Drive: A state of internal activity of an organism that is a necessary condition before a given stimulus will elicit a class of responses; e.g., a certain level of hunger (drive) must be present before food will elicit an eating response.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Mice, Inbred C57BLBase Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Animals, Genetically Modified: ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Sex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Respiratory Center: Part of the brain located in the MEDULLA OBLONGATA and PONS. It receives neural, chemical and hormonal signals, and controls the rate and depth of respiratory movements of the DIAPHRAGM and other respiratory muscles.Genes, Reporter: Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.Transgenes: Genes that are introduced into an organism using GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Periodicity: The tendency of a phenomenon to recur at regular intervals; in biological systems, the recurrence of certain activities (including hormonal, cellular, neural) may be annual, seasonal, monthly, daily, or more frequently (ultradian).Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Inhalation: The act of BREATHING in.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Biological Clocks: The physiological mechanisms that govern the rhythmic occurrence of certain biochemical, physiological, and behavioral phenomena.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Phrenic Nerve: The motor nerve of the diaphragm. The phrenic nerve fibers originate in the cervical spinal column (mostly C4) and travel through the cervical plexus to the diaphragm.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Hypoglossal Nerve: The 12th cranial nerve. The hypoglossal nerve originates in the hypoglossal nucleus of the medulla and supplies motor innervation to all of the muscles of the tongue except the palatoglossus (which is supplied by the vagus). This nerve also contains proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Respiratory Muscles: These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.Hypercapnia: A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Apnea: A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Feedback, Physiological: A mechanism of communication with a physiological system for homeostasis, adaptation, etc. Physiological feedback is mediated through extensive feedback mechanisms that use physiological cues as feedback loop signals to control other systems.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Interneurons: Most generally any NEURONS which are not motor or sensory. Interneurons may also refer to neurons whose AXONS remain within a particular brain region in contrast to projection neurons, which have axons projecting to other brain regions.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Molecular Motor Proteins: Proteins that are involved in or cause CELL MOVEMENT such as the rotary structures (flagellar motor) or the structures whose movement is directed along cytoskeletal filaments (MYOSIN; KINESIN; and DYNEIN motor families).Neural Inhibition: The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Synapses: Specialized junctions at which a neuron communicates with a target cell. At classical synapses, a neuron's presynaptic terminal releases a chemical transmitter stored in synaptic vesicles which diffuses across a narrow synaptic cleft and activates receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the target cell. The target may be a dendrite, cell body, or axon of another neuron, or a specialized region of a muscle or secretory cell. Neurons may also communicate via direct electrical coupling with ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES. Several other non-synaptic chemical or electric signal transmitting processes occur via extracellular mediated interactions.Nerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Synaptic Transmission: The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.Efferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a nerve center toward a peripheral site. Such impulses are conducted via efferent neurons (NEURONS, EFFERENT), such as MOTOR NEURONS, autonomic neurons, and hypophyseal neurons.Protein Transport: The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Enhancer Elements, Genetic: Cis-acting DNA sequences which can increase transcription of genes. Enhancers can usually function in either orientation and at various distances from a promoter.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Diaphragm: The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Kinesin: A microtubule-associated mechanical adenosine triphosphatase, that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to move organelles along microtubules toward the plus end of the microtubule. The protein is found in squid axoplasm, optic lobes, and in bovine brain. Bovine kinesin is a heterotetramer composed of two heavy (120 kDa) and two light (62 kDa) chains. EC 3.6.1.-.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Medulla Oblongata: The lower portion of the BRAIN STEM. It is inferior to the PONS and anterior to the CEREBELLUM. Medulla oblongata serves as a relay station between the brain and the spinal cord, and contains centers for regulating respiratory, vasomotor, cardiac, and reflex activities.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials: Depolarization of membrane potentials at the SYNAPTIC MEMBRANES of target neurons during neurotransmission. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials can singly or in summation reach the trigger threshold for ACTION POTENTIALS.Luminescent Proteins: Proteins which are involved in the phenomenon of light emission in living systems. Included are the "enzymatic" and "non-enzymatic" types of system with or without the presence of oxygen or co-factors.Myosin Type II: The subfamily of myosin proteins that are commonly found in muscle fibers. Myosin II is also involved a diverse array of cellular functions including cell division, transport within the GOLGI APPARATUS, and maintaining MICROVILLI structure.Cell Polarity: Orientation of intracellular structures especially with respect to the apical and basolateral domains of the plasma membrane. Polarized cells must direct proteins from the Golgi apparatus to the appropriate domain since tight junctions prevent proteins from diffusing between the two domains.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Sex Chromosomes: The homologous chromosomes that are dissimilar in the heterogametic sex. There are the X CHROMOSOME, the Y CHROMOSOME, and the W, Z chromosomes (in animals in which the female is the heterogametic sex (the silkworm moth Bombyx mori, for example)). In such cases the W chromosome is the female-determining and the male is ZZ. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Cell Shape: The quality of surface form or outline of CELLS.Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.Adenosine Triphosphatases: A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Patch-Clamp Techniques: An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.Mice, Inbred BALB CImmunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Afferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a peripheral part toward a nerve center.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Respiratory Physiological Processes: Biological actions and events that support the functions of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Nerve Tissue ProteinsMuscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Recruitment, Neurophysiological: The spread of response if stimulation is prolonged. (Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 8th ed.)Genetic Vectors: DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Dendritic Cells: Specialized cells of the hematopoietic system that have branch-like extensions. They are found throughout the lymphatic system, and in non-lymphoid tissues such as SKIN and the epithelia of the intestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts. They trap and process ANTIGENS, and present them to T-CELLS, thereby stimulating CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY. They are different from the non-hematopoietic FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS, which have a similar morphology and immune system function, but with respect to humoral immunity (ANTIBODY PRODUCTION).Microtubules: Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Glutamic Acid: A non-essential amino acid naturally occurring in the L-form. Glutamic acid is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Pseudopodia: A dynamic actin-rich extension of the surface of an animal cell used for locomotion or prehension of food.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Body Patterning: The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.Protein Multimerization: The assembly of the QUATERNARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE of multimeric proteins (MULTIPROTEIN COMPLEXES) from their composite PROTEIN SUBUNITS.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Zebrafish Proteins: Proteins obtained from the ZEBRAFISH. Many of the proteins in this species have been the subject of studies involving basic embryological development (EMBRYOLOGY).Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Tidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.HEK293 Cells: A cell line generated from human embryonic kidney cells that were transformed with human adenovirus type 5.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors: A family of DNA-binding transcription factors that contain a basic HELIX-LOOP-HELIX MOTIF.Pulmonary Ventilation: The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Cell Lineage: The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Transcriptional Activation: Processes that stimulate the GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of a gene or set of genes.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Coculture Techniques: A technique of culturing mixed cell types in vitro to allow their synergistic or antagonistic interactions, such as on CELL DIFFERENTIATION or APOPTOSIS. Coculture can be of different types of cells, tissues, or organs from normal or disease states.Actomyosin: A protein complex of actin and MYOSINS occurring in muscle. It is the essential contractile substance of muscle.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Decerebrate State: A condition characterized by abnormal posturing of the limbs that is associated with injury to the brainstem. This may occur as a clinical manifestation or induced experimentally in animals. The extensor reflexes are exaggerated leading to rigid extension of the limbs accompanied by hyperreflexia and opisthotonus. This condition is usually caused by lesions which occur in the region of the brainstem that lies between the red nuclei and the vestibular nuclei. In contrast, decorticate rigidity is characterized by flexion of the elbows and wrists with extension of the legs and feet. The causative lesion for this condition is located above the red nuclei and usually consists of diffuse cerebral damage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p358)Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Nucleic acid sequences involved in regulating the expression of genes.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate excitatory amino acid receptors, thereby blocking the actions of agonists.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Lac Operon: The genetic unit consisting of three structural genes, an operator and a regulatory gene. The regulatory gene controls the synthesis of the three structural genes: BETA-GALACTOSIDASE and beta-galactoside permease (involved with the metabolism of lactose), and beta-thiogalactoside acetyltransferase.Respiratory System: The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.
"L'Anse au Clair". Labrador Coastal Drive. L'anse au Clair L'Anse-au-Clair - Encyclopedia of Newfoundland and Labrador, vol. 3, ...
Coordinates: 28°51′12″S 153°36′06″E / 28.8533°S 153.6016°E / -28.8533; 153.6016 "Ballina Coastal Drive". Ballina Visitor and ...
"Coastal Guardians fleet now fully deployed". www.maritimejournal.com. Retrieved 25 June 2014. "£57m contract wins to drive ... "Coastal Guardians fleet now fully deployed". SSA. Retrieved 28 May 2014. "Briggs Marine". Offshore Technology. Retrieved 28 May ...
Stebbins, Jane (August 6, 2013). "Drive to recall commissioners gets ugly". Curry Coastal Pilot. Retrieved January 15, 2017. " ... "Sudden Oak Death battle continues". Curry Coastal Pilot. December 23, 2016. Retrieved January 15, 2017. Patel, Devan (April 22 ... Stebbins, Jane (July 2, 2013). "Plans to recall commissioners underway". Curry Coastal Pilot. Retrieved January 15, 2017. ...
"The Western Marmarica Coastal Survey, Libya; Hulin". Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections. Retrieved 2016-11-30. "Dr ... Hulin is director of the Western Marmarica Coastal Survey in Libya. She is editor of the Palestine Exploration Quarterly, the ... Hulin, Linda; Timby, Jane; Muftah, Ahmed M; Mutri, Giuseppina (2010), Western Marmarica Coastal Survey 2010: preliminary report ... "Dr Linda Hulin". Magdalen College Oxford. Retrieved 2016-11-30. "Fieldwork - School of Archaeology". University of Oxford. ...
"Dr. habil. Doris Abele - AWI". www.awi.de. Retrieved 2016-06-05. "Loss of diversity near melting coastal glaciers". www. ... "Loss of Diversity Near Melting Coastal Glaciers - AWI". www.awi.de. Retrieved 2016-06-05. "PRESS RELEASE Age and Antarctic ... From 2007-2009 she coordinated the IPY_ClicOPEN project of Climate Change Effects on Coastal Ecosystems at the Antarctic ... From 2011-13 she coordinated the IMCOAST project Impact of climate change on Antarctic Coastal Ecosystems. From 2013-2016 she ...
"Wild Atlantic Way: Self-Drive Coastal Donegal". Fáilte Ireland. Retrieved 22 Mar 2016. ...
Bezbaruah, MadanPrasad; Dr Krishna Gopal; Phal S. Girota (2003). Fairs and Festivals of India: Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka. Gyan ... She ruled "in conformity with the doctrine of succession Aliyasantana or Matriarchal, a tradition followed in coastal belt of ... Naravane, M. S (1998). The maritime and coastal forts of India. Mirjan. APH Publishing. p. 91. ISBN 81-7024-910-4. Retrieved ... "A Remote Sensing Approach for Establishing the Soil Physiographic Relationship in the Coastal Agro Eco system of North ...
Dr Thomas Turner, who was stranded on Flat Holm during a visit in 1815, passed the time by exploring the island. He noted that ... "Flat Holm Coastal and Anti-Aircraft Defences". Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales. Archived from ... In June 1815, a Dr Thomas Turner visited Flat Holm in a small boat and was stranded for a week due to high winds. He discovered ... Guy, Dr John (1984). Saving Flat Holm's Cholera Hospital. Exploring Local History. pp. 244-246. Matthews (editor), John Hobson ...
"International Coastal Engineering Award past winners". American Society of Civil Engineers. Retrieved 22 February 2016. "Dr. ... dr.ir. J.Th. Thijsse". Delfts Goud, leven en werken van achttien markante hoogleraren. Delft. John Z. Shi (May 2010). "Jurjen ... Battjes subsequently spent four years as an assistant professor at the Laboratory of Coastal Engineering at the University of ... In 1990, he won the International Coastal Engineering Award of the American Society of Civil Engineers. In 2009, Battjes was ...
"Door County Coastal Byway". Door County. Retrieved December 3, 2015. Beers, Darryl R. (2013). "Door County Coastal Byway". ... Bergin, Mary (September-October 2010). "Three Fall Drives in Wisconsin". Wisconsin Trails. Retrieved December 3, 2015. ... The Door County Coastal Byway is a 66-mile (106 km) loop beginning and ending at the intersection of WIS 42 and WIS 57 by ... Door County Coastal Byway Wisconsin Great River Road Wisconsin Lake Superior Byway Lower Wisconsin River Road. ...
"Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. 58 (2): 367-387. doi:10.1016/s0272-7714(03)00106-9.. ... "Dr. Gregory B. Pasternack - Watershed Hydrology, Geomorphology, and Ecohydraulics :: TFD Modeling". pasternack.ucdavis.edu. ... "Dr. Gregory B. Pasternack - Watershed Hydrology, Geomorphology, and Ecohydraulics :: TFD Hydrometeorology". pasternack.ucdavis. ... "Dr. Gregory B. Pasternack - Watershed Hydrology, Geomorphology, and Ecohydraulics :: Tidal Freshwater Deltas". pasternack. ...
"Scots coastal route named one of world's top drives". The Scotsman. 7 August 2015. Retrieved 2 February 2017. "North Coast 500 ... In 2015 the route was named fifth in Now Travel Magazine's "Top 5 Coastal Routes in the World". It has been described as " ... www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/news/highlands/657962/north-coast-500-named-in-top-five-coastal-routes-in-the-world/ North Coast ... 500, http://www.northcoast500.com/interactive-map.aspx Munro, Alistair (5 March 2015). "Huge drive to promote 'Scotland's Route ...
Intending only to do a little research, Dr. Tunnicliffe instead became the first woman on the West Coast to lead deep-sea ... 2016) David H. Turpin Gold Medal for Career Achievement in Research Scott, Marianne (2003). Naturally Salty: Coastal Characters ... "Dr. Verena Tunnicliffe - University of Victoria". web.uvic.ca. Retrieved 2017-10-08. Government of Canada, Industry Canada ( ... She only meant to stay in British Columbia for two years, but by 1983 Dr. Tunnicliffe helped to discover hydrothermal vent ...
2008) Fresh tales of Dr Who. Mandurah Coastal Times, 18 June 2008. Mason, Fleur. (2008) Time travelling tale is a giant step ... The Senior, 2008 Doctor Who Magazine, 2008 Mandurah Coastal Times, 2008 Southern Gazette, 2008. Sunday Times, 2008 Hills ... Mandurah Coastal Times, 1 April 2009 (2009), Support for emerging writers, Southern Gazette, 9 June 2009 (2009), Of pop stars ... Fact apes fiction in Dr Who tale, Stirling Times, 5 May 2009 (2009), Theatre talent joins forces, Hills Gazette, 6 June 2009 ( ...
The northern whiting inhabits coastal areas to 60 m, but is most often found in shallow water around bays and estuaries, often ... ISBN 92-5-103123-1. Cantor, Dr. T. (1850). "Catalogue of Malayan Fishes". Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal. Baptist ... Kuiter, R.H. (1993). Coastal fishes of south-eastern Australia. U.S.A: University of Hawaii Press. ISBN 1-86333-067-4. ... in tropical coastal waters of Thailand". Mer. 44 (1): 1-16. Retrieved 2007-11-15. Radhakrishnan, N. (1954). "Occurrence of ...
Dr. B. Beth Baikan. "Summary of Issues From The Sandakan District Coastal Zone Profile". Sabah ICZM Local Consultant. Town and ... Dr Richard Reid. "Sandakan". Laden, Fevered, Starved - The POWs of Sandakan, North Borneo, 1945. Retrieved 21 April 2015. Paul ... "The Japanese occupation of Sandakan, January 1942". Borneo Surgeon - A Reluctant Hero - The Story of Dr James P. Taylor. ... mostly crime such as theft and vandalism on public facility and also solid waste pollution in marine and coastal areas. But ...
"Yemeni tribes enter coastal town to drive out al Qaeda". Reuters. 4 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. "Tribesmen deploy in ... and the Yemen Army for control of the coastal city of Mukalla, Yemen. Al-Qaeda fighters entered Mukalla on 2 April 2015, ...
Dr. Perry Kendall, OBC, MD, FRCPC (born 1943) is a Public health physician who is the first Provincial Health Officer (PHO) for ... John Blatherwick of Vancouver Coastal Health). Kendall appointed Evan Adams and Bonnie Henry as Deputy Provincial Health ... Dr. Kendall also participates on a number of provincial and national committees and co-chairs the Pan-Canadian Public Health ... 2005 Recipient: Dr. Perry Robert William Kendall - Order of BC Recipient Profile Officer of the Provincial Health Officer ...
"The 2005 Coastal Cutthroat Trout Symposium" (PDF). Oregon Chapter American Fisheries Society. p. 157. Retrieved 2013-11-04. "Dr ... In January 2003, Fly, Rod and Reel magazine, named Dr. Behnke "Angler of the Year". In 2007, Dr. Behnke along with others ... Behnke, Robert J. "The 2005 Coastal Cutthroat Trout Symposium-Key Note Abstract-Some Food for Thought Concerning Coastal ... was named to honor Dr. Behnke's fisheries work. Dr. Behnke's seminal work, Trout and Salmon of North America, was published in ...
"Battling pollution in coastal areas". International Development Research Centre. Archived from the original on 6 October 2014. ... "Nature Honors Dr. Chris M. Wood". Retrieved 2 October 2014. ...
Dr. R.K. (2007). Study report of coastal water bodies in Nagapattinam district (PDF) (Report). NGO Co-ordination and Resource ... Dr. R.K. 2007, p. 19. Ministry of Panchayati Raj (September 8, 2009). "A Note on the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme" ( ... Five of the talukas are coastal, and all are named after their main towns, which are their administrative centres. From north ... Nagapattinam district is a coastal district of Tamil Nadu state in southern India. Nagapattinam district was carved out by ...
It has coastal bird life on a fresh water perennial lake. Lake Woods is 40 km South; a four-wheel drive is required for the ...
"Florida's Cultural Coast". Bill Moss (January 27, 1988). "Tourism ad drives home its point". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved ... "Historic Coast latest in a growing number of Florida coastal monikers". The Florida Times-Union. " ...
There are kilometers of coastal tracks for 4-wheel drive vehicles. Other amenities include public toilets, a small children's ...
Drought can drive flocks into more wooded habitat or coastal areas. They feed on the seeds of spinifex, grass seeds, and ... "Dr. Marshall's Philosophy on Breeding Exhibition Budgerigars". Bird Health. 2004. Archived from the original on 2004-08-11. ...
... coastal, inland waterways, and Great Lakes shipping. Inductees into the Hall of Fame must be deceased, or sunk or scrapped, for ... Dr. Franjo Tuđman Military Academy. *. University of Defence. *. Estonian National Defence College ... near-coastal transportation, research vessels, and other types of vessels.[citation needed] ...
According to Dr. Kieser, a lot of work on Henneguya salminicola was done by scientists at the Pacific Biological Station in ... Sea Lice Coastal Alliance for Aquaculture Reform. An overview of farmed- to wild-salmon interactive effects. Salmon Farming ... Problems Coastal Alliance for Aquaculture Reform. An overview of environmental impacts of salmon farming. Fish farms drive wild ... Nass and from mainland coastal streams in the southern half of B.C. "are more likely to have a low prevalence of infection." ...
In Belize, Climate Change Drives Coastal Management. By Aaron Humes Reprint , , Print , ,En español ... Approximately 203,000 Belizeans live in coastal communities - both urban centres such as Belize City and the towns of Corozal ... The project will explore and develop strategies to help coastal communities become more resilient to climate change, and will ... However, tourism accounts for almost 25 percent of GDP and a significantly greater population living in coastal communities ...
Ion-induced sulfuric acid-ammonia nucleation drives particle formation in coastal Antarctica.. Jokinen T1, Sipilä M1, Kontkanen ... Ion-induced sulfuric acid-ammonia nucleation drives particle formation in coastal Antarctica ... Ion-induced sulfuric acid-ammonia nucleation drives particle formation in coastal Antarctica ... Ion-induced sulfuric acid-ammonia nucleation drives particle formation in coastal Antarctica ...
Dr. Michael Dayan, Registered Clinical Counselor (RCC), PhD, MA Dr. Michael Dayan Clinical Counsellor & Psychotherapist ... Dr. Dayan is a counsellor specializing CBT, Mindfulness, & Family Therapy based in Richmond and Vancouver. His focus is on ...
Ion-induced sulfuric acid-ammonia nucleation drives particle formation in coastal Antarctica ... Ion-induced sulfuric acid-ammonia nucleation drives particle formation in coastal Antarctica ... Ion-induced sulfuric acid-ammonia nucleation drives particle formation in coastal Antarctica ... Ion-induced sulfuric acid-ammonia nucleation drives particle formation in coastal Antarctica ...
The West Coast is a literal toilet: 80% of coastal areas infected with toxic feces (biosludge), warns Dr. Drew. Sunday, August ... Laura Ingraham recently hosted television personality and medical internist Dr. David Drew Pinsky, commonly known as Dr. Drew, ... of coastal areas infected with toxic feces (biosludge), warns Dr. Drew,/a,. ... Dr. Drew noted:. "There is an organization out here called Heal the Bay which keeps tabs on safety of our beaches in Southern ...
Meet Dr. Michael Slowey, reproductive endocrinologist at Coastal Fertility Specialists. Dr. Slowey, along with Dr. John Schnorr ... 1375 Hospital Drive in Mount Pleasant, SC , Coastal Fertility Specialists , Copyright © 2017 , All rights reserved. ... HomeVideo LibraryMeet Dr. Michael Slowey - Reproductive Endocrinologist , Video Meet Dr. Michael Slowey - Reproductive ... Dr. Slowey explains his educational and personal background including how he became fascinated by the field of reproductive ...
In 2008 Dr. Galhenage returned to Australia to work as a Consultant Gastroenterologist at Fremantle Hospital. From 2015 he will ... Dr. Galhenage is a gastroenterologist who obtained his primary medical degree from the University of Western Australia in 1996 ... Dr. Galhenage maintains a strong clinical interest in general gastroenterology and endoscopy, including bowel cancer screening ... Cnr Robertson Drive and Bussell Highway Bunbury WA 6230 Tel: (08) 9722 1600 ...
Dr. Waters is a gastroenterologist who works at Fremantle Hospital and Fiona Stanley Hospital as well as at Coastal ... Dr. Waters is originally from the UK. He completed a pharmacology degree at the University of Edinburgh before travelling and ... Cnr Robertson Drive and Bussell Highway Bunbury WA 6230 Tel: (08) 9722 1600 ... To make an appointment for a consultation with Dr. Waters please click here. ...
Dr Lynch has recently moved to the Sunshine Coast with her husband however prior to that she worked throughout Australia within ... Dr Emma Lynch (M.B.B.S, BSc, DCH) ... Dr Emma Lynch (M.B.B.S, BSc, DCH). Dr Lynch has recently moved ... Dr Lynch is currently practicing out of our Sister Practice, Currimundi Family Doctors from the 5th of February 2018. In order ... At Coastal Family Health we pride ourselves on providing a high quality immunization service for children and families. We have ...
Visit Healthgrades for information on Dr. Lawrence Piazza, MD Find Phone & Address information, medical practice history, ... I contacted Coastal Eye Care and, although it turned out not to be the emergency I initially feared it to be, the staff was ... Dr. Piazza. does not have any memberships or affiliations listed. If you are Dr. Piazza. and would like to add memberships or ... Dr. Piazzas. Reviews. Likelihood of recommending Dr. Piazza to family and friends ...
She is affiliated with medical facilities such as Beaufort Memorial Hospital and Coastal Carolina Hospital. She is not ... Dr. Cramer has more experience with Spine than other specialists in her area. She graduated from University of Michigan Medical ... Be sure to call ahead with Dr. Cramer to book an appointment. ... Dr. Susan Cramer, MD is a Pain Medicine Specialist in Bluffton ... Coastal Pain & Spine Center. Coastal Pain & Spine Center38 Sheridan Park Cir Ste F. Bluffton. , SC. 29910 ...
Coastal Dermatology &. Plastic Surgery. Corporate Office : 5199 East Pacific Coast Highway #700. Long Beach, CA 90803. Tel : ( ... 2018 Crystal Clear Digital Marketing , Site Map , TOS/Privacy Policy , Coastal Dermatology & Plastic Surgery. ...
Co-chair Shared Care Coastal Community of Care. Biography. While at SFU my academic focus was both Biochemistry and Kinesiology ... Dr. Alan Baggoo. B.Sc. SFU, Molecular Biology & Biochemistry (Honors), 1990. MD, UBC, 1993. Orthopedic Surgeon, Vancouver ... Dr. Richards was my favorite professor. He challenged his students to think outside the box. I learned a lot from failing his ... I am currently work through the BCMA and POSM to improve the delivery of Orthopedic care to Coastal residents. ...
Coastal views of sport. UON Central Coast is a hub for exercise and sport science, with many researchers working with local ... Dr Xanne Janse De Jonge. Position. Senior Lecturer. Exercise and Sport Science. School of Environmental and Life Sciences. ... Dr Xanne Janse de Jonge on The Conversation. Blood, sweat and tears: the menstrual cycle and the Olympics. Read more ... Dr Xanne Janse de Jonge is placing the little-explored field of female hormones in sport performance in the research spotlight. ...
Dr. Nicholas Papajohn took the time to answer some of his patients most frequently asked questions. Read on for suggested sun ... Dr. Nicholas Papajohn , FAQs ,Coastal Skin Surgery & Dermatology. By Author - In Physician Highlight, Q&A - March 31, 2016 ... Tags: Botox, coastal skin surgery and dermatology, cosmetic dermatology, dermatology, Dr. Papajohn, Dysport, Emerald Coast skin ... Discover some of the most frequently asked questions by patients like you, provided by Dr. Nicholas Papajohn of Coastal Skin ...
Drive the Causeway Coastal Route. Discover a land of epic legends and Titanic history. The Causeway Coastal Route is one of ... Take a drive along the coast of Irelands Ancient East and discover tales from the past, unspoiled coastal towns and... ... Walking the cliffs, coastal trails and country lanes of Irelands north coast will make you fall in love with this land! ... The Causeway Coastal Route is regarded as one of the worlds greatest road journeys. Experience it yourself and be inspired... ...
Coastal Chiropractic and Wellness is your local Chiropractor in Madison serving all of your needs. Call us today at 203-245- ... I love Dr. K and his stellar staff. Heroes and Angels, dramatically improved the quality of my life. ...
Coastal NeuroSurgery specializes in treatment for the following conditions. If you suffer from any of the below conditions, ...
Welcome to Coastal Family Dental! We are glad you have chosen us for your oral health needs and hope that every encounter with ... Meet Dr. Nguyen Dr. Nguyen has helped numerous patients get the competent, excellent dental care that they need. His Costa Mesa ... Our Services At Coastal Family Dental, we have a wide range of services, including general, cosmetic and restorative dental ...
Find dr office in Baldwin County, AL on Yellowbook. Get reviews and contact details for each business including videos, opening ... Alabama Coastal Radiology. 750 Morphy Ave. Fairhope, AL 36532-1812Map. (251) 928-7205 ...
See reviews, photos, directions, phone numbers and more for Dr Kim locations in Wilmington, NC. ... Find 43 listings related to Dr Kim in Wilmington on YP.com. ... Coastal Carolina Pathology. 2606 Iron Gate Dr, Wilmington, NC ... Initially, Dr. Heer seemed to genuinely care about my health, but, after some time, it became readily apparent that Dr. Heer ... 3. Dr. Jon Kimberly Miller, MD. 2716 Ashton DrWilmington, NC 28412 ...
Chung, Dr. Christine 200 W Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA * Coastal Counseling 2910 Jefferson St. Suite 201. Carlsbad, CA ... Sahagian, Dr. Gregory A. 320 Santa Fe Dr. Encinitas, CA * San Diego Marriage and Family Therapy 16935 West Bernardo Dr.. San ... Chu, Dr. Pauline 200 W Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA * Chula Vista Christian Counseling 680 Telegraph Canyon Rd Suite 202. Chula ... Comstock, Dr. Christopher 200 W Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA * Condy Demus, Herbalife Independent Distributor P.O. Box 180454. Los ...
Dr. Paul Gayes: Coastal System Scientist , Floating Turbines and Changing Baselines , Episode 004. 4/21/2019 ... Dr. Gorka Sancho is a fish ecologist and a professor of biology at the College of Charleston where he conducts research at the ... Dr. Bob Podolsky is the director of the Grice Marine Laboratory at the College of Charleston, and has spent his career working ... Dr. Paul Gayes does a little bit of everything. Hes the Executive Director of the Burroughs and Chapin Center for Marine and ...
Coastal Ear Nose & Throat PA. 1050 W Granada Blvd, Ormond Beach, FL 32174 ... Dr. Vinod K Malik, MD. lisa.c.miller.925 rated. went to this dr. after calling to tell my issues needing another dr. because ... I selected Dr. Larrain to care for me and my unborn child in early 2016. I had a prior history of preterm labor and I asked Dr ... Dr. Adam hall… I doubt I could even call him a doctor… For nine months I went to that office and I couldnt even see him ...
  • Dr Lynch is currently practicing out of our Sister Practice, Currimundi Family Doctors from the 5th of February 2018. (coastalfamilyhealth.com.au)
  • The Georgia Medical Society (GMS) recently named the 2018 Health Care Heroes and two Coastal Health District team members were among those recognized. (gachd.org)
  • The GMS Health Care Innovation Award was given to Debbie Hagins, M.D., medical director and principal investigator for the Coastal Health District CARE Centers which provide comprehensive outpatient primary care (including nutritional services and oral health) and case management to persons with HIV/AIDS. (gachd.org)
  • With support from the NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, CCR will build upon its previous NOAA-funded efforts and those successful outcomes and strategies. (lsu.edu)
  • In order to achieve her fellowship into the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, Emma must complete a year at another practice and will be back with the Coastal Team in 2019. (coastalfamilyhealth.com.au)
  • Graduate coursework on coastal and marine biology includes courses in Marine Biology, Aquatic Toxicology, Coastal Fisheries Management, Freshwater Ecology, Animal Behavior, Ichthyology, Marine Mammalogy, and others along with required courses in Evolution, Quantitative Ecology, and Critical Skills in Science. (unf.edu)
  • Students take part in the Ocean Challenge by crafting and submitting their own paper sea creature or coral reef based on what they've learned about oceans and coastal communities. (nature.org)
  • He has particular expertise in the measurement and modelling of coastal sediment transport as well as experience in assessing resources and impacts for marine renewable energy developments. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Utilize basic principles of wind and wave generation to understand coastal sediment transport. (uno.edu)
  • The project will explore and develop strategies to help coastal communities become more resilient to climate change, and will encourage community exchange visits to help the people learn how they can adapt to climate change. (ipsnews.net)
  • We're building the political muscle and grassroots momentum to drive both state and federal wins on climate, and we're aiming high: Audubon has set a goal of contributing to emissions reductions of at least 80 percent of 1990 levels by 2050. (audubon.org)
  • Our collaborative work has helped shift the paradigm for climate change and sea level rise assessments at the coastal land margin away from 'bathtub' assessments, which simply apply a static rise to existing configurations, to a more dynamic and realistic assessment," said Hagen, the principal investigator of the projects. (lsu.edu)
  • Explore a wide range of topics from storms, climate change and coastal defence, to structural design, hydraulics and geotechnics. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Dr. Claussen is Director of the Max-Planck-Institute of Meteorology in Hamburg and chairs the cluster of excellence 'Integrated Climate System Analysis and Prediciton' at the University of Hamburg. (eurekalert.org)
  • Hydroclimatologist Dr Danielle Verdon-Kidd studies climate to help us better manage our most precious natural resource of all - water. (edu.au)
  • Scientists at The University of Manchester have helped to identify that the presence of large amounts of seaweed in coastal areas can influence the climate. (eurekalert.org)
  • The first nationwide vulnerability assessment for ocean acidification , published in Nature Climate Change, shows that coastal communities in 15 states that depend on the nation's approximately $1 billion shelled mollusk (e.g., oysters and clams) industry are at long-term economic risk from ocean acidification. (eponline.com)
  • Marvel at the rich ochre cliffs of Bells Beach, wander through coastal forests of leafy green eucalypts, and look down at the deep blue waters of Bass Strait. (visitvictoria.com)
  • Regarding future research, he adds, "Restoration efforts in coastal floodplain forests would be further improved by species-specific studies of moisture requirements for seed germination as well as studies on the effects of variable tidal inundation on the seeds and seedlings of important floodplain species. (environmental-expert.com)
  • The coastal forests of the Redwood region are highly productive, supporting structurally-diverse forest habitats. (usda.gov)
  • Travel inland or continue on the longer scenic coastal route to Phillip Island, stopping along the way at Wilson Promontory where there are forests, secluded coves and granite outcrops. (coxandkings.co.uk)
  • To validate their interpretations, the scientist compared their geological reconstruction with a computer model simulation of the Sahara vegetation cover, performed by the research group of Prof. Dr. Martin Claussen. (eurekalert.org)
  • K. brevis is present in the Gulf year-round," said study co-author Dr. Kate Hubbard, a scientist at FWRI who leads the state's monitoring efforts. (usf.edu)
  • The paper's co-author, Dr Gordon McFiggans, an atmospheric scientist from The University of Manchester's School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences (SEAES) said: "The findings are applicable to any coastal areas where there are extensive kelp beds. (eurekalert.org)
  • Using the lenses of traditional knowledge and western science, their goal was to collect and share information to build a respectful dialogue that better equips coastal communities and policy makers with socially just and ecologically sustainable strategies to navigate the changes that come with the recovery of the sea otter. (sfu.ca)
  • This course equips you with important skills increasingly in demand both in the UK and internationally, and prepares you for life as a civil and coastal engineer. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Our design project module in coastal engineering equips you to specialise in design or flood risk management and port engineering. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Biomass and breakdown of tree roots within streambed sediments were compared with leaf and wood detritus in three Coastal Plain headwater intermittent streams. (usda.gov)
  • In addition to contributing to organic matter storage, the abundance of riparian roots within streambed sediments suggests that roots play an important role in biogeochemical cycling within intermittent headwater streams of the Coastal Plain. (usda.gov)
  • Journey from Apollo Bay to the 12 Apostles along the Great Ocean Walk, weaving through national parks, deserted beaches and rugged coastal scenery. (visitvictoria.com)
  • Thousands of volunteers are expected to take part in the 29th annual Coastal Cleanup Day at 90 locations on beaches and inland watersheds around the region. (kpbs.org)
  • Drive between two of Australia's most vibrant cities via a dramatic coastline with a variety of scenery, from hinterland to lakes, mountains, beaches, national parks, historic towns and fishing villages. (coxandkings.co.uk)
  • Collect your car in Sydney and drive south on the Grand Pacific Drive towards Jervis Bay, known for its white sandy beaches, turquoise sea and resident dolphins. (coxandkings.co.uk)
  • Resource managers' input has informed the development and application of large-scale, high-definition computer models that can predict the coastal dynamics of sea level rise and assess hydrodynamic and ecological impacts at the coastal land margin. (lsu.edu)
  • The Ocean Challenge offers students a unique opportunity to help restore marine health, protect essential coral reefs and support coastal communities. (nature.org)
  • The event, hosted by I Love a Clean San Diego , is part of an international coastal cleanup effort that has included 150 counties and 9 million volunteers over the years. (kpbs.org)
  • I would like to inquire about the property at 1301 Coastal Highway 357 Dewey Beach, DE 19971. (century21.com)
  • Approximately 203,000 Belizeans live in coastal communities - both urban centres such as Belize City and the towns of Corozal and Dangriga, as well as destinations for fishing and tourism such as the villages of Sarteneja, Hopkins, Sittee River, Seine Bight and Placencia. (ipsnews.net)
  • However, tourism accounts for almost 25 percent of GDP and a significantly greater population living in coastal communities earn their livelihoods from this industry, Esikuri explained. (ipsnews.net)
  • Plant species that characterize coastal sage scrub communities include the pleasantly aromatic California sagebrush ( Artemisia californica ), bright yellow bush sunflower ( Encelia californica ), lemonade berry ( Rhus integrifolia ), goldenbush ( Isocoma menziesii ), coastal prickly pear cactus ( Opuntia littoralis and O. oricola ), black sage ( Salvia mellifera ), and Brandegee's sage ( Salvia brandegeei - on Santa Rosa Island only). (nps.gov)
  • This has dramatic effects to the food security and cultural well-being of many coastal Indigenous communities. (sfu.ca)
  • We have the people, tools and technology at LSU and the Center for Computation & Technology to find solutions that will be able to protect coastal communities worldwide," said J. "Ram" Ramanujam, director of the LSU Center for Computation & Technology. (lsu.edu)
  • Students are also supporting programs that promote alternative livelihoods and conservation education to reduce pressures on the ocean and strengthen coastal communities. (nature.org)
  • Natural News ) California is experiencing a homelessness crisis of unprecedented proportions, and it is now endangering the health and safety of every single person living in the state, particularly those who live in coastal areas. (naturalnews.com)
  • Long before the Institute celebrated itsjubilee on 20-23 October 1982, he expressed his feelings to the other editors, that the time had come for a second European symposium on the ecology of coastal vegetation. (springer.com)
  • Records show 15 months before the California Coastal Commission unanimously approved a permit allowing Southern California Edison to keep the waste at San Onofre, there were closed-door meetings. (kpbs.org)
  • There was a volcano of objections and they flowed into the coastal commission staff, and the coastal commission staff kind of joked about it with Southern California Edison," Aguirre said. (kpbs.org)
  • Coastal NeuroSurgery specializes in treatment for the following conditions. (coastalneurosurgerynj.com)
  • Dr. O'Dorisio has over four decades of experience and specializes in Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine tumors that include Familial Neuroendocrine syndromes. (coastalheadlines.com)
  • Combining this new information with surface water, groundwater, and meteorological data allowed the team to develop hydrological relationships that drive ecosystem changes and inform proposed restoration and management plans. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Estimate cost for different dredging methods in the context of coastal restoration. (uno.edu)
  • Students will also examine issues of coastal management and coastal hazards and learn how Geomorphologist can contribute to practical outcomes. (otago.ac.nz)
  • When we see strong upwelling induced by the Loop Current during spring to early summer, we don't get a major K. brevis bloom," said study coauthor Dr. Yonggang Liu, who studies the physics of the ocean with Weisberg at the USFCMS. (usf.edu)
  • Taking an unconventional approach to her research, she assembled the Coastal Voices team, comprised of a diverse group of Indigenous leaders, knowledge holders, scientists, and artists from BC and Alaska. (sfu.ca)
  • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists initiated a coastal study of Southern Lake Michigan in response to disastrous flooding in Chicago. (usgs.gov)
  • In the most heavily impacted areas, the habitat can appear as coastal sage scrub species scattered amidst a sea of exotic grasses. (nps.gov)
  • These species are well suited to the drier microclimates typical of coastal sage scrub habitat. (nps.gov)
  • Coastal sage scrub also serves as important habitat for a variety of Channel Islands animals. (nps.gov)
  • The Channel Islands Song Sparrow , for example, prefers to nest in many of the shrubs characteristic of coastal sage scrub habitat. (nps.gov)
  • Island Loggerhead Shrikes , Orange-crowned Warblers , Channel Island foxes , Channel Island slender salamanders , and island deer mice are among the many other species that make good use of coastal sage scrub habitat. (nps.gov)
  • With sea otters gone, super-abundant sea urchins decimated kelp forest habitat, but high shellfish abundance also fuelled coastal fisheries and community harvest. (sfu.ca)
  • In collaboration with the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, University of Central Florida, University of South Carolina and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, CCR researchers aim to refine, enhance and extend the models as well as link the economic impact and value of ecosystem services to the coastal dynamics of sea level rise. (lsu.edu)
  • COASTAL DIABETIC CENTRE is known for housing experienced General Physicians. (lybrate.com)
  • Dr. Lucas G Bingham Is this you? (vitals.com)
  • Dr. Lucas G Bingham, MD is a Doctor primarily located in Ladera Ranch, CA . He has 14 years of experience. (vitals.com)
  • Dr. Bingham is affiliated with Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center . (vitals.com)
  • Dr. Bingham has received 3 awards . (vitals.com)
  • Dr. Lucas G Bingham has been rated by 22 patients. (vitals.com)
  • The overall rating for Dr. Lucas G Bingham is 4.8 of 5.0 stars. (vitals.com)
  • Dr Bingham is an artist, sculpture and a trusted Doctor. (vitals.com)
  • When these products are used with the precision of Dr Bingham the results are a softer, more beautiful appearance. (vitals.com)
  • I have been going to Dr Bingham for years and my face looks balanced. (vitals.com)
  • If you have had disappointing results in the past, I would encourage you to trust Dr Bingham. (vitals.com)
  • Coastal sage scrub is a very extensive vegetation community on the Channel Islands, although less extensive than grasslands . (nps.gov)
  • and shall be a good guide for researchers not only on coastal vegetation but for allied habitats as well. (springer.com)
  • As Dr. Drew told Ingraham, small amounts of runoff in various places along the coast is normal, but there is now a consistent, recurring water contamination problem. (naturalnews.com)
  • The adhesive property of marine snow means that it readily attaches itself to suspended sediment (fine clay) from coastal runoff resulting in it becoming negatively buoyant. (google.com)
  • Dr Xanne Janse de Jonge is placing the little-explored field of female hormones in sport performance in the research spotlight. (edu.au)
  • To keep up to date with the latest developments in his field, Dr. O'Dorisio maintains a professional membership with the Endocrine Society, and the American Association for Cancer Research. (coastalheadlines.com)
  • The Coastal Voices research team is building knowledge about what the ecosystem used to look like before the extirpation of otters and what is happening now that it is shifting with their reintroduction. (sfu.ca)
  • Using photos, film, and social media along with traditional academic publishing, the Coastal Voices research team tells a compelling story of adaptation and resilience. (sfu.ca)
  • This track is especially well suited for students interested in pursuing graduate work and research careers in coastal and marine biology. (unf.edu)
  • Dr. Hagins' hard work in the area of clinical trials has garnered local, state, and national attention bringing to light the important efforts being put forward in public health regarding HIV medication research and treatment. (gachd.org)
  • The aim of my research is to understand how coastal systems have been altered by both extreme events (storms, tsunamis) and gradual environmental changes over the Holocene. (usm.edu)
  • Study at one of the world's leading centres for coastal engineering research for a professionally accredited civil and coastal engineering degree. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Study at one of the world's leading centres for coastal engineering research - you'll keep pace with the ever-changing discoveries, insights and thinking in the subject. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Here, we report on the observation of ion-induced nucleation of sulfuric acid and ammonia-a process experimentally investigated by the CERN CLOUD experiment-as a major source of secondary aerosol particles over coastal Antarctica. (nih.gov)
  • Dr. Galhenage maintains a strong clinical interest in general gastroenterology and endoscopy, including bowel cancer screening, iron deficiency, coeliac disease, functional bowel conditions and IBD. (coastalgastro.com.au)
  • Meet Dr. Nguyen Dr. Nguyen has helped numerous patients get the competent, excellent dental care that they need. (coastalfamilydental.com)
  • Dr. Lars H Runquist Jr has been rated by 16 patients. (vitals.com)
  • After testimony and presentation of evidence in a fair-dismissal hearing that spanned eight hours, the Liberty County Board of Education unanimously voted Monday to uphold Superintendent Dr. Judy Scherer's recommendation to terminate a teacher's contract. (coastalcourier.com)
  • Dr. Papajohn completed his residency at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, S.C., where he served as chief resident. (coastalskinsurgery.com)
  • Dr. O'Dorisio went on to complete his Internal Medicine residency, and then Endocrinology fellowship at Ohio State University. (coastalheadlines.com)
  • Dr. Slowey, along with Dr. John Schnorr, provide the highest level fertility testing and treatment in Charleston, SC and the surrounding areas. (coastalfertilityspecialists.com)
  • Dr. Bob Podolsky is the director of the Grice Marine Laboratory at the College of Charleston, and has spent his career working to unlock the secrets of the early life stages of marine invertebrates. (tunein.com)
  • Dr. Lars H Runquist Jr, MD is a Doctor primarily located in Charleston, SC . (vitals.com)
  • Dr. Galhenage is a gastroenterologist who obtained his primary medical degree from the University of Western Australia in 1996. (coastalgastro.com.au)
  • Dr. O'Dorisio is currently serving as the Director of the Neuroendocrine Tumor Program and Co-Leader Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine MOG, Professor within the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, Iowa. (coastalheadlines.com)
  • In 1971, Dr. O'Dorisio graduated from the Creighton University School of Medicine. (coastalheadlines.com)
  • If a patient has been diagnosed with neuro-endocrine cancer in the Midwest, I would encourage them to come just for one visit," Dr. O'Dorisio advised on his webpage at the University. (coastalheadlines.com)
  • A theoretical understanding of the subject is developed through examining conceptual models of coastal development and behaviour. (otago.ac.nz)
  • It details the inputs, behaviour and effects of various types of wastes found in the marine environment, their transfer from catchment to coast, their dispersion due to ocean mixing and circulation and considers the implications for coastal water use and management. (bangor.ac.uk)
  • Click here to view the full program of study for the Coastal and Marine Biology track. (unf.edu)
  • In 2008 Dr. Galhenage returned to Australia to work as a Consultant Gastroenterologist at Fremantle Hospital. (coastalgastro.com.au)