sacs (saccule and utricle) and tubules (semicircular ducts and cochlear ... The bony labyrinth of the internal ear is comprised of the vestibule, semicircular canals and cochlea. The membranous labyrinth ...
... the semicircular ducts; two saclike structures, the saccule and utricle, located in the vestibule; and the cochlear duct, which ... Within the bony labyrinth is a membranous labyrinth, which is also divided into three parts: ... and the cochlear duct, which is filled with endolymph.. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.. ...
... or osseous labyrinth, otic capsule, latin: labyrinthus osseus) is a bony capsule that consists of a system of interconnected ... cavities and canals in the internal ear that enclose the membranous labyrinth. ... The vestibule is the central part of the bony labyrinth that encloses the membranous sacs - saccule and utricle. ... The semicircular canals of the bony labyrinth contain perilymphatic fluid and enclose the membranous semicircular ducts. ...
Internal ear: bony labyrinth, membranous labyrinth, vestibule, saccule, utricle,semicircular ducts; cochlea and cochlear duct, ...
... vestibule [bony labyrinth], utricle and saccule [membranous labyrinth], WebScopeula [hair cells, supporting cells, otolithic ... Inner ear, 40X (cochlea [scala vestibuli, vestibular membrane=Reissners membrane, cochlear duct, stria vascularis, basilar ... Sublingual gland, H&E, 40X (mucous acini, serous acini, striated ducts, intercalated ducts, interlobular ducts). WebScope ... Parotid gland, H&E, 40X (acini, centroacinar cells, fat cells, striated ducts, intercalated ducts, interlobular ducts). ...
... ducts; fit loosely in bony labyrinth Semicircular ducts, Utricle + Saccule, Cochlear ducts Contain endolymph (produced in ... Vestibule Utricle + Saccule Equilibrium; static equilib + linear equilib of head 3. Cochlear duct Hearing ... The Ear: Outer, Middle, Inner Ear = Hearing + Equilibrium Bony Labyrinth -cavity in petrous bone Semicircular canal, Vestibule ... Flow of Tears Lacrimal gland Excretory ducts to eye Blink across eye Lacrimal puncta Lacrimal canaliculi Lacrimal sac (in ...
... cover the cochlear duct. Furthermore, they now extend to the extreme tip of the duct and communicate with each other across its ... hugs closely against the parts of the membranous labyrinth on the one side and the tympanic wall of the cartilaginous vestibule ... the proximal end of the cochlear duct, and the ampulla of the jiosterior semicircular duct. The greater part of the periotic ... The scala tj^mpani, as can be seen in figure 29, extends downward on the basal side of the cochlear duct along its first two ...
However, the loss of Gfi1 seems to affect the vestibular and cochlear hair cells differently. In the vestibule, the hair cells ... They are innervated by the cochlear nerve. These hair cells are responsible for auditory sensation. The membranous labyrinth of ... and the endolymphatic duct and sac. The sensory neuroepithelia are innervated by the eighth cranial nerve which consists of two ... 3K), the cochlear neurons synapse with the base of the three outer hair cells forming a cup-like staining pattern at the base ...
Diagram of a membranous labyrinth of the internal ear lying within the bony labyrinth.The cochlear duct can be seen spiraling ... cochlear duct can be seen spiraling within the bony cochlea.The saccule and utricle are positioned within the vestibule, and ... Diagram of a membranous labyrinth of the internal ear lying within the bony labyrinth.The ... within the bony cochlea.The saccule and utricle are positioned within the vestibule, and the three semi-circular ducts are ...
The cochlea itself separates into halves to reveal cochlear, vestibular and tympanic ducts and the branching of the cochlear ... The exractable labyrinth is dissectible into three portions. Half of it, consisting of the semicircular canals and vestibule, ... The other half of the labyrinth, upon removal, shows the vestibular and cochlear nerves, which join to form the auditory nerve ...
  • The saccule is an almost globular-shaped sac that lies in the spherical recess on the medial wall of the vestibule. (medscape.com)
  • The medial aspect of each ampullated end of the SCC ducts has a transverse crest which houses a specialized sensory neuroepithelium which is sensitive to angular acceleration of the head. (drtbalu.in)
  • In the description of the development of the periotic reticulum we have seen how it begins as a small focus along the central border of the epithelial semicircular duct and spreads at the expense of the temporary precartilage, forming as it does so a crescentic-shaped area of reticulum inclosing the duct. (edu.au)
  • Within each semicircular canal is a semicircular duct. (britannica.com)
  • The axons from the high-frequency region project to the dorsal portion of the anteroventral cochlear nucleus and the uppermost dorsal portions of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus (DCN) has input from the LL and output to the contralateral LL via the ipsilateral and contralateral Dorsal Acoustic Stria. (statemaster.com)
  • mesonephric duct an embryonic duct of the mesonephros, which in the male becomes the epididymis, ductus deferens and its ampulla, seminal vesicles, and ejaculatory duct, and in the female is largely obliterated. (thefreedictionary.com)