A species of gram-positive bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae. It is distinctive for its ability to ferment ETHANOL to caproic acid.
A genus of motile or nonmotile gram-positive bacteria of the family Clostridiaceae. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. They occur in water, soil, and in the intestinal tract of humans and lower animals.
Derivatives of BUTYRIC ACID that include a double bond between carbon 2 and 3 of the aliphatic structure. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that include the aminobutryrate structure.
An enzyme that plays a role in the GLUTAMATE and butanoate metabolism pathways by catalyzing the oxidation of succinate semialdehyde to SUCCINATE using NAD+ as a coenzyme. Deficiency of this enzyme, causes 4-hydroxybutyricaciduria, a rare inborn error in the metabolism of the neurotransmitter 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA).
A water-soluble, colorless crystal with an acid taste that is used as a chemical intermediate, in medicine, the manufacture of lacquers, and to make perfume esters. It is also used in foods as a sequestrant, buffer, and a neutralizing agent. (Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p1099; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1851)
A genus of ascomycetous fungi of the family Saccharomycetaceae, order SACCHAROMYCETALES.
A common inhabitant of the colon flora in human infants and sometimes in adults. It produces a toxin that causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis (ENTEROCOLITIS, PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS) in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CLOSTRIDIUM.
A species of anaerobic, gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae that produces proteins with characteristic neurotoxicity. It is the etiologic agent of BOTULISM in humans, wild fowl, HORSES; and CATTLE. Seven subtypes (sometimes called antigenic types, or strains) exist, each producing a different botulinum toxin (BOTULINUM TOXINS). The organism and its spores are widely distributed in nature.

Re-citrate synthase from Clostridium kluyveri is phylogenetically related to homocitrate synthase and isopropylmalate synthase rather than to Si-citrate synthase. (1/8)

The synthesis of citrate from acetyl-coenzyme A and oxaloacetate is catalyzed in most organisms by a Si-citrate synthase, which is Si-face stereospecific with respect to C-2 of oxaloacetate. However, in Clostridium kluyveri and some other strictly anaerobic bacteria, the reaction is catalyzed by a Re-citrate synthase, whose primary structure has remained elusive. We report here that Re-citrate synthase from C. kluyveri is the product of a gene predicted to encode isopropylmalate synthase. C. kluyveri is also shown to contain a gene for Si-citrate synthase, which explains why cell extracts of the organism always exhibit some Si-citrate synthase activity.  (+info)

Coupled ferredoxin and crotonyl coenzyme A (CoA) reduction with NADH catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex from Clostridium kluyveri. (2/8)

Cell extracts of butyrate-forming clostridia have been shown to catalyze acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA)- and ferredoxin-dependent formation of H2 from NADH. It has been proposed that these bacteria contain an NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase which is allosterically regulated by acetyl-CoA. We report here that ferredoxin reduction with NADH in cell extracts from Clostridium kluyveri is catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex and that the acetyl-CoA dependence previously observed is due to the fact that the cell extracts catalyze the reduction of acetyl-CoA with NADH via crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA. The cytoplasmic butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase complex was purified and is shown to couple the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin (E0' = -410 mV) with NADH (E0' = -320 mV) to the exergonic reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA (E0' = -10 mV) with NADH. The stoichiometry of the fully coupled reaction is extrapolated to be as follows: 2 NADH + 1 oxidized ferredoxin + 1 crotonyl-CoA = 2 NAD+ + 1 ferredoxin reduced by two electrons + 1 butyryl-CoA. The implications of this finding for the energy metabolism of butyrate-forming anaerobes are discussed in the accompanying paper.  (+info)

The genome of Clostridium kluyveri, a strict anaerobe with unique metabolic features. (3/8)

 (+info)

Cloning and expression of a Clostridium kluyveri gene responsible for diaphorase activity. (4/8)

A small enzyme showing diaphorase activity was purified from culture supernatant of Clostridium kluyveri and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. This sequence identified a gene (diaA) encoding a protein (DiaA) of 229 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 24,981 in the genomic DNA sequence database of C. kluyveri constructed by the Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth. The predicted protein was composed of a flavin reductase-like domain and a rubredoxin-like domain from its N-terminus. The diaA gene was cloned into an expression vector and expressed in an Escherichia coli recombinant. Recombinant enzyme rDiaA showed NADH/NADPH diaphorase activity with 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol and nitro blue tetrazolium. The enzyme was most active at pH 8.0 at 40 degrees C. The UV-visible absorption spectrum and thin layer chromatography (TLC) analyses indicated that one rDiaA molecule contained a tightly bound FMN molecule as a prosthetic group. An iron molecule was also detected in an enzyme molecule.  (+info)

Characterization of a dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase having diaphorase activity of Clostridium kluyveri. (5/8)

The Clostridium kluyveri bfmBC gene encoding a putative dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD; EC 1.8.1.4) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme rBfmBC was characterized. UV-visible absorption spectrum and thin layer chromatography analysis of rBfmBC indicated that the enzyme contained a noncovalently but tightly attached FAD molecule. rBfmBC catalyzed the oxidation of dihydrolipoamide (DLA) with NAD(+) as a specific electron acceptor, and the apparent K(m) values for DLA and NAD(+) were 0.3 and 0.5 mM respectively. In the reverse reaction, the apparent K(m) values for lipoamide and NADH were 0.42 and 0.038 mM respectively. Like other DLDs, this enzyme showed NADH dehydrogenase (diaphorase) activity with some synthetic dyes, such as 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol and nitro blue tetrazolium. rBfmBC was optimally active at 40 degrees C at pH 7.0, and the enzyme maintained some activity after a 30-min incubation at 60 degrees C.  (+info)

Structure of a trimeric bacterial microcompartment shell protein, EtuB, associated with ethanol utilization in Clostridium kluyveri. (6/8)

 (+info)

NADP+ reduction with reduced ferredoxin and NADP+ reduction with NADH are coupled via an electron-bifurcating enzyme complex in Clostridium kluyveri. (7/8)

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Hyperproduction of poly(4-hydroxybutyrate) from glucose by recombinant Escherichia coli. (8/8)

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'Clostridium kluyveri' is a type of anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that is commonly found in the environment, such as in soil and sewage. It is a gram-positive bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems.

The bacterium is named after the Dutch microbiologist Albert Jan Kluyver, who made significant contributions to the field of microbiology in the early 20th century. 'Clostridium kluyveri' is known for its ability to ferment a variety of substrates and produce acetate, butyrate, and hydrogen as end products.

Infections caused by 'Clostridium kluyveri' are rare but can include bacteremia, brain abscesses, and soft tissue infections. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics that are active against anaerobic bacteria, such as metronidazole or clindamycin.

'Clostridium' is a genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in nature, including in soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. Many species of Clostridium are anaerobic, meaning they can grow and reproduce in environments with little or no oxygen. Some species of Clostridium are capable of producing toxins that can cause serious and sometimes life-threatening illnesses in humans and animals.

Some notable species of Clostridium include:

* Clostridium tetani, which causes tetanus (also known as lockjaw)
* Clostridium botulinum, which produces botulinum toxin, the most potent neurotoxin known and the cause of botulism
* Clostridium difficile, which can cause severe diarrhea and colitis, particularly in people who have recently taken antibiotics
* Clostridium perfringens, which can cause food poisoning and gas gangrene.

It is important to note that not all species of Clostridium are harmful, and some are even beneficial, such as those used in the production of certain fermented foods like sauerkraut and natto. However, due to their ability to produce toxins and cause illness, it is important to handle and dispose of materials contaminated with Clostridium species carefully, especially in healthcare settings.

Crotonates are a group of organic compounds that contain a carboxylic acid functional group (-COOH) attached to a crotyl group, which is a type of alkyl group with the structure -CH=CH-CH\_{2}-. Crotyl groups are derived from crotonic acid or its derivatives.

Crotonates can be found in various natural and synthetic compounds, including some pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and other industrial chemicals. They can exist as salts, esters, or other derivatives of crotonic acid.

In medical contexts, crotonates may refer to certain medications or chemical compounds used for research purposes. For example, sodium crotylate is a salt of crotonic acid that has been studied for its potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. However, it is not widely used in clinical practice.

It's worth noting that the term "crotonates" may not have a specific medical definition on its own, as it refers to a broad class of compounds with varying properties and uses.

Succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSDH) is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Specifically, SSDH catalyzes the conversion of succinic semialdehyde to succinate in the final step of the GABA degradation pathway. This enzyme plays a critical role in maintaining the balance of GABA levels in the brain and is therefore essential for normal neurological function. Deficiencies or mutations in SSDH can lead to neurological disorders, including developmental delays, intellectual disability, and seizures.

Succinic acid, also known as butanedioic acid, is an organic compound with the chemical formula HOOC(CH2)2COOH. It is a white crystalline powder that is soluble in water and has a slightly acerbic taste. In medicine, succinic acid is not used as a treatment for any specific condition. However, it is a naturally occurring substance found in the body and plays a role in the citric acid cycle, which is a key process in energy production within cells. It can also be found in some foods and is used in the manufacturing of various products such as pharmaceuticals, resins, and perfumes.

"Saccharomyces" is a genus of fungi that are commonly known as baker's yeast or brewer's yeast. These organisms are single-celled and oval-shaped, and they reproduce through budding. They are widely used in the food industry for fermentation processes, such as making bread, beer, and wine.

In a medical context, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the species within this genus, has been studied for its potential health benefits when taken orally. Some research suggests that it may help to support gut health and immune function, although more studies are needed to confirm these effects and establish appropriate dosages and safety guidelines.

It's worth noting that while Saccharomyces is generally considered safe for most people, there have been rare cases of infection in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions. As with any supplement, it's important to talk to your healthcare provider before starting to take Saccharomyces cerevisiae or any other probiotic strain.

'Clostridium difficile' (also known as 'C. difficile' or 'C. diff') is a type of Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium that can be found in the environment, including in soil, water, and human and animal feces. It is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in individuals who have recently received antibiotics or have other underlying health conditions that weaken their immune system.

C. difficile produces toxins that can cause a range of symptoms, from mild diarrhea to severe colitis (inflammation of the colon) and potentially life-threatening complications such as sepsis and toxic megacolon. The most common toxins produced by C. difficile are called TcdA and TcdB, which damage the lining of the intestine and cause inflammation.

C. difficile infections (CDIs) can be difficult to treat, particularly in severe cases or in patients who have recurrent infections. Treatment typically involves discontinuing any unnecessary antibiotics, if possible, and administering specific antibiotics that are effective against C. difficile, such as metronidazole, vancomycin, or fidaxomicin. In some cases, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may be recommended as a last resort for patients with recurrent or severe CDIs who have not responded to other treatments.

Preventing the spread of C. difficile is critical in healthcare settings, and includes measures such as hand hygiene, contact precautions, environmental cleaning, and antibiotic stewardship programs that promote the appropriate use of antibiotics.

Clostridium infections are caused by bacteria of the genus Clostridium, which are gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming, and often anaerobic organisms. These bacteria can be found in various environments, including soil, water, and the human gastrointestinal tract. Some Clostridium species can cause severe and potentially life-threatening infections in humans. Here are some of the most common Clostridium infections with their medical definitions:

1. Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI): An infection caused by the bacterium Clostridioides difficile, previously known as Clostridium difficile. It typically occurs after antibiotic use disrupts the normal gut microbiota, allowing C. difficile to overgrow and produce toxins that cause diarrhea, colitis, and other gastrointestinal symptoms. Severe cases can lead to sepsis, toxic megacolon, or even death.
2. Clostridium tetani infection: Also known as tetanus, this infection is caused by the bacterium Clostridium tetani. The spores of this bacterium are commonly found in soil and animal feces. They can enter the body through wounds, cuts, or punctures, germinate, and produce a potent exotoxin called tetanospasmin. This toxin causes muscle stiffness and spasms, particularly in the neck and jaw (lockjaw), which can lead to difficulty swallowing, breathing, and potentially fatal complications.
3. Clostridium botulinum infection: This infection is caused by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and results in botulism, a rare but severe paralytic illness. The bacteria produce neurotoxins (botulinum toxins) that affect the nervous system, causing symptoms such as double vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, difficulty swallowing, dry mouth, and muscle weakness. In severe cases, botulism can lead to respiratory failure and death.
4. Gas gangrene (Clostridium perfringens infection): A rapidly progressing soft tissue infection caused by Clostridium perfringens or other clostridial species. The bacteria produce potent exotoxins that cause tissue destruction, gas production, and widespread necrosis. Gas gangrene is characterized by severe pain, swelling, discoloration, and a foul-smelling discharge. If left untreated, it can lead to sepsis, multi-organ failure, and death.
5. Clostridioides difficile infection (C. difficile infection): Although not caused by a typical clostridial species, C. difficile is a gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium that can cause severe diarrhea and colitis, particularly in hospitalized patients or those who have recently taken antibiotics. The bacteria produce toxins A and B, which damage the intestinal lining and contribute to inflammation and diarrhea. C. difficile infection can range from mild to life-threatening, with complications such as sepsis, toxic megacolon, and bowel perforation.

'Clostridium botulinum' is a gram-positive, rod-shaped, anaerobic bacteria that produces one or more neurotoxins known as botulinum toxins. These toxins are among the most potent naturally occurring biological poisons and can cause a severe form of food poisoning called botulism in humans and animals. Botulism is characterized by symmetrical descending flaccid paralysis, which can lead to respiratory and cardiovascular failure, and ultimately death if not treated promptly.

The bacteria are widely distributed in nature, particularly in soil, sediments, and the intestinal tracts of some animals. They can form spores that are highly resistant to heat, chemicals, and other environmental stresses, allowing them to survive for long periods in adverse conditions. The spores can germinate and produce vegetative cells and toxins when they encounter favorable conditions, such as anaerobic environments with appropriate nutrients.

Human botulism can occur through three main routes of exposure: foodborne, wound, and infant botulism. Foodborne botulism results from consuming contaminated food containing preformed toxins, while wound botulism occurs when the bacteria infect a wound and produce toxins in situ. Infant botulism is caused by the ingestion of spores that colonize the intestines and produce toxins, mainly affecting infants under one year of age.

Prevention measures include proper food handling, storage, and preparation practices, such as cooking and canning foods at appropriate temperatures and for sufficient durations. Wound care and prompt medical attention are crucial in preventing wound botulism. Vaccines and antitoxins are available for prophylaxis and treatment of botulism in high-risk individuals or in cases of confirmed exposure.

"Clostridium kluyveri". Retrieved 2011-07-07. Type strain of Clostridium kluyveri at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity ... Clostridium kluyveri (CLOKL) is an anaerobic, motile, gram-positive bacterium. It is named after the Dutch microbiologist ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de "Clostridium kluyveri: Barker and Taha 1942". National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). UniProt ...
BERGMEYER HU, HOLZ G, KLOTZSCH H, LANG G (1963). "Phosphotransacetylase from Clostridium Kluyveri. Culture of the Bacterium, ... Stadtman ER (1955). Stadtman, ER (ed.). "Phosphotransacetylase from Clostridium kluyveri". Methods Enzymol. Methods in ...
Stadtman, E. R.; Barker, H. A. (1949). "Fatty acid synthesis by enzyme preparations of Clostridium kluyveri". J. Biol. Chem. ... Stadtman, E. R.; Burton, R. M. (1955). "Aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium kluyveri". Methods Enzymol. 1: 518-523. doi: ...
Clostridium kluyveri Woods, D. D. (1957). "Albert Jan Kluyver 1888-1956". Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society ...
Scherf U, Söhling B, Gottschalk G, Linder D, Buckel W (1994). "Succinate-ethanol fermentation in Clostridium kluyveri: ... Bartsch RG, Barker HA (January 1961). "A vinylacetyl isomerase from Clostridium kluyveri". Archives of Biochemistry and ... Müh U, Cinkaya I, Albracht SP, Buckel W (September 1996). "4-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase from Clostridium aminobutyricum: ... an iron-sulfur and FAD-containing 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase/vinylacetyl-CoA delta 3-delta 2-isomerase from Clostridium ...
Gottschalk G, Barker HA (1966). "Synthesis of glutamate and citrate by Clostridium kluyveri. A new type of citrate synthase". ... Gottschalk G (1969). "Partial purification and some properties of the (R)-citrate synthase from Clostridium acidi-urici". Eur. ...
"Solubilization and partial characterisation of particulate dehydrogenases from Clostridium kluyveri". Biochim. Biophys. Acta. ...
Sohling B, Gottschalk G (1996). "Molecular Analysis of the Anaerobic Succinate Degradation Pathway in Clostridium kluyveri". ... n-Butanol can be produced by fermentation of biomass by the A.B.E. process using Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium ... Anaerobic bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium saccharobutylicum also contain these pathways. Succinate ... by utilizing the metabolic pathways present in Clostridium kluyveri. Succinate is an intermediate of the TCA cycle, which ...
Examples of butyrate-producing species of bacteria: Clostridium butyricum Clostridium kluyveri Clostridium pasteurianum ... used also in industry Clostridium beijerinckii Clostridium tetanomorphum Clostridium aurantibutyricum These bacteria begin with ... "The Genome of Clostridium kluyveri, a Strict Anaerobe with Unique Metabolic Features". Proceedings of the National Academy of ... Some of these species are: Clostridium acetobutylicum, the most prominent acetone and butanol producer, ...
"The genome of Clostridium kluyveri , a strict anaerobe with unique metabolic features". Proceedings of the National Academy of ... Two examples of obligate anaerobes are Clostridium botulinum and the bacteria which live near hydrothermal vents on the deep- ... In 1913, Martinus Beijerinck repeated Van Leeuwenhoek's experiment and identified Clostridium butyricum as a prominent ... including Clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, and Gram-positive cocci. Upcroft P, Upcroft JA (January 2001). "Drug Targets and ...
"Purification and characterization of a coenzyme-A-dependent succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium kluyveri". ...
... from Clostridium kluyveri". Eur. J. Biochem. 32 (1): 51-6. doi:10.1111/j.1432-1033.1973. ...
... associated with ethanol utilization in Clostridium kluyveri". The Biochemical Journal. 423 (2): 199-207. doi:10.1042/BJ20090780 ...
I. Formyl coenzyme A, an intermediate in the formate-dependent decomposition of acetyl phosphate in Clostridium kluyveri". The ...
Other examples of species of mesophiles are Clostridium kluyveri, Pseudomonas maltophilia, Thiobacillus novellus, Streptococcus ...
Clostridium acetobutylicum Clostridium botulinum Clostridium butyricum Clostridium difficile Clostridium kluyveri Clostridium ... novyi Clostridium perfringens Clostridium phytofermentans Clostridium tetani Clostridium thermocellum Pathema-Entamoeba ... Clostridium botulinum, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Clostridium perfringens, and Entamoeba histolytica) ... Burkholderia phages Pseudomonas aeruginosa Ralstonia solanacearum Pathema-Clostridium ...
Clostridium innocuum Clostridium intestinale Clostridium isatidis Clostridium jeddahense Clostridium kluyveri Clostridium ... Clostridium baratii Clostridium beihaiense Clostridium beijerinckii Clostridium diolis Clostridium bornimense Clostridium ... Clostridium aceticum Clostridium acetireducens Clostridium acetobutylicum Clostridium acidisoli Clostridium aciditolerans ... Clostridium aestuarii Clostridium akagii Clostridium algidicarnis Clostridium algifaecis Clostridium algoriphilum Clostridium ...
Clostridium histolyticum MeSH B03.300.390.400.200.493 - Clostridium kluyveri MeSH B03.300.390.400.200.575 - Clostridium ... Clostridium histolyticum MeSH B03.510.415.400.200.493 - Clostridium kluyveri MeSH B03.510.415.400.200.575 - Clostridium ... Clostridium botulinum type G MeSH B03.300.390.400.200.180 - Clostridium butyricum MeSH B03.300.390.400.200.200 - Clostridium ... Clostridium botulinum type G MeSH B03.510.415.400.200.180 - Clostridium butyricum MeSH B03.510.415.400.200.200 - Clostridium ...
One GRM locus in Clostridium phytofermentans has been shown to be involved in the fermentation of fucose and rhamnose, which ... associated with ethanol utilization inClostridium kluyveri" (PDF). Biochemical Journal. 423 (2): 199-207. doi:10.1042/ ... Similar results were obtained for the GRM BMC from Clostridium phytofermentans, for which both sugars induce the genes coding ... "Involvement of a Bacterial Microcompartment in the Metabolism of Fucose and Rhamnose by Clostridium phytofermentans". PLOS ONE ...
"Clostridium kluyveri". Retrieved 2011-07-07. Type strain of Clostridium kluyveri at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity ... Clostridium kluyveri (CLOKL) is an anaerobic, motile, gram-positive bacterium. It is named after the Dutch microbiologist ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de "Clostridium kluyveri: Barker and Taha 1942". National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). UniProt ...
name=yybP-ykoY regulon. species= Clostridium kluyveri DSM 555. (optional)size=3. ...
... Author: Gildemyn, Sylvia; ... Upgrading syngas fermentation effluent using Clostridium kluyveri in a continuous fermentation. DSpace Repository. Login ...
Bacteria with a chain-elongation activity are poorly studied, with only Clostridium kluyveri being known to perform this ... The absence of D. mccartyi NIT01 facilitated the presence of Clostridium (41.6% and 21.8%) and Cellulomonas (25.9% and 18.2%) ... Biostimulation coupled with bioaugmentation (Clostridium butyricum, a hydrogen-producing bacteria) amplified the increase of ... Clostridium spp.), which produce H2 that is consumed by OHRB, efficiently decreasing H2 concentration and acting as an ...
Thauer RK, Jungermann K, Henninger H, Wenning J, Decker K. The energy metabolism of Clostridium kluyveri. Eur J Biochem. 1968;4 ...
... reduction with NADH catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex from Clostridium kluyveri. J. Bacteriol. 190, 843- ... Diekert, G.B. and Thauer, R.K. (1978). Carbon monoxide oxidation by Clostridium thermoaceticum and Clostridium formicoaceticum ... reduction with NADH are coupled via an electron-bifurcating enzyme complex in Clostridium kluyveri. J. Bacteriol. 192, 5115- ... Chan, J.M., Ryle, M.J., and Seefeldt, L.C. (1999). Evidence that MgATP accelerates primary electron transfer in a Clostridium ...
... a historical industrial strain collection for superior enzymes that we used to engineer the autotrophic acetogen Clostridium ... This included reference enzymes from ATCC824 and NCIMB8052 as well as two thiolases from Clostridium kluyveri, which we had ... by the solventogenic Clostridium species Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium saccharobutylicum or ... Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13087-13092 ...
Clostridium kluyveri, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Eubacterium limosum (37-39).. Although several ... Butyrate-producing Clostridium cluster XIVa species specifically colonize mucins in an in vitro gut model. ISME J. (2013) 7:949 ... Bennett G. The central metabolic pathway from acetyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA in Clostridium acetobutylicum. FEMS Microbiol Rev. ( ... Most human butyrate producers belong to the Firmicutes phylum including species such as Clostridium butyricum, ...
Clostridium kluyveri Medicine & Life Sciences 100% * Carbon Monoxide Medicine & Life Sciences 49% ...
Clostridium kluyveri Preferred Term Term UI T558559. Date11/17/2003. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2005). ... Clostridium [B03.300.390.400.200] * Clostridium acetobutylicum [B03.300.390.400.200.025] * Clostridium beijerinckii [B03.300. ... Clostridium [B03.353.625.375.500] * Clostridium acetobutylicum [B03.353.625.375.500.025] * Clostridium beijerinckii [B03.353. ... Clostridium [B03.510.415.400.200] * Clostridium acetobutylicum [B03.510.415.400.200.025] * Clostridium beijerinckii [B03.510. ...
Recombinant Clostridium Kluyveri argS Protein (aa 1-566) (strain NBRC 12016). VAng-Lsx9414-inquire Creative Biolabs inquire. ...
Über das Vorkommen einer Reduktase von Δ²-Carbonsäuren in Clostridium kluyveri mit einer von der Butyryl-CoA-Dehydrogenase ...
Clostridium kluyveri NBRC 12016, complete genome. hypothetical protein. 1e-29. 128. NC_009706:3341250:3344359. 3344359. 3344763 ... Clostridium kluyveri NBRC 12016, complete genome. hypothetical protein. 2e-24. 110. NC_009706:2023912:2023912. 2023912. 2024310 ... Clostridium kluyveri DSM 555 chromosome, complete genome. hypothetical protein. 1e-29. 128. ... Clostridium kluyveri DSM 555 chromosome, complete genome. hypothetical protein. 2e-24. 110. ...
The enzyme has been described in Clostridium kluyveri, where it participates in succinate fermentation, and in Metallosphaera ...
... including Clostridium kluyveri, C. bolteae and Desulfitobacterium hafniense. These LGI1-like regions also appeared to be ...
Studies on the substrate range of Clostridium kluyveri; the use of propanol and succinate. Arch Microbiol. 1985;141:184-97. ... MH that produces CA from fructose [24], Clostridium sp. BS-1 that produces CA from d-galactitol [25], and Clostridium sp. BPY5 ... Biological caproate production by Clostridium kluyveri from ethanol and acetate as carbon sources. Bioresour Technol. 2017;241: ... Isolation, characterization, and quantification of Clostridium kluyveri from the bovine rumen. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2012; ...
Enoate reductases from Clostridium spec. La 1 and Clostridium kluyveri show a rather broad substrate specificity i.e. many ... Enoate reductases from Clostridium spec. La 1 and Clostridium kluyveri show a rather broad substrate specificity i.e. many ... 2-Enoate-reductase, a previously unknown soluble enzyme is present in Clostridium kluyveri and another Clostridium species ... 2-Enoate-reductase, a previously unknown soluble enzyme is present in Clostridium kluyveri and another Clostridium species ...
Tracer experiments on the mechanism of synthesis of valeric and caproic acids by Clostridium kluyveri. J Biol Chem 1949, 178: ... Abbassi-Guendouz et al.[12] found the emergence of specific bacterial communities for highly dry AD (Clostridium) and specific ... 12] observed the emergence of specific fermenting species of Clostridium in inhibited systems at high TS content. So far, the ... Control of the selectivity of butyric acid production and improvement of fermentation performance with Clostridium ...
A5N5C7 crotonase (EC 4.2.1.150) from Clostridium kluyveri (strain ATCC 8527 / DSM 555 / NCIMB 10680). 259 amino acids: ... P52046 crotonase monomer (EC 4.2.1.150) from Clostridium acetobutylicum (strain ATCC 824 / DSM 792 / JCM 1419 / LMG 5710 / VKM ... CRT_CLOAB / P52046 Short-chain-enoyl-CoA hydratase; 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase; Crotonase; EC 4.2.1.150 from Clostridium ... CH_091794 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase; EC 4.2.1.55 from Clostridium acetobutylicum. 261 amino acids: PaperBLAST, CDD 41% ...
lmPK from Leuconostoc mesenteroides, bbPK from Bifidobacterium bifidum, ckPTA from Clostridium kluyveri, bsPTA from Bacillus ... ckPTA from Clostridium kluyveri; bsPTA from Bacillus subtilis) were assembled resulting in four combinations, and were first ...
U2NS50_9CLOT Clostridium isatidis (UP000264883) Clostridium kluyveri (strain ATCC 8527 / DSM 555 / NCIMB 10680) (UP000002411) ... F0Z4B7_9CLOT Clostridium sp. DL-VIII (UP000005106) G7M539_9CLOT G7MCB9_9CLOT Clostridium sp. DMHC 10 (UP000037118) Clostridium ... N3C (UP000184869) Clostridium sp. SM-530-WT-3G (UP000545014) Clostridium sp. USBA 49 (UP000190748) A0A1T4XDV7_9CLOT Clostridium ... CAG:302 (UP000018278) Clostridium sp. CAG:306 (UP000018008) Clostridium sp. CAG:307 (UP000018128) R7GCS1_9CLOT Clostridium sp. ...
2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase OS=Clostridium kluyveri (strain ATCC 8527 / DSM 555 / NCIMB 10680) ... 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase OS=Clostridium novyi (strain NT) GN=gpmI PE=3 SV=1. 5. 521. 5.0E- ... 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase OS=Clostridium perfringens (strain 13 / Type A) GN=gpmI PE=3 SV=1. ... 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase OS=Clostridium perfringens (strain 13 / Type A) GN=gpmI PE=3 SV=1. ...
The metabolic strategy of E. pyruvativorans therefore resembles that of Clostridium kluyveri, which ferments ethanol only when ... anaerobe with metabolic properties analogous to those of Clostridium kluyveri. Wallace, R John; Chaudhary, Lal C; Miyagawa, ... Clostridium/metabolismo , Metabolismo Energético , Eubacterium/metabolismo , Trifosfato de Adenosina/biossíntese , Alanina/ ...
In conclusion, low fermentation pH is critical for the production of alcohols, although detrimental to C. kluyveri. Fine ... C6 compounds were only transiently produced at the beginning of the enrichment phase, during which Clostridium kluyveri, a ... C6 compounds were only transiently produced at the beginning of the enrichment phase, during which Clostridium kluyveri, a ... C6 compounds were only transiently produced at the beginning of the enrichment phase, during which Clostridium kluyveri, a ...
Clostridium intestinale URNW (UP000016721) Clostridium isatidis (UP000264883) Clostridium kluyveri (strain ATCC 8527 / DSM 555 ... Clostridium niameyense (UP000473885) Clostridium novyi (strain NT) (UP000008220) Clostridium oryzae (UP000190080) Clostridium ... Clostridium Clostridium aceticum (UP000035704) Clostridium acetireducens DSM 10703 (UP000175744) Clostridium acetobutylicum ( ... Clostridium frigidicarnis (UP000198619) Clostridium fungisolvens (UP000580568) Clostridium gasigenes (UP000198597) Clostridium ...
... reduction with NADH catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex from Clostridium kluyveri. J. Bacteriol. 190 (2008) ... 1. Kang, D.J., Ridlon, J.M., Moore, D.R., 2nd, Barnes, S. and Hylemon, P.B. Clostridium scindens baiCD and baiH genes encode ... 3. Kang, D.J., Ridlon, J.M., Moore, D.R., 2nd, Barnes, S. and Hylemon, P.B. Clostridium scindens baiCD and baiH genes encode ... 1. Hetzel, M., Brock, M., Selmer, T., Pierik, A.J., Golding, B.T. and Buckel, W. Acryloyl-CoA reductase from Clostridium ...
The genome of Clostridium kluyveri, a strict anaerobe with unique metabolic features. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105(6):2128-2133 ( ... Manual curation and reannotation of the genomes of Clostridium difficile 630Δerm and Clostridium difficile 630. J Med Microbiol ... Köpke M, Held C, Hujer S, Liesegang H, Wiezer A, Wollherr A, Ehrenreich A, Liebl W, Gottschalk G, Dürre P (2010) Clostridium ... The genome sequence of Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of tetanus disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(3):1316-1321 (doi ...
"Clostridium jeddahitimonense" * Clostridium jejuense * Clostridium josui * Clostridium kluyveri * Clostridium kogasense corrig. ... Parent taxon: Clostridium Prazmowski 1880 (Approved Lists 1980) Assigned by: Dorn-In S, Schwaiger K, Springer C, Barta L, ... Development of a multiplex qPCR for the species identification of Clostridium estertheticum, C. frigoriphilum, C. bowmanii and ... Ulrich S, Gareis M. Development of a multiplex qPCR for the species identification of Clostridium estertheticum, C. ...
  • In this process, acetone, butanol and ethanol are produced in a mixed fermentation (typically in a ratio of 3:6:1) by the solventogenic Clostridium species Clostridium acetobutylicum , Clostridium beijerinckii , Clostridium saccharobutylicum or Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum from sugar or starch feedstocks 7 . (nature.com)
  • 2-Enoate-reductase, a previously unknown soluble enzyme is present in Clostridium kluyveri and another Clostridium species growing on (E)-2-butenoate. (rhea-db.org)
  • Dorn-In S, Schwaiger K, Springer C, Barta L, Ulrich S, Gareis M. Development of a multiplex qPCR for the species identification of Clostridium estertheticum , C. frigoriphilum , C. bowmanii and C. tagluense -like from blown pack spoilage (BPS) meats and from wild boars. (dsmz.de)
  • WashU conducted a comparative genomic analysis of several ascomycete yeast species, including Lachancea kluyveri (synonym: Saccharomyces kluyveri). (usda.gov)
  • The enzyme has been described in Clostridium kluyveri, where it participates in succinate fermentation, and in Metallosphaera sedula, where it participates in the 3-hydroxypropanoate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle, an autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway found in some thermoacidophilic archaea. (expasy.org)
  • In conclusion, low fermentation pH is critical for the production of alcohols, although detrimental to C. kluyveri. (udg.edu)
  • Using a combinatorial pathway library approach, we first mined a historical industrial strain collection for superior enzymes that we used to engineer the autotrophic acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum . (nature.com)
  • Description: Clostridium Difficile (strain 630) Arginine--tRNA ligase, recombinant protein. (gemini-genomics.com)
  • Clostridium perfringens" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (ucdenver.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Clostridium perfringens" by people in this website by year, and whether "Clostridium perfringens" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Clostridium perfringens" by people in Profiles. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Immunization with recombinant bivalent chimera r-Cpae confers protection against alpha toxin and enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A in murine model. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Heterologous protection against alpha toxins of Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus induced by binding domain recombinant chimeric protein. (ucdenver.edu)
  • In silico, in vitro and in vivo analysis of binding affinity between N and C-domains of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Taguchi optimization of duplex PCR for simultaneous identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium perfringens alpha toxins. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Evidence that MgATP accelerates primary electron transfer in a Clostridium pasteurianum Fe protein- Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe protein nitrogenase tight complex. (degruyter.com)
  • Description: Clostridium Tetani Arginine--tRNA ligase, recombinant protein. (gemini-genomics.com)
  • Carbon monoxide oxidation by Clostridium thermoaceticum and Clostridium formicoaceticum . (degruyter.com)
  • C6 compounds were only transiently produced at the beginning of the enrichment phase, during which Clostridium kluyveri, a bacterium able to carry out carbon chain elongation, was detected in the community. (udg.edu)
  • Clostridium botulinum A str. (lbl.gov)
  • Clostridium kluyveri (CLOKL) is an anaerobic, motile, gram-positive bacterium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Especie tipo del género CLOSTRIDIUM, bacteria grampositiva de la familia Clostridiaceae. (bvsalud.org)
  • Type species of the genus CLOSTRIDIUM, a gram-positive bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae. (bvsalud.org)
  • When grown on ethanol C. kluyveri produce caproic acid in addition to acetic acid. (up.ac.za)
  • Spring S, Merkhoffer B, Weiss N, Kroppenstedt RM, Hippe H, Stackebrandt E. Characterization of novel psychrophilic clostridia from an Antarctic microbial mat: description of Clostridium frigoris sp. (dsmz.de)
  • Clostridium aceticum (Wieringa), a microorganism producing acetic acid from molecular hydrogen and carbon dioxide. (microbiologyresearch.org)