A species of gram-positive bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae. Its GLUTAMATE DEHYDROGENASE is commonly used in research.
A genus of motile or nonmotile gram-positive bacteria of the family Clostridiaceae. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. They occur in water, soil, and in the intestinal tract of humans and lower animals.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-glutamate and water to 2-oxoglutarate and NH3 in the presence of NAD+. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 1.4.1.2.
An enzyme that catalyzes the reaction of ATP, pyruvate, and orthophosphate to form AMP plus phosphoenolpyruvate plus pyrophosphate. EC 2.7.9.1.
A kingdom in the domain ARCHAEA comprised of thermoacidophilic, sulfur-dependent organisms. The two orders are SULFOLOBALES and THERMOPROTEALES.
A common inhabitant of the colon flora in human infants and sometimes in adults. It produces a toxin that causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis (ENTEROCOLITIS, PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS) in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CLOSTRIDIUM.
A species of anaerobic, gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae that produces proteins with characteristic neurotoxicity. It is the etiologic agent of BOTULISM in humans, wild fowl, HORSES; and CATTLE. Seven subtypes (sometimes called antigenic types, or strains) exist, each producing a different botulinum toxin (BOTULINUM TOXINS). The organism and its spores are widely distributed in nature.
An acute inflammation of the INTESTINAL MUCOSA that is characterized by the presence of pseudomembranes or plaques in the SMALL INTESTINE (pseudomembranous enteritis) and the LARGE INTESTINE (pseudomembranous colitis). It is commonly associated with antibiotic therapy and CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE colonization.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A species of gram-positive bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae, used for the industrial production of SOLVENTS.

Transfer of vancomycin resistance transposon Tn1549 from Clostridium symbiosum to Enterococcus spp. in the gut of gnotobiotic mice. (1/4)

The vancomycin resistance vanB2 gene cluster is disseminated worldwide and has been found in phylogenetically remote bacterial genera. The vanB2 operon is part of conjugative transposons Tn1549/Tn5382, but conjugative transposition of these elements has not been demonstrated. We have obtained transfer of a Tn1549-like element (referred to herein as "Tn1549-like") from Clostridium symbiosum MLG101 to Enterococcus faecium 64/3 and Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice and to E. faecium 64/3 in vitro. Retransfer of Tn1549-like from an E. faecium transconjugant also containing Tn916 to E. faecium BM77 was obtained in vitro, albeit at a very low frequency. Transfer efficiency was found to be both donor and recipient dependent. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of total SmaI-digested DNA of 48 transconjugants indicated in 27 instances the acquisition of ca. 34 kb of DNA. Two transconjugants harbored two copies of the transposon. Sequencing of the flanking regions of Tn1549-like in 48 transconjugants revealed 29 integration events in 26 loci in the E. faecium genome, and two hot spots for insertion were identified. Integration of the transposon was associated with the acquisition of 5 (n = 18) or 6 (n = 7) bp of donor DNA or with 5-bp duplications of target DNA in the remaining transconjugants. These data demonstrate functionality of the Tn1549-like element and attest that the transfer of the vanB operon between enterococci and human commensal anaerobes occurs in the intestinal environment.  (+info)

Homotropic allosteric control in clostridial glutamate dehydrogenase: different mechanisms for glutamate and NAD+? (2/4)

 (+info)

An asymmetric model for Na+-translocating glutaconyl-CoA decarboxylases. (3/4)

 (+info)

Analysis of the mobilization functions of the vancomycin resistance transposon Tn1549, a member of a new family of conjugative elements. (4/4)

 (+info)

Clostridium symbiosum is a species of gram-positive, obligately anaerobic, spore-forming bacteria that is commonly found in the human intestine. It is a member of the normal gut microbiota and plays a role in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates in the colon. The bacteria are non-pathogenic and do not typically cause disease in healthy individuals. However, they have been associated with certain conditions such as bacteremia (bacteria in the blood) in immunocompromised patients and nosocomial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients.

The bacteria are named after their characteristic shape, which is drumstick-like or club-shaped, due to the presence of terminal spores. They are difficult to culture and identify, but molecular methods such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing have been used to confirm their presence in clinical samples.

In summary, Clostridium symbiosum is a commensal bacterium found in the human intestine, which plays a role in carbohydrate metabolism and is not typically associated with disease in healthy individuals.

'Clostridium' is a genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in nature, including in soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. Many species of Clostridium are anaerobic, meaning they can grow and reproduce in environments with little or no oxygen. Some species of Clostridium are capable of producing toxins that can cause serious and sometimes life-threatening illnesses in humans and animals.

Some notable species of Clostridium include:

* Clostridium tetani, which causes tetanus (also known as lockjaw)
* Clostridium botulinum, which produces botulinum toxin, the most potent neurotoxin known and the cause of botulism
* Clostridium difficile, which can cause severe diarrhea and colitis, particularly in people who have recently taken antibiotics
* Clostridium perfringens, which can cause food poisoning and gas gangrene.

It is important to note that not all species of Clostridium are harmful, and some are even beneficial, such as those used in the production of certain fermented foods like sauerkraut and natto. However, due to their ability to produce toxins and cause illness, it is important to handle and dispose of materials contaminated with Clostridium species carefully, especially in healthcare settings.

Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GLDH or GDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of amino acids, particularly within liver and kidney tissues. It catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate, which links amino acid metabolism with the citric acid cycle and energy production. This enzyme is significant in clinical settings as its levels in blood serum can be used as a diagnostic marker for diseases that damage liver or kidney cells, since these cells release GLDH into the bloodstream upon damage.

Pyruvate, orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) is an enzyme found in plants and some bacteria that plays a crucial role in carbohydrate metabolism. Its primary function is to catalyze the reversible conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, releasing inorganic phosphate (Pi) and generating a molecule of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP).

The reaction catalyzed by PPDK is as follows:

PEP + Pi + ATP ↔ Pyruvate + AMP + PPi (inorganic pyrophosphate)

This enzyme is particularly important in C4 and CAM plants, where it helps to fix carbon dioxide during photosynthesis. In these plant species, PPDK is primarily located in the bundle sheath cells, which are surrounding the vascular bundles of leaves. Here, it facilitates the transfer of fixed carbon from mesophyll cells to bundle sheath cells for further processing and eventual reduction into carbohydrates.

PPDK is subject to complex regulation, with its activity being controlled by various factors such as light, pH, and metabolite concentrations. The enzyme can be reversibly inactivated under low light conditions or during the night through a process called protein phosphorylation, which adds a phosphate group to specific residues on the enzyme. This modification reduces PPDK's catalytic activity and helps conserve energy when it is not needed for carbon fixation. Upon exposure to light, the phosphate group can be removed by a protein phosphatase, reactivating the enzyme and allowing it to participate in carbohydrate metabolism once again.

Crenarchaeota is a phylum within the domain Archaea. Members of this group are typically extremophiles, living in harsh environments such as hot springs, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and highly acidic or alkaline habitats. They are characterized by their unique archaeal-type rRNA genes and distinct cell wall composition. Some Crenarchaeota have been found to be involved in nitrogen and carbon cycling in various environments, including the ocean and soil. However, much is still unknown about this group due to the difficulty of culturing many of its members in the lab.

'Clostridium difficile' (also known as 'C. difficile' or 'C. diff') is a type of Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium that can be found in the environment, including in soil, water, and human and animal feces. It is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in individuals who have recently received antibiotics or have other underlying health conditions that weaken their immune system.

C. difficile produces toxins that can cause a range of symptoms, from mild diarrhea to severe colitis (inflammation of the colon) and potentially life-threatening complications such as sepsis and toxic megacolon. The most common toxins produced by C. difficile are called TcdA and TcdB, which damage the lining of the intestine and cause inflammation.

C. difficile infections (CDIs) can be difficult to treat, particularly in severe cases or in patients who have recurrent infections. Treatment typically involves discontinuing any unnecessary antibiotics, if possible, and administering specific antibiotics that are effective against C. difficile, such as metronidazole, vancomycin, or fidaxomicin. In some cases, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may be recommended as a last resort for patients with recurrent or severe CDIs who have not responded to other treatments.

Preventing the spread of C. difficile is critical in healthcare settings, and includes measures such as hand hygiene, contact precautions, environmental cleaning, and antibiotic stewardship programs that promote the appropriate use of antibiotics.

Clostridium infections are caused by bacteria of the genus Clostridium, which are gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming, and often anaerobic organisms. These bacteria can be found in various environments, including soil, water, and the human gastrointestinal tract. Some Clostridium species can cause severe and potentially life-threatening infections in humans. Here are some of the most common Clostridium infections with their medical definitions:

1. Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI): An infection caused by the bacterium Clostridioides difficile, previously known as Clostridium difficile. It typically occurs after antibiotic use disrupts the normal gut microbiota, allowing C. difficile to overgrow and produce toxins that cause diarrhea, colitis, and other gastrointestinal symptoms. Severe cases can lead to sepsis, toxic megacolon, or even death.
2. Clostridium tetani infection: Also known as tetanus, this infection is caused by the bacterium Clostridium tetani. The spores of this bacterium are commonly found in soil and animal feces. They can enter the body through wounds, cuts, or punctures, germinate, and produce a potent exotoxin called tetanospasmin. This toxin causes muscle stiffness and spasms, particularly in the neck and jaw (lockjaw), which can lead to difficulty swallowing, breathing, and potentially fatal complications.
3. Clostridium botulinum infection: This infection is caused by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and results in botulism, a rare but severe paralytic illness. The bacteria produce neurotoxins (botulinum toxins) that affect the nervous system, causing symptoms such as double vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, difficulty swallowing, dry mouth, and muscle weakness. In severe cases, botulism can lead to respiratory failure and death.
4. Gas gangrene (Clostridium perfringens infection): A rapidly progressing soft tissue infection caused by Clostridium perfringens or other clostridial species. The bacteria produce potent exotoxins that cause tissue destruction, gas production, and widespread necrosis. Gas gangrene is characterized by severe pain, swelling, discoloration, and a foul-smelling discharge. If left untreated, it can lead to sepsis, multi-organ failure, and death.
5. Clostridioides difficile infection (C. difficile infection): Although not caused by a typical clostridial species, C. difficile is a gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium that can cause severe diarrhea and colitis, particularly in hospitalized patients or those who have recently taken antibiotics. The bacteria produce toxins A and B, which damage the intestinal lining and contribute to inflammation and diarrhea. C. difficile infection can range from mild to life-threatening, with complications such as sepsis, toxic megacolon, and bowel perforation.

'Clostridium botulinum' is a gram-positive, rod-shaped, anaerobic bacteria that produces one or more neurotoxins known as botulinum toxins. These toxins are among the most potent naturally occurring biological poisons and can cause a severe form of food poisoning called botulism in humans and animals. Botulism is characterized by symmetrical descending flaccid paralysis, which can lead to respiratory and cardiovascular failure, and ultimately death if not treated promptly.

The bacteria are widely distributed in nature, particularly in soil, sediments, and the intestinal tracts of some animals. They can form spores that are highly resistant to heat, chemicals, and other environmental stresses, allowing them to survive for long periods in adverse conditions. The spores can germinate and produce vegetative cells and toxins when they encounter favorable conditions, such as anaerobic environments with appropriate nutrients.

Human botulism can occur through three main routes of exposure: foodborne, wound, and infant botulism. Foodborne botulism results from consuming contaminated food containing preformed toxins, while wound botulism occurs when the bacteria infect a wound and produce toxins in situ. Infant botulism is caused by the ingestion of spores that colonize the intestines and produce toxins, mainly affecting infants under one year of age.

Prevention measures include proper food handling, storage, and preparation practices, such as cooking and canning foods at appropriate temperatures and for sufficient durations. Wound care and prompt medical attention are crucial in preventing wound botulism. Vaccines and antitoxins are available for prophylaxis and treatment of botulism in high-risk individuals or in cases of confirmed exposure.

Pseudomembranous enterocolitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the inner lining of the small intestine (enteritis) and large intestine (colitis), resulting in the formation of pseudomembranes – raised, yellowish-white plaques composed of fibrin, mucus, and inflammatory cells. The condition is most commonly caused by a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile), which can overgrow in the gut following disruption of the normal gut microbiota, often after antibiotic use. Symptoms may include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and dehydration. Severe cases can lead to complications such as sepsis, toxic megacolon, or even death if left untreated. Treatment typically involves discontinuing the offending antibiotic, administering oral metronidazole or vancomycin to eliminate C. difficile, and managing symptoms with supportive care. In some cases, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may be considered as a treatment option.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

'Clostridium acetobutylicum' is a gram-positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in soil and aquatic environments. It is a species of the genus Clostridium, which includes many bacteria capable of producing industrial chemicals through fermentation.

'Clostridium acetobutylicum' is particularly known for its ability to produce acetic acid and butyric acid, as well as solvents such as acetone and butanol, during the process of anaerobic respiration. This makes it a potential candidate for biotechnological applications in the production of biofuels and other industrial chemicals.

However, like many Clostridium species, 'Clostridium acetobutylicum' can also produce toxins and cause infections in humans and animals under certain circumstances. Therefore, it is important to handle this organism with care and follow appropriate safety protocols when working with it in a laboratory setting.

And Clostridium symbiosum (Stevens) comb. Nov". International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology. 26 (2): 195. doi:10.1099/ ... "Clostridium clostridioforme: Clostridium clostridioforme corrig. (Burri and Ankersmit 1906) Kaneuchi et al. 1976". National ... Haas, Kelly N.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L. (2020). "Reclassification of the Clostridium clostridioforme and Clostridium sphenoides ... While Clostridium species have cell walls that resemble gram-positive bacteria, E. clostridioformis often appears negative by ...
In maize, it is closer to the C-terminal, while in Clostridium symbiosum, it is closer to the N-terminal. Research has shown ... and the bacteria Clostridium symbiosum (P22983; as well as other bacteria). In those two organisms PPDK functions similarly to ... UniProt 50%-90% clusters: From Clostridium PPDK Stephen P, Vijayan R, Bhat A, Subbarao N, Bamezai RN (September 2008). " ... symbiosum protein, PDB: 1KBL, 1KC7​). PPDK is used in the C4 pathway, to improve the efficiency of carbon dioxide fixation. In ...
Clostridium symbiosum Clostridium tagluense Clostridium tarantellae Clostridium tepidiprofundi Clostridium tepidum Clostridium ... Clostridium baratii Clostridium beihaiense Clostridium beijerinckii Clostridium diolis Clostridium bornimense Clostridium ... Clostridium aceticum Clostridium acetireducens Clostridium acetobutylicum Clostridium acidisoli Clostridium aciditolerans ... Clostridium aestuarii Clostridium akagii Clostridium algidicarnis Clostridium algifaecis Clostridium algoriphilum Clostridium ...
F. prausnitzii is a part of the Clostridium leptum subgroup under Eubacterium-like organisms. A few strains F. prausnitzii, a ... symbiosum, F. praecutum, F. plauti, F. alocis, F. sulci, and F. prausnitzii have since been reclassified due to containing ...
Clostridium symbiosum MeSH B03.300.390.400.200.722 - Clostridium tertium MeSH B03.300.390.400.200.725 - Clostridium tetani MeSH ... Clostridium symbiosum MeSH B03.510.415.400.200.722 - Clostridium tertium MeSH B03.510.415.400.200.725 - Clostridium tetani MeSH ... Clostridium botulinum type G MeSH B03.300.390.400.200.180 - Clostridium butyricum MeSH B03.300.390.400.200.200 - Clostridium ... Clostridium botulinum type G MeSH B03.510.415.400.200.180 - Clostridium butyricum MeSH B03.510.415.400.200.200 - Clostridium ...
And Clostridium symbiosum (Stevens) comb. Nov". International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology. 26 (2): 195. doi:10.1099/ ... "Clostridium clostridioforme: Clostridium clostridioforme corrig. (Burri and Ankersmit 1906) Kaneuchi et al. 1976". National ... Haas, Kelly N.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L. (2020). "Reclassification of the Clostridium clostridioforme and Clostridium sphenoides ... While Clostridium species have cell walls that resemble gram-positive bacteria, E. clostridioformis often appears negative by ...
Species Clostridium symbiosum [TaxId:1512] [225715] (4 PDB entries). *. Domain d3glmd1: 3glm D:3-291 [210584]. automated match ... PDB Description: Glutaconyl-coA decarboxylase A subunit from Clostridium symbiosum co-crystallized with crotonyl-coA ... d3glmd1 c.14.1.4 (D:3-291) Glutaconyl-CoA decarboxylase A subunit {Clostridium symbiosum [TaxId: 1512]} ... d3glmd1 c.14.1.4 (D:3-291) Glutaconyl-CoA decarboxylase A subunit {Clostridium symbiosum [TaxId: 1512]} ...
Zum Mechanismus der 2-Hydroxyglutaryl-CoA Dehydratase aus Clostridium symbiosum by: Hetzel, Marc Published: (2004) ... Substrates and mechanism of 2-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA-dehydratase from Clostridium symbiosum by: Parthasarathy, Anutthaman ... On the enzymatic mechanism of 2-hydroxyisocaproyl-CoA dehydratase from Clostridium difficile Die Gene ldhA und hadA aus ... On the enzymatic mechanism of 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase and 4-hydroxybutyrate CoA-transferase from Clostridium ...
Crystal structure of a probable RNA-binding protein from Clostridium symbiosum ATCC 14940. ...
... such as Clostridium hathewayi, Clostridium symbiosum and Escherichia coli, while healthy controls had a high abundance of ... Similarly, the levels of Lactobacillus were significantly increased, while the levels of Clostridium coccoides and Clostridium ... from the Clostridia class and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was lower, while that from E. coli, Streptococcus salivarius, and ... Clostridium XI, Lactococcus, Flavonifractor and Hydrogenoanaerobacterium in HFD-fed mice, and these bacterial taxa were ...
Fecal Clostridium symbiosum for noninvasive detection of early and advanced colorectal cancer: test and validation studies. ... Fecal clostridium symbiosum, Parvimonas micra ATCC 33270, and Streptococcus anginosus [10, 25, 26]. Dai et al. identified ...
dash; Clostridium spiroforme *‐ Clostridium sporogenes *‐ Clostridium subterminale *‐ Clostridium symbiosum ...
dash; Clostridium spiroforme *‐ Clostridium sporogenes *‐ Clostridium subterminale *‐ Clostridium symbiosum ... https://www.metabiom.org/microbiota/719/clostridium-beijerinckii. Keywords: Microbiome, Dysbiosis, Microbiota, Organism, ...
Clostridium] symbiosum WAL-14163. s. 9. 32. [Clostridium] symbiosum WAL-14673. s. 9. 33. ...
... and Low-Resolution Structural Characterization of the Na+-Translocating Glutaconyl-CoA Decarboxylase From Clostridium symbiosum ...
Clostridium.nexile ## 2022-11-01 17:54:30 INFO::Fitting model to feature number 45, Clostridium.symbiosum. ## boundary ( ... 2022-11-01 17:55:19 INFO::Creating scatter plot for continuous data, age vs Clostridium.symbiosum. ## `geom_smooth()` using ... 2022-11-01 17:54:42 INFO::Creating boxplot for categorical data, dysbiosisCD vs Clostridium.symbiosum. ## 2022-11-01 17:54:42 ... 2022-11-01 17:55:14 INFO::Creating boxplot for categorical data, antibiotics vs Clostridium.symbiosum. ## 2022-11-01 17:55:14 ...
Clostridium symbiosum (associated with colorectal adenocarcinoma) [59], Clostridium clostridioforme (involved in bacteremia) [ ... Fecal Clostridium symbiosum for noninvasive detection of early and advanced colorectal cancer: test and validation studies. ... Clostridium clostridioforme: a mixture of three clinically important species. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2005;24:319-24. ... Burden of Clostridium difficile infection in the United States. N Engl J Med. 2015;372:2368-9. ...
Fecal Clostridium symbiosum for Noninvasive Detection of Early and Advanced Colorectal Cancer: Test and Validation Studies. ...
Species Clostridium symbiosum [TaxId:1512] [53226] (4 PDB entries). *. Species Cow (Bos taurus) [TaxId:9913] [53230] (3 PDB ...
Clostridium symbiosum , Diabetes Mellitus Experimental , Derivação Gástrica , Ratos , Animais , Gluconeogênese/fisiologia , ... Enhanced glucose homeostasis via Clostridium symbiosum-mediated glucagon-like peptide 1 inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis ... CONCLUSION: The findings of this study demonstrate that the introduction of postoperative intestinal Clostridium symbiosum in ... Clostridium symbiosum, Ruminococcus gnavus, and Bilophila. Moreover, higher levels of secondary bile acids, such as intestinal ...
Clostridium] clostridioforme 2_1_49FAA. s. 4. 2. [Clostridium] symbiosum WAL-14163. s. 4. 2. ...
... as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric ...
Clostridium: These are rod-shaped (bacilli) bacteria that are strictly anaerobic and spore-forming. They are the predominant ... symbiosum, C. leptum, C. difficile strain 630, C. sordelli, C. absonum, C. butyricum, C. paraputrificum, C. xylanolyticum, etc. ... Lactobacillus spp., Enterococcus spp., Bacteroides spp., Eubacterium spp., Clostridium spp.. Cecum. Bacteroides spp., ... Eubacterium spp., Clostridium spp., Bifidobacterium spp.. Colon. Bacteroides spp., Eubacterium spp., Clostridium spp., ...
Clostridium subterminale * Clostridium sufflavum * Clostridium sulfidigenes * Clostridium swellfunianum * Clostridium symbiosum ... Parent taxon: Clostridium Prazmowski 1880 (Approved Lists 1980) Assigned by: Dorn-In S, Schwaiger K, Springer C, Barta L, ... Development of a multiplex qPCR for the species identification of Clostridium estertheticum, C. frigoriphilum, C. bowmanii and ... Ulrich S, Gareis M. Development of a multiplex qPCR for the species identification of Clostridium estertheticum, C. ...
Clostridium subterminale * Clostridium sufflavum * Clostridium sulfidigenes * Clostridium swellfunianum * Clostridium symbiosum ... Parent taxon: Clostridium Prazmowski 1880 (Approved Lists 1980) Assigned by: Wilde E, Collins MD, Hippe H. Clostridium pascui ... Valid publication: Wilde E, Collins MD, Hippe H. Clostridium pascui sp. nov., a new glutamate-fermenting sporeformer from a ... Linking: To permanently link to this page, use https://lpsn.dsmz.de/species/clostridium-pascui. Copy to clipboard. Link copied ...
Recombinant Clostridium botulinum Penicillin-binding protein 1A(pbpA),Partial. CSB-EP401992CWV. E.coli. N-terminal 6xHis-SUMO- ... Recombinant Cenarchaeum symbiosum DNA polymerase II large subunit(polC) ,partial. CSB-EP370095DRA. E.coli. Tag-Free. ...
Clostridium symbiosum. *Coprococcus catus. *Escherichia coli. *Flavobacterium algicola. *Fusobacterium. *Megasphaera elsdenii. ...
Clostridium perfringens. *Clostridium septicum. *Clostridium sordellii. *Clostridium sticklandii. *Clostridium symbiosum. * ... "Clostridium perfringens" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... In silico, in vitro and in vivo analysis of binding affinity between N and C-domains of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin. ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Clostridium perfringens" by people in this website by year, ...
Clostridium sordellii [B03.300.390.400.200.700] * Clostridium sticklandii [B03.300.390.400.200.710] * Clostridium symbiosum [ ... Clostridium [B03.300.390.400.200] * Clostridium acetobutylicum [B03.300.390.400.200.025] * Clostridium beijerinckii [B03.300. ... Clostridium [B03.353.625.375.500] * Clostridium acetobutylicum [B03.353.625.375.500.025] * Clostridium beijerinckii [B03.353. ... Clostridium [B03.510.415.400.200] * Clostridium acetobutylicum [B03.510.415.400.200.025] * Clostridium beijerinckii [B03.510. ...
Clostridium sordellii B3.353.625.500.700 Clostridium sticklandii B3.353.625.500.710 Clostridium symbiosum B3.353.625.500.713 ... Clostridium B3.353.625.500 Clostridium acetobutylicum B3.353.625.500.25 Clostridium beijerinckii B3.353.625.500.100 Clostridium ... Clostridium botulinum type A B3.353.625.500.160.50 Clostridium botulinum type B B3.353.625.500.160.100 Clostridium botulinum ... Clostridium botulinum type E B3.353.625.500.160.250 Clostridium botulinum type F B3.353.625.500.160.300 Clostridium botulinum ...
Clostridium sordellii B3.353.625.500.700 Clostridium sticklandii B3.353.625.500.710 Clostridium symbiosum B3.353.625.500.713 ... Clostridium B3.353.625.500 Clostridium acetobutylicum B3.353.625.500.25 Clostridium beijerinckii B3.353.625.500.100 Clostridium ... Clostridium botulinum type A B3.353.625.500.160.50 Clostridium botulinum type B B3.353.625.500.160.100 Clostridium botulinum ... Clostridium botulinum type E B3.353.625.500.160.250 Clostridium botulinum type F B3.353.625.500.160.300 Clostridium botulinum ...
Clostridium sordellii B3.353.625.500.700 Clostridium sticklandii B3.353.625.500.710 Clostridium symbiosum B3.353.625.500.713 ... Clostridium B3.353.625.500 Clostridium acetobutylicum B3.353.625.500.25 Clostridium beijerinckii B3.353.625.500.100 Clostridium ... Clostridium botulinum type A B3.353.625.500.160.50 Clostridium botulinum type B B3.353.625.500.160.100 Clostridium botulinum ... Clostridium botulinum type E B3.353.625.500.160.250 Clostridium botulinum type F B3.353.625.500.160.300 Clostridium botulinum ...
Clostridium sordellii B3.353.625.500.700 Clostridium sticklandii B3.353.625.500.710 Clostridium symbiosum B3.353.625.500.713 ... Clostridium B3.353.625.500 Clostridium acetobutylicum B3.353.625.500.25 Clostridium beijerinckii B3.353.625.500.100 Clostridium ... Clostridium botulinum type A B3.353.625.500.160.50 Clostridium botulinum type B B3.353.625.500.160.100 Clostridium botulinum ... Clostridium botulinum type E B3.353.625.500.160.250 Clostridium botulinum type F B3.353.625.500.160.300 Clostridium botulinum ...
Clostridium sordellii B3.353.625.500.700 Clostridium sticklandii B3.353.625.500.710 Clostridium symbiosum B3.353.625.500.713 ... Clostridium B3.353.625.500 Clostridium acetobutylicum B3.353.625.500.25 Clostridium beijerinckii B3.353.625.500.100 Clostridium ... Clostridium botulinum type A B3.353.625.500.160.50 Clostridium botulinum type B B3.353.625.500.160.100 Clostridium botulinum ... Clostridium botulinum type E B3.353.625.500.160.250 Clostridium botulinum type F B3.353.625.500.160.300 Clostridium botulinum ...

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